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Encyclopedia > Date palm
Date Palm
Date Palms, Merzouga, Morocco
Date Palms, Merzouga, Morocco
Conservation status
Secure
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Liliopsida
Order: Arecales
Family: Arecaceae
Genus: Phoenix
Species: P. dactylifera
Binomial name
Phoenix dactylifera
L.

The Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is a palm in the genus Phoenix, extensively cultivated for its edible fruit. Due to its long history of cultivation for fruit, its exact native distribution is unknown, but probably originated somewhere in the desert oases of northern Africa, and perhaps also southwest Asia. It is a medium-sized tree, 15–25 m tall, often clumped with several trunks from a single root system, but also often growing singly. The leaves are pinnate, 3–5 m long, with spines on the petiole and about 150 leaflets; the leaflets are 30 cm long and 2 cm broad. The full span of the crown ranges from 6–10 m. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 647 KB) Summary Phoenix dactylifera, Erg Chebbi, Merzouga, Morocco; April 2006 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Date Palm Metadata This file contains additional information... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Liliopsida is the botanical name for a class. ... Family Arecaceae Arecales is the botanical order which includes only the palm family, Arecaceae. ... Genera Many; see list of Arecaceae genera Arecaceae or Palmae (also known by the name Palmaceae, which is taxonomically invalid. ... Species Phoenix abyssinica Phoenix acaulis Phoenix canariensis Canary Island Date Palm Phoenix dactylifera Date Palm Phoenix lourierii Phoenix paludosa Phoenix pusilla Phoenix reclinata Senegal Date Palm Phoenix roebelinii Pygmy Date Palm Phoenix rupicola Cliff Date Palm Phoenix sylvestris Indian Date Palm Phoenix theophrastii Cretan Date Palm Phoenix is a genus... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Genera Many; see list of Arecaceae genera Arecaceae or Palmae (also known by the name Palmaceae, which is taxonomically invalid. ... Species Phoenix abyssinica Phoenix acaulis Phoenix canariensis Canary Island Date Palm Phoenix dactylifera Date Palm Phoenix lourierii Phoenix paludosa Phoenix pusilla Phoenix reclinata Senegal Date Palm Phoenix roebelinii Pygmy Date Palm Phoenix rupicola Cliff Date Palm Phoenix sylvestris Indian Date Palm Phoenix theophrastii Cretan Date Palm Phoenix is a genus... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... This article is about arid terrain. ... For the English rock band, see Oasis (band). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... Look up foliage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Pinnate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

History of dates

Dates (Arabic: تمر Tamr) have been a staple food of the Middle East for thousands of years. They are believed to have originated around the Persian Gulf, and have been cultivated since ancient times from Mesopotamia to prehistoric Egypt, possibly as early as 6000 BC. There is archaeological evidence of date cultivation in eastern Arabia in 4,000 BC.[citation needed] Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ...


In later times, Arabs spread dates around northern Africa and into Spain, and dates were introduced into Mexico and California by the Spaniards by 1765, around Mission San Ignacio. Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Mission San Ignacio was founded by the Jesuit missionary Juan Bautista de Luyando in 1728 at the site of the modern town of San Ignacio, Baja California Sur, Mexico. ...


Fruit

Date clusters hanging down from the crown
Date clusters hanging down from the crown
Dried dates, deglet noor (edible parts)
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 280 kcal   1180 kJ
Carbohydrates     75 g
- Sugars  63 g
- Dietary fibre  8 g  
Fat 0.4 g
Protein 2.5 g
Water 21 g
Vitamin C  0.4 mg 1%
Percentages are relative to US
recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database

The fruit is a drupe known as a date. They are oval-cylindrical, 3–7 cm long, and 2–3 cm diameter, and when unripe, range from bright red to bright yellow in colour, depending on variety. Dates contain a single seed about 2–2.5 cm long and 6–8 mm thick. Three main Cultivar Groups of date exist; soft (e.g. 'Barhee', 'Halawy', 'Khadrawy', 'Medjool'), semi-dry (e.g. 'Dayri', 'Deglet Noor', 'Zahidi'), and dry (e.g. 'Thoory'). The type of fruit depends on the glucose, fructose and sucrose content. Download high resolution version (600x875, 179 KB)Photo of date (fruit) cluster on tree in Las Vegas, Nevada, taken November 2004 by User:Stan Shebs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (600x875, 179 KB)Photo of date (fruit) cluster on tree in Las Vegas, Nevada, taken November 2004 by User:Stan Shebs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. ... In chemistry, especially biochemistry, a fatty acid is a carboxylic acid often with a long unbranched aliphatic tail (chain), which is either saturated or unsaturated. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... Reference Daily Intake (RDI) is the daily dietary intake level of a nutrient considered sufficient to meet the requirements of nearly all (97–98%) healthy individuals in each life-stage and gender group. ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... The peach is a typical drupe (stone fruit) In botany, a drupe is a type of fruit in which an outer fleshy part (exocarp or skin and mesocarp or flesh) surrounds a shell (the pit or stone) of hardened endocarp with a seed inside. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ... Under the ICNCP, a Cultivar Group is a gathering of cultivars. ... Glucose (Glc), a monosaccharide (or simple sugar), is an important carbohydrate in biology. ... Fructose (or levulose) is a simple sugar (monosaccharide) found in many foods and is one of the three most important blood sugars along with glucose and galactose. ... Sucrose (common name: table sugar, also called saccharose) is a disaccharide (glucose + fructose) with the molecular formula C12H22O11. ...


The Date Palm is dioecious, having separate male and female plants. They can be easily grown from seed, but only 50% of seedlings will be female and hence fruit bearing, and dates from seedling plants are often smaller and of poorer quality. Most commercial plantations thus use cuttings of heavily cropping cultivars, mainly 'Medjool' as this cultivar produces particularly high yields of large, sweet fruit. Plants grown from cuttings will fruit 2–3 years earlier than seedling plants. Close-up of an Echinopsis spachiana flower, showing both carpels and stamen, making it a complete flower. ...


Dates are naturally wind pollinated but in both traditional oasis horticulture and in the modern commercial orchards they are entirely pollinated manually. Natural pollination occurs with about an equal number of male and female plants. However, with assistance, one male can pollenize up to 100 females. Since the males are of value only as pollenizers, this allows the growers to use their resources for many more fruit producing female plants. Some growers do not even maintain any male plants as male flowers become available at local markets at pollination time. Manual pollination is done by skilled labourers on ladders, or in some areas such as Iraq they climb the tree using a special climbing tool that wraps around the tree trunk and the climber's back to keep him attached to the trunk while climbing. Less often the pollen may be blown onto the female flowers by wind machine. Carpenter bee with pollen collected from Night-blooming cereus Pollination is an important step in the reproduction of seed plants: the transfer of pollen grains (male gametes) to the plant carpel, the structure that contains the ovule (female gamete). ... For the English rock band, see Oasis (band). ... Horticulture (Latin: hortus (garden plant) + cultura (culture)) are classically defined as the culture or growing of garden plants. ... The words pollenizer (polleniser) and pollinator are often confused. ... For other uses, see Ladder (disambiguation). ... SEM image of pollen grains from a variety of common plants: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea), prairie hollyhock (Sidalcea malviflora), oriental lily (Lilium auratum), evening primrose (Oenothera fruticosa), and castor bean (Ricinus communis). ... This article is about devices that perform tasks. ...


Parthenocarpic cultivars are available but the seedless fruit is smaller and of lower quality.[citation needed] In botany and horticulture, parthenocarpic literally means virgin fruit; the fruit develops without fertilization of ovules, therefore it is seedless. ...


Dates ripen in four stages, which are known throughout the world by their Arabic names kimri (unripe), khalal (full-size, crunchy), rutab (ripe, soft), tamr (ripe, sun-dried). A 100 gram portion of fresh dates is a premium source of vitamin C and supplies 230 kcal (960 kJ) of energy. Since dates contain relatively little water, they do not become much more concentrated upon drying, although the vitamin C is lost in the process. Arabic redirects here. ... BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... Etymology: French calorie, from Latin calor (heat), from calere (to be warm). ... The joule (IPA: or ) (symbol: J) is the SI unit of energy. ...


Dates are an important traditional crop in Iraq, Arabia, and north Africa west to Morocco and are mentioned in many places in the Quran. In Islamic countries, dates and yogurt or sometimes milk are a traditional first meal when the sun sets during Ramadan. Dates (especially Medjool and Deglet Noor) are also cultivated in southern California in the United States. The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article is about Islamic religious observances in the month of Ramadan. ... Deglet Noor (Arabic: translucent) is a date cultivar grown primarily in Algeria and Tunisia; they are a chief date crop in the Coachella Valley of the United States as well. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Date palms take about 7 years after planting before they will bear fruit, and produce viable yields for commercial harvest after about 10 years. Mature date palms can produce 80–120 kilograms of dates per harvest season, although they do not all ripen at the same time so several harvests are required. In order to get fruit of marketable quality, the bunches of dates must be thinned before ripening so that the remaining fruits grow larger.


Cultivars of dates

Date Palm orchard, Boumalne, Morocco
Date Palm orchard, Boumalne, Morocco

A large number of date cultivars are grown. The most important are: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2848x2136, 1669 KB) Summary Phoenix dactylifera orchard, Vallée du Dadès, near Boumalne, Morocco; April 2006 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Date Palm Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2848x2136, 1669 KB) Summary Phoenix dactylifera orchard, Vallée du Dadès, near Boumalne, Morocco; April 2006 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Date Palm Metadata... This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ...

  • 'Aabel' - common in Libya
  • 'Ajwah' - from the town of ‘Ajwah in Saudi Arabia, it is the subject of a famous hadith of the prophet Muhammad.
  • 'Amir Hajj' - from Iraq, these are soft with a thin skin and thick flesh.
  • ''Abid Rahim' (Arabic: عبد رحيم‎), from Sudan
  • 'Amer' (amir) hajj - called "the visitor's date"
  • 'Barakawi' (Arabic: بركاوي‎), from Sudan
  • 'Barhee' (barhi) (from Arabic barh, a hot wind) - these are nearly cylindrical, light amber to dark brown when ripe; soft, with thick flesh and rich flavour. One of the few varieties which are good in the khalal stage when they are yellow (like a fresh grape as opposed to dry, like a raisin).
  • 'Bireir' (Arabic: برير‎) - from Sudan
  • 'Deglet Noor' (Arabic: 'translucent' or 'date of light') - so named because the centre appears light or golden when held up to the sun. This is a leading date in Algeria, the USA, and Tunisia, and in the latter country it is grown in inland oases and is the chief export cultivar. It is semi-dry and not very sweet.
  • 'Derrie' or 'Dayri' (the 'Monastery' date) - from southern Iraq - these are long, slender, nearly black, and soft.
  • 'Empress' - developed by the Deval Family in Indio California USA from a seedling of 'Deglet Noor'. It is larger than 'Deglet Noor', somewhat softer and sweeter. It generally has a light tan top half and brown bottom half.
  • 'Ftimi' or 'Alligue' - these are grown in inland oases of Tunisia.
  • 'Halawy' (Halawi) (Arabic: 'sweet') - these are soft, and extremely sweet, small to medium in size.
  • 'Haleema' - in Hoon, Libya (Haleema is a woman's name)
  • 'Hayany' - from Egypt (Hayani) (Hayany is a man's name) - these dates are dark-red to nearly black and soft.
  • 'Iteema' - common in Algeria
  • 'Kenta' - common in Tunisia
  • 'Khadrawy' (Arabic: 'green') - a cultivar favoured by many Arabs, it is a soft, very dark date.
  • 'Khalasah' (Arabic: 'quintessence') - one of the most famous palm cultivars in Saudi Arabia, famous for its sweetness level that is not high nor low, thus, suits most people. Its fruit is called 'Khlas'. Its famous place is 'Huffuf' (Al-Ahsa) in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia (Al-Sharqheyah).
  • 'Khastawi' (Khusatawi, Kustawy) - this is the leading soft date in Iraq; it is syrupy and small in size, prized for dessert.
  • 'Maktoom' (Arabic: 'hidden') - this is a large, red-brown, thick-skinned, soft, medium-sweet date.
  • 'Manakbir' - a large fruit which ripens early.
  • 'Medjool' (Arabic: 'unknown') - from Morocco, also grown in the USA, Jordan and Israel; a large, sweet and succulent date.
  • 'Migraf' (Mejraf) - very popular in Southern Yemen, these are large, golden-amber dates.
  • 'Mgmaget Ayuob' - from Hoon, Libya
  • 'Mishriq' (Arabic: 'East' - مشرق)‎ - from Sudan and Saudi Arabia
  • 'Nabtat-seyf' - in Saudi Arabia.
  • 'Sag‘ai' - from Saudi Arabia.
  • 'Saidy' (Saidi) - soft, very sweet, these are popular in Libya.
  • 'Sayer' (Sayir) (Arabic: 'common') - these dates are dark orange-brown, of medium size, soft and syrupy.
  • 'Sekkeri' - (lit. sugary) Dark brown skin; distinctly sweet and soft flesh, from Saudi Arabia.
  • 'Sellaj' - in Saudi Arabia.
  • 'Tagyat' - common in Libya.
  • 'Tamej' - in Libya.
  • 'Thoory' (Thuri) - popular in Algeria, this dry date is brown-red when cured with a bluish bloom and very wrinkled skin. Its flesh is sometimes hard and brittle but the flavour described as sweet and nutty.
  • 'Umeljwary' - in Libya.
  • 'Umelkhashab' - Brilliant red skin; bittersweet, hard white flesh (Saudi Arabia).
  • 'Zahidi' (Arabic: '[Of the] ascetic') - these medium size, cylindrical, light golden-brown semi-dry dates are very sugary, and sold as soft, medium-hard and hard.

It should be noted, however, that a cultivar can have several names depending on the locality. Date trees are cultivated in Sudan from the Egyptian border in the North all the way along the Nile south of Khartoum until Sennar. ... Date trees are cultivated in Sudan from the Egyptian border in the North all the way along the Nile south of Khartoum until Sennar. ... Date trees are cultivated in Sudan from the Egyptian border in the North all the way along the Nile south of Khartoum until Sennar. ... Deglet Noor (Arabic: translucent) is a date cultivar grown primarily in Algeria and Tunisia; they are a chief date crop in the Coachella Valley of the United States as well. ... Date trees are cultivated in Sudan from the Egyptian border in the North all the way along the Nile south of Khartoum until Sennar. ...


Production

Date seller in the old souq in Kuwait City
Date seller in the old souq in Kuwait City
Date output in 2005
Date output in 2005
Top Ten Dates Producers — 2005
(1000 tonnes)
Flag of Egypt Egypt 1,170.00
Flag of Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia 970.49
Flag of Iran Iran 880.00
Flag of the United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates 760.00
Flag of Algeria Algeria 516.29
Flag of Pakistan Pakistan 496.58
Flag of Sudan Sudan 328.20
Flag of Libya Libya 150.00
Flag of the People's Republic of China China 130.00
Flag of Tunisia Tunisia 125.00
World Total 5526.56
Source:
UN Food & Agriculture Organisation (FAO)
[1]

Iraq used to be a major producer of dates but in recent years production and exports have been curtailed.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 1876 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Date Palm Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 1876 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Date Palm Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... A souk (سوق, also sook, souq, or suq) is a commercial quarter in an Arab city. ... Kuwait City Kuwait City (also Al-Kuwait - الكويت), population 32,403 (2005 Census), is the capital of the emirate of Kuwait and part of the Al-Asimah governorate. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 351 pixelsFull resolution (1425 × 625 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/png)This bubble map shows the global distribution of date output in 2005 as a percentage of the top producer (Egypt - 1,170,000 tonnes). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 351 pixelsFull resolution (1425 × 625 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/png)This bubble map shows the global distribution of date output in 2005 as a percentage of the top producer (Egypt - 1,170,000 tonnes). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Saudi_Arabia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iran. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Arab_Emirates. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Algeria. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sudan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Libya. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tunisia. ... FAO emblem With its headquarters in Rome, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that works to raise levels of nutrition and standards of living; to improve the production, processing, marketing, and distribution of food and agricultural products; to promote rural development; and...


Food uses

Dry or soft dates are eaten out-of-hand, or may be seeded and stuffed with fillings such as almonds, walnuts, candied orange and lemon peel, and marzipan. Dates can also be chopped and used in a range of sweet and savoury dishes, from tajines (tagines) in Morocco to puddings, bread, cakes and other dessert items. Dates are also processed into cubes, paste, spread, date syrup or "honey" called "dibs", powder (date sugar), vinegar or alcohol. Recent innovations include chocolate-covered dates and products such as sparkling date juice, used in some Islamic countries as a non-alcoholic version of champagne, for special occasions and religious times such as Ramadan. Binomial name (Mill. ... For other uses, see Walnut (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (L.) Osbeck Orange—specifically, sweet orange—refers to the citrus tree Citrus sinensis (syn. ... This article is about the fruit. ... Peel, also known as rind, is the outer protective layer of a fruit. ... Fruit shapes molded from marzipan Marzipan is a confection consisting primarily of sugar and ground almonds. ... A tajine is a Moroccan dish as well as a special pot for preparing this dish. ... Pudding can be prepared with a large variety of toppings such as fresh fruit and/or berries, and whipped cream Christmas pudding Dessert pudding Illustrations from Isabella Beetons Mrs Beetons Book of Household Management, 1861 Pudding most often refers to a dessert, but can also be a savory dish. ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cake (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Honey (disambiguation). ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage (also known as booze in slang term) is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of alcohol includes many other compounds. ... For other uses, see Chocolate (disambiguation). ... This article is about Champagne, the alcoholic beverage. ... This article is about Islamic religious observances in the month of Ramadan. ...


Dates can also be dehydrated, ground and mixed with grain to form a nutritious stockfeed. Dried dates are fed to camels, horses and dogs in the Sahara. In northern Nigeria, dates and peppers added to the native beer are believed to make it less intoxicating. For other uses, see Chili. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ...


Young date leaves are cooked and eaten as a vegetable, as is the terminal bud or heart, though its removal kills the palm. The finely ground seeds are mixed with flour to make bread in times of scarcity. The flowers of the date palm are also edible. Traditionally the female flowers are the most available for sale and weigh 300-400 grams. The flower buds are used in salad or ground with dried fish to make a condiment for bread. For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... Salt, sugar and pepper are the most essential condiments in Western cuisine. ...


In India, North Africa, Ghana, and Côte d'Ivoire, date palms are tapped for the sweet sap which is converted into palm sugar (known as jaggery or gur), molasses or alcoholic beverages. In North Africa the sap obtained from tapping palm trees is known as lāgbī /IPA:laːgbiː/. If left for a sufficient period of time (typically hours-depending on the temperature) lāgbī easily becomes an alcoholic drink. Special skill is required when tapping the palm tree so that it does not die. Leafhoppers and many other insects feed off plant sap Sap is the fluid transported in xylem cells (tracheids or vessel elements) or phloem sieve tube elements of a plant. ... A block of Indian jaggery (gur) Cleaning of pans prior to manufacture of jaggery Preparation of jaggery Jaggery is the traditional unrefined sugar used in India. ... Molasses or treacle is a thick syrup by-product from the processing of the sugarcane or sugar beet into sugar. ...


It is also used to make Jallab. Jallab is a type of syrup popular in the Middle East that is made from dates and rose water. ...


Other uses

Date Palm stump showing the wood structure
Date Palm stump showing the wood structure

Date seeds are soaked and ground up for animal feed. Their oil is suitable for use in soap and cosmetics. They can also be processed chemically as a source of oxalic acid. The seeds are also burned to make charcoal for silversmiths, and can be strung in necklaces. Date seeds are also ground and used in the manner of coffee beans, or as an additive to coffee. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 711 KB) Summary Phoenix dactylifera cut stump, showing lack of growth rings. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 711 KB) Summary Phoenix dactylifera cut stump, showing lack of growth rings. ... Oxalic acid (IUPAC name: ethanedioic acid, formula C2H2O4) is a dicarboxylic acid with structure (HOOC)-(COOH). ... Charcoal is the blackish residue consisting of impure carbon obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the several U.S. counties named Coffee, see Coffee County. ...


Date palm leaves are used for Palm Sunday in Christian religion. In North Africa, they are commonly used for making huts. Mature leaves are also made into mats, screens, baskets and fans. Processed leaves can be used for insulating board. Dried leaf petioles are a source of cellulose pulp, used for walking sticks, brooms, fishing floats and fuel. Leaf sheaths are prized for their scent, and fibre from them is also used for rope, coarse cloth, and large hats. The leaves are also used as a lulav in the Jewish holiday of Sukkot. Palm Sunday is a moveable feast in the Christian calendar which falls on the Sunday before Easter. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Thermal insulation on the Huygens probe The term thermal insulation can refer to materials used to reduce the rate of heat transfer, or the methods and processes used to reduce heat transfer. ... Leaf of Dog Rose (Rosa canina), showing the petiole and two leafy stipules In botany, the petiole is the small stalk attaching the leaf blade to the stem. ... Cellulose as polymer of β-D-glucose Cellulose in 3D Cellulose (C6H10O5)n is a polysaccharide of beta-glucose. ... The rabbi of Zidichov waving The Lulav Lulav (‎) is a ripe, green, closed frond of the date palm tree. ... Sukkot (Hebrew:  ; booths. ...


Stripped fruit clusters are used as brooms. In Pakistan, a viscous, thick syrup made from the ripe fruits is used as a coating for leather bags and pipes to prevent leaking.


Date palm wood is used for posts and rafters for huts; it is lighter than coconut and not very durable. It is also used for construction such as bridges and aqueducts, and parts of dhows. Leftover wood is burnt for fuel. For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Coconut (disambiguation). ... A Dhow near Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ...


Where craft traditions still thrive, such as in Oman, the palm tree is the most versatile of all indigeneous plants, and virtually every part of the tree is utilised to make functional items ranging from rope and baskets to beehives, fishing boats, and traditional dwellings.[citation needed] Domesticated Western honey bees are kept in beehives. ...


Traditional medicinal uses

Dates have a high tannin content and are used medicinally as a detersive (having cleansing power) and astringent in intestinal troubles.[citation needed] As an infusion, decoction, syrup, or paste, dates may be administered for sore throat, colds, bronchial catarrh, and taken to relieve fever and number of other complaints.[citation needed] One traditional belief is that it can counteract alcohol intoxication. The seed powder is also used in some traditional medicines. A bottle of tannic acid. ... A bottle of tannic acid, an astringent Astringent medicines cause shrinkage of mucous membranes or exposed tissues and are often used internally to check discharge of blood serum or mucous secretions. ... In anatomy, the intestine is the segment of the alimentary canal extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consists of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine. ... An infusion is a beverage made by steeping a flavoring substance in hot or boiling water. ... A decoction is a method of extraction of herbal or plant material, which includes, but is not limited to: Leaves, flowers, stems, roots, bark, and rhizomes. ... Catarrh is a discharge or mucus blockage caused by the swelling of the mucous membranes. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Drunkenness of Noah by Giovanni Bellini Drunkenness is the state of being intoxicated by consumption of alcohol to a degree that mental and physical facilities are noticeably impaired. ...


A gum that exudes from the wounded trunk is employed in India for treating diarrhea and genito-urinary ailments.[citation needed] The roots are used against toothache. The pollen yields an estrogenic principle, estrone, and has a gonadotropic effect on young rats. Types 5-7 on the Bristol Stool Chart are often associated with diarrhea Diarrhea (in American English) or diarrhoea (in British English) is a condition in which the sufferer has frequent watery, loose bowel movements (from the Greek word διάρροια; literally meaning through-flowing). Acute infectious diarrhea is a common cause... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Excretory system. ... SEM image of pollen grains from a variety of common plants: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea), prairie hollyhock (Sidalcea malviflora), oriental lily (Lilium auratum), evening primrose (Oenothera fruticosa), and castor bean (Ricinus communis). ... Estriol. ... Estrone (also oestrone) is an estrogenic hormone secreted by the ovary. ... Gonadotropins are protein hormones secreted by gonadotrope cells of the pituitary gland of vertebrates. ...


Diseases

Date Palms are susceptible to a disease called Bayoud disease which is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum. This disease, which kills many of the popular older cultivars like 'Deglet Noor', has led to a major decline in production where it is present, notably Morocco and western Algeria. However, new cultivars resistant to the disease are being developed. This article is a list of diseases of date palms (Phoenix dactylifera). ... This article is about the medical term. ... Subkingdom/Phyla Chytridiomycota Blastocladiomycota Neocallimastigomycota Glomeromycota Zygomycota Dikarya (inc. ... Binomial name Fusarium oxysporum Schltdl. ... Deglet Noor (Arabic: translucent) is a date cultivar grown primarily in Algeria and Tunisia; they are a chief date crop in the Coachella Valley of the United States as well. ...


See also

Date and walnut loaf is a traditional cake eaten in Britain, made using dates and walnuts. ... Date trees are cultivated in Sudan from the Egyptian border in the North all the way along the Nile south of Khartoum until Sennar. ... A block of Indian jaggery (gur) Cleaning of pans prior to manufacture of jaggery Preparation of jaggery Jaggery is the traditional unrefined sugar used in India. ... Binomial name (L.) H. Karst. ... Here are lists of fruits considered edible in some cuisine. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Introduction to Date Palm (188 words)
Date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L., is one of the oldest fruit trees in the
The number of the date palms is about 100 million worldwide, of which 62 million palms can be found in the Arab world.
The date palm is a perennial, the females of which normally begin to bear dates within an average five of years from the time of planting of the offshoot.
CHAPTER IV: CLIMATIC REQUIREMENTS OF DATE PALM (2934 words)
Date palm is cultivated in arid and semi-arid regions which are characterised by long and hot summers, no (or at most low) rainfall, and very low relative humidity level during the ripening period.
Date palm flowering is initiated after a cold period, when the temperature becomes high enough and reaches a level known as the flowering zero (0).
Date palm culture has mostly been developed in areas with winter rainfall which does not cause harm to the date fruits, but benefits the soils of the plantations by lessivating the deposited surface salt and avoiding the upward movement of salt from lower layers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     

OGBLECHI, S.R.
19th June 2010
Dear SIr/Madam,
I wish to extract juice from Date fruit on small-scale for human consumption.Please, I want to know if it is better to consume Date fruit directly or better to transform it to juice before consumption. I have never seen pure Date fruit juice. I am currently researching on production of Date palm fruit juice.

I need your advice, please.

My contact is [email protected]

My best regards.

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