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Encyclopedia > Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College

Motto Vox clamantis in deserto
(The voice of one crying in the wilderness.)
Established December 13, 1769
Type Private
Academic term Quarter
Endowment US $3.76 billion[5]
President James Edward Wright
Faculty 647[1]
Undergraduates 4,085[1]
Postgraduates 1,668[1]
Location Flag of the United States Hanover, NH, USA
Campus Rural town, 269 acres (1.1 km²)
Nickname Big Green
Mascot Indian,[2] Keggy the Keg,[3] and Dartmouth Moose[4] (all unofficial)
Athletics NCAA Division I, Ivy league
34 varsity teams
Website www.dartmouth.edu

Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as "Trustees of Dartmouth College,"[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution.[8] In addition to its undergraduate liberal arts program, Dartmouth has medical, engineering, and business schools, as well as 19 graduate programs in the arts and sciences. With a total enrollment of 5,753, Dartmouth is the smallest school in the Ivy League.[1] Download high resolution version (687x736, 37 KB) Dartmouth College Shield This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... James Wright is the 16th President of Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, and has served in this position since 1998. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... “km” redirects here. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Keggy the Keg is an unofficial mascot of Dartmouth College, created in the fall of 2003. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... Dartmouth Medical School is the medical school of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... The Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College is one of the oldest professional schools of engineering in the USA. Founded in 1867 after a donation by General Sylvanus Thayer, the School comprises both the Undergraduate Department of Engineering Sciences at Dartmouth and a graduate professional school in engineering. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ...


Established in 1769 by Congregational minister Eleazar Wheelock with funds partially raised by the efforts of Native American preacher Samson Occom, the College's initial mission was to educate and Christianize the Native Americans in the area. After a long period of financial and political struggles, Dartmouth emerged from relative obscurity in the early twentieth century.[9] In 2004, Booz Allen Hamilton selected Dartmouth College as one of the "World's Ten Most Enduring Institutions," recognizing its ability to overcome crises that threatened its survival (most notably in Trustees of Dartmouth College v. Woodward).[10] Dartmouth alumni are famously involved in their college, from Daniel Webster to the many donors in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.[11] Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The Reverend Eleazar Wheelock (April 22, 1711 – April 24, 1779) was an American Congregational minister, orator, educator, and founder of Dartmouth College. ... Samson Occom was born in 1723 into the Mohegan nation near New London, Connecticut to Joshua Tomacham and Sarah, believed to be a direct descendant of the famous Mohegan chief, Uncas. ... Booz Allen Hamilton (a. ... Holding The charter granted by the British crown to the trustees of Dartmouth College, in New-Hampshire, in the year 1769, is a contract within the meaning of that clause of the constitution of the United States, (art. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ...


Dartmouth is located on a rural 269-acre (1.1 km²) campus in the Upper Valley region of New Hampshire. Given the College's isolated location, participation in athletics and the school's Greek system is high.[12] Dartmouth's 34 varsity sports team compete in the Ivy League conference of the NCAA Division I. Students are also well-known for preserving a variety of strong campus traditions.[13][14][15][16] Upper Valley is the name for the region lying along the upper Connecticut River valley, following the border between New Hampshire and Vermont. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...

Contents

History

The Charter of Dartmouth College on display in Baker Memorial Library. The Charter was signed on December 13, 1769 on behalf of King George III of Great Britain.
The Charter of Dartmouth College on display in Baker Memorial Library. The Charter was signed on December 13, 1769 on behalf of King George III of Great Britain.

Dartmouth was founded by Eleazar Wheelock, a Puritan minister from Connecticut, who sought to establish a school to train Indians as ministers to spread civilization and Christianity. Wheelock's inspiration for such an establishment largely resulted from his relationship with Mohican Indian Samson Occom. Occom became an ordained minister under Wheelock’s tutelage from 1743 to 1747, returning to his people on Long Island to preach.[17] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 420 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1397 × 1992 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 420 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1397 × 1992 pixels, file size: 2. ... Fisher Ames Baker Memorial Library is the main library at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... “George III” redirects here. ... The Reverend Eleazar Wheelock (April 22, 1711 – April 24, 1779) was an American Congregational minister, orator, educator, and founder of Dartmouth College. ... For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... The Mohicans were, during the 16th century and the beginning of the 17th century, a functional confederation of several branches of Native Americans. ... Samson Occom was born in 1723 into the Mohegan nation near New London, Connecticut to Joshua Tomacham and Sarah, believed to be a direct descendant of the famous Mohegan chief, Uncas. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ...


Wheelock instituted Moor's Indian Charity School in 1755.[18] The Charity School proved somewhat successful, but additional funding was necessary to continue school’s operations. To this end, Wheelock sought the help of friends to raise money. Occom, accompanied by Reverend Nathaniel Whitaker, traveled to England in 1766 to raise money in the dissenting churches of that nation. With the funds, they established a trust to help Wheelock.[17]


Although the fund provided Wheelock ample financial support for the Charity School, Wheelock had trouble recruiting Indians to the institution – primarily because its location was far from tribal territories. Receiving the best land offer from New Hampshire, Wheelock approached the Royal Governor of the Province of New Hampshire John Wentworth for a charter. Wentworth, acting in the name King George III of the United Kingdom, granted Dartmouth a royal charter on December 13, 1769, establishing the final colonial college and naming the institution after his English friend, William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth.[17] Dartmouth's purpose, according to the original charter, was to provide for the Christianization, instruction, and education of "youth of the Indian Tribes in this land [...] and also of English youth and any others." Given the failure of the Charity School, however, Wheelock intended his new College as one primarily for whites.[19][17] John Wentworth (1737-1820) was the British colonial governor of New Hampshire at the time of the American Revolution. ... “George III” redirects here. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Nine institutions of higher education, sometimes called Colonial colleges, were founded and chartered in the American Colonies prior to the American Revolution (1775-1783). ... William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth (June 20, 1731 - July 7, 1801) was a British statesman who is most remembered for his part in the government before and during the American Revolution. ... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar...

Painting by Robert Clayton Burns (1962) depicting Daniel Webster arguing Dartmouth College v. Woodward.

Wheelock had established a collegiate department within Moor's Charity School in 1768. In 1770, he moved the school to Hanover in 1770, where the College granted its first degrees in 1771.[20] Occom, disappointed with Wheelock's departure from the school's original goal of Indian Christianization, went on to form his own community of New England Indians called Brothertown Indians in New York.[17][19] Image File history File links DanielWebster_DartmouthCollegeCase. ... Image File history File links DanielWebster_DartmouthCollegeCase. ... The Brothertown Indians (also Brotherton) are Native American descendants of the Pequot and Mohegan (Algonquin-speaking) tribes in southern New England. ...


In 1819, Dartmouth College was the subject of the historic Dartmouth College case, in which the State of New Hampshire's 1816 attempt to amend the College's royal charter to make the school a public university was challenged. An institution called Dartmouth University occupied the College buildings and began operating in Hanover in 1817, though the College continued teaching classes in rented rooms nearby.[17] Daniel Webster, an alumnus of the class of 1801, presented the College's case to the Supreme Court of the United States, which found the amendment of Dartmouth's charter to be an illegal impairment of a contract by the state and reversed New Hampshire's takeover of the College. Webster concluded his peroration with the famous and frequently quoted words: "It is, Sir, as I have said, a small college. And yet there are those who love it."[17] Trustees of Dartmouth College vs. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... This article or section should include material from Dartmouth College Mens Varsity Swim Team. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... “Old girl” redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the...

Lithograph of the President's House, Thornton Hall, Dartmouth Hall, and Wentworth Hall, circa 1834. The lithograph depicts the reverse of the actual scene.
Lithograph of the President's House, Thornton Hall, Dartmouth Hall, and Wentworth Hall, circa 1834. The lithograph depicts the reverse of the actual scene.

Dartmouth emerged onto the national academic stage at the turn of the twentieth century. Prior to this period, the College was "little more than a finishing school," relatively unknown, and poorly funded.[9] Under the presidency of William Jewett Tucker (1893-1909), Dartmouth saw a complete revitalization of facilities, faculty, and the student body. Twenty new structures replaced antiquated buildings, while the student body and faculty both expanded threefold. Tucker is often credited with having "refounded Dartmouth" and bringing it into national prestige.[21] Presidents Ernest Fox Nichols (1909-16) and Ernest Martin Hopkins (1916-45) continued Tucker's trend of modernization, further improving campus facilities and introducing selective admissions in the 1920s.[9] John Sloan Dickey, serving as president from 1945 until 1970, strongly emphasized the liberal arts (particularly public policy and international relations).[9][22] Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 870 KB)Dartmouth Hall, of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 870 KB)Dartmouth Hall, of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... The Rev. ... Ernest Fox Nichols (June 1, 1869– April 29, 1924) was a U.S. educator and physicist. ... Ernest Martin Hopkins served as the 11th President of Dartmouth College, 1916-1945. ... College admissions in the United States play an important sociological role, determining (in part) the quality of education a person will receive as well as his or her career track. ... John Sloan Dickey (4 November 1907 – 9 February 1991) was an American diplomat, scholar, and intellectual. ...


Dartmouth, previously serving as a men's college, admitted women as full-time students and undergraduate degree candidates in 1972 amid much controversy.[23] At about the same time, the College adopted its unique "Dartmouth Plan" of academic scheduling.


During the 1990s, the College saw a major academic overhaul under President James O. Freedman and a controversial 1999 initiative to abolish single-sex Greek houses.[9][24] Since the election of a number of petition elections to the Board of Trustees starting in 2004, the role of alumni in Dartmouth governance has been the subject of ongoing ideological conflict.[25] James Freedman, fifteenth president of Dartmouth College. ...


Academics

Until it burned in 1904, Dartmouth Hall (first built in 1784) was the oldest building on Dartmouth's campus. (It was rebuilt the following year, shown here.)
Until it burned in 1904, Dartmouth Hall (first built in 1784) was the oldest building on Dartmouth's campus. (It was rebuilt the following year, shown here.)[26]

Dartmouth, a liberal arts institution, offers only a four-year Bachelor of Arts degree to undergraduate students.[27][8] There are 39 academic departments offering 56 major programs, although students are free to design special majors or engage in dual majors.[28] In 2007, the most popular majors were economics, government, psychological and brain sciences, history, and English.[8] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly a U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ...


In order to graduate, a student must complete 35 total courses, eight to ten of which are typically part of a chosen major program.[29] Other requirements for graduation include the completion of ten "distributive requirements" in a variety of academic fields, proficiency in a foreign language, and a writing class or first-year seminar in writing.[29] Many departments offer honors programs requiring students seeking that distinction to engage in "independent, sustained work," culminating in the production of a thesis.[29] In addition to the courses offered in Hanover, Dartmouth offers 57 different off-campus programs, including Foreign Study Programs, Language Study Abroad programs, and Exchange Programs.[30][31] This article is about the thesis in academia. ...


Dartmouth also grants degrees in nineteen Arts & Sciences graduate programs.[8] Furthermore, Dartmouth is home to three graduate schools: the Dartmouth Medical School (established 1797), Thayer School of Engineering (1867)—which also serves as the undergraduate department of engineering sciences—and Tuck School of Business (1900). With these graduate programs, conventional American usage would accord Dartmouth the label of "Dartmouth University";[8] however, because of historical and nostalgic reasons (such as Dartmouth College v. Woodward), the school uses the name "Dartmouth College" for the entire institution.[17] Dartmouth Medical School is the medical school of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... The Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College is one of the oldest professional schools of engineering in the USA. Founded in 1867 after a donation by General Sylvanus Thayer, the School comprises both the Undergraduate Department of Engineering Sciences at Dartmouth and a graduate professional school in engineering. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Holding The charter granted by the British crown to the trustees of Dartmouth College, in New-Hampshire, in the year 1769, is a contract within the meaning of that clause of the constitution of the United States, (art. ...


Dartmouth employs a total of 597 tenured or tenure-track faculty members, including the highest proportion of female tenured professors among the Ivy League universities.[8] Faculty members have been at the forefront of such major academic developments as the Dartmouth Conferences, the Dartmouth Time Sharing System, Dartmouth BASIC, and Dartmouth ALGOL 30. As of 2005, sponsored project awards to Dartmouth faculty research amounted to $169 million.[32] The Dartmouth Summer Research Conference on Artificial Intelligence was the name of a conference now considered the seminal event for artificial intelligence as a field. ... The Dartmouth Timesharing System, or DTSS for short, was the first large-scale time-sharing system to be implemented successfully. ... Dartmouth BASIC is the original version of the BASIC programming language. ... Dartmouth ALGOL 30 was an implementation, firstly of ALGOL 58, then of ALGOL 60 for the LGP-30 at Dartmouth College, hence the name. ...

Further information: List of Dartmouth College faculty

Eleazar Wheelock, the founder and first president of the College. ...

The Dartmouth Plan

Baker Memorial Library at Dartmouth College
Baker Memorial Library at Dartmouth College

Dartmouth functions on a quarter system, operating year-round on four ten-week academic terms. The Dartmouth Plan (or simply "D-Plan") is an academic scheduling system that permits the customization of each student's academic year. All undergraduates are required to be in residence for the fall, winter, and spring terms of their freshman and senior years, as well as the summer term of their sophomore year.[33] During all other terms, students are permitted to choose between studying on-campus, studying at an off-campus program, or taking a term off for vacation, outside internships, or research projects.[33] The typical course load is three classes per term, and students will generally enroll in classes for twelve total terms over the course of their academic career.[34] Download high resolution version (640x834, 52 KB)Description: Photograph of Baker Building at Dartmouth College Source: Photograph taken by Jared C. Benedict on 17 June 2004. ... Download high resolution version (640x834, 52 KB)Description: Photograph of Baker Building at Dartmouth College Source: Photograph taken by Jared C. Benedict on 17 June 2004. ... Fisher Ames Baker Memorial Library is the main library at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ...


The D-Plan was instituted in the early 1970s at the same time that Dartmouth began accepting female undergraduates. It was initially devised as a plan to increase the enrollment without enlarging campus accommodations, and has been described by some commentators as "a way to put 4,000 students into 3,000 beds."[9] Although new dormitories have been built since, the number of students has also increased and the D-Plan remains in effect.


Admissions

McNutt Hall, the location of the Department of Admissions & Financial Aid
McNutt Hall, the location of the Department of Admissions & Financial Aid

Dartmouth describes itself as "highly selective,"[35] ranked as the fifteenth "toughest to get into" school by The Princeton Review in 2007, and classified as "most selective" by U.S. News & World Report.[36][37] For the class of 2011, 14,176 students applied for approximately 1,100 places, and only 15.3% of applicants were admitted.[8] For the class of 2010, the middle 50% SAT range for matriculating students was 670-770 and 680-780 for verbal and math, respectively, while the ACT range was 29-34. Ninety percent of matriculating students graduated in the top ten percent of their high school class, 30% graduated as valedictorian, and 10.6% as salutatorian.[38] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... In the United States and Canada, the title of valedictorian (an anglicized derivation from the Latin vale dicere, to say farewell) is given to the top graduate of the graduating class (the Australia/New Zealand equivalent being dux, although some Australian universities use the American term) of an educational institution. ... In the United States and Canada, the title of salutatorian is given to the second-highest graduate of the entire graduating class of an educational institution. ...


In 2007, Dartmouth was ranked eleventh among undergraduate programs at national universities by U.S. News & World Report.[39] However, since Dartmouth is ranked in a category for national research universities, some have questioned the fairness of the ranking given the College's emphasis on undergraduate education.[40][41] The 2006 Carnegie Foundation classification[42] listed Dartmouth as the only majority-undergraduate, arts-and-sciences focused institution in the country that also had some graduate coexistence and very high research activity.[43] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is an international centre for research in education based in the United States of America. ...


Board of Trustees

Main article: Board of Trustees of Dartmouth College

Dartmouth is governed by a Board of Trustees which includes the College president and the state governor (both ex officio), eight trustees appointed by the board itself (charter trustees), and eight elected trustees (alumni trustees).[44] The alumni trustees are nominated for board appointment by members of the Association of Alumni of Dartmouth College, a body created in 1854 that represents Dartmouth's 60,000 living alumni. Alumni trustee candidates are nominated by the Alumni Council or by alumni petition, and are elected by a vote of living alumni. In September 2007, it was announced that the Board's size will be expanded from 18 to 26 by adding eight charter trustee seats.[45] Daniel Webster arguing Trustees of Dartmouth College v. ...


Campus

"This is what a college is supposed to look like."
Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1953[46]
Main article: List of Dartmouth College buildings

Dartmouth College is situated in the rural town of Hanover, New Hampshire, located in the Upper Valley along the Connecticut River in New England. Its 269-acre (11 km²) campus is centered around a five-acre (two-hectare) "Green",[47] a former field of pine trees cleared by the College in 1771.[48] Dartmouth is the largest private landowner of the town of Hanover,[49] and its total landholdings and facilities are worth an estimated $434 million.[6] In addition to its Hanover campus, Dartmouth owns 4,500 acres (18.2 km²) of Mount Moosilauke in the White Mountains Region[50] and a 27,000-acre (109 km²) tract of land in northern New Hampshire known as the Second College Grant. Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... A view of the northeast corner of campus from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. ... Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... Upper Valley is the name for the region lying along the upper Connecticut River valley, following the border between New Hampshire and Vermont. ... The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... , View of the Green from the north, from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. ... For other uses, see Pine (disambiguation). ... Mount Moosilauke Panorama: This image shows a 360 degree view from the summit on a clear summer day. ... The White Mountains Region is located in northern New Hampshire. ... Second College Grant is a grant located in Coos County, New Hampshire. ...


Dartmouth's campus buildings vary in age from Dartmouth Hall (originally constructed in 1784[51]) to new dormitories and mathematics facilities completed in 2006.[52][53] Most of Dartmouth's buildings are designed in the Georgian American colonial style,[54][55][56] a theme which has been preserved in recent architectural additions.[57] Colonial house and street. ...


Academic facilities

The Hopkins Center
The Hopkins Center

The College's creative and performing arts facility is the Hopkins Center for the Arts ("the Hop"). Opened in 1962, the Hop houses the College's drama, music, film, and studio arts departments, as well as a woodshop, pottery studio, and jewelry studio which are open for use by students and faculty.[58] The building was designed by the famed architect Wallace Harrison, who would later design the similar-looking front façade of Manhattan's Lincoln Center.[59] Its facilities include two theaters and one 900-seat auditorium.[58] The Hop is also the location of all student mailboxes ("Hinman boxes")[60] and the Courtyard Café dining facility.[61] The Hop is connected to the Hood Museum of Art, arguably North America's oldest museum in continuous operation,[62] and the Loew Auditorium, where films are screened.[63] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Hopkins Center for the Arts at Dartmouth College is located at 2 East Wheelock Street in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Wallace K. Harrison is a mid-twentieth-century architect. ... -1... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... The Hood Museum of Art is North Americas oldest museum in continuous operation. ...

A view of the northeast corner of campus from the tower of Baker Memorial Library
A view of the northeast corner of campus from the tower of Baker Memorial Library

In addition to its nineteen graduate programs in the arts and sciences, Dartmouth is home to three separate graduate schools. The Dartmouth Medical School is located in a complex on the north side of campus[64] and includes laboratories, classrooms, offices, and a biomedical library.[65] The Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, located several miles to the south in Lebanon, New Hampshire, contains a 396-bed teaching hospital for the Medical School.[66] The Thayer School of Engineering and the Tuck School of Business are both located at the end of Tuck Mall, west of the center of campus and near the Connecticut River.[65] The Thayer School presently comprises two buildings;[65] Tuck has six academic and administrative buildings, as well as several common areas.[67] The two graduate schools share a library, the Feldberg Business & Engineering Library.[67] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 2. ... Fisher Ames Baker Memorial Library is the main library at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Dartmouth Medical School is the medical school of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is a teaching hospital and medical network headquartered in Lebanon, New Hampshire. ... Lebanon is a city located in Grafton County, New Hampshire. ... A Teaching hospital is a hospital which provides medical training. ... The Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College is one of the oldest professional schools of engineering in the USA. Founded in 1867 after a donation by General Sylvanus Thayer, the School comprises both the Undergraduate Department of Engineering Sciences at Dartmouth and a graduate professional school in engineering. ... The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ...


Dartmouth's nine libraries are all part of the collective Dartmouth College Library, which comprises 2.48 million volumes in addition to digital resources, videos, maps, sound recordings, and photographs.[8] Its specialized libraries include the Biomedical Libraries, Evans Map Room, Feldberg Business & Engineering Library, Jones Media Center, Kresge Physical Sciences Library, Paddock Music Library, Rauner Special Collections Library, and Sherman Art Library. Baker-Berry Library is the main library at Dartmouth, composed of Baker Memorial Library (opened 1928) and Berry Library (opened 2000[68]). Located on the northern side of the Green, Baker's 200-foot tower[69] is an iconic symbol the College.[70][71] Fisher Ames Baker Memorial Library is the main library at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ...


Athletic facilities

Memorial Field
Memorial Field

Dartmouth's original sports field was the Green, where students played cricket and old division football during the 1800s.[48] Today, Dartmouth maintains more than a dozen athletic facilities and fields[72] and has spent more than $70 million in facility improvements since 2000.[73] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other Memorial Fields see Memorial Field Memorial Field is a football stadium located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. It is the home of Dartmouth Colleges Big Green football and outdoor track teams. ... , View of the Green from the north, from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. ... This article is about the sport. ... Dartmouth-Rules Football From the early 1800s to around 1890, students at Dartmouth College played an indigenous soccer-like game called Old Division Foot Ball. ...


Most of Dartmouth's athletic facilities are located in the southeast corner of campus.[72] The center of athletic life is the Alumni Gymnasium, which includes the Karl Michael Competition Pool and the Spaulding Pool, a fitness center, a weight room, and a 1/13th-mile (123-meter) indoor track.[74] Attached to Alumni Gymnasium is the Berry Sports Center, which contains basketball and volleyball courts (Leede Arena), as well as the Kresge Fitness Center.[75] Behind the Alumni Gymnasium is Memorial Field, a 20,000-seat stadium overlooking Dartmouth's football field and track.[76] The nearby Thompson Arena, designed by Italian engineer Pier Luigi Nervi and constructed in 1975, houses Dartmouth's ice rink.[77] Alumni Gymnasium Dartmouth College Alumni Gymnasium, located in Hanover, New Hampshire in the U.S., is the center of Dartmouth Colleges athletic life and hosts venues for many of Dartmouths 34 varsity sports. ... Leede Arena is a 2,100-seat multi-purpose arena in Hanover, New Hampshire and was built in 1986. ... For other Memorial Fields see Memorial Field Memorial Field is a football stadium located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. It is the home of Dartmouth Colleges Big Green football and outdoor track teams. ... Thompson Arena is a 5,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Pier Luigi Nervi Pier Luigi Nervi (June 21, 1891 - January 9, 1979) was an Italian engineer and architect. ...


Dartmouth's other athletic facilities in Hanover include the Friends of Dartmouth Rowing Boathouse, located along the Connecticut River, the Hanover Country Club, Dartmouth's oldest remaining athletic facility (established in 1899),[78] and the Corey Ford Rugby Clubhouse.[79] The College also maintains the Dartmouth Skiway, a 100-acre (0.4 km²) skiing facility located over two mountains near the Hanover campus in Lyme Center, New Hampshire.[80] // About the Club Hanover Country Club is a college-owned, semi-private golf course open to the public. ... The Dartmouth Skiway is located about twenty minutes north of Dartmouth College in Lyme, New Hampshire. ... Lyme is a town located in Grafton County, New Hampshire. ...


Housing and student life facilities

Lord Hall in the Gold Coast Cluster
Lord Hall in the Gold Coast Cluster

As opposed to ungrouped dormitories or residential colleges as employed at such institutions as Yale University, Dartmouth has nine residential communities located throughout campus.[81] The dormitories vary in design from modern to traditional Georgian styles, and room arrangements range from singles to quads and apartment suites.[81] Since 2006, the College has guaranteed housing for students during their freshman and sophomore years.[82] More than 3,000 students elect to live in housing provided by College.[81] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... A residential college system is a housing and educational aspect of certain universities across the world, most notably Oxford University and Cambridge University in the United Kingdom; Yale University, Rice University, and the California Institute of Technology in the United States. ... Yale redirects here. ...


Campus meals are served by Dartmouth Dining Services, which operates eleven dining establishments around campus.[83] Four of them are located at the center of campus in Thayer Dining Hall.[84]


The Collis Center is the center of student life and programming, serving as what would be generically termed the "student union" or "campus center."[85] It contains a café, study space, common areas, and a number of administrative departments.[86][87] Robinson Hall, next door to both Collis and Thayer, contains the offices of a number of student organizations including the Dartmouth Outing Club and The Dartmouth daily newspaper.[88] The Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC) is the oldest and largest collegiate outing club in the United States. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ...


Student life

In 2006, The Princeton Review ranked Dartmouth third in its "Quality of Life" category, and sixth for having the "Happiest Students."[89] Athletics and participation in the Greek system are the most popular campus activities;[12] in all, Dartmouth offers more than 350 organizations, teams and sports.[90] The school is also home to a variety of longstanding traditions and celebrations. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ...


Student groups

Robinson Hall houses many of the College's student-run organizations, including the Dartmouth Outing Club. The building is a designated stop along the Appalachian Trail.
Robinson Hall houses many of the College's student-run organizations, including the Dartmouth Outing Club. The building is a designated stop along the Appalachian Trail.

Dartmouth's more than 200 student organizations and clubs cover a wide range of interests.[91] As of 2007, the College hosts eight academic groups, 17 cultural groups, two honor societies, 30 "issue-oriented" groups, 25 performing groups, 12 pre-professional groups, 20 publications, and 11 recreational groups.[92] Notable student groups include The Dartmouth (arguably the nation's oldest university newspaper[93]), the controversial The Dartmouth Review,[94] and the nation's largest and oldest collegiate outdoors club, the Dartmouth Outing Club. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixels, file size: 2. ... The Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC) is the oldest and largest collegiate outing club in the United States. ... The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail or simply The A.T., is a marked hiking trail in the eastern United States, extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... The Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC) is the oldest and largest collegiate outing club in the United States. ...


Partially due to Dartmouth's rural, isolated location, the Greek system dating from the 1840s is one of the most popular social outlets for students.[95][12] Dartmouth is home to 27 recognized Greek houses: 15 fraternities, nine sororities, and three coeducational organizations.[96] As of 2007, over 60% of eligible students belong to a Greek organization;[97] since 1987, students have not been permitted to join Greek organizations until their sophomore year.[98] Dartmouth College was among the first institutions of higher education to desegregate fraternity houses in the 1950s, and was involved in the movement to create coeducational Greek houses in the 1970s.[99] In the early 2000s, campus-wide debate focused on a Board of Trustees recommendation that Greek organizations become "substantially coeducational";[100] this attempt to the change the Greek system eventually failed.[101] The College has an additional classification of social/residential organizations known as undergraduate societies.[102] The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ...


Athletics

Main article: Dartmouth Big Green
A Dartmouth varsity hockey game against Princeton at Thompson Arena
A Dartmouth varsity hockey game against Princeton at Thompson Arena

As of 2007, Dartmouth College fields 34 intercollegiate varsity teams: 16 for men, 16 for women, and coeducational sailing and equestrian programs. Dartmouth's athletic teams compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I eight-member Ivy League conference; some teams also participate in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC).[103] As is mandatory for the members of the Ivy League, Dartmouth College does not offer athletic scholarships.[103][104] In addition to the traditional American team sports (football, basketball, baseball, and ice hockey), Dartmouth competes in many other sports including track and field, sailing, tennis, rowing, soccer, skiing, and lacrosse.[8] The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2048 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2048 pixel, file size: 2. ... Thompson Arena is a 5,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ...


The College also offers 26 club and intramural sports such as rugby, water polo, figure skating, volleyball, ultimate frisbee, and cricket, leading to a 75% participation rate in athletics among the undergraduate student body.[105][8] The figure skating team has performed particularly well in recent years, winning the national championship in each of the past four consecutive seasons.[106] In addition to the academic requirements for graduation, Dartmouth requires every undergraduate to complete a 50 yard swim and three terms of physical education.[107]


Technology

Students at a bank of Blitz terminals in Baker-Berry Library.
Students at a bank of Blitz terminals in Baker-Berry Library.

Technology plays an important role in student life, as Dartmouth has been ranked as one of the most technologically-advanced colleges in the world (as in Newsweek's 2004 ranking of "Hottest for the Tech-Savvy"[108] and Yahoo!'s 1998 "Wired Colleges" list[109]). BlitzMail, the campus e-mail network, plays a tremendous role in social life, as students tend to use it for communication in lieu of cellular phones or instant messaging programs.[110][111] Student reliance on BlitzMail (known colloquially as "Blitz," which functions as both noun and verb[111]) is reflected by the presence of about 100 public computer terminals intended specifically for BlitzMail use.[111] Since 1991, Dartmouth students have been required to own a personal computer.[112][113] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 576 pixelsFull resolution (2552 × 1836 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 576 pixelsFull resolution (2552 × 1836 pixel, file size: 2. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... BlitzMail is an e-mail system used at Dartmouth College. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Cellular redirects here. ... // Instant messaging (IM) is a form of real-time communication between two or more people based on typed text. ...


In 2001, Dartmouth became the first Ivy League institution to offer entirely ubiquitous wireless internet access.[108] With over 1,400 access points, the network is available throughout all College buildings as well as in most public outdoor spaces.[114] Other technologies being pioneered include College-wide Video-on-Demand and VoIP rollouts.[114][115]


Native Americans at Dartmouth

The charter of Dartmouth College, granted to Eleazar Wheelock in 1769, proclaims that the institution was created "for the education and instruction of Youth of the Indian Tribes in this Land in reading, writing and all parts of Learning ... as well as in all liberal Arts and Sciences; and also of English Youth and any others."[116] The funds for Dartmouth College were raised primarily by the efforts of a Native American named Samson Occom.[117] The Reverend Eleazar Wheelock (April 22, 1711 – April 24, 1779) was an American Congregational minister, orator, educator, and founder of Dartmouth College. ... Samson Occom was born in 1723 into the Mohegan nation near New London, Connecticut to Joshua Tomacham and Sarah, believed to be a direct descendant of the famous Mohegan chief, Uncas. ...


Despite this initial mission, the College graduated only nineteen Native Americans during its first two hundred years.[117] In 1970, the College established Native American academic and social programs as part of a "new dedication to increasing Native American enrollment."[117] Since then, Dartmouth has graduated over 500 Native American students from over 120 different tribes, more than the other seven Ivy League universities combined.[117]


Traditions

Snow sculpture at the 2004 Dartmouth Winter Carnival
Snow sculpture at the 2004 Dartmouth Winter Carnival

Dartmouth is well-known for its fierce school spirit and many traditions.[118] The College functions on a quarter system, and one weekend each term is set aside as a traditional celebratory event, known on campus as "big weekends"[119][120] or "party weekends".[121] In the fall term, Homecoming (officially called Dartmouth Night) is marked by a bonfire on the Green constructed by the freshman class.[122] Winter term is celebrated by Winter Carnival, a tradition started in 1911 by the Dartmouth Outing Club to promote winter sports.[123] In the spring, Green Key is a weekend mostly devoted to campus parties and celebration.[124] Download high resolution version (2048x3072, 1718 KB)Snow Sculpture at the 2004 Dartmouth Winter Carnival. ... Download high resolution version (2048x3072, 1718 KB)Snow Sculpture at the 2004 Dartmouth Winter Carnival. ... This article concerns the traditions of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ...


The summer term was formerly marked by Tubestock, an unofficial tradition in which the students used wooden rafts and inner tubes to float on the Connecticut River. Begun in 1986, Tubestock met its demise in 2006 when Hanover town ordinances and a lack of coherent student protest conspired to defeat the popular tradition.[125] The class of 2008, during their summer term on campus in 2006, replaced the defunct Tubestock with Fieldstock. This new celebration includes a barbecue, live music, and the revival of the 1970s and 1980s tradition of racing homemade chariots around the Green. Unlike Tubestock, Fieldstock is funded and supported by the College.[126] The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ...


Another longstanding tradition is four-day, student-run Dartmouth Outing Club trips for incoming freshmen, begun in 1935. Each trip concludes at the Moosilauke Ravine Lodge.[127] In 2006, 85% of freshman elected to participate. The Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC) is the oldest and largest collegiate outing club in the United States. ... Moosilauke Ravine Lodge is a cabin complex on the side of Mount Moosilauke. ...


Insignia and other representations

Motto and song

Dartmouth's motto, chosen by Eleazar Wheelock, is "Vox Clamantis in Deserto". The Latin motto is literally translated as "The voice of one crying in the wilderness",[128][129] but is more often rendered as "A voice crying in the wilderness",[130] which attempts to translate the synecdoche of the phrase. The phrase appears five times in the Bible and is a reference to the College's location on what was once the frontier of European settlement.[129][131] Richard Hovey's "Men of Dartmouth" was elected as the best of all the songs of the College in 1896,[122] and today it serves as the school's alma mater, although the lyrics and title have since been changed to be gender-neutral. Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which: a term denoting a part of something is used to refer to the whole thing, or a term denoting a thing (a whole) is used to refer to part of it, or a term denoting a specific class of thing (a species... The Dartmouth College Alma Mater was adopted as the official song of Dartmouth College during the early twentieth century. ...


Seal

Seal of Dartmouth College
Main article: Seal of Dartmouth College

Dartmouth's 1769 royal charter required the creation of a seal for use on official documents and diplomas.[116] The College's founder Eleazar Wheelock designed a seal for his college bearing a striking resemblance to the seal of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, a missionary society founded in London in 1701, in order to maintain the illusion that his college was more for mission work than for higher education.[129] Engraved by a Boston silversmith, the seal was ready by Commencement of 1773. The trustees officially accepted the seal on August 25, 1773, describing it as: Image File history File links Dartseal. ... Image File history File links Dartseal. ... Seal of Dartmouth College The Seal of Dartmouth College refers to the official insignia of Dartmouth College, an Ivy League university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. ... This article is about the authentication means. ... The Reverend Eleazar Wheelock (April 22, 1711 – April 24, 1779) was an American Congregational minister, orator, educator, and founder of Dartmouth College. ... Seal of the Society for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (SPG), formed in 1701, was a missionary organization of the Church of England. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...

An Oval, circumscribed by a Line containing SIGILL: COL: DARTMUTH: NOV: HANT: IN AMERICA 1770. within projecting a Pine Grove on the Right, whence proceed Natives towards an Edifice two Storey on the left; which bears in a Label over the Grove these Words "vox clamantis in deserto" the whole supported by Religion on the Right and Justice on the Left, and bearing in a Triangle irradiate, with the Hebrew Words [El Shaddai], agreeable to the above Impression, be the common Seal under which to pass all Diplomas or Certificates of Degrees, and all other Affairs of Business of and concerning Dartmouth College.[132]

On October 28, 1926, the trustees affirmed the charter's reservation of the seal for official corporate documents alone.[129] The College Publications Committee under Ray Nash commissioned typographer W. A. Dwiggins to create a line drawing version of the seal in 1940 that saw widespread use. Dwiggins' design was modified during 1957 to change the date from "1770" to "1769," to accord with the date of the College Charter. The trustees commissioned a new set of dies with a date of "1769" to replace the old dies, now badly worn after almost two hundred years of use.[129] The 1957 design continues to be used under trademark number 2305032.[133] is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Shield

On October 28, 1926, the Trustees approved a "Dartmouth College Shield" for general use. Artist and engraver W. Parke Johnson designed this emblem on the basis of the shield that is depicted at the center of the original seal. This design does not survive. On June 9, 1944 the trustees approved another coat of arms based on the shield part of the seal, this one by Canadian artist and designer Thoreau MacDonald. That design was used widely and, like Dwiggins' seal, had its date changed from "1770" to "1769" around 1958.[129] That version continues to be used under trademark registration number 3112676 and others.[133] is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Thoreau MacDonald (born April 21, 1901 at Toronto, Ontario; died May 30, 1989 at Toronto) was a Canadian illustrator, designer and painter. ...


College designer John Scotford made a stylized version of the shield during the 1960s, but it did not see the success of MacDonald's design.[134] The shield appears to have been used as the basis of the shield of the Dartmouth Medical School, and it has been reproduced in sizes as small as a few nanometers across.[135] The design has appeared on Rudolph Ruzicka's Bicentennial Medal (Philadelphia Mint, 1969) and elsewhere. Dartmouth Medical School is the medical school of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Rudolph Ruzicka (1883-1978) was a celebrated Czech-American wood engraver, etcher, illustrator, book designer, and typographer. ... The Philadelphia Mint was created from the need to establish a national identity and the needs of commerce. ...


Nickname, symbol, and mascot

Keggy posing on the Dartmouth College Green with Baker Memorial Library in the background.
Keggy posing on the Dartmouth College Green with Baker Memorial Library in the background.

Dartmouth has never had an official mascot.[136] The nickname "The Big Green," originating in the 1860s, is based on students' adoption of a shade of forest green ("Dartmouth Green") as the school's official color in 1866.[137] Since the 1920s, the Dartmouth College athletic teams have been known by their unofficial nickname "the Indians," a moniker that probably originated among sports journalists.[136] This unofficial mascot and team name was used until the early 1970s, when its use came under criticism. In the 1974, the Trustees declared the "use of the [Indian] symbol in any form to be inconsistent with present institutional and academic objectives of the College in advancing Native American education."[138] Some alumni and students, as well as the conservative student newspaper, The Dartmouth Review, have sought to return the Indian symbol to prominence,[139] but no team has worn the symbol on its uniform in decades.[140] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1300 × 1965 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1300 × 1965 pixel, file size: 1. ... Fisher Ames Baker Memorial Library is the main library at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ...


Various student initiatives have been undertaken to adopt a new mascot, but none has become "official." One proposal devised by the College humor magazine the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern was Keggy the Keg, an anthropomorphic beer keg who makes occasional appearances at College sporting events. Despite student enthusiasm for Keggy,[141] the mascot has only received approval from the student government.[142] In November 2006, student government attempted to revive the "Dartmoose" as a potential replacement amid renewed controversy surrounding the former Indian mascot.[143] The Dartmouth Jack OLantern (sometimes spelled Jack-O-Lantern) was founded at Dartmouth College in 1908. ... Keggy the Keg is an unofficial mascot of Dartmouth College, created in the fall of 2003. ... An anthropomorphic character; a cat ascribed human characteristics. ...


Alumni

Dartmouth's alumni are known for their devotion to the College.[11] In 2007, Dartmouth was ranked second only to Princeton University in the U.S. for alumni donation rates by U.S. News & World Report.[144] As of 2007, Dartmouth has graduated 237 classes of students and has over 60,000 living alumni in a variety of fields.[145] Daniel Webster class of 1801, arguing Dartmouth College v. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Salmon P. Chase, class of 1826, was an American politician: Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.
Salmon P. Chase, class of 1826, was an American politician: Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

Over 164 Dartmouth graduates have served in the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives,[146] such as Massachusetts statesman Daniel Webster.[146] Cabinet members of American presidents include Attorney General Amos T. Akerman,[147] Secretary of Defense James V. Forrestal,[148] Secretary of Labor Robert Reich,[149] and current Secretary of the Treasury Henry Paulson.[150] C. Everett Koop was the Surgeon General of the United States under president Ronald Reagan.[151] Two Dartmouth alumni have served as justices on the Supreme Court of the United States: Salmon P. Chase and Levi Woodbury.[152][153] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 531 × 600 pixels Full resolution (3139 × 3544 pixel, file size: 607 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Secretary of the... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 531 × 600 pixels Full resolution (3139 × 3544 pixel, file size: 607 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Secretary of the... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Amos Tappan Akerman (February 23, 1821 - December 21, 1880) served as United States Attorney General under President Ulysses S. Grant from 1870-1872. ... James Vincent Forrestal (February 15, 1892–May 22, 1949) was a Secretary of the Navy and the first United States Secretary of Defense (1947 - 1949). ... Robert Bernard Reich (born June 24, 1946) was the twenty-second United States Secretary of Labor, serving under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1997. ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ... C. Everett Koop Charles Everett Koop, M.D. (born October 14, 1916 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American physician. ... US Public Health Service US Public Health Service Collar Device US Public Health Service Cap Device The Surgeon General of the United States is the head of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the U.S... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Levi Woodbury (December 22, 1789–September 4, 1851) was the first justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to have attended law school. ...


In literature and journalism, Dartmouth has produced five Pulitzer Prize winners: Thomas Burton,[154] Richard Eberhart,[155] Robert Frost,[156] Paul Gigot,[157] and Nigel Jaquiss.[158] Other authors and media personalities include political analyst Dinesh D'Souza,[159] radio talk show host Laura Ingraham,[160] commentator Mort Kondracke,[161] and journalist James Panero.[162] The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Thomas Burton was a Loughborough wool merchant. ... Richard Ghormley Eberhart (April 5, 1904 – June 9, 2005) was a prolific American poet who published more than a dozen books of poetry and approximately twenty works in total. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Paul A. Gigot is a Pulitzer Prize-winning conservative political commentator and the editor of the editorial pages for The Wall Street Journal. ... Nigel Jaquiss (born 1962) is a journalist who won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting, for his work exposing governor of Oregon Neil Goldschmidts alleged sexual abuse of a 14-year-old girl while he was mayor of Portland, Oregon. ... Dinesh DSouza (born April 25, 1961 in Bombay, India) is an author currently serving as the Robert and Karen Rishwain Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. ... Laura Anne Ingraham (born June 19, 1964 in Glastonbury, Connecticut) is an American conservative talk radio host and author. ... Morton M. Kondracke (born April 28, 1939) is an American political commentator and journalist. ... James Panero (born 1975, New York City) is the managing editor of the New Criterion and former Editor-in-Chief of The Dartmouth Review. ...


Dartmouth alumni in academia include Stuart Kauffman and Jeffrey Weeks, both recipients of MacArthur Fellowships (commonly called "genius grants").[163][164] Dartmouth has also graduted three Nobel Prize winners: Owen Chamberlain (Physics, 1959),[165] K. Barry Sharpless (Chemistry, 2001),[166] and George Davis Snell (Physiology or Medicine, 2001).[167] Educators include the founding president of Vassar College Milo Parker Jewett,[168] founder and first president of Bates College Oren B. Cheney,[169] founder and first president of Kenyon College Philander Chase,[170] and former president of Union College Charles Augustus Aiken.[171] Nine of Dartmouth's sixteen presidents were alumni of the College.[172] Stuart Alan Kauffman (born September 28, 1939) is a theoretical biologist and complex systems researcher, who has given much thought to the origin of life on Earth. ... Jeffrey Renwick Weeks is an American mathematician. ... The MacArthur Fellows Program or MacArthur Fellowship (sometimes nicknamed the genius grant) is an award given by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation each year to typically 20 to 40 citizens or residents of the U.S., of any age and working in any field, who show exceptional... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, are awarded for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. ... Owen Chamberlain Owen Chamberlain (July 10, 1920 – February 28, 2006) was a prominent American physicist. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Karl Barry Sharpless (born April 28, 1941) is an American chemist renowned for his work on organometallic chemistry. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... George Davis Snell (December 19, 1903 – June 6, 1996) was a U.S. geneticist and co-recipient of the 1980 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, together with Baruj Benacerraf and Jean Dausset, for discovery of the Major histocompatibility complex genes which encode cell surface molecules important for the immune... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... Milo Parker Jewett (1808 - 1882) was a U.S. educator. ... Oren B. Cheney Oren Burbank Cheney was the founder of Bates College. ... Philander Chase (December 14, 1775 - September 20, 1852) was an Episcopal bishop and founder and first president of Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio in 1824. ... Charles Augustus Aiken was a clergyman and academic. ...

Henry Paulson, class of 1968, was the CEO of Goldman Sachs and is currently the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury.
Henry Paulson, class of 1968, was the CEO of Goldman Sachs and is currently the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury.

Dartmouth alumni serving as CEOs or company presidents include Sandy Alderson (San Diego Padres),[173] John Donahoe (eBay), Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. (IBM),[174] Charles E. Haldeman (Putnam Investments),[175] Donald J. Hall, Sr. (Hallmark Cards),[176] Jeffrey R. Immelt (General Electric),[177] Henry Paulson (Goldman Sachs),[178] and Grant Tinker (NBC).[179] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1500x1800, 507 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Secretary of the Treasury Henry Paulson ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1500x1800, 507 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Secretary of the Treasury Henry Paulson ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ... Richard Lynn Alderson (born November 22, 1947 in Seattle, Washington) is the CEO of the Major League Baseball San Diego Padres. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames The Pads, The Friars, The Fathers, The Dads Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... John Donahoe, Dartmouth College Graduate Class of 1981 is now the President of Ebay marketplace. ... This article is about the online auction center. ... Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... Charles butt-hole Haldeman, Jr. ... Putnam Investments, a subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies (MMC) since 1970 ([1]), is a global money management firm founded in 1937 and headquartered in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. ... Donald J. Hall Sr. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Jeffrey R. Immelt (born February 19, 1956, Cincinnati, OH) is the current chairman of the board and chief executive officer of General Electric. ... “GE” redirects here. ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ... Grant Tinker (born January 11, 1925) is the former chairman and CEO of NBC from 1981 to 1986, co-founder of MTM Enterprises, and television producer. ... This article is about the television network. ...


In entertainment and television, Dartmouth is represented by Rachel Dratch, a cast member of Saturday Night Live,[180] creator of Grey's Anatomy Shonda Rhimes,[181] and the titular character of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, Fred Rogers.[182] Other notable actors include Sarah Wayne Callies (Prison Break),[180] Mindy Kaling (The Office),[183] Emmy Award winner Michael Moriarty,[180], Andrew Shue of Melrose Place,[184] Aisha Tyler of Friends and 24,[180] and Connie Britton of Spin City, The West Wing, and Friday Night Lights.[180] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the American television series. ... This article is about the television series. ... Shonda Rhimes (born January 13, 1970 in Chicago, Illinois) is a screenwriter, director and producer. ... Mister Rogers Neighborhood or Mister Rogers is an American childrens television series that was created and hosted by Fred Rogers. ... The Reverend Frederick McFeely Fred Rogers (March 20, 1928 – February 27, 2003) was an American educator, minister, songwriter and television host. ... Sarah Wayne Callies (born Sarah Anne Callies on June 1, 1977 in La Grange, Illinois) is an American actress who is best known for her role as Dr. Sara Tancredi in the American television series, Prison Break. ... This article is about a television series. ... Mindy Kaling on The Office Mindy Kaling is an American actress and scriptwriter best known for her work on the television show The Office, on which she plays the bubbly Kelly Kapoor. ... This article is about the USA version of The Office. ... Michael Moriarty (born April 5, 1941) is a Tony-winning and Emmy-winning American actor. ... Andrew Shue (born February 20, 1967 in Wilmington, Delaware USA) is an actor, best known for his role on Melrose Place (1992–1998). ... Melrose Place is an American primetime soap opera that ran between 1992 and 1999, created by Darren Star for the FOX network. ... Aisha Tyler (born September 18, 1970 in San Francisco, California) is an American actress, stand-up comedian and occasional writer. ... For friendship, see friendship. ... For other uses, see 24 (disambiguation). ... Connie Britton (born Constance Womack on March 6, 1967, in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American actress who is most well-known for her role as Tami Taylor in Friday Night Lights starring opposite Kyle Chandler and as Nikki Faber on ABCs Spin City from 1996-2000. ... Spin City was an American sitcom television series that ran from 1996 to 2002 on ABC, and was created by Gary David Goldberg & Bill Lawrence, based on a fictional local government running New York City, originally starring Michael J. Fox as Mike Flaherty, the Deputy Mayor of New York. ... This article is about a TV show. ... Friday Night Lights is an award-winning American television serial drama adapted by Peter Berg, Brian Grazer and David Nevins from a book of the same name. ...


A number of Dartmouth alumni have found success in professional sports. In baseball, Dartmouth alumni include All-Star and Gold Glove winner Brad Ausmus[185] and All-Star Mike Remlinger.[186] Professional football players include former Miami Dolphins quarterback Jay Fiedler,[187] linebacker Reggie Wiliams,[188][189] three-time Pro Bowler Nick Lowery,[190] quarterback Jeff Kemp,[191] and Tennessee Titans tight end Casey Cramer.[192] Dartmouth has also produced a number of Olympic competitors. Kristin King and Sarah Parsons were members of the United States' 2006 bronze medal-winning ice hockey team.[193][193][194] Cherie Piper, Gillian Apps, and Katie Weatherston were among Canada's ice hockey gold medalists in 2006.[195][196][197] Dick Durrance and Tim Caldwell competed for the United States in skiing in the 1936 and 1976 Winter Olympics, respectively.[198][199] Arthur Shaw,[200] Earl Thomson,[201] Edwin Myers,[200] Marc Wright,[200] Adam Nelson,[202] Gerald Ashworth,[200] and Vilhjálmur Einarsson[200] have all won medals in track and field events. In American baseball, the Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to simply as the Gold Glove, is the award annually given to the Major League player judged to be the most superior individual fielding performance at each position (in each league), as voted by the managers and coaches in each... Bradley David Ausmus (born April 14, 1969, in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American 3-time Gold Glove Award winning catcher in Major League Baseball with the Houston Astros. ... Michael John Remlinger (born March 23, 1966 in Middletown, New York) is a relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who is currently without a team after being released by th the Boston Red Sox. ... Jay Brian Fiedler (born December 29, 1971) is an American football quarterback, and is currently a free agent. ... Reginald Williams (born September 19, 1954 in Flint, Michigan) is a former professional American football player. ... Nick Lowery (born May 27, 1956 in Munich, Germany) was an american football placekicker for the New England Patriots (1978), Kansas City Chiefs (1980-1993), and New York Jets (1994-1996). ... Jeffrey Allan Kemp (born July 11, 1959 in Santa Ana, California), was a former American professional football player. ... Casey Cramer (born January 5, 1982) is an American football player for the Tennessee Titans. ... Kristin King (born July 21, 1979 in Piqua, Ohio) is an American ice hockey player. ... Sarah Parsons (born July 27, 1987 in Dover, Massachusetts) is an American ice hockey player. ... Cherie Piper (born on June 29, 1981 in Toronto) is a Canadian ice hockey player residing in Markham, Ontario. ... Gillian Mary Apps (born November 2, 1983 in Toronto, Ontario) is a womens ice hockey player. ... Katie Weatherston (born April 6, 1983 in Thunder Bay, Ontario) is a womens ice hockey player. ... Richard Dick Durrance (October 14, 1914 - June 13, 2004) was an 17-time national championship skier and one of the first American skiiers to compete successfully with European skiiers. ... Tim Caldwell (born 1954) was an American cross country skier who competed from 1972 to 1984. ... Arthur Briggs Shaw (28. ... Earl John Thomson (February 15, 1895 - April 19, 1971) was Canadian athlete, a specialist in the high hurdles. ... Edwin Earl Myers (December 18, 1896 - August 1978) was an American athlete who competed in the mens pole vault. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Adam Nelson is an elite American shotputter. ... Gerald Howard Gerry Ashworth (born May 1, 1942) is a former American athlete, winner of the gold medal in the 4x100 m relay at the 1964 Summer Olympics. ... Vilhjálmur Einarsson (born on June 4, 1934) is an Icelandic former athlete, and triple-jump silver medalist at the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. ...


In popular culture

Dartmouth College has appeared in or been referenced by a number of popular media. The 1978 comedy film National Lampoon's Animal House was cowritten by Chris Miller '63, and is based loosely on a series of fictional stories he wrote about his fraternity days at Dartmouth. In a CNN interview, John Landis said the movie was "based on Chris Miller's real fraternity at Dartmouth," Alpha Delta Phi.[203] Dartmouth's Winter Carnival tradition was the subject of the 1939 film Winter Carnival starring Ann Sheridan.[123] National Lampoons Animal House is a 1978 comedy film in which a misfit group of fraternity boys take on the system at their college. ... John David Landis (born August 3, 1950) is an American movie actor, director, writer, and producer. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ...


In addition, Dartmouth has served as the alma mater for a number of fictional characters, including Stephen Colbert's fictional persona,[204] Michael Corleone of The Godfather,[205] Meredith Grey of Grey's Anatomy,[206] and Howie Archibald of Gossip Girl.[207] Two leading characters of the 2007 film Superbad were also slated to attend Dartmouth.[208] This article is about Stephen Colbert, the actor. ... This article is about Stephen Colbert, the character. ... Michael Corleone (December 25, 1920 – December 29, 1997) is a fictional character in Mario Puzos novels, The Godfather and The Sicilian. ... This article is about the 1972 film. ... Information Gender Female Age late 20s-early 30s Occupation Surgical Resident at Seattle Grace Hospital Title M.D. Family Thatcher Grey (father) Dr. Ellis Grey (mother; deceased) Dr. Lexie Grey (half-sister) Molly Grey Thompson (half-sister) Relationships Dr. Derek Shepherd (boyfriend) Dr. Finn Dandridge (ex-boyfriend) Children None Relatives... This article is about the television series. ... Gossip Girl is an American television teen drama based on the popular novel series of the same name written by Cecily von Ziegesar. ... Superbad is a 2007 comedy written by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Common Data Set '06-'07 (PDF). Office of Institutional Research. Retrieved on 2007-09-16.
  2. ^ Forbes, Allison. "Mascot debate returns to agenda", The Dartmouth, 2003-04-15. Retrieved on 2007-01-29. “The Assembly's Student Life Committee initiated discussions about the College's unofficial mascot, the Indian...” 
  3. ^ Butler, Brent; Frances Cha. "'Keggy' makes an awaited return", The Dartmouth, 2004-02-16. Retrieved on 2007-01-29. “...Keggy debuted last fall as the Big Green's unofficial mascot...” 
  4. ^ Spradling, Jessica. "Moose tops mascot survey", The Dartmouth, 2003-05-23. Retrieved on 2007-01-29. “...the moose has been an unofficial symbol of the College for a long time.” 
  5. ^ Impressive returns reported for Dartmouth endowment in fiscal 2006–07. Dartmouth News. Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2007-09-04.
  6. ^ a b Trustees of Dartmouth College. 2005 Form 990 (PDF). GuideStar.org. Retrieved on 2007-09-23.
  7. ^ Trustees of Dartmouth College. Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2007-02-12.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j About Dartmouth: Facts. Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2007-01-24.
  9. ^ a b c d e f Sayigh, Aziz G; Boris V. Vabson. "The Wheelock Succession", The Dartmouth Review, 2006-10-01. Retrieved on 2007-02-12. 
  10. ^ Booz Allen Hamilton Lists the World's Most Enduring Institutions. Booz Allen Hamilton (2004-12-16). Retrieved on 2007-01-24.
  11. ^ a b Jaschik, Scott. "Dartmouth Approves Controversial Board Changes", Inside Higher Education, 2007-09-10. Retrieved on 2007-09-10. 
  12. ^ a b c Webster, Katharine. "Conservatives Gain Ground at Dartmouth: Dartmouth Alumni Elect Conservatives to Trustees Amid Struggle to Change College's Direction", Associated Press, ABC News, 2007-05-25. Retrieved on 2007-09-22. 
  13. ^ Kennedy, Randy. "A Frat Party Is:; a) Milk and Cookies; b) Beer Pong", The New York Times, 1999-11-07. Retrieved on 2007-09-23. “...at Dartmouth College a place where traditions die hard...” 
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  15. ^ Our Mission. Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2006-10-15.
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  33. ^ a b D-Plan. Admissions and Financial Aid. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Library of Congress reading room The Library of Congress Classification (LCC) is a system of library classification developed by the Library of Congress. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth Jack OLantern (sometimes spelled Jack-O-Lantern) was founded at Dartmouth College in 1908. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NNDB, ostensibly standing for Notable Names Database, produced by Soylent Communications, is an online database of biographical details of notable people. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NNDB, ostensibly standing for Notable Names Database, produced by Soylent Communications, is an online database of biographical details of notable people. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Scripps College is a liberal arts womens college in Claremont, California. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855 by abolitionists, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Union College in New York. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Jewell College is a private, four-year liberal arts college of 1,274 undergraduate students located in Liberty, Missouri, U.S. It was founded in 1849 by members of the Missouri Baptist Convention and other civic leaders which included Robert James, a Baptist minister and father of the infamous... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Slate is an online news and culture magazine created in 1996 by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley and owned by Microsoft (as part of MSN). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Drake, Chuck (2004). Dartmouth Outing Guide, Fifth edition, Dartmouth Outing Club. 
  • Glabe, Scott L. (2005). Dartmouth College: Off the Record. College Prowler. ISBN 1-59658-038-0. 
  • Hughes, Molly K.; Susan Berry (2000). Forever Green: The Dartmouth College Campus — An arboretum of Northern Trees. Enfield Books. ISBN 1-893598-01-2. 
  • Richardson, Leon B. (1932). History of Dartmouth College. Dartmouth College Publications. OCLC 12157587. 

The Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC) is the oldest and largest collegiate outing club in the United States. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Dartmouth College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3925 words)
Dartmouth was made the ninth and final colonial college when it was given a royal charter by King George III in 1769, mostly as a result of the efforts of Eleazar Wheelock, a Puritan minister, and his patron, Royal Governor John Wentworth.
Dartmouth College Alumni Gymnasium, the center of athletic life at Dartmouth, is home of the Dartmouth College Aquatic facilities, basketball courts, squash and racketball courts, indoor track, fencing lanes as well as a rowing training center.
Dartmouth College was among the first institutions of higher education to desegregate fraternity houses in the 1950s, and was involved in the movement to create coeducational Greek houses in the 1970s.
Today in History: December 13 (468 words)
Chief Justice John Marshall (1755-1835) supported the inviolability of the charter as a contract and ruled that the college, under the charter, was a private and not a public entity.
Dartmouth and Wentworth Halls, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, circa 1900.
The college was named in honor of William Legge, the Earl of Dartmouth, a friend of Wentworth and an important benefactor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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