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Encyclopedia > Danny Ford

Danny Lee Ford is a former American football coach, who most notably led Clemson University as its head coach to its 1981 national football championship. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Clemson University is a member of the NCAAs Division I and is in the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... See also: 1980 in sports, other events of 1981, 1982 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: NASCAR Championship - Darrell Waltrip Richard Petty won the Daytona 500 CART Racing - Rick Mears won the season championship May 25 - Indianapolis 500 - Bobby Unser Formula One... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...

Contents

Early career

After graduating from Gadsden High School in 1966, Ford was an All-SEC selection on the field and off the field under Paul "Bear" Bryant at Alabama, where he played in three bowl games. He received a bachelor's degree in industrial arts in 1970 and later received a master's degree in special education in Tuscaloosa in 1971. He coached as an assistant at Alabama, Virginia Tech, and Clemson prior to being named the head coach at Clemson. The Spirit of American Citizenship Monument on Rainbow Drive (US 411), just before the Broad Street Bridge. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... Paul William Bear Bryant (September 11, 1913–January 26, 1983) was an American college football coach. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship campus of the University of Alabama System. ...


Career at Clemson

Ford had an auspicious beginning to his head coaching career, following the departure of the Tigers' previous coach, Charley Pell to the University of Florida. After nine years as an assistant coach, he debuted with a 17-15 win over Ohio State in the 1978 Gator Bowl. The 30 year-old coach, youngest in Division I at the time, also defeated a college football legend in a contest that truly put Clemson football on the map, as he beat Woody Hayes in the latter's last game. This article or section needs additional references or sources. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... The Toyota Gator Bowl is an annual college football bowl game that is played at ALLTEL Stadium in Jacksonville, Florida. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant research university located in Clemson, South Carolina. ... Wayne Woodrow “Woody” Hayes (February 14, 1913 – March 12, 1987) was a college football coach who is best remembered for his 28-year tenure at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, from 1951-1978. ...


"When Coach Ford was named coach at Clemson, there were mixed emotions," recalls Jeff Davis, a Clemson Ring of Honor member. "It was obvious that he had so many things to offer. And what he lacked he made up for in working harder than anyone else and communicating his expectations to the players. He blossomed as well as any coach could."


He compiled a 96-29-4 (.760) record at Clemson, including a 6-2 bowl record. He was the third winningest coach in the country on a percentage basis after the '89 season. Ford also coached 21 All-Americans and 41 players who went on to play in the NFL, during his 11 seasons in Tigertown. The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ...


In 1981, Ford helped Clemson reach the summit of college football by winning the National Championship, the first by any Clemson team. His Tigers, who were unranked in the preseason, downed three top-10 teams during the course of the 12-0 season that concluded with a 22-15 victory over Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. Ford, national Coach of the Year in '81, is still the youngest coach to win a national championship on the gridiron. He also led Clemson to a 30-2-2 record between 1981-1983, best in the nation. Immediately following the 1982 season Clemson was placed on probation by the NCAA for recruiting violations. Seal of the University of Nebraska The University of Nebraska is one of two public university systems in the state of Nebraska, USA. The system has four universities and a technical college: University of Nebraska-Lincoln University of Nebraska at Omaha University of Nebraska at Kearney University of Nebraska Medical... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ...


Clemson won three straight ACC titles under his guidance between 1986 and 1988. In 1989, Clemson registered a 10-2 season and top-12 national ranking for the fourth straight season. Ford, who always wore a block "C" cap and chewed tobacco on the sideline, closed his career with a 27-7 win over West Virginia (and their All-America quarterback Major Harris) in the Gator Bowl. In the decade of the 1980s, Clemson had the nation's fifth-highest winning percentage. The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... The West Virginia Mountaineers are the athletic teams of West Virginia University. ... An All-America team is a sports team composed of star players. ... Major Harris (February 15, 1968–) was a college quarterback for West Virginia University during the 1980s. ...


While at Clemson, Ford defeated many College Football Hall of Fame coaches. These include Joe Paterno, Tom Osborne, Barry Switzer, Bobby Bowden, Vince Dooley, and Woody Hayes. College Football Hall of Fame front. ... Joseph Vincent Paterno (born December 21, 1926, in Brooklyn, New York), nicknamed JoePa, is the head coach of Pennsylvania State Universitys college football team, a position he has held since 1966. ... Tom Osborne may refer to: Thomas William Tom Osborne, long-time college football coach at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln; more recently a member of the United States House of Representatives Tom Osborne, politician in Newfoundland and Labrador and member of the Cabinet of Newfoundland and Labrador This is a... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert Cleckler Bowden (born November 8, 1929 in Birmingham, Alabama), better known as Bobby Bowden, is the winningest coach in NCAA Division I football history with 366 career wins. ... Vincent Joseph Dooley (born September 4, 1932 in Mobile, Alabama) was the head football coach (seasons 1964 through 1988) and athletic director (1979 to 2004) at the University of Georgia. ... Wayne Woodrow “Woody” Hayes (February 14, 1913 – March 12, 1987) was a college football coach who is best remembered for his 28-year tenure at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, from 1951-1978. ...


After Clemson

Ford resigned on January 18, 1990, after a falling out with Clemson administration. He was subsequently cleared in an NCAA investigation that also was announced around that time. Though there is contention among those who attended Clemson at that time as to whether that was the true reason for his forced resignation.


Joe Kines brought Ford to the University of Arkansas in 1992 to help with the clean-up following Frank Broyles' firing Jack Crowe after a loss to The Citadel. Ford took Kines job in 1993, leading Arkansas to an SEC West championship in 1995 on the legs of Madre Hill and the defensive genius of Joe Lee Dunn, after emerging from 2 years of probation imposed under Crowe. Broyles fired Ford following an inappropriate remark caught on television during the 1997 season, the second of back-to-back 4-7 campaigns. Ford finished 26-30-1 in five seasons with the Razorbacks, but left the cupboard full for successor Houston Nutt, who coached the Hogs to 9-3 and 8-4 seasons in 1998 and 1999. Joe Kines (b. ... The University of Arkansas known also as the U of A or UA, is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... Frank Broyles, current athletic director for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks athletic department. ... Jack Crowe was the head football coach at the University of Arkansas from 1990 to 1992. ... The Citadel may be: The Citadel, a 1937 novel by Scottish author A.J. Cronin The Citadel, a 1938 film based on the novel The Citadel, two 1960 U.S. and one 1983 BBC adaptations of the novel The Citadel, a diving spot in Martinique The Citadel, a fictional alien... Madre Hill (born January 2, 1976 in Malvern, Arkansas) is a former NFL running back. ... Joe Lee Dunn is the former defensive coordinator of the Memphis Tigers football program. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Ford and his wife, Deborah, have four children, Jennifer, Ashleigh, Elizabeth, and Lee, as well as two nieces, three great nephews and two great nieces: Kendall, Sam, Max, Spencer, and Molly. They currently reside in the Clemson, SC area. Clemson is a city located in South Carolina, a state of the United States of America. ...


External links

  • The Razorback Legacy - Danny Ford Record / Bio
Preceded by
Charley Pell
Clemson Tigers Head Coach
19791989
Succeeded by
Ken Hatfield
Preceded by
Vince Dooley
Paul "Bear" Bryant Award
1981
Succeeded by
Joe Paterno
Preceded by
Joe Kines
University of Arkansas Head Football Coach
19931997
Succeeded by
Houston Nutt

Riggs • W.M. Williams • Penton • Heisman • Shealy • CochemsWilliamsShaughnessy • Stone • Dobson • Hart • DonahueStewartSaundersCodyNeelyHowardIngramParkerPellFordHatfieldWestBowden This article or section needs additional references or sources. ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant research university located in Clemson, South Carolina. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Ken Hatfield is an American football head coach. ... Vincent Joseph Dooley (born September 4, 1932 in Mobile, Alabama) was the head football coach (seasons 1964 through 1988) and athletic director (1979 to 2004) at the University of Georgia. ... The Paul Bear Bryant Award has been given out annually since 1957 to NCAA college footballs coach of the year. ... Joseph Vincent Paterno (born December 21, 1926, in Brooklyn, New York), nicknamed JoePa, is the head coach of Pennsylvania State Universitys college football team, a position he has held since 1966. ... Joe Kines (b. ... The Arkansas Razorbacks, also known as the Hogs, are the names of college sports teams at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Clemson University is a member of the NCAAs Division I and is in the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... John William Heisman (October 23, 1869 – October 3, 1936) was a prominent American football player and college football coach in the early era of the sport and is the namesake of the Heisman Trophy awarded annually to the seasons best college football player. ... Eddie Cochems, circa 1906 Edward Eddie Cochems (Born 1877 in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin - Died 1953 in Madison, Wisconsin) was the first American football coach to build an offense around the forward pass. ... Bob Williams is unique in Clemson football history for being one of the few coaches in the country to have coached at two schools involved in a rivalry (two years at the University of South Carolina), as well as being the Tigers only three-term coach. ... Francis Joseph Shag Shaughnessy (born April 8, 1884, Amboy, Illinois; died May 15, 1969, Montreal) was a football and baseball player and coach. ... Frank Mills Dobson (born January 10, 1885, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA) was a football coach (with James Coulter) at the University of Georgia in 1909 and subsequently head coach at Clemson University, the University of Richmond, the University of South Carolina, the University of Maryland, and The Apprentice School. ... Edward Donahue was the head football coach at Clemson from 1917 to 1920. ... E. J. Stewart was a collegiate football and basketball coach. ... William H. Navy Bill Saunders was a college football coach at Clemson, Colorado, and Northern Colorado. ... Josh Cody was a college football coach. ... Jess C. Neely (January 4, 1898 - April 9, 1983) was a college football coach at Clemson, and Rice. ... Frank J. Howard (March 25, 1909 - January 26, 1996) was an American college football player and coach. ... Hootie Ingram was the head football coach at Clemson from 1970 to 1972. ... Jimmy Red Parker was a college football coach. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources. ... Ken Hatfield is an American football head coach. ... Thomas Tommy Cleveland West (born on July 31, 1954, in Carrollton, Georgia) is the current Head Coach of Football at the University of Memphis. ... Tommy Bowden (born July 10, 1954 in Birmingham, Alabama) is the head football coach at Clemson University. ...

Futrall • B.N. Wilson • Searles • Thomas • D.A. McDaniel • A.D. Brown • LongmanBezdek • E.T. Pickering • T.T. McConnell • Paine • J.B. Craig • McLarenSchmidtThomsenCole • Tomlin • Rose • BarnhillDouglasWyattMitchellBroylesHoltzHatfieldCroweKinesFordNutt The Razorbacks are the mascot for the University of Arkansas The Arkansas Razorbacks, also known as the Hogs, are the names of college sports teams at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... Charles Thomas was a college football coach. ... Frank Longman was a college football coach. ... Hugo Francis Bezdek (April 1, 1883 in Prague, Austria-Hungary – September 19, 1952 in Atlantic City, New Jersey) was a Czech-American sports figure in the first half of the 20th century. ... Norman C Paine was the head football coach at Baylor University in 1913. ... George W. McLaren was a college football coach. ... Francis Albert Schmidt (December 3, 1885 - September 19, 1944) was an American football coach and is an inductee in the College Football Hall of Fame. ... Fred Thomsen was a college football coach. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... John Barnhill was the Head Football Coach for the University of Tennessee for four seasons from 1941 to 1945. ... Otis Douglas(died 1989) was the head football coach for the Arkansas Razorbacks football program from 1951-1954. ... Bowden Wyatt (d. ... Jack Mitchell was a college football coach. ... Frank Broyles, current athletic director for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks athletic department. ... Louis Leo Holtz (born on January 6, 1937 in Follansbee, West Virginia) is a former NCAA football head coach, and is currently an author and a motivational speaker who has spoken to the likes of Fortune 500 companies on topics such as the importance of teamwork and goal setting. ... Ken Hatfield is an American football head coach. ... Jack Crowe was the head football coach at the University of Arkansas from 1990 to 1992. ... Joe Kines (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Danny Ford - ClemsonWiki (1192 words)
Danny Ford was a very popular Clemson head football coach who oversaw Clemson's only National Championship season in 1981.
In his eleven seasons at the helm of the Tiger gridiron program between 1979 and 1989, Ford racked up a 96-29-4 record and is one of only two coaches in ACC history with over a 75 percent average (minimum four years).
With the 1978 Gator Bowl victory at age 30, Danny Ford was both the youngest NCAA Division I college head coach, and the only one whose record consisted of a single bowl win.
Danny Ford at AllExperts (684 words)
Danny Ford led Clemson to its one and only national championship in football in 1981, coaching a total of 11 seasons in Tigertown.
Ford, national Coach of the Year in '81, is still the youngest coach to win a national championship on the gridiron.
Ford took Kines job in 1993, leading Arkansas to an SEC West championship in 1995 on the legs of Madre Hill.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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