FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Dao (sword)
This article contains Chinese text.
Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Chinese characters.
Chinese Dao Knife or Sabre
Chinese Dao Knife or Sabre

Dao (Chinese: ; pinyin: dāo; Wade-Giles: tao1, "knife") is a category of single-edge Chinese swords primarily used for slashing and chopping (sabres), often called a broadsword in English translation because some varieties have wide blades. In China, the dao is known as one of the four major weapons, along with the Gun (staff), Qiang (spear), and the Jian (sword), and referred to as "The General of All Weapons". Dao is actually a generic word used to denote any member of a family of single-edged, broad-bladed cutting or slicing tools, but in common, everyday usage means knife. The weapon, also known as dan dao 單刀 (single knife) when just one is used, is thereby thought to be an adaptation of the kitchen knives common to Chinese cuisine. Dao also appears in the names of such polearms as the pudao and guan dao, indicating the knifelike nature of their blades. Image File history File links Zhongwen. ... The UTF-8-encoded Japanese Wikipedia article for mojibake, as displayed in ISO-8859-1 encoding. ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Hán tá»±: A Chinese character or Han character (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a logogram used in writing Chinese, Japanese, rarely Korean, and formerly Vietnamese. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Picture of Chinese Dao Saber. ... Picture of Chinese Dao Saber. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... French naval officers sabre of the 19th Century From left to right: two bayonets, a short curved infantry or artillery briquet, a straight infantry officers sabre, and a carbine. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Gun event at the 10th All China Games The Chinese word Gun (Chinese: ; pinyin: gùn) refers to a long Chinese staff weapon used in Chinese martial arts. ... 10th All China Games 10th All China Games Qiang (qÄ«ang,槍) is the Chinese term for spear. ... For the novel of the same name, see Eric Van Lustbader. ... 19th century French Navy officer sabre A backsword is a sword having a blade with only one edge. ... This article is about the tool. ... Chinese cuisine (Chinese: 中國菜) originated from different regions of China and has become widespread in many other parts of the world — from East Asia to North America, Australasia and Western Europe. ... A reenactor troupe armed with a variety of polearm known as a halberd. ... The Chinese pudao (撲刀) was originally an infantry weapon which is now used in martial arts. ... A guan dao or kwan dao is a type of Chinese pole weapon that is currently used in some forms of Chinese martial arts (wushu). ...

Contents

General characteristics

While dao have varied greatly over the centuries, most single-handed dao of the Ming period and later, and the modern swords that are based (sometimes loosely) on them share a number of characteristics. Dao blades are moderately curved and single-edged, though often with few inches of the back edge sharpened as well; the moderate curve allows them to be reasonably effective in the thrust. Hilts are canted, curving in the opposite direction as the blade which improves handling in some forms of cuts and thrusts. Cord is usually wrapped over the wood of the handle. Hilts may also be pierced like those of jian (straight-bladed Chinese sword) for the addition of lanyards, though modern swords for performances will often have tassels or scarves instead. Guards are typically disc-shaped often with a cupped shape to prevent rainwater from getting into the sheath, and to prevent blood from dripping down to the handle, making it more difficult to grip. Sometimes guards are thinner pieces of metal with an s-curve, the lower limb of the curve protecting the user's knuckles; very rarely they may have guards like those of the jian. For other uses, see Ming. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... For the novel of the same name, see Eric Van Lustbader. ... A lanyard (sword knot) fixed to an infantry sword handle A lanyard, also spelled laniard, is a rope or cord often worn around the neck or wrist to carry something. ...

Dao as seen in contemporary wushu.
Dao as seen in contemporary wushu.

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 686 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 686 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Gun (staff) event at the 10th All China Games Wushu (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; literally martial arts), also known as modern wushu or contemporary wushu, is both an exhibition and a full-contact sport derived from traditional Chinese martial arts. ...

Early history

The earliest dao date from the Shang Dynasty in China's Bronze Age, and are known as zhibei dao (直背刀) - straight backed knives. As the name implies, these were straight-bladed or slightly curved weapons with a single edge. Originally bronze, these would be made of iron or steel by the time of the late Warring States. Originally less common as a military weapon than the jian - the straight, double-edged blade of China - the dao became popular with cavalry during the Han dynasty due to its sturdiness and superiority as a chopping weapon. Soon after dao began to be issued to infantry, beginning the replacement of the jian as a standard-issue weapon. Remnants of advanced, stratified societies dating back to the Shang period have been found in the Yellow River Valley. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Alternative meaning: Warring States Period (Japan) The Warring States Period (traditional Chinese: 戰國時代, simplified Chinese: 战国时代 pinyin Zhànguó Shídài) takes place from sometime in the 5th century BC to the unification of China by Qin in 221 BC. It is nominally considered to be the second part of the Eastern... For the novel of the same name, see Eric Van Lustbader. ... Battlespace Weapons Tactics Strategy Organization Logistics Lists War Portal         Cavalry (from French cavalerie) were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat. ... Han Dynasty in 87 BC Capital Changan (206 BC–9 AD) Luoyang (25 AD–220 AD) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Chinese folk religion Government Monarchy History  - Establishment 206 BC  - Battle of Gaixia; Han rule of China begins 202 BC  - Interruption of Han rule 9 - 24  - Abdication...


During the Tang Dynasty, dao were exported to both Korea and Japan, influencing the swordsmithing of both nations. The blades of Tang era dao are reminiscent of the Japanese chokuto or the popular image of the quasi-mythical ninjato. For the band, see Tang Dynasty (band). ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... A chokutō The chokutō (直刀), often confused with the ninjatō, is a type of Japanese sword that dates back to pre-Heian times. ... ninjatō (忍者刀) is a fictional Japanese sword used by the ninja that was similar to the katana, but tended to be straighter, and was generally not made of folded metal. ...


During the Song Dynasty, one form of infantry dao was the shoudao, a chopping weapon with a clip point. While some illustrations show them as straight, the 11th century Song military encyclopedia Wujing Zongyao depicts them with curved blades - possibly an influence from the steppe tribes of Central Asia, who would conquer parts of China during the Song period. Also dating from the Song are the falchion-like dadao and the long, two-handed zhanmadao. For other uses, see Liu Song Dynasty. ... This article is about the ecological zone type. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a region of Asia from the Caspian Sea in the west to central China in the east, and from southern Russia in the north to... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Dadao (大刀) (big knife), one of the varieties of dao or Chinese saber, is also known as the Chinese great sword. ... The zhanmadao (斬馬刀) (zhǎn mǎ dāo) (lit. ...


Yuan, Ming and Qing

One of the Qianlong Emperor's Imperial Guards Brigade (1760) carrying his archery equipment and wearing a sheathed dao. Notice the lanyard through the handle.
One of the Qianlong Emperor's Imperial Guards Brigade (1760) carrying his archery equipment and wearing a sheathed dao. Notice the lanyard through the handle.

The Mongols invaded in the early 13th century in the process of conquering the largest land empire in history. The Yuan dynasty of the Mongols influenced China and other nations considerably, particularly in the tools and tactics of war. A favored weapon of the Mongol cavalry was the sabre: this simple, one handed, curved blade had been used by the Turkic and Tungusic tribes of Central Asia since the 8th century at least. Its effectiveness for mounted warfare and popularity among soldiers across the entirety of the Mongol empire had lasting effects. The Persian shamshir, the Indian talwar, the Afghani pulwar, the Turkish kilij, the Arabian saif, the Mamluk "scimitar", and the European sabre (adopted via Hungary's Magyar horsemen) and cutlass are perhaps descended from the Turko-Mongol curved blade. One of the Qianlong Emperors numerous Manchu bodyguards. ... One of the Qianlong Emperors numerous Manchu bodyguards. ... The Qianlong Emperor (born Hongli, September 25, 1711 – February 7, 1799) was the fifth emperor of the Manchu Qing Dynasty, and the fourth Qing emperor to rule over China. ... The Imperial Guards Brigade guarded the person of the Emperor of China and the Forbidden City during the Qing dynasty. ... Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... A lanyard (sword knot) fixed to an infantry sword handle A lanyard, also spelled laniard, is a rope or cord often worn around the neck or wrist to carry something. ... For other uses, see Mongols (disambiguation). ... Capital Dadu Language(s) Mongolian Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1260-1294 Kublai Khan  - 1333-1370 (Cont. ... This article is about the various peoples speaking one of the Turkic languages. ... Tungus can mean several things: Tungus is an obsolete term for the Evenks of Russia. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a region of Asia from the Caspian Sea in the west to central China in the east, and from southern Russia in the north to... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Talwar with sheath A talwar, talwaar, or tulwar (Devanagari: तलवार) is a type of Islamic sword prevalent in medieval India dating back to at least the 13th century. ... A pulwar (also spelled pulouar) is a single handed curved sword from Afghanistan. ... The kilij (also spelled kilic) is a sword used by the Ottoman Empire starting around the late 15th century. ... The Arabic word saif (سيف) and variations Saif, Sayf, Seif generally means {{coward)). // As such it does not in and of itself denote anything more specific than saber or back-sword in its parent land. ... Mamluk Flag Eastern Mediterranean 1450 Capital Cairo Language(s) Arabic, Kipchak Turkic[1] Religion Islam Government Monarchy History  - As-Salih Ayyubs death 1250  - Battle of Ridanieh 1517 Today part of Egypt Saudi Arabia Syria Palestine Israel Lebanon Jordan Turkey Libya A Mamluk cavalryman, drawn in 1810 A mamluk (Arabic... Talwar, 17th Century, from India. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... French naval officers sabre of the 19th Century From left to right: two bayonets, a short curved infantry or artillery briquet, a straight infantry officers sabre, and a carbine. ... This article is about the Hungarian ethnic group. ... French naval cutlass of the 19th Century A cutlass is a short, thick saber or slashing sword, with a straight or slightly curved blade sharpened on the cutting edge, and a hilt often featuring a solid cupped or basket-shaped guard. ... The Altaic peoples are the peoples who speak Altaic languages. ...


In China, Mongol influence lasted long after the collapse of the Yuan dynasty at the hands of the Ming, continuing through both the Ming and the Qing dynasties (the latter itself founded by a steppe people, the Manchu), furthering the popularity of the dao and spawning a variety of new blades. Blades with greater curvature became popular, and these new styles are collectively referred to as pei dao. During the mid-Ming these new sabers would completely replace the jian as a military-issue weapon. The four main types of pei dao are: For other uses, see Ming. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... The Manchu people (Manchu: Manju; simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Mǎnzú, Mongolian: Манж) are a Tungusic people who originated in Manchuria (todays Northeastern China). ...

  • yanmao dao, or "goose-quill sabre." This weapon, similar to the earlier zhibei dao, is largely straight, with a curve appearing at the center of percussion near the blade's tip. This allows for thrusting attacks and overall handling similar to that of the jian, while still preserving much of the dao's strengths in cutting and slashing.
  • liuye dao, the "willow leaf saber." The most common form of Chinese sabre, this weapon features a moderate curve along the length of the blade. This weapon became the standard sidearm for both cavalry and infantry, and is the sort of sabre originally used by many schools of Chinese martial arts.
  • pian dao, "slashing sabre." A deeply curved dao meant for slashing and draw-cutting, this weapon bears a strong resemblance to the shamshir and scimitar. A fairly uncommon weapon, it was generally used by skirmishers in conjunction with a shield.
  • niuweidao, the "oxtail sabre." A heavy bladed weapon with a characteristic flaring tip, this is the archetypal "Chinese broadsword" of kung fu movies today. It is first recorded in the early 1800s (the late Qing dynasty) and only as a civilian weapon; there is no record of it being issued to troops, and it does not appear in any listing of official weaponry. Its appearance in movies and modern literature is thus often anachronistic, and it is also sometimes labelled as a willow-leaf sabre.

Besides these four types of dao, the duan dao or "short dao" was also used, this being a compact weapon generally in the shape of a liuye dao. The dadao saw continued use, and during the Ming dynasty the large two-handed changdao and zhanmadao were used both against the cavalry of the northern steppes and the pirates of the southeast coast; these latter weapons would continue to see limited use during the Qing period. Also during the Qing there appear weapons such as the nandao, regional variants in name or shape of some of the above dao, and more obscure variants such as the "nine ringed broadsword," which were likely invented for street demonstrations and theatrical performances rather than for use as weapons. The center of percussion is the point on a bat, racquet, sword or other long thin object where a perpendicular impact will produce translational and rotational forces which perfectly cancel each other out at some given pivot point. ... -1... This article is about the defensive device. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... Look up Anachronism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Dadao (大刀) (big knife), one of the varieties of dao or Chinese saber, is also known as the Chinese great sword. ... Changdao (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ), literally meaning long knife, was a type of anti-cavalry sword used in China during the Ming Dynasty. ... The zhanmadao (斬馬刀) (zhÇŽn mÇŽ dāo) (lit. ... Pirates may refer to: A group of people committing any of these activities: Piracy at sea or on a river/lake. ... The nandao (南刀, Southern Broadsword in Chinese) is a southern variation of the Chinese sword, or dao, nowadays used mostly in contemporary wushu exercises and forms. ...


The Chinese spear and dao (liuyedao and yanmaodao) were commonly issued to infantry due to the expense of and relatively greater amount of training required for the effective use of Chinese straight sword, or jian. Dao can often be seen depicted in period artwork worn by officers and infantry. 10th All China Games 10th All China Games Qiang (qīang,槍) is the Chinese term for spear. ... For the novel of the same name, see Eric Van Lustbader. ...


During the Yuan dynasty and after, some aesthetic features of Persian, Indian, and Turkish swords would appear on dao. These could include intricate carvings on the blade and "rolling pearls": small metal balls that would roll along fuller-like grooves in the blade. For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Prussian bayonet, with a prominent fuller A Fuller is a rounded or beveled groove on the flat side of a blade, such as a sword, knife, or bayonet (shown). ...


Recent history

Chinese soldiers armed with dao
Chinese soldiers armed with dao

Some of the blades from the Qing Dynasty lived on and even had descendants see military action in the 20th century. The dadao was used by some Chinese militia units against Japanese invaders in the Second Sino-Japanese War, as was the miao dao, a descendant of the changdao. These were used during planned ambushes on Japanese troops because the Chinese military and patriotic resistance groups often had more willing soldiers than firearms. Image File history File linksMetadata Greatwall_1933_swords. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Greatwall_1933_swords. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... The Dadao (大刀) (big knife), one of the varieties of dao or Chinese saber, is also known as the Chinese great sword. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ... Belligerents China United States1 Empire of Japan Collaborationist Chinese Army2 Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Chen Cheng, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Li Zongren, Xue Yue, Bai Chongxi, Peng Dehuai, Joseph Stilwell, Claire Chennault, Albert Wedemeyer Hirohito, Fumimaro Konoe, Hideki Tojo, Kotohito Kanin, Matsui Iwane, Hajime Sugiyama, Shunroku Hata, Toshizo Nishio... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Changdao (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ), literally meaning long knife, was a type of anti-cavalry sword used in China during the Ming Dynasty. ...


Most Chinese martial arts schools still train extensively with the dao, seeing it as a powerful conditioning tool and a versatile weapon, with self defense techniques transferable to similarly sized objects more commonly found in the modern world, such as canes, baseball or cricket bats, for example. There are also schools that teach double broadsword shuang dao 雙刀, forms and fencing, one Dao for each hand.-1... A cane is a long stick, generally of bamboo, malacca (rattan), or some similar plant, used as a walking stick; as a support for growing plants; for marking out a piece of ground; or as a material for consturcting furniture or buildings. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ...


One measure of the proper length of the sword should be from the hilt in your hand and the tip of the blade at the brow and in some schools, the height of shoulder. Alternatively, the length of the sword should be from the middle of the throat along the length of the outstretched arm. There are also significantly larger versions of dao used for training in some Baguazhang and Taijiquan schools. BāguàzhÇŽng is one of the major internal (a. ... Tai Chi Chuan or Taijiquan (from Chinese 太极拳 Tàijíquán, literally supreme ultimate fist), commonly known as Tai Chi or Taiji, is a nei chia (internal) Chinese martial art which is known for the claims of health and longevity benefits made by its practitioners and in some recent...


References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Dao (sword)
  • Graff, David A. (2002). Medieval Chinese Warfare, 300-900. London: Routledge. ISBN 0-415-23955-9. 
  • Tom, Philip with Scott M. Rodell (February 2005). "An Introduction to Chinese Single-Edged Hilt Weapons (Dao) and Their Use in the Ming and Qing Dynasties". Kung Fu Tai Chi, p. 85
  • Werner, E. T. C. (1989). Chinese Weapons. Singapore: Graham Brash. ISBN 9971-4-9116-8. 


Scott M. Rodell Scott M. Rodell is a martial artist, author, and teacher of Yang style taijiquan. ...

Contemporary Wushu
v  d  e
Main Taolu Events
Sparring
ChangquanDaoQiangJianGun Sanda
NanquanNandaoNangun
Related
TaijiquanTaijijian International Wushu Federation
World Wushu Championships
Gun (staff) event at the 10th All China Games Wushu (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; literally martial arts), also known as modern wushu or contemporary wushu, is both an exhibition and a full-contact sport derived from traditional Chinese martial arts. ... Chángquán (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; literally Long Fist) is a general term for external (as opposed to internal) Northern Wushu. ... 10th All China Games 10th All China Games Qiang (qÄ«ang,槍) is the Chinese term for spear. ... For the novel of the same name, see Eric Van Lustbader. ... Gun event at the 10th All China Games The Chinese word Gun (Chinese: ; pinyin: gùn) refers to a long Chinese staff weapon used in Chinese martial arts. ... The leitai of the 2004 China National Sanda Championships Sanshou (Chinese: 散手, lit. ... Nánquán (Chinese: 南拳; literally southern fist) refers to those Chinese martial arts that originate south of the Yangtze River, including Hung Kuen, Choy Lee Fut, and Wing Chun. ... The nandao (南刀, Southern Broadsword in Chinese) is a southern variation of the Chinese sword, or dao, nowadays used mostly in contemporary wushu exercises and forms. ... Nangun event at the 10th All China Games The Nangun (Chinese: ; pinyin: nángùn; literally southern staff) is a southern variation of the northern staff, which is nowadays used mostly in contemporary wushu exercises and forms. ... Tai chi chuan (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: tai4 chi2 chüan2) is an internal Chinese martial art. ... Taijijian event at the 10th All China Games Taijijian (Chinese: ; pinyin: tàijíjiàn; literally Taiji Sword) is a sword used in the Taijiquan technique of wushu (sport) curriculum. ... The International Wushu Federation (or IWUF) is an organization established in 1990 to promote competitive wushu (Chinese martial arts) internationally outside China, competitive wushu in this sense meaning generally the internationally recognized contemporary wushu forms, used in the Wushu World Championships for example. ... The World Wushu Championships (WWC) (Chinese: ) are held every two years and are organised by the International Wushu Federation (IWUF). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Japanese Swords Manufacturer,Japanese Katana Swords,Katana Japanese Swords,Katana Swords Manufacturer,Japanese Swords ... (1053 words)
Swords were a major weapon of war during the ancient and medieval history.
Koto refers to the "old sword" period, Shinto refers to the "new sword" era, Shinshinto is the "new, new sword" era, Gendai is the "modern sword" era, and Shinsaku represents the newly made swords.
The Rapier was a favored Sword in the 16th and the 17th century used mostly as a dueling weapon.
Sword (908 words)
Swords were still used although increasingly limited to officers and ceremonial uniforms.
A tool exists that resembles the sword and it is called a machete (or, in Southern Africa, a panga) and is used to cut through thick vegetation.
Indeed, the difference between a machete and a sword is mainly that of utilization, and several types of swords in history resemble the machete in construction, such as for example the scramasax, the dusack, and the falchion.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m