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Encyclopedia > Danish Empire
Denmark-Norway's possessions c. 1800
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Denmark-Norway's possessions c. 1800

In various forms, Denmark has had colonial possessions since the beginning of the 13th century, when it obtained possessions in Estonia. In personal union with Norway, Denmark-Norway had possession of old Norwegian holdings, Greenland, the Faroe Islands, Orkney, Shetland and Iceland. In the 17th century, following territorial losses on the Scandinavian Peninsula, Denmark-Norway began to develop colonies, forts, and trading posts in Africa, the Caribbean, and India. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 42 KB) Denmark-Norway and possessions in 1800. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 42 KB) Denmark-Norway and possessions in 1800. ... Estonia was a dominion of Denmark during Middle Ages. ... The Kingdom of Denmark-Norway, consisting of Denmark and Norway, including Norways possessions Iceland, Greenland and the Faroe Islands, is a term used for the two united kingdoms after their amalgamation as one state in 1536. ... The Orkney Islands form one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, and are a Lieutenancy Area. ... See Shetland (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... The Scandinavian Peninsula is in northeastern Europe, consisting principally of the mainland territories of Norway and Sweden. ... For other uses, see Africa (disambiguation). ... Central America and the Caribbean (detailed pdf map) The Caribbean (Spanish: Caribe; French: Caraïbe; Dutch: Caraïben; Portuguese: Caribe or Caraíbas) is a region of the Americas consisting of the Caribbean Sea, its islands (most of which enclose the sea), and the surrounding coasts. ...


Christian IV first initiated the policy of expanding Denmark's overseas trade, as part of the mercantilist wave that was sweeping Europe. Denmark's first colony was established at Tranquebar, or Trankebar, on India's southcoast in 1620. Admiral Ove Gjedde led the expedition that established the colony. King Christian IV. Christian IV (April 12, 1577–February 28, 1648), king of Denmark and Norway, the son of Frederick II, king of Denmark and Norway, and Sofie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, was born at Frederiksborg castle in 1577, and succeeded to the throne on the death of his father (April... Mercantilism is the economic theory that a nations prosperity depended upon its supply of gold and silver, that the total volume of trade is unchangeable. ... Tranquebar, 1600. ... Events September 6 - English emigrants on the Mayflower depart from Plymouth, England for the future New England and arrive at the end of the year. ...


The only remaining vestige of this empire, and its only substantial territory ever, is that of Greenland, whose colonial status ceased in 1953, and is now an autonomous region of the Danish state. The Faroes have autonomy since 1948 within the Danish Empire. The Faroe Islands (Faroese: Føroyar, meaning Sheep Islands) are a group of islands in the north Atlantic Ocean between Scotland and Iceland. ...

Contents


India

Main article: Danish India
Danish and other European settlements in India.
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Danish and other European settlements in India.

Denmark maintained a scattering of small colonies and trading posts throughout the Indian sub-continent and Ceylon from the 17th to 19th centuries, after which most were sold or ceded to Britain which had become the dominant power there. Danish India is a term for the former colonies of Denmark in India, which included the town of Tranquebar in present-day Tamil Nadu state, and the Nicobar Islands, currently part of Indias union territory of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1140x700, 232 KB) Summary Map of India with Sri Lanka, illustrating locations of European settlements in the subcontinent between 1501 and 1739 CE. Adaptation from: [1] with reference varification from: [2] (URL accessed: 23-Mar-2006) Licensing File links The following... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1140x700, 232 KB) Summary Map of India with Sri Lanka, illustrating locations of European settlements in the subcontinent between 1501 and 1739 CE. Adaptation from: [1] with reference varification from: [2] (URL accessed: 23-Mar-2006) Licensing File links The following...


The colony at Trankebar was kept for over 200 years, with a few interruptions, until it was sold to the British in 1845. Trankebar was never an enormously profitable venture, but it was still something of a success. Categories: India geography stubs ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1755 Denmark acquired the village of Serampore (Frederiksnagore), and later the towns of Achne and Pirapur. They are located about 25 kilometres north of Calcutta. In 1829 a Danish university was established at Serampore, which still exists today. These towns were also sold to Britain in 1845. Other colonial ventures include colonization attempts of Dansborg and the Nicobar Islands, called Frederik Ă˜erne ("Frederik Islands") by the Danes. Serampore, India, is a pre-colonial town on the right bank of the Hoogli River in the Hooghly (Hughli) district of West Bengal. ... Serampore is a pre-colonial town on the right bank of the Hoogli River in the Hooghly (Hughli) district of Indias West Bengal state. ... This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ... Tranquebar, about 1600. ... Map of Nicobar Islands The Nicobar Islands are an island chain in the eastern Indian Ocean, and are part of India. ...


Caribbean

Main article: Danish West Indies

Denmark acquired the island of St. Thomas in 1671, St. Jan (today St. John) in 1718, and bought St. Croix from France in 1733. All of the islands' economies were based primarily on sugar. These islands were known as the Danish West Indies and were eventually sold to the United States in 1917 for 25 million dollars. The Danes had been looking to get rid of the islands for some decades as the economies of the islands had been declining. The United States hoped to use them as naval bases. Since 1917, the islands have been known as the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Danish West Indies or Danish Antilles, (DWI, Dansk Vest Indien) are a former colony of Denmark in the Caribbean, now known as the U.S. Virgin Islands. ... Saint Thomas is an island in the Caribbean Sea and a constituent of the United States Virgin Islands (USVI). ... Oppenheimer Beach, in St John, U.S. Virgin Islands. ... // Events The Funj warrior aristocracy deposes the reigning mek and places one of their own ranks on the throne of Sennar. ... A separate article treats the several rivers known as the St. ... Events February 12 - British colonist James Oglethorpe founds Savannah, Georgia. ... Magnified crystals of refined sugar Magnification of typical sugar In general use, non-scientists take sugar to mean sucrose, also called table sugar or saccharose, a white crystalline solid disaccharide. ... The Danish West Indies or Danish Antilles, (DWI, Dansk Vest Indien) are a former colony of Denmark in the Caribbean, now known as the U.S. Virgin Islands. ...


Africa

Main article: Danish Gold Coast

Denmark maintained a number of tradings stations and four forts on the Gold Coast in west Africa, especially around modern day Ghana. The three trading stations were Fort Fredriksborg (Kpompo), Fort Christiansborg, (by Accra in 1661) that was purchased from Sweden, and Frederiksberg. The forts were Fort Prinsensten built in 1784, Fort Augustaborg from 1787, Fort Friedensborg and Fort Kongensten, several of which are ruins today. Of these, only one is still used today, Fort Christiansborg, which is Ghanian president's residence in Ghana. Plantations were established by Frederiksborg, but they failed. Fort Christiansborg became the base for Danish power in west Africa, and the centre for slave trade to the Danish West Indies. In 1807, Denmark's African business partners were suppressed by the Ashanti, which led the abandonment of all trading stations. Denmark sold its forts to Great Britain in 1850. The Danish Gold Coast was a part of the Gold Coast (roughly present-day Ghana), which is on the West African Gulf of Guinea (hence the territory is sometimes called Danish Guinea), which was colonized by the Danes, first by the Danish West India Company (a chartered company), later as... Flag of Gold Coast Gold Coast was a British colony on the Gulf of Guinea in west Africa. ... The skyline Location of Accra Labadi Beach Downtown Accra Accra, population 1,970,400 (2005), is the capital of Ghana. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Ashanti may mean: Ashanti Confederacy, a powerful state of ancient West Africa Ashanti, a region of Ghana Ashanti people, an ethnic group HMS Ashanti, the name of two Royal Navy warships Ashanti Gold, a gold mining company, now owned by AngloGold Ashanti is also the name of: Ashanti (born 1980...


See also

Denmark had a colonial empire from the 18th century until the 20th. ...

External links

  • List of Danish colonial possessions List of Danish colonial possessions


 
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