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Encyclopedia > Datassette

The Commodore 1530* (C2N) Datassette (a portmanteau of data + cassette), was Commodore's dedicated computer tape recorder. It provided access to an inexpensive storage medium for Commodore's 8-bit home/personal computers, notably the PET, VIC-20, and C64. It has been suggested that blend (linguistics) be merged into this article or section. ... Data is the plural of datum. ... Typical 60-minute Compact Cassette. ... Commodore is the commonly used name for Commodore International, a West Chester, Pennsylvania based electronics company who was a vital player in the home/personal computer field in the 1980s. ... In general, a tape recorder, tape deck, cassette deck or tape machine is any device that records and plays back, fluctuating signal by moving a strip of magnetic tape across a tape head. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Data storage device. ... 8-bit refers to the number of bits used in the data bus of a computer. ... TRS-80 Color Computer II The home computer is a consumer-friendly word for the second generation of microcomputers (the technical term that was previously used), entering the market in 1977 and becoming common during the 1980s. ... The PET (Personal Electronic Transactor) was a home-/personal computer produced by Commodore starting in the late 1970s. ... VIC-20 with accessories. ... For the hip hop group, see Commodore 64 (band). ...


(* See the "Main models" section for information on the Commodore 1531. )


Confusingly, the Datassette at various times was sold both as the C2N DATASETTE UNIT Model 1530 and as the 1530 DATASSETTE UNIT Model C2N. Note the difference in spelling (one versus two s 'es) used on the original product packaging.

Contents


Description and history

The Datassette contained built-in A/D converters and audio filters to convert the computer's digital information into analog sound and vice versa (much like a modem does over a telephone line). Connection to the computer was done via a proprietary plug fitting directly with a corresponding part of the computer's circuit board edge. The absence of recordable audio signals on this interface made the Datassette and its few clones the only cassette recorders usable with CBM's machines, until aftermarket converters made the use of ordinary recorders possible. This article or section should include material from AD converters In electronics, an analog-to-digital converter (abbreviated ADC, A/D, or A to D) is a device that converts continuous signals to discrete digital numbers. ... An audio filter is a type of filter used for processing sound signals. ... A digital signal is a signal that is both discrete and quantized. ... An analog or analogue signal is any continuously variable signal. ... A modem (a portmanteau word constructed from modulator and demodulator) is a device that modulates an analog carrier signal to encode digital information, and also demodulates such a carrier signal to decode the transmitted information. ...


The inexpensive and widely available audio cassettes made the Datassette a good choice for the budget-aware home computer mass market. In Europe, the Datassette was the medium of choice for several years after its launch, although floppy disk drives were generally available. In the U.S., however, disk drives quickly became standard, despite the Commodore 1541 floppy drive costing roughly 5 times as much as a Datassette. Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... A floppy disk is a data storage device that is composed of a ring of thin, flexible (i. ... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government • President • Vice President Federal Republic George... The Commodore 1541 (aka CBM 1541, and originally called VIC-1541), made by Commodore International, was the best-known floppy disk drive for the Commodore 64 home computer. ...


The Datassette was a very slow and fairly unreliable medium (the latter caused by the sensitivity of the encoded analog signal to disturbances by magnetic fields and tape failure). Contemporary disk drives were an order of magnitude faster and more reliable. Some years after the Datassette's launch, however, special turbo tape compression software appeared, providing much faster tape operation (loading and saving). Such software was available for loading commercial prerecorded applications (mostly games), as well as for loading and saving the users' homemade programs and data. Current flowing through a wire produces a magnetic field (B, labeled M here) around the wire. ... In computer science and information theory, data compression or source coding is the process of encoding information using fewer bits (or other information-bearing units) than an unencoded representation would use through use of specific encoding schemes. ...


Datasette's could typically store about 200 KB (100+ KB per 30 minute side, link).


Main models

Used with the PET, VIC-20, C64/128

The are at least four main models of the 1530/C2N Datassette, listed chronologically below. The first two were made as PET peripherals while the latter two were mostly marketed towards VIC-20 and C64 owners, although all were compatible with all those computers (as well as the C128). The Commodore 128 is a home/personal computer, also known as the C128. ...

  • The built-in Datassette in the original PET 2001: black cassette lid, five white keys, no tape counter, no REC LED
  • Black  body original shape model, black cassette lid, five black keys, no tape counter, no REC LED
  • White body original shape model, black cassette lid, five black keys, with tape counter, no REC LED
  • White body new shape model, silver cassette lid, six black keys, with tape counter and a red REC LED

In addition to this, some models came with a small hole above the keys, to allow access to the adjustment screw of the tape head azimuth position. A small screwdriver could thus easily be used to effect the adjustment without disassembling the Datassette's chassis. External links LEd Category: TeX ... A basic screwdriver (Phillips tip shown) A screwdriver is a device specifically designed to insert and tighten, or to loosen and remove, screws. ...


Used with the C16/116 and Plus/4

Similar in physical appearance but incompatible both connector-wise and storage format-wise with the 1530/C2N models is the Commodore 1531, made for the Commodore 16 and Plus/4 series computers: The Commodore 16 was a home computer made by Commodore with a 6502-compatible 7501 CPU, released in 1984. ... Commodore Plus/4. ...

  • Black/Charcoal body new shape model, silver cassette lid, six light gray keys, with tape counter and a red REC LED

  Results from FactBites:
 
Datassette - C64-Wiki (232 words)
The datassette is Commodore's fancy name for a modified cassette tape recorder for use as a data medium; a data-cassette recorder.
The datassette has its own cable permanently attached to it, carrying both data and the power needed for the unit.
The datassette accepts standard cassette tapes, and a 90-minutes tape (45 minutes on each side) will hold on the order of 150 kilobytes on each side if no compression or fast loader is used.
Datassette - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (587 words)
The Datassette contained built-in A/D converters and audio filters to convert the computer's digital information into analog sound and vice versa (much like a modem does over a telephone line).
In Europe, the Datassette was the medium of choice for several years after its launch, although floppy disk drives were generally available.
The Datassette was a very slow and fairly unreliable medium (the latter caused by the sensitivity of the encoded analog signal to disturbances by magnetic fields and tape failure).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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