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Encyclopedia > Danube Swabians

The Danube Swabians (German: Donauschwaben, Hungarian: Dunai-Svábok or Dunamenti németek, Romanian: Şvabi or Şvabi Dunăreni, Serbian: Dunavske Švabe or Дунавске Швабе, Croatian: Podunavski Švabe) is a collective term for Germans who lived in the former Kingdom of Hungary, especially in the Danube (Donau) River valley. Because of differential development within the territory settled, the Danube Swabians cannot be seen as a unified people. They include the Germans of Hungary (Ungarndeutsche), Satu Mare Swabians, the Banat Swabians (Banater Schwaben), and the Danube Swabians in Serbia's Vojvodina (Wojwodinedeutsche) and Croatia's Slavonia (especially in Osijek region). The Carpathian Germans and Transylvanian Saxons are not included within the Danube Swabian group. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ... The Danube (ancient Danuvius, ancient Greek Istros) is the longest river of the European Union and Europes second-longest[3] (after the Volga). ... Hungary Germans (German: Ungarndeutsche) are any German-speaking minority group in Hungary who would be counted among the Danube Swabians (German: Donauschwaben). ... Satu Mare Swabians (German: Sathmarer Schwaben) are a German ethnic group, who live near Satu Mare in Romania, and who form part of the broader group known as Danube Swabians. ... The Banat Swabians are a German-speaking population in Southeast Europe, part of the Danube Swabians, who immigrated over 200 years ago from different parts of Southern Germany into Banat, after it had been almost entirely depopulated during wars with Turkey. ... Ethnic groups of Vojvodina Ethnic map of Vojvodina Serbs – Serbs constitute an absolute majority of people in Vojvodina. ... Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... Coat of arms Slavonia (Croatian: Slavonija) is a geographical and historical region in eastern Croatia. ... Osijek (pronounced: []) is the fourth largest city in Croatia with a population of 114,616 in 2001. ... Carpathian Germans (German: Karpatendeutsche, Slovak: karpatskí Nemci), sometimes simply called Slovak Germans (German: Slowakeideutsche), is the name for a group of German language speakers on the territory of present-day Slovakia. ... The Transylvanian Saxons (German: Siebenbürger Sachsen; Romanian: SaÅŸi, Hungarian: Szászok) are a people of German origin who settled in Transylvania from the 12th century onwards. ...

Contents

History

Danube Swabian men's tracht, from the historic house of the parents of Stefan Jäger, Hatzfeld (Jimbolia), Romanian Banat.
Danube Swabian men's tracht, from the historic house of the parents of Stefan Jäger, Hatzfeld (Jimbolia), Romanian Banat.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 420 KB) Summary Took this picture myself in Stefan Jaeger Museum, Hatzfeld/Jimbolia, Romanian Banat. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 420 KB) Summary Took this picture myself in Stefan Jaeger Museum, Hatzfeld/Jimbolia, Romanian Banat. ... An Austria folkloric group There has been a renewed interest in Germanic traditional costumes, or Tracht. ... Jimbolia (Hungarian: Zsombolya, German: Hatzfeld) is a city in Timiş county, Romania. ... Banat (Romanian: Banat; Serbian: Банат or Banat; German: Banat; Hungarian: Bánát or Bánság; Slovak: Banát) is a geographical and historical region in Southeastern Europe divided among three countries: the eastern part belongs to Romania (the counties of TimiÅŸ, CaraÅŸ-Severin, Arad, and MehedinÅ£i), the western...

Origins

Beginning in the 12th century, German merchants and miners began to settle in the Kingdom of Hungary at the invitation of the Hungarian monarchy. Although there were significant colonies of Carpathian Germans in the Spiš mountains and Transylvanian Saxons in Transylvania, German settlement throughout the rest of the kingdom had not been extensive until this time. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Carpathian Germans (German: Karpatendeutsche, Slovak: karpatskí Nemci), sometimes simply called Slovak Germans (German: Slowakeideutsche), is the name for a group of German language speakers on the territory of present-day Slovakia. ... SpiÅ¡ (-Slovak; Latin: Scepusium, Polish: Spisz, German: Zips, Hungarian: Szepes) is the name of a historic administrative county (comitatus) of the Kingdom of Hungary. ... The Transylvanian Saxons (German: Siebenbürger Sachsen; Romanian: SaÅŸi, Hungarian: Szászok) are a people of German origin who settled in Transylvania from the 12th century onwards. ... Map of Romania with Transylvania in yellow Transylvania (Romanian: or Transilvania; Hungarian: ; German: ; Serbian: or Erdelj / Ердељ) is a historical region in the center of Romania. ...


During the 17th-18th centuries, warfare between the Habsburg Monarchy and the Ottoman Empire devastated and depopulated much of the lands of the valley, referred to geographically as the Pannonian plain. The Habsburgs ruling Austria and Hungary at the time resettled the land with people of various ethnicities including Magyars, Slovaks, Croats, Serbs, Romanians, Ukrainians, and Germans. The Germans came at this time from Swabia, Hesse, Franconia, Bavaria, Austria, and Alsace-Lorraine. However, despite their origin, they were all referred to as Swabians. (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–1922 Mehmed VI... The Pannonian Plain is a large plain in Central Europe that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea (see below) dried out. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Germany. ... Hesse (German: Hessen) is a state of Germany with an area of 21,110 km² and just over six million inhabitants. ... The Franconian Rake is originally is a heraldic symbol of the bishops of Würzburg, who - though nominally Dukes of Franconia - only ruled in parts of Franconia. ... The Free State of Bavaria  (German: Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... Location Administration Capital Strasbourg Regional President Adrien Zeller (UMP) (since 1996) Départements Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Statistics Land area1 8,280 km² Population (Ranked 14th)  - January 1, 2005 est. ... Lorraine coat of arms location of the Lorraine province Lorraine (French: Lorraine; German: Lothringen) is a historical area in present-day northeast France. ... A Swabian is a native of Swabia, a place that is located in the south-west region of Germany. ...


Settlement

The first wave of resettlement came as the Ottoman Turks were gradually being forced back after their defeat at the Battle of Vienna in 1683. The settlement was encouraged by nobility whose lands had been devastated through warfare, and by military officers including Prince Eugene of Savoy and Claudius Mercy. Many Germans settled in the Bakony (Bakonywald) and Vértes (Schildgebirge) mountains north and west of Lake Balaton (Plattensee), as well as around the town Buda (Ofen), now part of Budapest. The area of heaviest German colonization during this period was in the Swabian Turkey (Schwäbische Türkei), a triangular region between the Danube river, Lake Balaton, and the Drava (Drau) River. Other areas settled during this time by Germans were Pécs (Fünfkirchen), Satu Mare (Sathmar), and south of Mukachevo (Munkatsch). Combatants Holy League: Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, Austria, Saxony, Franconia, Swabia, Bavaria Ottoman Empire, Khanate of Crimea, Transylvania, Wallachia, Moldavia Commanders John III Sobieski, Charles V of Lorraine Kara Mustafa Pasha Strength 70,000, (10,000 during siege) 138,000, (200,000 during siege) Casualties 4,000 killed 15,000 killed... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... Prince Eugen von Savoyen in a contemporary painting François-Eugène, Prince of Savoy-Carignan, known as Prinz Eugen von Savoyen in German and Eugenio, Principe di Savoia in Italian (October 18, 1663 – April 24, 1736) was arguable the greatest general to serve the Habsburgs. ... Bakony (German: Bakonyer Wald; Serbian: Bakonjska gora or Бакоњска гора) is the largest mountain range in Transdanubia, Hungary and the largest part of the Transdanubian Medium Mountains. ... Lake Balaton (Hungarian: Balaton; Latin: Lacus Pelso; German: Plattensee; Serbian: Blatno Jezero or Блатно Језеро; meaning approximately muddy lake in Slavic, probable origin of the name), located in Hungary, is the largest lake in Central Europe. ... Buda (German: Ofen, Croatian: Budim, Slovak: Budín, Serbian: Будим or Budim, Turkish: Budin) is the western part of the Hungarian capital Budapest on the right bank of the Danube. ... Nickname: Paris of the East, Pearl of the Danubeor Queen of the Danube Location of Budapest in Hungary Country Hungary County Pest Mayor Gábor Demszky (SZDSZ) Area    - City 525,16 km²  - Land n/a km²  - Water n/a km² Population    - City (2006) 1,695,000  - Density 3570/km... The term Swabian Turkey (German: Schwäbische Türkei) describes a region in southeastern Transdanubia in Hungary delimited by the Danube (Donau), the Drava (Drau), and Lake Balaton (Plattensee) inhabited by an ethnic German minority. ... The Drave at Drávaszabolcs, Hungary The Drave at Vízvár, Hungary The Drave at Maribor, Slovenia The Drava or Drave (German: Drau, Slovenian, Croatian and Italian: Drava, Hungarian: Dráva) is a river in southern Central Europe. ... Pécs   (Latin: Quinque Ecclesiae, Croatian: Pečuh, German: Fünfkirchen, Serbian: Pečuj or Печуј, Slovak: Päťkostolie, Turkish: Peçuy, Italian: Cinquechiese) is the fourth largest city of Hungary, located in the south-west of the country. ... County Satu Mare County Status County capital Mayor Iuliu Ilyés, from Democratic Union of Hungarians in Romania, since 2004 Population (2002) 115. ... Mukacheve (Мукачеве, Ruthenian: Мукачів (Mukachiv), Russian: Мукачево (Mukachevo), Hungarian: Munkács, Slovak and Czech: Mukačevo, German: Munkatsch, Yiddish: Munkacz) is a city in Zakarpattya region of southwestern Ukraine. ...


After the Banat area of Central Europe was annexed from the Ottomans by the Habsburgs in the Treaty of Passarowitz (1718), plans were made to resettle the region, which became known as the Banat of Temesvár (Temeschwar / Temeschburg), as well as the Bačka (Batschka) region between the Danube and Tisza (Theiss) rivers. Fledgling settlements were destroyed during another Austrian-Turkish war (1737-1739), but extensive colonization continued after the suspension of hostilities. The resettlement was accomplished through private and state initiatives. After Maria Theresa of Austria assumed the throne as Queen of Hungary in 1740, she encouraged vigorous colonization on crown lands, especially between Timişoara and the Tisza. The land steadily rejuvenated: marshes near the Danube and the Tisza were drained, farms were rebuilt, and roads and canals were constructed. Many Danube Swabians served on Austria's Military Frontier (Militärgrenze) against the Ottomans. Between 1740 and 1790 more than 100,000 Germans immigrated to the Kingdom of Hungary. Banat (Romanian: Banat; Serbian: Банат or Banat; German: Banat; Hungarian: Bánát or Bánság; Slovak: Banát) is a geographical and historical region in Southeastern Europe divided among three countries: the eastern part belongs to Romania (the counties of TimiÅŸ, CaraÅŸ-Severin, Arad, and MehedinÅ£i), the western... Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... The Treaty of Passarowitz was the peace treaty signed in Požarevac, Serbia (German: Passarowitz, Turkish Pasarofça, Hungarian: Pozsarevác) on July 21, 1718 between the Ottoman Empire on one side and the Habsburg Monarchy of Austria and the Republic of Venice on the other. ... // The Funj warrior aristocracy deposes the reigning mek and places one of their own ranks on the throne of Sennar. ... Banat of Temeswar, province of the Habsburg Monarchy in 1739 The Banat of Temeswar (German: Temeswarer Banat, Romanian: Banatul TimiÅŸoarei, Serbian: TamiÅ¡ki Banat or Тамишки Банат, Hungarian: Temesi Bánság) was an Habsburg province that existed between 1718 and 1778. ... Bačka (Serbian: Бачка or Bačka, Hungarian: Bácska, Croatian: Bačka, Slovak: Báčka, German: Batschka) is an area of the Pannonian plain lying between the rivers Danube and Tisa. ... The Tisza or Tisa is one of the major rivers of Central Europe. ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ... Maria Theresa, Empress of Austria, Queen of Hungary and Bohemia The worlds most famous coin, a silver thaler of Maria Theresa, dated 1780 Maria Theresa (German: ; May 13, 1717–November 29, 1780) was Empress of Austria and Queen of Hungary and Bohemia. ... This is a list of all rulers of Hungary since Árpád. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... Military Frontier (Military Border, Military Krajina, Vojna Krajina, Војна Крајина, Militärgrenze, Confiniaria militaria) was a borderland of Habsburg Austria which acted as the cordon sanitaire against the Turks from the Middle Ages (Croatian Krajina) or from the late 17th and 18th centuries (Slavonian and Banat Krajina) until the 19th century. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


The Napoleonic Wars ended the large-scale movement of Germans to the Hungarian lands, although the colonial population grew steadily and was self-sustaining. Small daughter-colonies developed in Slavonia and Bosnia. After the creation of Austria-Hungary in 1867, Hungary established a policy of Magyarization whereby minorities, including the Danube Swabians, were induced by political and economic means to adopt the Magyar language and culture. Combatants Allies: Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Spain[3] Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[5] Saxony[6] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack Gebhard von Blücher Duke of Brunswick Prince of Hohenlohe Mikhail Kutuzov... Coat of arms Slavonia (Croatian: Slavonija) is a geographical and historical region in eastern Croatia. ... Approximate borders between Bosnia (marked light) and Herzegovina (marked dark) Historically and geographically, the region known as Bosnia (natively Bosna/Босна) comprises the northern part of the present-day country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Magyarization or Magyarisation is the common name given to a number of forced assimilation policies applied by the Hungarian authorities at different times in history. ... Magyars are an ethnic group primarily associated with Hungary. ...

Danube Swabians being led away by Russian forces, painting by Stefan Jäger, from the historic house of his parents, Hatzfeld (Jimbolia), Romanian Banat.
Danube Swabians being led away by Russian forces, painting by Stefan Jäger, from the historic house of his parents, Hatzfeld (Jimbolia), Romanian Banat.

After the treaties of Saint-Germain (1919) and Trianon (1920) following World War I, the Banat was divided between Romania, Yugoslavia, and Hungary; Bačka was divided between Yugoslavia and Hungary; and Satu Mare went to Romania. Before World War II, the biggest populations of Germans in the Vojvodina were Hodschag, Werbass, and Abthausen. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1383x762, 1595 KB) Summary This is a famous painting by Stefan Jaeger, from the Stefan Jaeger Elternhaus in Hatzfeld/Jimbolia, Romanian Banat. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1383x762, 1595 KB) Summary This is a famous painting by Stefan Jaeger, from the Stefan Jaeger Elternhaus in Hatzfeld/Jimbolia, Romanian Banat. ... Jimbolia (Hungarian: Zsombolya, German: Hatzfeld) is a city in Timiş county, Romania. ... Banat (Romanian: Banat; Serbian: Банат or Banat; German: Banat; Hungarian: Bánát or Bánság; Slovak: Banát) is a geographical and historical region in Southeastern Europe divided among three countries: the eastern part belongs to Romania (the counties of TimiÅŸ, CaraÅŸ-Severin, Arad, and MehedinÅ£i), the western... The Treaty of Saint-Germain, was signed on 10 September 1919 by the victorious Allies of World War I on the one hand and by the new republic of Austria on the other. ... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Grand Trianon at Versailles, site of the signing The Treaty of Trianon was the peace agreement imposed on Hungary after World War I by the victorious powers. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Paul... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in Latin, Југославија in Cyrillic, English: Land of the South Slavs) describes four political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in Latin, Југославија in Cyrillic, English: Land of the South Slavs) describes four political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... Odžaci - Orthodox Church Odžaci (Serbian: Odžaci or Оџаци, Croatian: Odžaci, Hungarian: Hódság, German: Hodschag) is a town and municipality in the West Bačka District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Vrbas (Serbian: Врбас or Vrbas, Hungarian: Verbász, Rusin: Вербас, Croatian: Vrbas, German: Werbass) is a city located in Serbia and Montenegro at 45. ... Apatin (Serbian: Апатин or Apatin, Romanian: Apatin, Croatian: Apatin, Hungarian: Apatin, German: Abthausen) is a city in the Vojvodina administrative region of Serbia and Montenegro, located in the West Bačka District, 45°40′N 18°59′E. Apatin city is the administrative, economic, cultural, educational and tourist center of the...


World War II, Expulsion and Current Situation

At the start of World War II, many Danube Swabians served in the militaries of Romania, Hungary, and Croatia. Because it was not legal to draft Volksdeutsche, the Nazis conscripted them to theoretically "volunteer" Waffen-SS units, particularly, the 22nd Volunteer Cavalry Division (Maria Theresa) and the 7th Volunteer Mountain Division (Prinz Eugen). Of about 100,000 men who served in the various forces, approximately 29,000 lost their lives. This total includes 2,000 POWs from the 7th SS Division which were summarily executed by Tito's communist partisans. Volksdeutsche (ethnic Germans) is a historical term which arose in the early 20th century to apply for Germans living outside of the German Empire. ... Waffen-SS recruitment poster; Volunteer to the Waffen-SS The Waffen-SS was the armed wing of the Schutzstaffel. ... The 22. ... Freiwilligen-Gebirgs-Division SS-Freiwilligen-Division Prinz Eugen SS-Freiwilligen-Gebirgs-Division Prinz Eugen 7. ... Josip Broz Tito (May 7, 1892 - May 4, 1980) was the ruler of Yugoslavia between the end of World War II and his death in 1980. ...


In 1945, the Soviet Red Army marched into the Danube Swabian-populated lands beginning the exodus of Germans from Eastern Europe. After the war, many of the Germans of Yugoslavia, who by this point were mostly women, children, or elderly, were held in inhuman conditions in camps made out of their former towns, such as the one at Knićanin, or they were killed outright. From 1945-48, many Germans in Hungary were dispossessed and forced to "return" to Germany, although it was not their birthplace. The Germans in Romania were not deported but were instead dispersed within Romania. Many left Romania for West Germany between 1970-90, and this stream became a flood after 1990. Beginning in 1920 and especially after World War II, many Danube Swabians migrated to the United States, Brazil, Canada, Austria, Australia, and Argentina. 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Soviet redirects here. ... The short forms Red Army and RKKA refer to the Workers and Peasants Red Army, (in Russian: Рабоче-Крестьянская Красная Армия - Raboche-Krestyanskaya Krasnaya Armiya), the armed forces first organized by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918. ... Knićanin (Serbian: Knićanin or Книћанин, German: Rudolfsgnad) is a village in Serbia and Montenegro. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...


Culture

Danube Swabian women's tracht, from the historic house of the parents of Stefan Jäger, Hatzfeld (Jimbolia), Romanian Banat.
Danube Swabian women's tracht, from the historic house of the parents of Stefan Jäger, Hatzfeld (Jimbolia), Romanian Banat.

The Danube Swabian culture is a melting pot of southern German regional customs, with a large degree of Balkan and mostly Hungarian influence. This is especially true of the food, where paprika is heavily employed, which lead to the nickname for Hungarian Germans of Paprikadeutsche. The architecture is neither Southern German nor Balkan but is unique to itself. The houses, often made of mud bricks, are ubiquitous throughout the Banat region. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 489 KB) Summary Danube Swabian womens Festtracht. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 489 KB) Summary Danube Swabian womens Festtracht. ... An Austria folkloric group There has been a renewed interest in Germanic traditional costumes, or Tracht. ... Jimbolia (Hungarian: Zsombolya, German: Hatzfeld) is a city in Timiş county, Romania. ... Banat (Romanian: Banat; Serbian: Банат or Banat; German: Banat; Hungarian: Bánát or Bánság; Slovak: Banát) is a geographical and historical region in Southeastern Europe divided among three countries: the eastern part belongs to Romania (the counties of TimiÅŸ, CaraÅŸ-Severin, Arad, and MehedinÅ£i), the western... Customs duty is a tariff or tax on the import or export of goods. ... Binomial name Capsicum annuum L. Paprika, Capsicum annuum, is a sweet-to-mildly hot cultivar of the chile pepper of the family Solanaceae. ...

Language

The Danube Swabian language is only nominally Swabian. In reality, it contains elements of many dialects of the original German settlers, mainly Swabian, Rhinelandic/Pfälzisch, Alsatian, and Alemannic, as well as Austro-Hungarian administrative and military jargon. Loanwords from Hungarian are especially common regarding cuisine and agriculture, but also regarding dress, politics, placenames, and sports. Other cultures of influence include Serbian and Croatian, Russian (for communist concepts), Romanian, Turkish (Hambar), English (for football), and general Balkan and South Slavic loanwords or, properly, wanderwörter like Kukoriz (maize). A Swabian is a native of Swabia, a place that is located in the south-west region of Germany. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Rhinelandic is a term for linguistic varieties in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands, including the Limburgish language. ... Pfälzisch (Palatinate German) is a West Franconian dialect of German which is spoken in the Rhine Valley between the cities of Zweibrücken, Kaiserslautern and Mannheim. ... This inscription in Alsatian on a window in Eguisheim, Alsace, reads: Dis Hausz sted in Godes Hand - God bewar es vor Feyru (This house stands in Gods hand - God beware it for fire) Alsatian (French Alsacien, German Elsässisch) is a Low Alemannic German dialect spoken in Alsace, a... Alemannic German (Alemannisch) is a group of dialects of the Upper German branch of the Germanic language family. ... Military slang, or informal military terms, are colloquial terms used commonly by military personnel —often as abbreviations or derivations of the NATO Phonetic Alphabet, or otherwise incorporating aspects of formal military concepts and terms. ... A cuisine (from French cuisine, meaning cooking; culinary art; kitchen; itself from Latin coquina, meaning the same; itself from the Latin verb coquere, meaning to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a place of origin. ... The term dress may refer to any of these:- Clothing or attire in general A specific type of womens garment, discussed in the article on skirt and dress The dres subculture in Poland. ... Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ... In geography and cartography, a toponym is a place name, a geographical name, a proper name of locality, region, or some other part of Earths surface or its natural or artificial feature. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... A hambar still in heavy use in Hatzfeld/Jimbolia, Romanian Banat, albeit with the traditional wooden slats replaced with chicken wire A hambar (Danube Swabian German: hambar, Romanian: hambar or pătul, Serbian: ambar/амбар or čardak/чардак, Bulgarian: хамбар (hambar)) is a corn crib or small building commonly used for storing and... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... ... Countries inhabited by South Slavs (in black) Distribution of Slavic peoples by language The South Slavs are a southern branch of the Slavic peoples that live in the Balkans, the southern Pannonian Plain and the eastern Alps. ... A Wanderwort (plural Wanderwörter, German for wandering word, ) is a word that was spread among numerous languages and cultures, usually in connection with trade, so that it becomes impossible to establish its original etymology, or even its original language. ... Binomial name Zea mays L. Maize (Zea mays ssp. ...


Many German words used by speakers of Danube Swabian dialects may sound archaic. To the ear of a Standard German speaker, the Danube Swabian dialect sounds like what it is: a mix of southwestern German dialects from the 1700s. Due to relative isolation and differing proximities to nearby German speakers (Austrians and Transylvanian Saxons), the language varies considerably, with speakers able to distinguish inhabitants of neighboring villages by the words they use for such things as marmalade (Schleckle being one variant), or by how many (usually Hungarian) loanwords they employ. The Transylvanian Saxons (German: Siebenbürger Sachsen; Romanian: Saşi, Hungarian: Szászok) are a people of German origin who settled in Transylvania from the 12th century onwards. ... Marmalade is a sweet conserve made from fruit, sugar, and (usually) a gelling agent. ...


Naming

As is the custom in Hungary (as well as in East Asia), Danube Swabians often put the surname first, especially when writing, for example Butscher Jakob (see photo of memorial). Danube Swabian villages tend to have relatively few family names as the villagers stem from only a few families, but usually the same family name does not appear in more than a couple of villages, meaning that there are many Danube Swabian family names. The names come from throughout southern Germany, from assimilated Hungarians, and occasionally from Balkan and Italian origins. There are usually no middle names, but often double first names, if a distinction can be made. The variety of first names is few, since children were usually named after grandparents or godparents. Popular names for women include: Anna, Barbara, Christina, Katharina, Magdalena, Maria, Sophia, Theresia, and many two-name combinations thereof. Popular names for men include: Adam, Christian, Friedrich, Georg, Gottfried, Heinrich, Jakob, Johann, Konrad, Ludwig, Mathias, Nikolaus, Peter, Philipp (or Filipp), and Stefan (or Stephan). With so few names in villages, other modifiers or nicknames were almost always used to distinguish people. The modifiers were often size related (e.g., "Kleinjohann" or "Little Johann"), occupation related, or location related (usually by prefixing the streetname). East Asia is a subregion of Asia that can be defined in either geographical or cultural terms. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ...


Coat of arms

Coat of arms of the Danube Swabians
Coat of arms of the Danube Swabians

The coat of arms (Wappen) of the Danube Swabians was designed in 1950 by Hans Diplich. Its blazon is Parti per fess wavy 1 Or, an eagle displayed couped Sable langued Gules; 2 parti per fess Argent and Vert, a fortress Argent roofed and turreted Gules surmounted with Sun and Crescent waning Or; chief wavy Azure. Image File history File links DSWappen. ... Image File history File links DSWappen. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


It depicts:

Genera Several, see below. ... The title of Emperor of Austria was proclaimed in 1804 by the Habsburg Holy Roman Emperor, Francis II, who feared for the future of the old Reich in the face of Napoleons aggressions, and wished to maintain his imperial title in the event that the Holy Roman Empire should... The Danube (ancient Danuvius, ancient Greek Istros) is the longest river of the European Union and Europes second-longest[3] (after the Volga). ... It has been suggested that New moon be merged into this article or section. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the Quran, its principal scripture, whose followers, known as Muslims (مسلم), believe God (Arabic: الله ) sent through revelations to Muhammad. ... For other uses, see Sun (disambiguation). ... Prince Eugen von Savoyen in a contemporary painting François-Eugène, Prince of Savoy-Carignan, known as Prinz Eugen von Savoyen in German and Eugenio, Principe di Savoia in Italian (October 18, 1663 – April 24, 1736) was arguable the greatest general to serve the Habsburgs. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... County TimiÅŸ County Status County Capital Mayor Gheorghe Ciuhandu, Christian-Democratic Peoples Party, since 1996 Area 130,5 km² Population (2002) 325,997 Density 2,345 inh/km² Geographical coordinates Web site http://www. ...

See also

Memorial in German for soldiers who died in World War I in Sekitsch (Lovćenac), Vojvodina.
Memorial in German for soldiers who died in World War I in Sekitsch (Lovćenac), Vojvodina.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 597 KB) Summary This memorial to those from Lovćenac (German: Sekitsch), Serbia and Montenegro, who died in the first world war has been moved from its original location. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 597 KB) Summary This memorial to those from Lovćenac (German: Sekitsch), Serbia and Montenegro, who died in the first world war has been moved from its original location. ... The train station in Lovćenac in 2003 Lovćenac (Serbian: Lovćenac or Ловћенац, German: Sekitsch, in the past rarely Winkelsberg, Hungarian: Szeghegy) is a village located in the Mali IÄ‘oÅ¡ municipality, in the North Bačka District of Vojvodina, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... Germans expelled from the Sudetenland // The expulsion of Germans after World War II refers to the mass deportation of people considered Germans (Reichsdeutsche, Volksdeutsche, Sorbs, many Upper Silesians and Kashubians) from European countries with large German-speaking minorities, primarily Soviet-occupied areas of Eastern Europe in the final months of... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Germans. ... Volksdeutsche (ethnic Germans) is a historical term which arose in the early 20th century to apply for Germans living outside of the German Empire. ... Carpathian Germans (German: Karpatendeutsche, Slovak: karpatskí Nemci), sometimes simply called Slovak Germans (German: Slowakeideutsche), is the name for a group of German language speakers on the territory of present-day Slovakia. ... The Baltic Germans (German: ), were ethnically German inhabitants of the eastern shore of the Baltic Sea, which today forms the countries of Estonia and Latvia. ... The Transylvanian Saxons (German: Siebenbürger Sachsen; Romanian: SaÅŸi, Hungarian: Szászok) are a people of German origin who settled in Transylvania from the 12th century onwards. ... The Volga Germans are ethnic Germans living near the Volga River and the Black Sea, maintaining German culture, German language, German traditions and religions: Evangelical Lutherans or Roman Catholic. ...

External links

  • History of the Danube Swabians
  • Los Angeles Donau Schwabian Dancegroup heritage page
  • The Donauschwaben

References

  • Krallert, Wilfried (1958). Atlas zur Geschichte der deutschen Ostsiedlung. Bielefeld: Velhagen & Klasing.
  • German wikipedia article
  • http://www.axishistory.com

  Results from FactBites:
 
history (585 words)
They settled on the potentially fertile land along the Danube River as well as some of its tributaries and, hence, were later named the Danube Swabians.
The Danube Swabians were extremely proud of their German language and cultural heritage and lived in closely-knit settlements, maintaining same.
The largest part of the surviving Danube Swabians were forced to flee or were expelled from their homeland as a result of the ever advancing communism.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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