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Encyclopedia > Danville, Virginia
Danville, Virginia

Seal
Nickname: River City, City of Churches
Motto: A World Class Organization
Danville, Virginia (Virginia)
Danville, Virginia
Location within the state of Virginia
Coordinates: 36°35′14″N 79°24′16″W / 36.58722, -79.40444
Country United States
State Virginia
Government
 - Mayor Sherman Saunders
Area
 - Total 43.9 sq mi (113.8 km²)
 - Land 43.1 sq mi (111.5 km²)
 - Water 0.9 sq mi (2.3 km²)
Elevation 531 ft (162 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 48,411
 - Density 1,124.2/sq mi (434.1/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 434
FIPS code 51-21344[1]
GNIS feature ID 1492837[2]
Website: http://www.danville-va.gov

Danville is an independent city in Virginia, bounded by Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Caswell County, North Carolina. It was the last capital of the Confederate States of America. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Danville with Pittsylvania county for statistical purposes under the Danville, Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. Danville is also called the city of churches because it has more churches per square mile than any other city in the state of Virginia. The population was 48,411 at the 2000 census. It hosts the Danville Braves baseball club of the Appalachian League. Dan River Industries, formerly one of the world's largest textile mills, recently closed leaving a large number of Danvillians without jobs. Image File history File links Danville_va_seal. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... 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Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... The 434 area code was created on June 1, 2001 as a split from the 804 area code. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Pittsylvania County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Caswell County Courthouse - 2005 Caswell County redirects here. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides a comprehensive statistical picture of the economy of the United States. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ... City of Churches is a name given to various cities with many churches. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Atlanta Braves National League AAA Richmond Braves AA Mississippi Braves A Myrtle Beach Pelicans Rome Braves R Danville Braves Orlando Braves The Danville Braves are a minor league baseball team in Danville, Virginia, USA. They are a Class R team in the Appalachian League, and have been a farm team... The Appalachian League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the Virginia and Tennessee region. ...


Today Danville's population is estimated to be 45,700, according to the Weldon Cooper Center at the University of Virginia. The population decrease since the 2000 Census is attributed mostly to migration. Look up migration in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Geography

Location of Danville, Virginia
Location of Danville, Virginia

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 43.9 square miles (113.8 km²), of which, 43.1 square miles (111.5 km²) of it is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km²) of it (2.00%) is water. Adapted from Wikipedias VA county maps by Seth Ilys. ... Adapted from Wikipedias VA county maps by Seth Ilys. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...


Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 48,411 people, 17,607 households, and 12,941 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,124.2 people per square mile (434.1/km²). There were 23,108 housing units at an average density of 536.6/sq mi (207.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 53.86% White, 44.11% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.60% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.45% from other races, and 0.78% from two or more races. 1.26% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 20,607 households out of which 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.2% were married couples living together, 19.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.2% were non-families. 33.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.89. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 23.3% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 23.6% from 45 to 64, and 19.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 83.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.4 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $26,900, and the median income for a family was $36,024. Males had a median income of $29,620 versus $21,384 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,151. About 15.9% of families and 20.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 33.9% of those under age 18 and 12.3% of those age 65 or over. Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


The crime index for the city in 2006 was 4914.7. The violent crime index for the Danville MSA was 247.5, ranking 259th of 311. Danville's unemployment rate of 6.6% is highest in the state.


Transportation

Railroad

Amtrak's Crescent train connects Danville with the cities of New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Charlotte, Atlanta, Birmingham and New Orleans. The Amtrak station is situated at 677 Craghead Street. Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... The Crescent is a passenger train operated by Amtrak in the eastern part of the United States. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Charlotte redirects here. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State Counties Jefferson, Shelby Incorporated December 19, 1871 Government  - Type Mayor - Council  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (Current) Larry Langford (Mayor-Elect) Area  - City 151. ... NOLA redirects here. ... The Danville, Virginia Amtrak station was built in 1899 from plans drawn by the noted Southern Railway (US) architect, Frank Milburn. ...


Highway

U.S. Route 58 Business (Riverside Dr/River St) parallels the north bank of the Dan River traveling east/west through Danville's main commercial district while the US 58 Bypass route bypasses the city's center to the south via the Danville Expressway. U.S. Route 29 splits into a business route and a bypass at the North Carolina/Virginia border. The business route enters the heart of Danville via West Main Street and Memorial Drive and exits via Central Boulevard and Piney Forest Road; US 29 Business travels relatively north/south. The bypass (future Interstate 785) takes the eastern segment of the Danville Expressway and rejoins the business route north of the city near Chatham, Virginia. The Dan River flows in both North Carolina and Virginia, USA. It arises in the state of Virginia in Patrick County and crosses the state border into Stokes County, North Carolina. ... U.S. Highway 58 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 508 miles (818 km) from Virginia Beach, Virginia to northeast Tennessee. ... Bypass may refer to: Bypass (computing), in computing, circumventing security features in hacking, or taking a different approach to an issue in troubleshooting Bypass (effect), in effects units, a switch that allows sound processing to be turned off to get a dry, unprocessed sound output Bypass (road), road or highway... The Danville Expressway is a 15 mile (25 km) partial-loop interstate-grade highway around Danville, Virginia. ... U.S. Route 29 is a major north-south route in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... State Route 785 is an unsigned primary state highway in the city of Danville, Virginia, United States. ... The Danville Expressway is a 15 mile (25 km) partial-loop interstate-grade highway around Danville, Virginia. ... Chatham is a town in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, United States. ...


North Carolina Highway 86 becomes State Route 86 once it crosses the state line into Danville as South Main Street. It continues north to its terminus at US 29 Business/Central Boulevard. North Carolina Highway 86 runs north/south for 53 miles (85 km) through the northern counties of North Carolina, from the Virginia state line at Danville, Virginia to Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ... State Route 86 is a short continuation of North Carolina Highway 86 in the U.S. state of Virginia. ...


State Route 293 was created in 1998 to mark the route of old US 29 Business, which was rerouted to the west. SR 293 enters Danville's downtown historic district as West Main Street, then Main Street, and then crosses the Dan River to meet US 29 Business as North Main Street. State Route 293 is a primary state highway in the city of Danville, Virginia, United States. ... The Dan River flows in both North Carolina and Virginia, USA. It arises in the state of Virginia in Patrick County and crosses the state border into Stokes County, North Carolina. ... United States Highway 29 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 1,036 miles (1,667 km) from the western suburbs of Baltimore to Pensacola, Florida. ...


State Route 51 parallels US 58 Business as Westover Drive from its western terminus at US 58 Business at the Danville's corporate limits to its eastern terminus at US 58 Business near the Dan River. State Route 51 is a primary state highway in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, United States, but mostly within the independent city of Danville. ...


History

Wreck of the Old 97, Danville, Virginia, 1903
Wreck of the Old 97, Danville, Virginia, 1903

In 1728, William Byrd headed an expedition sent to determine the true boundary between Virginia and North Carolina. One night late that summer, the party camped upstream from what is now Danville, Byrd was so captured with the beauty of the land, that he eloquently prophesied a future settlement in the vicinity, where people would live “with much comfort and gaiety of Heart.” The river along which he camped was named the “Dan”, for Byrd, supposing himself to be in the land of plenty, felt he had wandered “from Dan to Beersheba”. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... William Byrd IIII (1674-1744) was born at Westover Plantation in Charles City County, Virginia, and educated in England for the law. ... Beersheba (Hebrew: ‎, Beer Sheva, Arabic: ‎, Bir as-Sabi, Turkish: ) is the largest city in the Negev desert of southern Israel, often being referred to as the Capital of the Negev. ...


The first white settlement (numerous Indian tribes had lived in the area) occurred downstream from Byrd’s campsite in 1792, at a spot along the river shallow enough to allow fording. It was named “Wynne’s Falls,” after the first settler. The village has a “social” reason for its origin, since it was here that pioneering Revolutionary War veterans met once a year to fish and talk over old times.


The establishment by the General Assembly of a tobacco warehouse at Wynne’s Falls in 1793 was the beginning of “The World’s Best Tobacco Market.” Virginia’s largest market for bright leaf tobacco. The village was renamed Danville by act of the Virginia Legislature on November 23, 1793. A charter for the town was drawn up February 17,1830, but by the time of its issue, the population had exceeded the pre-arranged boundaries. This necessitated a new charter, which was issued in 1833. In that year, James Lanier was elected the first mayor, assisted by a council of “twelve fit and able men.”


The outbreak of the Civil War found Danville a thriving community of some 5,000 people. During those four years of war, the town was transformed into a strategic center of activity. It was a quartermaster’s depot, rail center, hospital station for confederate wounded and a prison camp. Here six tobacco warehouses were converted into prisons, housing at one time more than 5,000 captured Federal soldiers . This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ...


Starving and dysentery, plus a smallpox epidemic in 1864, caused the death of 1,314 of these prisoners. Their remains now lie interred in the Danville National Cemetery.


Danville became the Last Capital of the Confederate States of America within the space of a few days. Jefferson Davis and the temporary Capital moved to the palatial home of William T. Sutherlin on April 3, 1865. It was in the Sutherlin home that Davis' issued his final Presidential Proclamation. The final Confederate Cabinet meeting was held at the Benedict House(destroyed) in Danville. Davis and members of his cabinet remained there until April 10, 1865 When news of Lee’s surrender forced them to flee southward. On the day of their departure, Governor William Smith arrived from Lynchburg, to establish his headquarters. Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... William Thomas Sutherlin (1822 – 1893) was a 19th Century tobacco entreprenuer most famous for opening his Danville, Virginia home to Jefferson Davis and his cabinet during the week before Gen. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


On July 22, 1882, six of Danville’s enterprising citizens founded the Riverside Cotton Mills, which today is known the country over as Dan River Inc., the largest single-unit textile mill in the world.


Here occurred the most famous wreck in American rail history. On September 27, 1903, “Old 97.” The Southern Railway’s crack express mail train, was running behind schedule. Its engineer “gave her full throttle,” but the speed of the train caused it to jump the tracks on a high trestle overlooking the valley of the Dan. The engine and five cars plunged into the ravine below, killing nine and injuring seven, but immortalizing the locomotive and its engineer, Joseph A. ("Steve") Broadey, in a now well-known song. A marker is located on U.S. 58 between Locust Lane and North Main Street at the train crash site. A mural of the Wreck of the Old 97 is painted on a downtown Danville building in memory of the historic wreck. is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Danville, Virginia, 1903 The Old 97, a Southern Railway train en route from Monroe, Virginia to Spencer, North Carolina, derailed at Stillhouse Trestle near Danville, Virginia on September 27, 1903. ...


On March 2, 1911, Danville Police Chief R. E. Morris, who had been elected to three two-year terms and was running for a fourth term, was arrested as an escaped convicted murderer. He admitted that he was really Edgar Stribling of Harris County, Georgia, and had been on the run for thirteen years.[3]-1... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Harris County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ...


Danville was home to both Nancy Langhorne, Viscountess Astor, the first woman to serve in the British House of Commons, and Irene Langhorne Gibson, the inspiration for "the Gibson girl". It is also the home of the very first and only black man truly in NASCAR's history, Wendell Scott, and the birthplace of "Battling Jim" Johnson (b. ca. 1883), a boxer who fought heavyweight champion Jack Johnson to a draw in Paris, France in 1913. This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopaedia entry. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... A USPS stamp depicting a Gibson girl. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Wendell Oliver Scott (b August 28, 1921 - d December 23, 1990) was an American stock car racing driver from Danville, Virginia. ... John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), better known as Jack Johnson and nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer and arguably the best heavyweight of his generation. ... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...


APVA Preservation Virginia President William B. Kerkam, III, and its Executive Director Elizabeth S. Kostelny announced at a press conference held in Danville (2007) at Main Street Methodist Church, a building not designated to the list but nonetheless at risk, that the entire city of Danville has been named one of the Most Endangered Historic Sites in Virginia.


Civil Rights Movement in Danville

A series of violent episodes of the Civil Rights Movement in Virginia occurred in Danville during the summer of 1963. On May 31, representatives of the black community organized as the Danville Christian Progressive Association (DCPA) demanded an end to segregation and job discrimination in Danville. A boycott of white merchants was declared, and a march to City Hall followed. Most of the marchers were high school students. They were met by police and city workers armed with clubs. The protesters were sprayed with fire hoses and hit with clubs. Around forty protesters needed medical attention. Marches and other protests continued for several weeks.[4] Martin Luther King, Jr. came to Danville and spoke at High Street Baptist Church about the brutality of the police force. He called it the worst police brutality he had seen in the South. Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ...


The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) sent organizers to Danville to support the DCPA. They helped lead protest, including demonstrations at the Howard Johnson Hotel and restaurant on Route 29. The hotel was known for discriminating against blacks. A special grand jury indicted 13 DCPA, SCLC, and SNCC activists for violating the "John Brown" law. This law, passed in 1830 after a slave uprising, made it a serious felony to "..incite the colored population to acts of violence or war against the white population." It became known as the "John Brown" law in 1860 because it was used to convict and hang abolitionist John Brown after his raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced snick) was one of the principle organizations of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was a white American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection as a means to abolish all slavery. ... Harpers Ferry, West Virginia 1865. ...


By the end of August, over 600 protesters had been arrested in Danville on charges of inciting to violence, contempt, trespassing, disorderly conduct, assault, parading without a permit, and resisting arrest. Because of the large number of arrest on these charges, often the jails would be over crowded, protesters were housed in George Washington High School located in Danville, VA. The demonstrations failed to achieve desegregation in Danville which remained segregated until passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. First page of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub. ...


Millionaire's Row

Millionaire's Row is the most impressive area in Danville. It has many fine homes built in the 1800's and early 1900's by descendants of American planters. They are beautiful mansions adorned by trees lining the streets and peppered about the yards of these beautiful homes. The entire area around "Penn's Bottom", the nick name for the part of Main St that experienced heavy growth as the first suburb of Danville during the Tobbaco boom, has been designated as a historic district. The Old West End Historic District, Tobacco Warehouse Historic District, Downtown Danville Historic District and North Main Historic District are going through a period of revitalization. The Many Fine examples of Victorian Architecture are showcased every Holiday season with the Christmas Tour. Also located in this district is the "Sutherlin Mansion" currently known as the Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History. This Italinate Mansion was the home of Major William T. Sutherlin a Confederate Quartermaster and was the location of the last "White House" of the Confederacy after the fall of Richmond. The museum, and its grounds currently occupy a complete block in this district. The remainder of the plantation was subdivided to create the surrounding neighborhood. William Thomas Sutherlin (1822 – 1893) was a 19th Century tobacco entreprenuer most famous for opening his Danville, Virginia home to Jefferson Davis and his cabinet during the week before Gen. ...


City Government

Danville City Council

"The Danville City Council is the governing body of the City of Danville." [5] The City Council consists of nine members elected by the citizens of Danville. The City Council selects the Mayor and Vice Mayor from among its members to serve two year terms. [6] The City Council has the power "to adopt and enforce legislative and budgetary ordinances, policies, and rules and regulations necessary to conduct the public's business and to provide for the protection of the general health, safety and welfare of the public."[7] The members if the Danville City Council are as follows: A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Deputy Mayor is an elective or appointive office of the second ranking official in many local governments. ...


Terms Expire on June 30, 2008
  • Peter A. "Pete" Castiglione, Jr. (Vice Mayor)
  • E. Stokes Daniels
  • John C. Hamlin
  • T. David Luther
  • Sherman M. Saunders (Mayor)

Terms Expire on June 30, 2010
  • Ruby B. Archie
  • T. Wayne Oakes
  • Adam J. Tomer
  • Gary P. Miller

City Manager

The City of Danville has a council-manager government in which a City Manager is hired by council to supervise the city government and ensure that the laws, ordinances, and various policies made by the City Council are carried out in an effective manner. The council-manager government is one of two main variations of representative municipal government in the United States. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ...


Notable Danville natives

Redirect page ... Charles Dana Gibson (September 14, 1867 _ December 23, 1944) was an American graphic artist, noted for his creation of one of the first pin-up girls, the Gibson Girl. Woman Jurors by Charles Dana Gibson, 1902 He was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... Clarence 13X, deified as Allah by the Nation of Gods and Earths. ... The Five Percenter Universal Flag (Seven, Sun, Moon, and Star). ... Ferrell Edmunds, Jr. ... Robert Holt Edmunds, Jr. ... The Supreme Court of North Carolina is the states highest appellate court. ... Emmet Gowin (born 1941 in Danville, Virginia) is an American photographer. ... Percy Miller Jr. ... The Carolina League is a minor league baseball affiliation which operates in the South Atlantic region of the United States. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... Herman Moore (born October 20, 1969 in Danville, Virginia) is an former American NFL wide receiver. ... John Sylvester Newman, Jr. ... George Jessel Buddy Curry (born in 1958) was a former NFL football player. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1966–present) Eastern Conference (1966) Western Conference (1967-69) Coastal Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC West (1970-2001) NFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Black, Red, Silver and White Mascot Freddie Falcon Personnel Owner Arthur Blank General Manager... Mojo Nixon (born Neill Kirby McMillan, Jr. ... Eric Blake Owens (born February 3, 1971, in Danville, Virginia) is a Major League Baseball utility player. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Tony Rice Tony Rice (born June 8, 1951 in Danville, Virginia) is an influential bluegrass guitarist. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Wendell Oliver Scott (b August 28, 1921 - d December 23, 1990) was an American stock car racing driver from Danville, Virginia. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Peyton Sellers Peyton Sellers (born October 20, 1983 in Danville, Virginia) is an American race car driver, competing in the NASCAR West Series and Busch Series. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Anthony Darrell Tony Womack (born September 25, 1969, in Danville, Virginia) is a professional Major League Baseball player, currently a free agent. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Jon Dalton, also known as Jonny Fairplay (born March 11, 1974), is a Reality TV participant and former art consultant from Danville, Virginia who came in third place as a competitor on the reality TV show Survivor: Pearl Islands. ... John B. Henderson John Brooks Henderson (November 16, 1826 – April 12, 1913) was a United States Senator from Missouri and a co-author of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ...

Newspapers distributed in Danville

The Richmond Times-Dispatch (RTD or TD for short) is the primary daily newspaper in Richmond, Virginia the capital of Virginia, and is commonly considered the newspaper of record for events occurring in much of the state. ... The newspaper that one knows today as the News & Record began as two smaller papers, The Daily Record and the Greensboro Daily News. ... The Roanoke Times is the very liberal main newspaper in Roanoke, VA. It is published by Landmark Communications, founder of the first anti-segregationist newspaper in Virginia, and generally maintains an anti-Southern, anti-white perspective. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...

Colleges and universities

This article is in need of improvement. ... Danville Community College (DCC) is one of the 23 two year colleges in the Virginia Community College System. ... The National College is a pioneer institution for higher education at Tiruchirapalli (shortly called Trichy), Tamil Nadu which has the credit of producing several stalwards in India, including former President of India Shri. ...

Notable businesses

  • Danville Regional Medical Center
  • Dan River Mills

References

  1. ^ a b American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  2. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ "Arrest Police Chief as Escaped Convict", The New York Times, March 3, 1911. Retrieved January 10, 2008.
  4. ^ Civil Rights Movement Veterans. "Danville VA, Movement". 
  5. ^ [1]"City Council." Retrieved Dec. 20, 2007.
  6. ^ [2]"City Council." Retrieved Dec. 20, 2007.
  7. ^ [3]"City Council." Retrieved Dec. 20, 2007.

Goodyear Brockway Corning Glass The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Danville (Danville, Virginia) - baltimoresun.com (506 words)
Virginia's unemployment fell slightly in April to 3.3 percent.
The Virginia Employment Commission said Wednesday the decline from 3.9 percent in March was the result of several factors.
A Virginia Tech professor who lost his wife in a mass shooting last year will head a new peace center in the classroom wing where she died, the university announced Tuesday.
Danville, Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (750 words)
Danville is an independent city in Virginia, bounded by Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Caswell County, North Carolina.
Danville is also called the city of churches because it has more churches per square mile than any other city in the state of Virginia.
Danville was the last capital of the Confederate States of America between April 3, 1865 and April 10, 1865.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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