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Encyclopedia > Danny Gatton
Danny Gatton
Background information
Born September 4, 1945
Died October 4, 1994
Genre(s) Jazz
Blues
Rockabilly
Years active 1960 - 1994
Notable instrument(s)
Fender Telecaster

Danny Gatton (September 4, 19454 October 1994) was a talented and enigmatic American guitarist who committed suicide at his Maryland home in 1994 while still relatively unknown to the public. A biography, Unfinished Business: The Life and Times of Danny Gatton by Ralph Heibutzki, was published in 2003. It has a voluminous discography. is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on the use of the blue notes and a repetitive pattern that most often follows a twelve-bar structure. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music to emerge during the 1950s. ... The Fender Telecaster, also known as a Tele, is a typically dual-pickup, solid-body electric guitar made by Fender. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... the very definition of a guitarist is cody allen and taylor hines because of there un ending guitar skills and awsomnes. ... Mayor of Leipzig, Germany, committed suicide along with his wife and daughter on April 20, 1945. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... Ralph Heibutzki is a musician from Michigan. ...

Contents

Early life

Gatton was born in Washington, DC on September 4, 1945. His father, Daniel W. Gatton Sr., was a rhythm guitarist known for his unique percussive style, who left his musical career to raise his family in a more stable profession. The younger Gatton grew up to share his father's passion for the instrument. Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Rhythm guitar is a guitar that is primarily used to provide rhythmic and harmonic accompaniment for a singer or for other instruments in an ensemble. ...


Career

Danny Gatton began his career playing in bands while still a teenager. He began to attract wider interest in the 1970s while playing guitar and banjo for the group Liz Meyer & Friends. He made his name as a performer in the Washington, D.C. area during the 1980s, both as a solo performer and with his Redneck Jazz Explosion, in which he would trade licks with virtuoso pedal steel player Buddy Emmons over a tight bass-drums rhythm which drew from blues, country, bebop and rockabilly influences. He also backed Robert Gordon and Roger Miller. He contributed a cover of "Apricot Brandy", a song by Elektra Records-supergroup Rhinoceros, to the 1990 compilation album Rubáiyát. For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument of African American origin adapted from several African instruments. ... In popular music, a lick is a rock term [meaning]...something like a stock pattern or phrase (Middleton 1990, p. ... Pedal steel guitar with two 10-string necks The pedal steel guitar is a type of electric guitar that uses a metal slide to stop the strings, rather than fingers on strings as with a conventional guitar. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music to emerge during the 1950s. ... Robert Gordon may refer to one of several people: Robert Gordon (1786–1864), a Scottish trader and philanthropist Robert Gordon, who recorded several albums of 1950s-influenced rock music in the 1970s Robert Gordon, music critic Robert A. Gordon, American sociologist Robert J. Gordon, economist Robert Gordon, British diplomat Colonel... A section of the album jacket for Golden Hits Roger Dean Miller (January 2, 1936 – October 25, 1992) was an American singer, songwriter, and musician. ... Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ... Rhinoceros were a short-lived rock band in late 1960s. ... Rubáiyát is a compilation album, released in 1990 to commemorate 40 years of record label Elektra Records. ...


Playing Style

Gatton's playing combined musical styles such as jazz, blues and rockabilly in an innovative fashion, and he was known by some as "the telemaster" (a portmanteau of "Telecaster", Gatton's guitar of choice, and "Master"). He was also called "the world's greatest unknown guitarist". However, he never achieved the commercial success that his talent arguably deserved. His album "88 Elmira Street" was up for a 1990 Grammy Award for the song "Elmira Street Boogie" in the category Best Rock Instrumental Performance but was beaten out by Eric Johnson for Cliffs of Dover. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on the use of the blue notes and a repetitive pattern that most often follows a twelve-bar structure. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music to emerge during the 1950s. ... A portmanteau (IPA pronunciation: RP, US) is a word or morpheme that fuses two or more words or word parts to give a combined or loaded meaning. ... 1950s-style Telecaster with natural finish, with metal bridge cover removed. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eric Johnson (born August 17, 1954) is a Grammy Award-winning guitarist and recording artist from Austin, Texas. ... Cliffs of Dover is a song by Eric Johnson. ...


His skills were most appreciated by his peers such as Eric Clapton, Willie Nelson and his childhood idol Les Paul. During his career, Gatton appeared on stage with guitar heroes such as Alvin Lee and Jimmie Vaughan, the latter literally walking in one night on a Gatton club gig. There is also an apocryphal rumor about an onstage "head-cutting" jam between Gatton and fellow Washington, D.C.-area resident (and Telecaster player) Roy Buchanan. In 1993, Gatton was invited by rocker Chris Isaak to record tracks for Isaak's San Francisco Days CD. Reports of where Gatton's playing can be heard on the CD vary, with unconfirmed reports placing him on either "Can't Do A Thing (To Stop Me)", "5:15" or "Beautiful Houses." Gatton reportedly brought a customized Fender Telecaster and Stratocaster to the recording session. Eric Patrick Clapton CBE (born 30 March 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning British guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Les Paul (born Lester William Polsfuss on June 9, 1915) is an American jazz guitarist and inventor. ...


He usually played a 1953 Fender Telecaster (Fender now manufactures a replica of his heavily customized instrument), with Joe Barden pickups and Fender Super 250L's, or Nickel Plated Steel (.010 to .046 with a .015 for the G) strings. As a slide Gatton would use a beer bottle or mug, often still half full of beer, without regard to whether it might spill all over stage and on Gatton's guitar (or more likely, a clever gimmick by the showman).[1] 1950s-style Telecaster with natural finish, with metal bridge cover removed. ... Three magnetic pickups on an electric guitar. ... Example of a bottleneck, with fingerpicks and resonator guitar. ...


He always played with a jazz style teardrop pick, and was capable of intricate passages combining Bluegrass, bebop, and garage sounds, executed with amazing clarity and at dizzying speeds. His picking technique was a combination of pick and fingers, primarily his middle and ring fingers on his right hand. The basis of his picking technique was Banjo rolls -- he was an accomplished banjo player and learned the traditional (Scruggs style) right hand technique from playing the banjo. Various guitar picks. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music which has its own roots in Irish, Scottish and English traditional music. ... Earl Scruggs performing at The Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival on June 12th, 2005 Earl Eugene Scruggs (born January 6, 1924) is a musician noted for creating a banjo style (now called Scruggs style) that is a defining characteristic of bluegrass music. ...


Also among his admirers are James Burton, Lenny Breau, Vince Gill, Evan Johns (of "Evan Johns and His H-Bombs"), Bill Kirchen, Albert Lee, Arlen Roth, Ricky Skaggs, Slash ("Guns N' Roses"), and Richie Sambora.[1] James Burton (born August 21, 1939 in Minden, Louisiana) is an American guitarist. ... Lenny Breau (August 5, 1941–August 12, 1984) was a brilliantly innovative American-born Canadian jazz guitarist who brought together country, classical, flamenco and jazz guitar techniques. ... Vince Gill Vince Gill (born April 12, 1957) is an American country music musician, songwriter, and singer. ... Bill Kirchen is an American rockabilly guitarist. ... Albert Lee is an English guitarist. ... Arlen Roth (b. ... Ricky Skaggs, April 1988 Ricky Skaggs1st off Skaggs was known to hate everyone he met. ... Saul Hudson (born July 23, 1965), more widely known as Slash, is an English guitarist best known as the former lead guitarist of Guns N Roses and as the current lead guitarist of Velvet Revolver. ... Richard Stephen Sambora (born on July 11th, 1959), is an American rock guitarist, singer and songwriter who is the lead guitarist of the rock band Bon Jovi. ...


Suicide

On October 4, 1994, Gatton locked himself in his garage in Newburg, MD and shot himself.[1] He left behind no explanation. In retrospect of his suicide, people around Danny have suggested that he may have gone in and out of depression for many years. Certainly, he made statements alluding to taking his own life during several severe episodes of what should have been recognized as a depressed mental state. Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or unipolar depression when compared to bipolar disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ...


Further reading

Heibutzki, Ralph (2003). Unfinished business : the life & times of Danny Gatton. San Francisco: Backbeat Books. ISBN 0-87930-748-X. 


References

  1. ^ a b c Heibutzki, Ralph (2003). Unfinished business : the life & times of Danny Gatton. Backbeat Books, San Francisco, 186. ISBN 0-87930-748-X. 

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Danny Gatton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (579 words)
Danny Gatton (September 4, 1945 – 4 October 1994) was a talented and enigmatic American guitarist who committed suicide at his Maryland home in 1994 while still relatively unknown to the public.
Gatton was born in Washington, DC on September 4, 1945.
Gatton's playing combined musical styles such as jazz, blues and rockabilly in an innovative fashion, and he was known by some as "the telemaster" or "the world's greatest unknown guitarist".
Super Guitarist Danny Gatton (3517 words)
Gatton's genius, if that's what it was, lay in his ability to synthesize an almost impossibly broad range of styles, and in his mastery of guitar mechanics.
Danny Gatton was born in Washington, D.C., at 88 Elmira Street - as noted in the title of his first Elektra album.
Gatton must have been one of the first, perhaps the first act in what can loosely be called rock music to make his major-label debut at age forty-six, but he wasn't the product of major-label culture and didn't belong there.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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