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Encyclopedia > Dartmouth College Greek organizations
Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005.
Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005.

Dartmouth College is host to many Greek organizations and a significant percentage of the undergraduate student body is active in Greek life. In 2005, the school stated that 1,785 students were members of a fraternity, sorority, or coeducational Greek house, about 60 percent of the eligible student body.[1] Greek organizations at Dartmouth provide both social and residential opportunities for students, and are the only single-sex residential option on campus. Greek organizations at Dartmouth do not provide dining options, as regular meals service has been banned in Greek houses since the 1910s. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixels, file size: 2. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ...


Social fraternities at Dartmouth College grew out of a tradition of student literary societies that began in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The first social fraternities were founded in 1842 and rapidly expanded to include the active participation of over half of the student body. Fraternities at Dartmouth built dedicated residence and meeting halls in the 1920s, and then struggled to survive the lean years of the 1930s. Dartmouth College was among the first institutions of higher education to desegregate fraternity houses in the 1950s, and was involved in the movement to create coeducational Greek houses in the 1970s. Sororities were introduced to campus in 1977. In the early 2000s, campus-wide debate focused on whether or not the Greek system at Dartmouth would become "substantially coeducational", but most houses retain single-sex membership policies. A literary society is a group of people interested in literature. ... The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at Lafayette College. ... Desegregation is the process of ending racial segregation, most commonly used in reference to the United States. ...


Currently, Dartmouth College extends official recognition to sixteen all-male fraternities, nine all-female sororities, and three coeducational fraternities. The Greek houses are largely governed through three independent councils, the Interfraternity Council, the Panhellenic Council, and the Coed Council. Dartmouth College has two cultural interest fraternities, and two cultural interest sororities, which do not participate in the major governing councils, but are member organizations of national associations. Cultural interest fraternities and sororities, in the North American student fraternity and sorority system, refer to general or social organizations oriented to students having a special interest in a culture or cultural identity. ...

Contents
  1. History
    1.1  Expansion of the fraternity system
    1.2  Coeducation to the present
  2. Fraternities: ΑΔ, ΑΦΑ, ΑΧΑ, BG, ΓΔΧ, ΖΨ, ΘΔΧ, ΚΚΚ, ΛΥΛ, ΣΑΕ, ΣΝ, ΣΦΕ, ΦΔΑ, ΧΓΕ, ΧH, ΥΨ
  3. Sororities: ΑΞΔ, ΑΠΩ, ΑΦ, ΔΔΔ, ΕΚΘ, ΚΔΕ, ΚΚΓ, ΣΔ, ΣΛΥ
  4. Coeds: ΑΘ, Tabard, ΦΤ
  5. Defunct: Acacia, ΑΚΑ, ΑΣΦ, ΑΤΩ, ΒΘΠ, ΔΚΕ, ΔΣΘ, ΔΥ, ΔΦΕ, ΔΨΔ, ΖΒΧ, HPF, ΚΑΨ, ΛΧΑ, ΞΚΧ, ΠΛΦ, ΣΑΜ, ΤΕΦ, FIJI, ΦΣΨ
  6. See also
  7. References
  8. External links

History

Dartmouth Hall, circa 1834.
Dartmouth Hall, circa 1834.

Social fraternities at Dartmouth College grew out of a tradition of student literary societies that began in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The first such society at Dartmouth, the Social Friends, was formed in 1783. A rival organization, called the United Fraternity, was founded in 1786. A chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was established at Dartmouth in 1787, and counted among its members Daniel Webster, class of 1801.[2] These organizations were, in large part, the only social life available to students at the College. The organizations hosted debates on a variety of topics not encountered in the curriculum of the day, and amassed large libraries of titles not found in the official College library. Both the Social Friends and the United Fraternity created libraries in Dartmouth Hall, and met in a room called Society Hall inside Dartmouth Hall. In 1815, the College decided to intervene in the hotly contested recruitment battle between the Social Friends and the United Fraternity by restricting each society to recruit only from separate halves of the new student class. In 1825, the College began simply assigning new students to one society or the other. Interest in the literary societies declined in the 1830s and 1840s. The College library and instructional curriculum had expanded to include much of what the literary societies had supported, and new Greek letter societies began to appear on campus.[3] Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 870 KB)Dartmouth Hall, of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 870 KB)Dartmouth Hall, of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... A literary society is a group of people interested in literature. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... For a curriculum vitae, see Résumé. In formal education, a curriculum (plural curricula) is the set of courses, and their content, offered at a school or university. ... For other uses, see Library (disambiguation). ... Recruitment refers to the process of finding possible candidates for a job or function, usually undertaken by recruiters. ...


In 1841, two factions of the United Fraternity split off from the literary society. One of the new societies called itself Omega Phi and on May 10, 1842, obtained a charter as the Zeta chapter of Psi Upsilon. The other faction to split from the United Fraternity organized itself on July 13, 1842, as Kappa Kappa Kappa, a local fraternity. More Greek organizations were founded, and by 1855, 64% of students, mostly upperclassmen, were members of the Greek letter societies on campus.[3] Initially, the original Greek letter societies would not extend invitations of membership to first year students. Two separate Greek letter organizations were created exclusively for freshmen: Kappa Sigma Epsilon and Delta Kappa. These societies would dissolve in 1883, when the fraternities of the upper classes began to pledge freshmen.[4] A chapter of Phi Beta Kappa survived at Dartmouth, but by the 1830s had established its role as a strictly literary society by dropping requirements of secrecy for membership and activities.[5] The new, social Greek organizations distinguished themselves from Phi Beta Kappa and the previous literary societies in several ways. The new fraternities were self-selective and exclusive. Each organization developed its own secret rituals and procedures. Most of the societies began to invest in creating their own meeting halls, either upstairs rooms in buildings on Main Street, or free-standing structures near campus. There were 11 active Greek organizations at Dartmouth College in 1900.[6] is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... “Freshman” redirects here. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


Expansion of the fraternity system

The fortunes of the fraternity system at Dartmouth followed a boom and bust pattern in the early twentieth century. The economic expansion of the 1920s created a boom in the fortunes of the fraternities at Dartmouth. Many of the fraternities built new brick residence near campus during this decade, including Zeta Psi, Kappa Kappa Kappa, Phi Sigma Kappa, Sigma Nu, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Chi Phi, Theta Delta Chi, Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Chi, Gamma Delta Chi, and Delta Tau Delta. It was during this period that Webster Avenue developed as "fraternity row".[3] The new residences were built without significant dining facilities, as the Trustees of the College had banned fraternities from serving regular meals in their chapter houses since the 1910s. College administrators also challenged the fraternities to become more engaged in College life during this time. College President Ernest Martin Hopkins personally decided to abolish freshman rush in 1924.[4] Ernest Martin Hopkins served as the 11th President of Dartmouth College, 1916-1945. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


As did the nation, fraternities at Dartmouth went through difficult times during the Great Depression. The decade of the 1930s saw almost no building projects at all in the fraternity system, and many houses could no longer afford regular maintenance. One of the great tragedies at Dartmouth College occurred on a winter night in 1934, when nine members of Theta Chi died from carbon monoxide poisoning after a metal chimney on a dilapidated coal furnace in the basement of the chapter house broke in the night.[7] In 1935, Dartmouth historian and professor Leon Burr Richardson asserted in a survey that, in light of the national suffering, the fraternity chapters should ask themselves if they had "any excuse for existence."[4] Four fraternities dissolved during the Great Depression (Alpha Sigma Phi, Alpha Tau Omega, Lambda Chi Alpha, and Sigma Alpha Mu), and two (Phi Kappa Sigma and Alpha Chi Rho) merged to pool scarce resources in order to survive. All of the surviving fraternities closed for the duration of World War II, as the campus was largely (although not exclusively) used to educate, train, and house Navy sailors and Marines being prepared for combat.[8] For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Carbon monoxide, with the chemical formula CO, is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... USN redirects here. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ...


The fraternities of Dartmouth College were directly involved in the African-American Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s. In 1952, the Dartmouth chapter of Theta Chi was derecognized by its national over a dispute regarding minority membership. The Dartmouth chapter reorganized as a local fraternity named Alpha Theta. A campus-wide referendum held in 1954 on the issue of desegregation of fraternities resulted in a majority in favor of requiring fraternities on campus to eliminate racially discriminatory membership policies by the year 1960, and to secede from national groups that retained such policies in their charters.[9] This became a binding obligation imposed on the fraternities by the college administration, and several fraternities at Dartmouth dissociated from their national organizations, including the chapters of Phi Sigma Kappa (1956), Delta Tau Delta (1960), Phi Delta Theta (1960), Sigma Chi (1960), and Sigma Nu (1963). Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... An African-American drinks out of a water fountain marked for colored in 1939 at a street car terminal in Oklahoma City. ...


National social changes also affected Greek societies at Dartmouth in the 1960s and 1970s. Many began to question the value of belonging to a national fraternal organization. The Dartmouth chapters of Chi Alpha Rho, Chi Phi, Delta Upsilon, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Kappa Psi, and Sigma Phi Epsilon all disaffiliated from their national fraternities in the 1960s. As political activism increased, fraternities were increasingly seen as anachronistic, and in 1967, the faculty voted 67-16 to adopt a proposal to abolish fraternities at Dartmouth. The proposal was rejected by the Board of Trustees.[10] Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ...


Coeducation to the present

Coeducation would dramatically change all social life at Dartmouth College, including the fraternity system. The College first began admitting women as full-time students in 1972. By the fall of 1973, five local fraternities (Alpha Theta, Foley House, The Tabard, Phi Tau, and Phi Sigma Psi) had all decided to adopt a coeducational membership policy and admit women as full members. The first sorority on campus, Sigma Kappa, was founded in 1977. Many alumni expressed strong concerns that the need for housing for new sororities would inevitably lead to financial pressure and the possible dissolution of existing fraternities at the College. In response, the Trustees imposed a moratorium limiting the campus to no more than six recognized sororities.[11] Converting from an all-male to a coeducational membership policy was not enough to save at least one Greek organization on campus. In 1981, the Harold Parmington Foundation reorganized itself as a new coeducational fraternity Delta Psi Delta, but the organization never attracted many new members and was finally forced to dissolve in the spring of 1991. In addition, Foley House dropped out of the Greek system in 1981, although it continued to operate as a dining cooperative and as of 2007 remained an official residential option on West Street. Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Diverse women. ...


During the 1980s and 1990s, College administrators introduced new initiatives to hold the Greek organizations on campus more accountable for their actions and to offer more social alternatives to the predominantly single-sex Greek system. In 1982, the administration announced that Greek organizations would have to comply with a set of "minimum standards", enforced through annual reviews, in order to remain in good standing with the College. These standards included not only health and safety regulations regarding the conditions of the Greek houses, but requirements for Greek-sponsored activities deemed beneficial to the College community at large.[10] The College introduced Undergraduate Societies to campus in 1993, as a residential and social alternative to Greek organizations. Similar to the Greek houses in many respects, Undergraduate Societies were required to have open, coeducational membership policies. Panarchy voted to change its status to an undergraduate society and was joined the following year by a newly-formed society, called Amarna.[12] In the fall of 1993, Student Assembly President Andrew Beebe, class of 1993, argued in favor of the coeducation of the entire Greek system in his remarks at fall Convocation.[13] During that same academic term, College President James O. Freedman predicted that the Greek system at Dartmouth would be coeducational within 10 years.[11] This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ... Student Assembly is a common name the legislative branch of many university student governments in the United States. ... A Convocation (Latin calling together, translating the Greek ecclesia) is a group of people formally assembled for a special purpose. ... James Freedman, fifteenth president of Dartmouth College. ...


In 1999, the college administration announced a "Residential and Social Life Initiative" to improve campus life. Speculation that all single-sex fraternities and sororities would be required to adopt coeducational membership policies led to intense campus debate. In a survey conducted by The Dartmouth newspaper, 49% of the student body responded, and 83% of those respondents were in favor of retaining a single-sex Greek system at Dartmouth.[14] In a December, 2006 interview, College President Jim Wright admitted that it had been "a serious mistake" to announce the Student Life Initiative in the manner in which it was presented to the campus, but expressed that in his opinion, "the Greek system at Dartmouth now is stronger than it's ever been."[15] The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... James Wright is the 16th President of Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, and has served in this position since 1998. ...


Fraternities

The single-sex male-only fraternities at Dartmouth College are largely organized and represented to the College through the Interfraternity Council (IFC). The Interfraternity Council is a student-led governance organization that assists the member Greek organizations with finances, public relations, programming, judicial administration, recruitment, and academic achievement. Alpha Phi Alpha is not a member of the IFC, but is a member of the National Pan-Hellenic Council. Lambda Upsilon Lambda is also not a member of the IFC, but is a member of the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations.[16] The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ... The National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO) is an umbrella council for 23 Latino Greek Letter Organizations established in 1998. ...


Alpha Delta (ΑΔ)

Alpha Delta, 2007
Alpha Delta, 2007

Alpha Delta ("AD") was founded by members of the Gamma Sigma Society. In 1847, the society became the Dartmouth chapter of Alpha Delta Phi, a national fraternity.[10] The third fraternity founded at Dartmouth College, Alpha Delta has never had a discrimination clause in its charter or constitution. The house dissociated from the national in 1969 and renamed itself Alpha Delta Fraternity. Alpha Delta is well known for being part of the inspiration behind the movie National Lampoon's Animal House. The screenplay, co-written by Chris Miller, class of 1963, was inspired by a pair of short stories Miller wrote in National Lampoon in 1974 and 1975 ("The Night of the Seven Fires" and "Pinto's First Lay") about his experiences as a member of Alpha Delta Phi. In November 2006, Miller published a 336 page memoir of his experiences in the fraternity under the title The Real Animal House: The Awesomely Depraved Saga of the Fraternity That Inspired the Movie.[17] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... National Lampoons Animal House is a 1978 comedy film in which a misfit group of fraternity boys take on the system at their college. ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... Chris Miller (born 1942) is an American screenwriter, most notable for his work on National Lampoon magazine and Animal House (he also had a bit part as Curtis Wayne Hardbar Fuller and was credited as Christian Miller). ... January 1973 cover of National Lampoon National Lampoon was an American humor magazine that began in 1970 as an offshoot of the Harvard Lampoon. ... As a literary genre, a memoir (from the French: mémoire from the Latin memoria, meaning memory) forms a subclass of autobiography, although it is an older form of writing. ...


Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ)

The Theta Zeta chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha was founded as the first historically African-American fraternity at Dartmouth College in 1972. The first members of the fraternity traveled to Boston, Massachusetts on the weekends of the 1971 spring academic term to attend pledge events at the Sigma chapter. The Dartmouth chapter was chartered as the 381st chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha on May 12, 1972. Early chapter meetings on campus were held in both the Choates dormitories and Cutter-Shabazz Hall. The fraternity secured their own house in 1982, a duplex structure that, since renovated, today houses the Delta Delta Delta sorority. Facing smaller membership, the fraternity decided to relocate to a smaller house near the western end of Webster Avenue in the late 1980s, and in 1992, the fraternity again relocated to College-owned apartment housing. The Dartmouth chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha sponsors an annual step performance known as the Green Key StepShow.[18]Notable alumni of the chapter include National Football League all-star Reggie Williams, class of 1976[19], and current Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations in Major League Baseball, Jimmie Lee Solomon, class of 1978.[20][21] Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A view of the northeast corner of campus from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. ... A view of the northeast corner of campus from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. ... Stepping or step-dancing is a form of percussive dance in which the participants entire body is used as an instrument to produce complex rhythms and sounds through a mixture of footsteps, spoken word, and hand claps. ... This article concerns the traditions of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... NFL redirects here. ... Reginald Williams (born September 19, 1954 in Flint, Michigan) is a former professional American football player. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Jimmie Lee Solomon is the current Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations in Major League Baseball. ...


Alpha Chi Alpha (ΑΧΑ)

Alpha Chi Alpha, 2007
Alpha Chi Alpha, 2007

Alpha Chi Alpha ("Alpha Chi") was founded in 1956 as the Phi Nu chapter of Alpha Chi Rho, a national fraternal organization. A previous Phi Nu chapter of Alpha Chi Rho at Dartmouth had merged with the Kappa chapter of Phi Kappa Sigma in 1935 to become Gamma Delta Chi, a local fraternity still in existence at Dartmouth. The second Phi Nu chapter of Alpha Chi Rho is unrelated to the first chapter. The men of Alpha Chi Rho again broke away from the national group in 1963 and became a local fraternity named Alpha Chi Alpha.[22] The Dartmouth chapter objected to a clause in the national fraternity organization's constitution that required all Alpha Chi Rho brothers to "accept Jesus as their lord and savior." The land and house used by the Alpha Chi Alpha fraternity are owned by the college. Dartmouth invested $1.3 Million in renovations completed in the fall of 2004, which included the razing of the “Barn” structure that was used as social space by the brothers of Alpha Chi Alpha to make way for a new expanded basement and main floor area.[23] Renovations on the Alpha Chi Alpha physical plant were completed in 2005.[24] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 1. ... ΑΧΑ, view from front of renovated house. ... Alpha Chi Rho (ΑΧΡ) is a mens collegiate fraternity founded on June 4, 1895 at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut by the Reverend Paul Ziegler, his son Carl Ziegler, and Carls friends William Rouse, Herbert T. Sherriff and William A.D. Eardeley. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Bones Gate (BG)

Bones Gate, 2007
Bones Gate, 2007

Bones Gate ("BG") was founded in 1901 as the Gamma Gamma chapter of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity. In 1960 the Gamma Gamma chapter dissociated from Delta Tau Delta when the national organization continued to have an official policy barring membership of minorities. The new local fraternity at Dartmouth went unnamed until 1962, when the brothers adopted the name "Bones Gate", a tribute to a tavern and boarding house in Chessington, England where a number of brothers spent most of their foreign study program.[25] In the summer of 2005, the Bones Gate residence underwent significant structural renovations to bring the building up to the College's Minimum Standards. Improvements included an enclosed fire escape running from the basement to the third floor, a new bathroom on the ground floor, the rehabilitation of all other bathrooms, and alterations to bedrooms.[26] The brothers of Bones Gate strive to live by their credo of welcoming friends to their house: "This Gate Hangs High and Hinders None. Refresh, Enjoy and Travel On."[27] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 1. ... Delta Tau Delta (ΔΤΔ, DTD, or Delts) is a U.S.-based international college fraternity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Boarding House is a privately owned house,in which individuals or families on vaccation, holidays, deputition,transfered on temporary duties, on some particular training,short&mediun tenure visitors,working professionals & lodgers,rent one or more rooms sets for one or more nights,sometimes for extended periods of weeks, months and... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Fire escapes on the back of a Cincinnati building. ... A typical American bathroom A bathroom is a room that may have different functions depending on the cultural context. ... A bedroom is a room where people sleep. ... The credo (Latin for I believe; pronounced ) is a statement of religious belief, such as the Nicene Creed (or, less often, another creed, such as the Apostles Creed). ...


Gamma Delta Chi (ΓΔΧ)

Gamma Delta Chi, 2007
Gamma Delta Chi, 2007

Gamma Delta Chi ("GDX") can trace its history to two fraternities on the Dartmouth College campus, Phi Kappa Sigma and Alpha Chi Rho. Gamma Delta Epsilon, a local fraternity, was founded in 1908, disbanded in 1912, but was reformed in 1921. In 1928, the Gamma Delta Epsilon house sought to establish itself as a chapter of a national fraternity and obtained a charter from the Phi Kappa Sigma national fraternity, becoming its Kappa Chapter. Epsilon Kappa Alpha, was established as a local fraternity on the Dartmouth campus in 1915. As with Gamma Delta Epsilon, Epsilon Kappa Alpha sought to become a chapter of a national fraternity and was granted a charter as the Phi Nu chapter of Alpha Chi Rho in 1918.[10] The Dartmouth chapters of Alpha Chi Rho and Phi Kappa Sigma found themselves in similar financial situations in 1934. Both chapters owned prime lots near campus that lacked adequate residential structures. The two fraternities decided to share their resources and in 1935 merged to become a new local fraternity, Gamma Delta Chi. The lot formerly owned by Alpha Chi Rho was sold to the Church of Christ at Dartmouth where a new church building was constructed, and the revenue from the land sale supported the construction of a new house at Gamma Delta Chi's current location.[28] (The Alpha Chi Rho national fraternity would later re-establish a Phi Nu chapter at Dartmouth in 1956 as a separate fraternity from Gamma Delta Chi. This second Phi Nu chapter would dissociated from the Alpha Chi Rho national in 1963 to become a local fraternity named Alpha Chi Alpha.) Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... The quality of this article or section may be compromised by peacock terms. You can help Wikipedia by removing peacock terms. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alpha Chi Rho (ΑΧΡ) is a mens collegiate fraternity founded on June 4, 1895 at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut by the Reverend Paul Ziegler, his son Carl Ziegler, and Carls friends William Rouse, Herbert T. Sherriff and William A.D. Eardeley. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ...


Zeta Psi (ΖΨ)

Zeta Psi, 2007
Zeta Psi, 2007

Zeta Psi ("Zete") at Dartmouth College was founded in 1853 as the Psi chapter of the national fraternity, and was the fifth fraternity founded at the College. The fraternity became inactive in 1863, but was revived from 1871 through 1873 after which it again became inactive. The current Psi Epsilon Chapter of Zeta Psi at Dartmouth was established in 1920. In 2001, the Dartmouth chapter was derecognized by the College because "the fraternity harassed specific fellow students and violated ethical standards that Dartmouth student organizations agree to uphold, by periodically creating and circulating among Zeta Psi members 'newsletters' that purported to describe situations, some of them of a sexual nature, of various members of the fraternity and other students."[29] Zeta Psi, meanwhile, countered that "nothing could be further from the truth... Dartmouth College lacks jurisdiction to punish Psi Epsilon of Zeta Psi's for alleged violations of its own rules or regulations,"[30] although Dartmouth had not invoked Zeta Psi's regulations. From 2001 to 2006, Zeta Psi continued to operate as an independent fraternity, not officially recognized by Dartmouth College. In January 2007, Dartmouth College announced an agreement that would allow Zeta Psi to reorganize on campus as early as 2009. Part of the agreement dictated that the organization "go dark", with no activities or recruiting, for a period of two years.[31] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Zeta Psi Fraternity of North America Inc. ... Harassment refers to a wide spectrum of offensive behavior. ... John Lockes writings on the Social Contract were particularly influential among the American Founding Fathers. ... Look up Newsletter in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Diplomatic recognition is a political act by which one state acknowledges an act or status of another state or government, thereby according it legitimacy and expressing its intent to bring into force the domestic and international legal consequences of recognition. ... Recruitment refers to the process of finding possible candidates for a job or function, usually undertaken by recruiters. ...


Theta Delta Chi (ΘΔΧ)

Theta Delta Chi, 2007
Theta Delta Chi, 2007

Theta Delta Chi ("Theta Delt") was founded at Dartmouth College in 1869 as the Omicron Deuteron chapter of the national fraternity, and was the eighth fraternity founded at Dartmouth.[10] Theta Delta Chi was the scene of a famous murder in June, 1920. Henry Maroney, class of 1920, was shot to death in his room at Theta Delta Chi by Robert Meads, class of 1919. Meads was reportedly the central figure in a large-scale bootlegging operation at the College during the early years of Prohibition. An already intoxicated Maroney reportedly stole a quart of Canadian whisky from Meads. Later that same night, Meads found Maroney in his room at the fraternity and shot him through the heart. Meads was convicted of a lesser charge of manslaughter and given a sentence of 15 to 20 years hard labor.[32] The sensational murder is reportedly the source of the nickname given to the Theta Delta Chi residence: the "Boom Boom Lodge".[33] Theta Delta Chi has several distinguished alumni, including Robert Frost, who attended Dartmouth for a time in 1892.[34] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rum-running is the business of smuggling or transporting of alcoholic beverages illegally, usually to circumvent taxation or prohibition. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Canadian whisky is whisky made in Canada; by law it must be aged there at least three years in a barrel. ... Penal labour or penal servitude is a form of unfree labour. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ...


Kappa Kappa Kappa (ΚΚΚ)

Tri-Kap, 2007
Tri-Kap, 2007

Kappa Kappa Kappa ("Tri-Kap") is a local fraternity founded on July 13, 1842.[35] It is one of the oldest local Greek houses in the nation and the second permanent Greek-letter fraternal society established at Dartmouth College. The organization has no affiliation with the Ku Klux Klan, which was founded after Kappa Kappa Kappa was founded and unfortunately adopted Roman alphabet initials, “KKK,” similar to the Greek alphabet letters of Kappa Kappa Kappa. According to legend, Kappa Kappa Kappa sued the Ku Klux Klan for defamation of name, but lost because the judge ruled that the similarity in the initials of the organizations was sheer coincidence. In 1984, the brothers of Kappa Kappa Kappa modified the organization's constitution to prohibit "overt homosexual activities" and forced their Social Chair, Joel Thayer, class of 1985, to depledge. Five brothers chose to leave the fraternity with Thayer.[36] In 1992, Kappa Kappa Kappa changed its name to Kappa Chi Kappa ("Bi-Kap"), but under extreme protest from the alumni it returned to the traditional name in 1995. In the fall of 1995, the house was block rushed by a group of Korean American students, and by June 1996, 90% of the organization's membership was Asian American.[37] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 1. ... Tri-Kap, view from front lawn looking west. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... The Greek alphabet (Greek: ) is an alphabet consisting of 24 letters that has been used to write the Greek language since the late 8th or early 9th century BC. It was the first alphabet in the narrow sense, that is, a writing system using a separate symbol for each vowel... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... A Korean American is a person of Korean ancestry who was either born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ...


Lambda Upsilon Lambda (ΛΥΛ)

Lambda Upsilon Lambda, known more formally as La Unidad Latina, Lambda Upsilon Lambda Fraternity, Inc. was established at Dartmouth in 1997.[38] The Psi Chapter of Lambda Upsilon Lambda is the College's first historically Latino fraternity. The fraternity has no physical plant. Lambda Upsilon Lambda sponsors Noche Dorada, an annual semi-formal dinner that features a guest speaker invited to the campus to address issues of Latino culture. The fraternity also supports the Brazil Project, in conjunction with the Sigma chapter at Wesleyan University, which supports thirteen families in Brazil.[39] La Unidad Latina, Lambda Upsilon Lambda Fraternity, Incorporated was established on February 19, 1982 in order to address the shortcomings of academic institutions in meeting and addressing the needs of Latino students in higher education. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... Semi-formal is a dress code in the European tradition. ... Wesleyan University is a private liberal arts college founded in 1831 and located in Middletown, Connecticut. ...


Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ)

Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 2007
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 2007

Sigma Alpha Epsilon ("SAE") at Dartmouth College was founded in 1903 as a local fraternity named Chi Tau Kappa. In 1908, the fraternity sought to associate itself with a national fraternity and was granted a charter from Sigma Alpha Epsilon to became the New Hampshire Alpha chapter.[10] With funding support from the national organization, the fraternity acquired a house on School Street that had previously been the residence of a College professor. By 1916, the fraternity had moved to a wood house on College Street north of the Green. The fraternity would replace the structure entirely with a new brick residence built between 1928 and 1931, one of the final fraternity building projects started on campus before the Great Depression.[3] Sigma Alpha Epsilon members are encouraged by their national organization to emulate the tenets of The True Gentleman, a statement written by John Walter Wayland.[40] Notable alumni of the chapter include the United States Secretary of the Treasury Henry M. Paulson, Jr., class of 1968[41], and benefactor to Dartmouth College Barry MacLean, class of 1960.[42] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... , View of the Green from the north, from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Henry Hank Merritt Paulson, Jr. ...


Sigma Nu (ΣΝ)

Sigma Nu, 2007
Sigma Nu, 2007

Sigma Nu ("Sig Nu") at Dartmouth College was originally formed in 1903 as the Pukwana Club, an organization that was created as a reaction to the perceived elitism of Greek organizations at the time. The club’s concept was based on the love for the traditions of Dartmouth, faithful friendship, and honorable dealings. In 1907, the Pukwana Club joined the national fraternity system after it received a charter to become the Delta Beta chapter of Sigma Nu. Sigma Nu’s “Way of Honor” principle was very similar to the principles expressed in the Pukwana Club’s original charter. The first residence for Sigma Nu at Dartmouth was purchased and refurbished in 1911. Known as the Green Castle, it served as chapter headquarters until the current house was built in 1925. In response to the national fraternity’s segregationist membership policies, the fraternity went local in 1963, becoming Sigma Nu Delta. In 1984, after the national fraternity's policies were changed, the fraternity reaffiliated with the national.[43] In the summer of 2007, the Sigma Nu residence underwent significant structural renovations to bring the building up to the College's Minimum Standards and improve living facilities. Improvements included an enclosed fire escape running from the basement to the third floor, a redone kitchen and bathroom, new flooring, a new study room, and alterations to bedrooms.[44] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Elitism is the belief or attitude that the people who are considered to be the elite — a selected group of persons with outstanding personal abilities, wealth, specialised training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are the people whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously, or... This article concerns the traditions of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ...


Sigma Phi Epsilon (ΣΦΕ)

Sigma Phi Epsilon, 2007
Sigma Phi Epsilon, 2007

Sigma Phi Epsilon ("Sig Ep") at Dartmouth College was founded on April 22, 1908, as the local fraternity Omicron Pi Sigma. In 1909, the local fraternity became New Hampshire Alpha Chapter of Sigma Phi Epsilon. By the late 1960s, the house had become disenchanted with the national organization and felt that the Dartmouth membership would be better served as a local fraternity. The brothers voted to dissociate from the national organization on January 18, 1967. A vote of the alumni of the New Hampshire Alpha chapter on February 1, 1967, supported the decision. The new local fraternity adopted the name Sigma Theta Epsilon (which was also used by an unrelated national fraternity). The Sigma Phi Epsilon national continued to communicate with the local Sigma Theta Epsilon fraternity at Dartmouth, and by 1981 was willing to offer significant financial support for building renovations in exchange for reaffiliation. Convinced that the national organization had reformed in its commitment to the individual chapters, the local fraternity voted to rejoin Sigma Phi Epsilon on February 18, 1981.[45] The national Sigma Phi Epsilon organization is known for its Balanced Man Initiative, an ongoing program of development that pushes brothers to challenge themselves and to use their different talents and backgrounds to strengthen the house and contribute positively to, in this case, the College and the Upper Valley community. Members of Sigma Phi Epsilon become full brothers the moment they join the fraternity, without having to endure a traditional pledge period. A prominent alumnus of the New Hampshire Alpha chapter is Theodore S. Geisel, class of 1925, better known as "Dr. Seuss".[46] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Sigma Theta Epsilon is an interdenominational Christian fraternal organization, tracing its history (through a series of name changes and mergers) to its founding in 1925 at Lincoln, Nebraska. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Upper Valley is the name for the region lying along the upper Connecticut River valley, following the border between New Hampshire and Vermont. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American writer and cartoonist best known for his classic childrens books under the pen name Dr. Seuss, including The Cat in the Hat, Green Eggs and Ham, How the Grinch Stole Christmas and One Fish Two Fish Red...


Phi Delta Alpha (ΦΔΑ)

Phi Delta Alpha, 1986
Phi Delta Alpha, 1986

Phi Delta Alpha ("Phi Delt") was founded in 1884 as the New Hampshire Alpha chapter of Phi Delta Theta, a national fraternity. Early meetings of the fraternity were held in the Tontine Building on Main Street. The meeting location moved to the Currier Building in 1887 when the Tontine Building burned down. Phi Delta Theta began construction on a new house in 1898, and the building was completed in 1902, designed by Charles Rich of Lamb & Rich. In 1960, the Dartmouth chapter broke away from the national because the national would not allow minorities to pledge the house. The new, local fraternity replaced the last letter in its name with Alpha.[47] In March 2000, the fraternity was derecognized by the College. One of the primary reasons for the punishment was that four members of Phi Delta Alpha started a fire in the Chi Gamma Epsilon basement next door. The fraternity was also cited for rushing ineligible students, committing alcohol and illegal drug violations, using coercive pledge practices, and providing the College with false information.[48] Under the leadership of Gig Faux, class of 1984, Phi Delta Alpha applied to the College for rerecognition in fall, 2002. The first rush class was formed in the winter of 2003.[49] Current General Electric Chief Executive Officer, Jeffrey Immelt, class of 1978, is a former president of Phi Delta Alpha.[50] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixels, file size: 333 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixels, file size: 333 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Hugh Lamb and Charles Alonzo Rich were partners in the New York City architecture firm of Lamb & Rich, which operated from 1880 to 1899. ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage (also known as booze in slang term) is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of alcohol includes many other compounds. ... Panamanian motor vessel Gatun during the largest cocaine bust in United States Coast Guard history (20 tons), off the coast of Panama. ... “GE” redirects here. ... “Chief executive” redirects here. ... Jeffrey R. Immelt (born February 19, 1956) is the current chairman of the board and chief executive officer of General Electric. ...


Chi Gamma Epsilon (ΧΓΕ)

Chi Gamma Epsilon, 2007
Chi Gamma Epsilon, 2007

Chi Gamma Epsilon ("Chi Gam") was founded in 1905 as the Gamma Epsilon chapter of Kappa Sigma, a national fraternity. The Dartmouth chapter dissociated from the national fraternity in 1987.[10] The disputes with the national organization were primarily over the amount of loans the national organization could offer the local chapter. Initially, the new local fraternity adopted the name Kappa Sigma Gamma, but the national fraternity took offense to the likeness of the names. After a period simply being known by its address, 7 Webster Avenue, the fraternity came upon the name by which it is now known. Chi Gamma Epsilon made national headlines in 1998 for co-sponsoring a "ghetto" theme party with the sisters of Alpha Xi Delta sorority that many found to be offensive for its racial stereotypes of African-Americans.[51] Several Chi Gamma Epsilon/Kappa Sigma alumni brothers found fame in Major League Baseball careers, including all-star players Brad Ausmus, class of 1991, and Mike Remlinger, class of 1987, and former Baltimore Orioles General Manager Jim Beattie, class of 1976. Another prominent alumnus is Vivid Entertainment President William Asher, class of 1984.[52] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Chi Gamma Epsilon is a fraternity at Dartmouth College. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 234 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... For other uses, see Loan (disambiguation). ... A ghetto is an area where people from a specific racial or ethnic background live as a group in seclusion, voluntarily or involuntarily. ... An ethnic stereotype is a generalized representation of an ethnic group, composed of what are thought to be typical characteristics of members of the group. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Bradley David Ausmus (born April 14, 1969, in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American 3-time Gold Glove Award winning catcher in Major League Baseball with the Houston Astros. ... Michael John Remlinger (born March 23, 1966 in Middletown, New York) is a relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who is currently without a team after being released by th the Boston Red Sox. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 5, 8, 20, 22, 33, 42 Name Baltimore Orioles (1954–present) St. ... James Louis Beattie (born July 4, 1954 in Hampton, Virginia), is a former professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues from 1978-1986. ... Vivid Entertainment Group is one of the worlds largest adult film producers, featuring a popular catalog of VHS and DVD titles and Internet content[1]. Vivid specializes in high-production-value movies, filmed in exotic locations and shot with professional lighting and quality cinematography. ...


Chi Heorot (ΧH)

Chi Heorot, 2007
Chi Heorot, 2007

Chi Heorot ("Heorot", "XH") was founded in 1897 as a local fraternity named Alpha Alpha Omega, and in 1902 was granted a charter as the Chi chapter of Chi Phi. In 1903, the fraternity moved to its present location, and in 1927 it sold off its eighteenth-century house and built the house that stands today. In 1968, the house dissociated from the national fraternity, and adopted the name Chi Phi Heorot.[10] The "Heorot" in Chi Phi Heorot comes from the medieval poem Beowulf, in which Heorot is the great hall where warriors converge to tell their stories. After several suspensions by the College in the early 1980s, it re-joined the Chi Phi national in 1981. This was short-lived; in 1987, because of damage done to the house that the College insisted upon having repaired for safety reasons but the Chi Phi national refused to help finance, the Dartmouth brotherhood again opted to become a local fraternity. In exchange for financing renovations to the structure, the College assumed ownership of the property and house. In its second incarnation as a local fraternity, the brotherhood chose the name Chi Heorot.[53] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Chi Heorot was founded in 1897 as a local fraternity named Alpha Alpha Omega, and in 1902 was granted a charter as the Chi chapter of Chi Phi. ... The Chi Phi (ΧΦ) fraternity is an American college social fraternity founded in 1824 at Princeton University, in 1858 at the University of North Carolina, and in 1860 at Hobart College, making it the oldest social collegiate fraternity in history. ... Heorot is the stronghold of king Hrothgar in the epic poem Beowulf. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... This article is about the epic poem. ... For other uses, see Warrior (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Safety (disambiguation). ...


Psi Upsilon (ΨΥ)

Psi Upsilon, 2007
Psi Upsilon, 2007

The Zeta Chapter of Psi Upsilon International Fraternity for Men ("Psi U") was founded at Dartmouth in 1842, the first fraternity at Dartmouth College. In 1907, Psi Upsilon built the wood frame house it still occupies, designed by noted New Jersey theater architect and Dartmouth alumnus Fred Wesley Wentworth. Several additions during the latter half of the twentieth century greatly improved the structure, which houses around twenty brothers each year. The house most recently underwent substantial renovations during the spring of 2006. F. Scott Fitzgerald famously enjoyed the 1938 Winter Carnival in the Psi Upsilon chapter house.[54] The Zeta chapter creates an ice pond in its yard every winter and is known as the "keg jumping fraternity" for its most-popular Winter Carnival activity. The house has a reputation for attracting brothers from a variety of different sports teams. A prominent alumnus of the Zeta chapter of Psi Upsilon is former United States Vice President Nelson Rockefeller, class of 1930.[55] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Psi Upsilon (ΨΥ, Psi U) is the fifth oldest college fraternity, founded at Union College in 1833. ... Framing is a term used to describe the process of erecting a framed structure, usually out of wood or occasionally steel. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... This article concerns the traditions of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Rockefeller Centre ice rink An ice rink is a frozen body of water where people can ice skate or play winter sports. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... -1... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ...


Sororities

The single-sex female-only sororities at Dartmouth College are largely organized and represented to the College through the Panhellenic Council. The Panhellenic Council is a student-led governance organization that assists the member Greek organizations by promoting values, education, leadership, friendships, cooperation and citizenship. Alpha Pi Omega and Sigma Lambda Upsilon are not members of the Panhellenic Council, but are members of the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations.[16] The National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO) is an umbrella council for 23 Latino Greek Letter Organizations established in 1998. ...


Alpha Xi Delta (ΑΞΔ)

Alpha Xi Delta, 2007
Alpha Xi Delta, 2007

The Theta Psi chapter of Alpha Xi Delta ("AZD") was founded as Delta Pi Omega in 1997. On January 6, 1997, the local sorority was officially recognized by the College, and on July 2, 1997, the sisters voted to affiliate with the Alpha Xi Delta national sorority. On February 21, 1998, the local organization's petition was approved by the national with a charter as the Theta Psi chapter.[56] Alpha Xi Delta occupies the house once home to Beta Theta Pi. Alpha Xi Delta made national headlines in 1998 for co-sponsoring a "ghetto" party with the brothers of Chi Gamma Epsilon that many found to be offensive.[51] In its short time at Dartmouth, Alpha Xi Delta has graduated multiple Rhodes Scholars.[57] The Dartmouth chapter of Alpha Xi Delta has adopted a Girl Scout troop as part of the sorority's national "Choose Children" philanthropy campaign.[58] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Alpha Xi Delta (ΑΞΔ) was founded in 1893 by ten women at Lombard College, Galesburg, Illinois, who shared a vision of an organization dedicated to the personal growth of women. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The Girl Scouts of the United States of America is a youth organization for girls in the United States based on the Scouting principles developed by Robert Baden-Powell. ...


Alpha Pi Omega (ΑΠΩ)

Alpha Pi Omega was established by women at Dartmouth College in May 2001. The organization was chartered as the Epsilon Chapter of the national historically Native American sorority in 2006, and was officially recognized by the college as a full chapter beginning with the fall 2006 academic term. The sorority does not have a physical plant or dedicated housing on campus. Alpha Pi Omega has a six-week long pledge period known as the Honey Process.[39] For college governance purposes, the Epsilon Chapter associates locally with the local member societies of the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations.[16] This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


Alpha Phi (ΑΦ)

After much debate about the addition of a new sorority to the Dartmouth campus, Alpha Phi was selected and approved by the Dartmouth Panhellenic Council and the Office of Residential Life. Alpha Phi was recognized on March 3, 2006, as the Dartmouth College colony of the international sorority.[59] The colony officially became a chapter on April 28, 2007. The sorority currently does not have its own residential facility.[60] Alpha Phi (ΑΦ) is a fraternity for women founded at Syracuse University on October 10, 1872. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ)

Delta Delta Delta, 2007
Delta Delta Delta, 2007

Delta Delta Delta ("Tri-Delt") at Dartmouth College was founded as the Gamma Gamma chapter of the national sorority in 1984. The house was the first Greek organization to secede from the Co-ed Fraternity Sorority Council in the spring of 2000,[61] a move that eventually precipitated the dissolution of that organizing body as other Greek organization on campus followed suit. Delta Delta Delta remains a member of the Panhellenic Council, which represents the interests of the sororities on campus.[16] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ...


Epsilon Kappa Theta (ΕΚΘ)

Epsilon Kappa Theta, 2007
Epsilon Kappa Theta, 2007

Epsilon Kappa Theta ("EKT," "Theta") at Dartmouth College was founded in January 1982 as the Epsilon Kappa colony of the Kappa Alpha Theta national sorority. Epsilon Kappa was the 100th colony of the sorority. The sorority initially met in a wide variety of locations, including the basement of the college president's house. In 1984, the sorority moved into Brewster Hall, a College-owned house that had previously been used as an International House and later as temporary housing for the Alpha Chi Omega sorority. In 1992, the sisters of the Epsilon Kappa chapter of Kappa Alpha Theta found the strict national rules and the primarily Christian religious readings and rituals of the organization to be antithetical to the spirit of feminism and inclusivity that the chapter desired. The national organization was unhappy with the colony's decision to disobey their rules and their failure to follow the sorority's rituals. On May 4, 1992, the Dartmouth chapter notified the Kappa Alpha Theta national organization of its unanimous vote to disaffiliate and become a local sorority. The national organization revoked the charter of Epsilon Kappa. The Dartmouth women chose the new name Epsilon Kappa Theta.[62] The current Epsilon Kappa Theta residence is a Victorian house over 100 years old.[63] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Feminists redirects here. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ...


Kappa Delta Epsilon (ΚΔΕ)

Kappa Delta Epsilon, 2007
Kappa Delta Epsilon, 2007

Kappa Delta Epsilon ("KDE") is a local sorority founded in the fall of 1993 by the Dartmouth Panhellenic Council at Dartmouth. After the dissolution of the Xi Kappa Chi local sorority in the spring of 1993, the Panhellenic Council decided that there was a need for a new sorority to replace it. Fifty women joined the new sorority in the first rush in the fall of 2003.[64] The Kappa Delta Epsilon physical plant was extensively remodeled by the college during the summer of 2003. The newly remodeled building contains a main meetings room, kitchen, two bedrooms and a back porch on the first floor. The second and third floors contain all bedrooms which house about thirteen more resident sisters. The basement consists of the "pub room", the bar room, the fireplace room, and the sisters-only room.[65] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... A kitchen is a room used for food preparation and sometimes entertainment. ... Pub redirects here. ... A bar at the coach terminal, Udine, Italy A bar is the counter where drinks are mixed by a bartender, mainly in hotels, taverns and pubs. ... Winter (fireplace), tacuinum sanitatis casanatensis (XIV century) A fireplace is an architectural element consisting of a space designed to contain a fire, generally for heating but sometimes also for cooking. ...


Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ)

Kappa Kappa Gamma, 2007
Kappa Kappa Gamma, 2007

The Epsilon Chi chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma ("KKG", "Kappa") was founded at Dartmouth on December 30, 1978, and was the second sorority at Dartmouth College.[10] The sisters of Kappa Kappa Gamma sponsor events for the campus, go on sister retreats, hold barbecues, and have formal and semi-formal dances. They have weekly house meetings in order to communicate news and issues about the house, to catch up on the week’s events, and to spend time with their fellow sisters. Philanthropy is an important part of the Epsilon Chi chapter’s activities. The sisters cook dinners on a regular basis for David’s House, an institution that supports and houses families of sick children at a local hospital, in a joint effort with the brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.[66] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... The term retreat has several related meanings, all of which have in common the notion of safety or temporarily removing oneself from ones usual environment. ... A barbecue in a public park in Australia A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City Pans on the top shelf hold hamburgers and hot dogs that were grilled earlier when the coals were hot. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Philanthropy is the act of donating money, goods, time, or effort to support a charitable cause, usually over an extended period of time and in regard to a defined objective. ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ...


Sigma Delta (ΣΔ)

Sigma Delta, 2007
Sigma Delta, 2007

Sigma Delta ("Sigma Delt") was the first sorority at Dartmouth College, founded in May 1977 as a chapter of the national sorority Sigma Kappa. In April 1981, Sigma Kappa moved into a residence formerly inhabited by Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity. The local chapter at Dartmouth began to have differences with the national organization concerning religion in sorority rituals and an emphasis on men in national sorority songs. The Dartmouth chapter dissociated from the national organization in the fall of 1988, becoming Sigma Delta. The classes of 1989, 1990, and 1991 that formed the new local sorority dedicated the new organization to principles of "strength, friendship, and acceptance of difference". Since reorganizing as a local sorority, Sigma Delta has hosted at least one open party each term in addition to service events.[67] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Photograph of a nude man by Wilhelm von Gloeden, ca. ... For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ...


Sigma Lambda Upsilon (ΣΛΥ)

Sigma Lambda Upsilon, more formally known as Sigma Lambda Upsilon/Senoritas Latinas Unidas Sorority, Inc., was established by five women at Dartmouth in 2003, as the Alpha Beta chapter of the national, historically-Latino sorority. The sorority has no physical plant or designated College-owned housing. The Dartmouth chapter supports several activities including philanthropic events, formal dinners, and a Summer Book Club. The organization cosponsors Love Your Body Day with Delta Delta Delta.[39] On December 1, 1987 at Binghamton University, Founding Mothers Cynthia Santiago-Guzman, Adriana Zamora-Tirado, Carmen Ibeth Garcia-Quinones and Carol Elizabeth Torres created an organization that would not only serve as a voice for women in an academic setting, but would also provide sincere sisterhood and unconditional support while...


Coeducational fraternities

The three coeducational fraternities at Dartmouth College are organized and represented to the College through the Coed Council. The Coed Council is a student-led governance organization that assists the member Greek organizations with public relations, programming, recruitment, and academic achievement.[16] All three coeducational fraternities at Dartmouth own the land and residence buildings they occupy.[68][69][70]


Alpha Theta (ΑΘ)

Alpha Theta, 2007
Alpha Theta, 2007

Alpha Theta was founded as a local fraternity named Iota Sigma Upsilon on March 3, 1920, by a group of seven students. In 1921 the fraternity received a charter as the Alpha Theta chapter of Theta Chi. John Sloan Dickey, later President of the College, joined the fraternity in 1928 and was elected house president only two weeks later, while still a pledge. Nine brothers of Theta Chi died in a tragic accident on the morning of February 25, 1934, when the metal chimney of the building's old coal furnace blew out in the night and the residence filled with poisonous carbon monoxide gas.[7] Alpha Theta was one of the first collegiate fraternities in the United States to break from its national organization over civil rights issues. In 1951, while Dickey served as President of the College, the student body passed a resolution calling on all fraternities to eliminate racial discrimination from their constitutions. The Theta Chi national organization's constitution contained a clause limiting membership in fraternity to "Caucasians" only. On April 24, 1952, the members of the Dartmouth chapter voted unanimously to stop recognizing the racial clause in Theta Chi's constitution. Upon learning that the Dartmouth delegation to Theta Chi's national convention later that year planned to raise questions about the clause, the Alpha Theta chapter was derecognized by the national organization on July 25, 1952. The house reincorporated as a local fraternity and adopted the name Alpha Theta. Alpha Theta was also one of the first all-male fraternities to admit female members. In 1972, Dartmouth admitted the first class of female students and officially became a coeducational institution. Alpha Theta also voted to become coeducational. After a few years, most of the women in the fraternity had become inactive and the house voted to become single-sex male-only again on November 10, 1976. The house returned to a coeducational membership policy in 1980.[71] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... John Sloan Dickey (4 November 1907 – 9 February 1991) was an American diplomat, scholar, and intellectual. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up Chimney in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... A furnace is a device for heating air or any other fluid. ... Carbon monoxide, with the chemical formula CO, is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas. ... For the peoples actually from the Caucasus, see Peoples of the Caucasus. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Tabard (ΣΕΧ)

The Tabard, 2007
The Tabard, 2007

The Tabard at Dartmouth College was founded in 1857 as a local fraternity for students in the Chandler Scientific School named Phi Zeta Mu. In 1893, as the Chandler School was absorbed by Dartmouth, the house sought to associate itself with a national fraternity and was granted a charter as the Eta Eta chapter of Sigma Chi national fraternity. The Dartmouth chapter dissociated from the national organization in 1960 when the Sigma Chi membership policies continued to discriminate against minorities. The new local fraternity briefly used the name Sigma Epsilon Chi, and included those Greek letters in a wrought iron railing on their residence. The fraternity later chose to use the name The Tabard, but retained use of the Greek letters. The new name was inspired by The Tabard, a fictitious London inn described in the General Prologue of the The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer.[72] The Tabard was one of five Greek organizations at Dartmouth to become coeducational and admit women pledges when the College began admitting women students in 1972. In 1997, the Tabard approved new membership policies that affirmed their policies of non-discrimination on the basis of race, gender, or sexual orientation and further removed self-selection from the pledging process. The Tabard actively cultivates a reputation as one of the more liberal organizations on campus with its policies and support of inclusivity and personal freedoms. Members consider wearing clothing with the Greek letters ΣΕX, a reference to human sexuality, as reaffirming the house's liberal beliefs. The Tabard has been the subject of multiple anti-narcotic police raids over the past decade.[73][74] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Tabard, a coeducational fraternity at Dartmouth College, was founded in 1857 as a local fraternity named Phi Zeta Mu. ... New Hampshire native Abiel Chandler, a Boston commission merchant, bequeathed funds to Dartmouth College to establish the Abiel Chandler School of Science and the Arts in 1852. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... A wrought iron railing in Troy, New York. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... The Tabard Inn, Southwark, around 1850 The Tabard was established in the medieval period on Borough High Street in Southwark. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see The Canterbury Tales (disambiguation). ... Chaucer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Race (disambiguation). ... Gender in common usage refers to the sexual distinction between male and female. ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, usually conceived of as classifiable according to the sex or gender of the persons whom the individual finds sexually attractive. ... Self-selection is a term used to indicate any situation in which individuals select themselves into a group. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ... 19th century Heroin bottle This article is about the drug classification. ...


Phi Tau (ΦΤ)

Phi Tau, 2007
Phi Tau, 2007

Phi Tau was founded at Dartmouth College in 1905 as the Tau chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa, but dissociated from the national fraternity on March 7, 1956 due to the national fraternity's anti-semitic and racist membership policies.[9] Phi Tau prides itself on its progressiveness; when the house constitution was rewritten in 1956, references to gender were deliberately excluded, making the house officially coeducational even before Dartmouth College accepted women as students. Phi Tau is the only coeducational Greek organization at Dartmouth that has always had female members since first admitting them, and was the first Greek house at Dartmouth to add sexual preference to its non-discrimination clause. Members of Phi Tau refer to one another as "brothers" regardless of gender. The fraternity is known for its quarterly "Milque and Cookies" party, featuring thousands of homemade cookies and milkshakes.[75] Phi Tau completely replaced their residence hall in 2002, at a cost of $1.8 million, funded in part by the sale of 1,675 square meters (0.4 acres) of land to the College.[70] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 1. ... Phi Tau is a coeducational fraternity at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Phi Tau is also a commonly used abbreviation for Phi Kappa Tau, a (completely separate) national fraternity found on many college campuses throughout the United States. ... Phi Sigma Kappa (ΦΣK) is a fraternity devoted to three cardinal principles: the promotion of Brotherhood, the stimulation of Scholarship, and the development of Character. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with sexual orientation. ...


Defunct Greek organizations

Greek organizations at Dartmouth College that dissolved over the years have largely done so as a result of financial difficulties or critically low membership and interest.


Acacia

The Zayin chapter of Acacia, a national fraternity, was founded at Dartmouth on March 31, 1906. The Acacia national organization never heard from the Dartmouth chapter again, and lacks records of any student members or activities that the chapter might have pursued. The national declared the chapter dissolved in 1908. Acacia was the first fraternity at Dartmouth to dissolve, and the Zayin chapter was the first Acacia chapter at any campus to close.[76] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ)

Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) at Dartmouth College was founded in 1983 as the Xi Lambda chapter of the national sorority. Alpha Kappa Alpha was the first historically African-American sorority at Dartmouth College. The College supported the sorority with dedicated apartment housing until it became defunct in the spring of 2003. The sorority had no members of the class of 2004 and was unable to recruit new members for subsequent classes because of a national moratorium on recruitment related to a hazing incident at another chapter.[77] Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, is the first Greek-letter organization established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hazing is an often ritualistic test and a task, which may constitute harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform random, often meaningless tasks, sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ...


Alpha Sigma Phi (ΑΣΦ)

Alpha Sigma Phi at Dartmouth College was originally founded in 1925, as a local fraternity named Sigma Alpha, The local fraternity became the Alpha Eta chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi, a national fraternity, in 1928. Faced with financial difficulties during the Great Depression, the Dartmouth chapter dissolved in 1936.[10] C. Everett Koop, class of 1937 and Surgeon General of the United States from 1982 to 1989, was a member of one of the final Alpha Sigma Phi pledge classes at Dartmouth.[78] Alpha Sigma Phi (ΑΣΦ, commonly abbreviated to Alpha Sig) is a social fraternity with 68 active chapters, colonies, and interest groups. ... C. Everett Koop Charles Everett Koop, M.D. (born October 14, 1916 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American physician. ... US Public Health Service US Public Health Service Collar Device US Public Health Service Cap Device The Surgeon General of the United States is the head of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the U.S...


Alpha Tau Omega (ΑΤΩ)

Alpha Tau Omega was founded at Dartmouth College in 1915 as the local fraternity Sigma Tau Omega. In 1924, the local fraternity was granted a charter to become the Delta Sigma chapter of national fraternity Alpha Tau Omega. The Dartmouth chapter dissolved in 1936, at the height of the Great Depression.[10] ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) is an American fraternity. ...


Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ)

Beta Theta Pi ("Beta") was founded in 1858 as a local fraternity at Dartmouth's Chandler Scientific School named Sigma Delta Pi. Sigma Delta Pi was the second Chandler fraternity and the seventh fraternity founded at the College. The fraternity changed its name to Vitruvian (a tribute to Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man) in 1871 and later established two short-lived chapters at other schools. In 1889, the local brotherhood decided to join a national fraternity and the organization soon became the Alpha Omega chapter of Beta Theta Pi. Beta Theta Pi was suspended by the College on three occasions in the 1990s. An incident of hazing in 1994 led to a year-long period of derecognition.[79] In the summer of 1995, a member of Beta Theta Pi read a poem aloud during a house meeting that was deemed to be racist and sexist, and resulted in many calling for derecognition of the fraternity.[80] In 1996, a Coed Fraternity Sorority Council judiciary committee found Beta Theta Pi guilty of six violations of College and fraternity policies.[79] The College derecognized Beta Theta Pi permanently on December 6, 1996.[81] The Hanover Police Department reported that the brothers of Beta Theta Pi did an estimated $15,000 in damage to the property soon after hearing of the permanent derecognition decision.[82] Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... New Hampshire native Abiel Chandler, a Boston commission merchant, bequeathed funds to Dartmouth College to establish the Abiel Chandler School of Science and the Arts in 1852. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Leonardo da Vincis Vitruvian Man (1492). ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... This box:      The sign of the headquarters of the National Association Opposed To Woman Suffrage Sexism is commonly considered to be discrimination and/or hatred against people based on their sex rather than their individual merits, but can also refer to any and all systemic differentiations based on the sex... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... For other uses, see Police (disambiguation). ...


Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ)

The Pi Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon ("Deke") was founded in 1853. It was the fourth social fraternity at Dartmouth College. Eight brothers of Delta Kappa Epsilon were famously involved in a 1949 murder of a fellow Dartmouth student. The men, after heavy drinking at three different fraternities, sought out a former member of the freshman football team. Finding him asleep in his dormitory room, but wearing a letter sweater that the eight men felt he did not deserve to be wearing, they beat him and he soon thereafter died of the injuries. Two Delta Kappa Epsilon brothers were brought to trial, fined, and given suspended sentences for the crime. In response to the murder, College President John Sloan Dickey announced that he felt it was important to reduce the influence of the fraternity system on campus.[83] The organization was renamed Storrs House in 1970 before dissolving entirely.[10] Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) is the oldest secret college mens fraternity of New England origin. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A varsity letter (or monogram) is an award earned in the United States by regular participation or excellence in a school sport. ... A suspended sentence is a legal construct. ... John Sloan Dickey (4 November 1907 – 9 February 1991) was an American diplomat, scholar, and intellectual. ...


Delta Sigma Theta (ΔΣΘ)

Delta Sigma Theta is an historically African-American sorority at Dartmouth College that was founded in 1982 as the Che-Ase Interest Group. At the time, the College had imposed a moratorium on the founding on new sororities, but when the moratorium was lifted, the group was recognized by the college as a sorority in the fall of 1984. The women contacted the Delta Sigma Theta national sorority and were granted a charter as the Pi Theta chapter in the spring of 1985.[84] Delta Sigma Theta provided an extensive array of public service through the Five-Point Thrust program.[85] Until the chapter's dissolution, the sister of Delta Sigma Theta had cosponsored the Step Show, an annual cultural dance performance, with the brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha. The sorority had occupied dedicated College-owned apartment housing until June, 2004, when all but one member of the Dartmouth chapter graduated. An attempt was made to recruit new members in the summer, but the chapter became inactive in the fall semester of 2004.[77] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Delta Upsilon (ΔΥ)

Delta Upsilon at Dartmouth College was originally founded as Epsilon Kappa Phi, a local fraternity, at Dartmouth College in 1920. In 1926, the local fraternity became the Dartmouth chapter of Delta Upsilon, a national fraternity. The fraternity dissociated from the national in 1966, and adopted the name Foley House. Foley House was one of the six local Greek organizations that became coeducational in 1972. In 1981, the organization decided to drop its association with the Greek system entirely and became one of the Affinity Housing programs offered by the College, available to any student interested in cooperative housing.[10] Delta Upsilon (ΔΥ) is one of the oldest international, all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities and is the first non-secret fraternity ever founded. ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ...


Delta Phi Epsilon (ΔΦΕ)

Delta Phi Epsilon was founded at Dartmouth College in 1984 as the Epsilon Alpha chapter the national sorority. The sorority was derecognized by the College in June, 1989, when it failed to maintain an active membership of at least 35 students.[86] The Dartmouth chapter made an effort to revive itself by separating from the national in 1990 to became Pi Sigma Psi, a local sorority, but dissolved soon thereafter.[10] Delta Phi Epsilon (ΔΦΕ) is the name given to several college fraternities and sororities. ...


Delta Psi Delta (ΔΨΔ)

Delta Psi Delta was established at Dartmouth College in 1950 as the Dartmouth chapter of Tau Epsilon Phi, a national fraternity. The Dartmouth chapter dissociated from the national in 1969, and reformed itself as the Harold Parmington Foundation. Faced with falling membership in 1981, the fraternity reformed itself with a more traditional Greek letter name, Delta Psi Delta, and opened its membership to women as well as men. Faced with critically low enrollment, Delta Psi Delta finally dissolved in 1991.[10] The local, coeducational fraternity at Dartmouth was not associated with either the local sorority at Carleton College[87] or the local fraternities at California State University, Chico[88] and Linfield College[89] also named Delta Psi Delta. Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational, liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ... California State University, Chico is the second-oldest campus in the California State University system, and home to the Chico University Arboretum. ... Linfield College is a private, four-year liberal arts college located in McMinnville, Oregon, United States, with a campus in Portland, Oregon, and an adult degree program located in eight communities throughout the state. ...


Zeta Beta Chi (ΖΒΧ)

Zeta Beta Chi was founded in 1984 as a local sorority named Alpha Beta. In 1986, the sorority gained a charter as the Dartmouth chapter of Delta Gamma, a national sorority. In 1997, the sorority voted to go local again, and reformed as Zeta Beta Chi. Plagued with low membership, the sorority was already on a marginal financial footing in 1998, when a College inspection during the summer discovered mercury contamination in the sorority's basement, the former house of Arthur Sherburne Hardy. The College closed the building for the remainder of the year, negatively impacting fall rush. The sorority announced its dissolution in December 1998.[83] Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... General Name, Symbol, Number mercury, Hg, 80 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 12, 6, d Appearance silvery Standard atomic weight 200. ... A townhouse with basement windows showing A basement is one or more floors of a building that are either completely or partially below the ground floor. ... // For the premier of Ontario 1896–1899, see Arthur Sturgis Hardy. ...


Harold Parmington Foundation (HPF)

The Harold Parmington Foundation was a local fraternity founded in 1970 after the Dartmouth chapter of Tau Epsilon Phi dissociated from its national organization. The new local fraternity continued to reside in 15 Webster Avenue, the house now occupied by the Epsilon Kappa Theta sorority. With only one member each from the classes of 1983 and 1984, the fraternity reorganized itself as a coeducational fraternity named Delta Psi Delta. [90] A past president of the fraternity, Brian Dale, class of 1980, was one of the passengers on American Airlines Flight 11 that was hijacked and flown into the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City during the September 11, 2001 attacks.[90][91] Flight 11 redirects here. ... The North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City was completed in 1972 at a height of 417 m (1368 feet), distinguishable from the southern tower (Two World Trade Center) by the huge antenna on the roof. ... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Kappa Alpha Psi (ΚΑΨ)

Kappa Alpha Psi at Dartmouth College was founded in 1987 as the Mu Chi chapter of the national fraternity. Kappa Alpha Psi was the second historically African-American fraternity at Dartmouth College. Its membership was active through at least the end of the 1990s. The Kappa Alpha Psi national currently lists the Mu Chi chapter as inactive.[92] Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ...


Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ)

Lambda Chi Alpha was founded at Dartmouth College in 1914 as the Theta Zeta chapter of the national fraternity. Faced with insurmountable financial stress during the Great Depression, the Dartmouth chapter dissolved in 1932.[10] Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters at more than 300 universities. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


Xi Kappa Chi (ΞΚΧ)

Xi Kappa Chi was originally established at Dartmouth in 1980 as the Zeta Mu chapter of Alpha Chi Omega, a national sorority. The sorority dissociated from the national organization in 1990 and became a local sorority named Xi Kappa Chi. Faced with low membership in 1993, the local sorority considered an affiliation with Phi Mu, a national sorority, as a possibility of attracting more new members hesitant to rush a small local sorority. The Phi Mu national organization sent representatives to Dartmouth in April, 1993, but based on their report, the Phi Mu national council voted against a Dartmouth chapter. Xi Kappa Chi was dissolved by the Dartmouth Panhellenic Council in 1993.[93] Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ...


Pi Lambda Phi (ΠΛΦ)

The Pi chapter of the national fraternity Pi Lambda Phi was established at Dartmouth College in 1924. The membership of the Dartmouth chapter was predominantly Jewish. About half of the College's fraternities at the time had national constitutions that explicitly forbade membership to Jews, and for many of the other chapters, it was an informal policy to exclude membership to Jewish students. The national constitution of Pi Lambda Phi expressly accepted members of all religions. Pi Lambda Phi was not initially accepted by the Dartmouth Greek community, and efforts in 1924 and 1925 to gain formal admission into the Interfraternity Council failed. The fraternity was finally recognized in the spring of 1927.[94] The fraternity's first residence, purchased in 1924, was a building on South Street originally occupied by a Roman Catholic church. The fraternity would reside there until 1961, when it moved to a house north of Webster Avenue on Occom Ridge. The chapter dissolved in 1971.[3] Pi Lambda Phi (ΠΛΦ or Pi Lam) is a college social fraternity founded by Frederick Manfred Werner, Louis Samter Levy, and Henry Mark Fisher at Yale University in 1895. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


Sigma Alpha Mu (ΣΑΜ)

Sigma Alpha Mu was established at Dartmouth College in 1930 as the Sigma Upsilon chapter of the national fraternity. At the time, the Sigma Alpha Mu national limited membership in the organization to Jewish men. Sigma Alpha Mu placed more emphasis on the observances of Judaism than did the other predominantly Jewish fraternity on campus, Pi Lambda Phi, and had difficulty attracting the interest of most mainstream Jewish students on campus.[94] The Dartmouth chapter dissolved in 1935, during the Great Depression.[10] Sigma Alpha Mu (ΣΑΜ) also known as Sammy is a college fraternity founded at the City College of New York in 1909. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Tau Epsilon Phi (ΤΕΦ)

Tau Epsilon Phi was established at Dartmouth College in 1950 as the Epsilon Delta chapter of the national fraternity. The Dartmouth chapter dissociated from the national in 1969, and voted to call itself the Harold Parmington Foundation.[10] Tau Epsilon Phi (TEΦ, commonly pronounced TEP) is a predominantly American fraternity with approximately 40 active chapters, chiefly located at universities and colleges in the Northeastern United States. ...


Phi Gamma Delta (FIJI)

Phi Gamma Delta was founded at Dartmouth College as the Delta Upsilon chapter of the national fraternity in 1901. The Dartmouth chapter seceded from the national fraternity in 1965, and adopted the new name of Phoenix. The new local fraternity dissolved in 1971.[10] The fraternity has no association with the Phoenix all-female senior society founded at Dartmouth in 1984. Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 116 chapters and 5 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ...


Phi Sigma Psi (ΦΣΨ)

Phi Sigma Psi ("Phi Psi") traces its heritage at Dartmouth College to the Beta Psi local fraternity, founded in 1895. Beta Psi became the New Hampshire Alpha chapter of Phi Kappa Psi in 1896. The Dartmouth chapter dissociated from the national in 1967, adopting the new name Phi Sigma Psi. Phi Sigma Psi was one of the six fraternities that adopted a formal coeducational membership policy in 1972. In the late 1980s, the membership began referring to the organization as "Phi Psi/Panarchy". The fraternity changed its name to The Panarchy in 1991.[95] In 1993, the College began a program for "undergraduate societies" as open-membership alternatives to the Greek system. In September 1993, the members of Panarchy voted to disaffiliate from the Greek system and became the first of two Undergraduate Societies.[96] Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Dartmouth College Greek organizations
  • Dartmouth College undergraduate societies
  • Dartmouth College senior societies

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ...

References

Cited references
  1. ^ Hughes, C.J. (2006) "Bye Bye SLI." Dartmouth Alumni Magazine. Vol. 98, No. 4, Mar./Apr., 2006, p.18.
  2. ^ Kartalopoulos, William B. (1997). "The Phi Beta Kappa". Daniel Webster: Class of 1801. Dartmouth College Archives. Retrieved Oct. 10, 2007.
  3. ^ a b c d e Meacham, Scott (1999). "Halls, Tombs and Houses: Student Society Architecture at Dartmouth,"Dartmo.: The Buildings of Dartmouth College. 1999, updated Feb. 2004. Retrieved Mar. 14, 2007.
  4. ^ a b c Hill, Ralph Nading, Ed. (1964). The College on the Hill: A Dartmouth Chronicle. Trustees of Dartmouth College, The. Dartmouth Publications: Hanover, New Hampshire. p.234.
  5. ^ The Phi Beta Kappa Society (2007). "A Brief History of Phi Beta Kappa". Retrieved Oct. 10, 2007.
  6. ^ The eleven fraternities active at Dartmouth College in 1900 were Alpha Alpha Omega, Alpha Delta Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Zeta Psi, Theta Delta Chi, Kappa Kappa Kappa, Sigma Chi, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Psi, and Psi Upsilon.
  7. ^ a b Unattributed (1934). "Dartmouth's Saddest". Time Magazine. Mar. 4, 1934.
  8. ^ Hill, Ralph Nading, Ed. (1964). The College on the Hill: A Dartmouth Chronicle. Trustees of Dartmouth College, The. Dartmouth Publications: Hanover, New Hampshire. p.254.
  9. ^ a b Scobie, Richard (1956). A Fraternal Revolution: The Birth of Phi Tau Fraternity, As Told by One of the Principles: Richard Scobie. Hanover, New Hampshire: 1956.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Dartmouth Greek Leadership Council (1999). "History of CFS Organizations at Dartmouth". Retrieved Mar. 13, 2007.
  11. ^ a b Peric, Sabrina (2002). "How does single-sex Greek system fit with coeducation?". The Dartmouth. Nov. 6, 2002. [Note: article incorrectly includes Gamma Delta Chi and incorrectly excludes Phi Sigma Psi in list of Greek organizations that decided to admit women in 1973.]
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Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The Dartmouth Review is an extreme right-wing independent bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). Founded in 1980 (with the backing of the Institute for Educational Affairs Collegiate Network) as a right-wing secession from the colleges official newspaper —The Dartmouth&#8212... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Alpha Sigma Phi (ΑΣΦ, commonly abbreviated to Alpha Sig) is a social fraternity with 68 active chapters, colonies, and interest groups. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational, liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ... California State University, Chico is the second-oldest campus in the California State University system, and home to the Chico University Arboretum. ... Linfield College is a private, four-year liberal arts college located in McMinnville, Oregon, United States, with a campus in Portland, Oregon, and an adult degree program located in eight communities throughout the state. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Report of the Greek Life Steering Committee - Overview (1933 words)
A majority of the Greek organizations at Dartmouth are ready to embrace higher expectations, to work toward significant improvements and to be held accountable to their own values and those of Dartmouth College.
As participants in the Dartmouth College community, we are all responsible for seeking individually creative and innovative ways of engaging in campus life while simultaneously serving as stewards of a common set of values.
It is understood that Greek organizations are accountable to Dartmouth College and the Dartmouth community, to the membership of each individual organization, and to their Greek peers.
Dartmouth College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3406 words)
Dartmouth was made the ninth and final colonial college when it was given a royal charter by King George III in 1769, mostly as a result of the efforts of Eleazar Wheelock, a Puritan minister, and his patron, Royal Governor John Wentworth.
Dartmouth College Alumni Gymnasium, the center of athletic life at Dartmouth, is home of the Dartmouth College Aquatic facilities, basketball courts, squash and racketball courts, indoor track, fencing lanes as well as a rowing training center.
Dartmouth College was among the first institutions of higher education to desegregate fraternity houses in the 1950s, and was involved in the movement to create coeducational Greek houses in the 1970s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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