FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Daniel Webster
Daniel Webster


In office
March 6, 1841 – May 8, 1843
July 23, 1850October 24, 1852
Preceded by John Forsyth
John M. Clayton
Succeeded by Abel P. Upshur
Edward Everett

Born January 18, 1782(1782-01-18)
Salisbury, New Hampshire
Died October 24, 1852 (aged 70)
Marshfield, Massachusetts
Political party Federalist
National Republican
Whig
Spouse Grace Fletcher Webster
Caroline LeRoy Webster
Profession Politician, Lawyer
Religion Unitarian Universalism

Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nation's antebellum era. He first rose to regional prominence through his defense of New England shipping interests. His increasingly nationalistic views and the effectiveness with which he articulated them led Webster to become one of the most famous orators and influential Whig leaders of the Second Party System. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Portait of U.S. Secretary of State John Forsyth John Forsyth (October 22, 1780 – October 21, 1841) was a 19th century American politician from Georgia. ... John Middleton Clayton (July 24, 1796–November 9, 1856) was an American statesman from Delaware who served as a U.S. Senator and as the U.S. Secretary of State from 1849 to 1850. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur Abel Parker Upshur (June 17, 1790–February 28, 1844) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... Edward Everett (April 11, 1794 – January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Salisbury is a town located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Marshfield is a town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... it can also be known as NRP.The National Republican Party was a United States political party that existed for a relatively brief period in the 1820s at the start of the Second Party System. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... The flaming chalice is the universally recognized symbol for Unitarian Universalism. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolising French nationalism during the July Revolution 1830. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Second Party System is the term historians give to the political system existing in the United States from about 1824 to 1854. ...


As an attorney, Webster served as legal counsel in several cases that established important constitutional precedents that bolstered the authority of the Federal government. As Secretary of State, he negotiated the Webster-Ashburton Treaty that established the definitive eastern border between the United States and Canada. Primarily recognized for his Senate tenure, Webster was a key figure in the institution's "Golden Age." So well-known was his skill as a Senator throughout this period that Webster became a third and northern counterpart of what was and still is known today as the "Great Triumvirate," with his colleagues Henry Clay from the west and John C. Calhoun from the south. His "Reply to Hayne" in 1830 was generally regarded as "the most eloquent speech ever delivered in Congress."[1] For information on the type of fish called Lawyer, see the article on Burbot. ... This article describes the government of the United States. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... The Webster-Ashburton Treaty, signed August 9, 1842, settled the dispute over the location of the Maine-New Brunswick border between the United States and Great Britain and the shared use of the Great Lakes. ... The Peace Arch border between Surrey, British Columbia and Blaine, Washington Canada and the United States of America share the longest common border in the world. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The Great Triumvirate is a term that refers to the three statesmen who dominated the United States Senate in the 1830s and 1840s, namely: Henry Clay of Kentucky, Daniel Webster of Massachusetts, and John C. Calhoun of South Carolina. ... For his namesake son, see Henry Clay, Jr. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century, at the center of the foreign policy and financial disputes of his age and best known as a spokesman for... The Webster-Hayne debate was a famous debate in the U.S. between Senator Daniel Webster of Massachusetts and Senator Robert Y. Hayne of South Carolina that took place on January 19-27, 1830 regarding protectionist tariffs. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...


Similar to Henry Clay, Webster's desire to see the Union preserved and conflict averted led him to search out compromises designed to stave off the sectionalism that threatened war between the North and South. Webster tried three times to achieve the Presidency; all three bids failed, the final one in part because of his compromises. Similarly Webster's efforts to steer the nation away from civil war toward a definite peace ultimately proved futile. Despite this, Webster came to be esteemed for these efforts and was officially named by the Senate in 1957 as one of its five most outstanding members. In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life

Webster was born January 18, 1782 to Ebenezer and Abigail Webster (née Eastman) in Salisbury, New Hampshire, which was later incorporated as a part of the present town of Franklin in 1828. There he and his nine siblings were raised on his parents' farm, a small parcel of land granted to his father in recognition of his service in the French and Indian War. As Daniel was a “sickly” child, his family indulged him, exempting him from the harsh rigors of 18th-century New England farm life.[2] is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Salisbury is a town located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... Franklin is a city located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, at the merging of the Pemigewasset and Winnipesaukee Rivers to form the Merrimack River. ... Daniel Webster Family Home is a site significant for its . ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...

Webster Hall at Dartmouth College houses the Rauner Special Collections Library in which some of Webster's personal belongings and writings are held

Webster attended Phillips Exeter Academy, a preparatory school in Exeter, New Hampshire, before attending Dartmouth College. After he graduated from Dartmouth (Phi Beta Kappa), Webster was apprenticed to the lawyer Thomas W. Thompson. Webster was forced to resign and become a schoolmaster (as young men often did then, when public education consisted largely of subsidies to local schoolmasters), when his older brother's own quest for education put a financial strain on the family that consequently required Webster's support. In 1802 he served as the headmaster of the Fryeburg Academy, Maine, for the period of one year.[3] When his brother's education could no longer be sustained, Webster returned to his apprenticeship. Webster left New Hampshire and got employment in Boston under the prominent attorney Christopher Gore in 1804. Clerking for Gore—who was involved in international, national, and state politics—Webster educated himself on various political subjects and met New England politicians.[4] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Thomas Weston Thompson (March 15, 1766 - October 1, 1821) was a United States Representative and Senator from New Hampshire. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Fryeburg Academy, founded 1792, is one of the oldest private schools in the United States. ... Boston redirects here. ... Christopher Gore (September 21, 1758 - March 1, 1827) was a prominent Massachusetts lawyer, Federalist politician, and diplomat. ...


In 1805 Webster was accepted into the bar and returned to New Hampshire to set up a practice in Boscawen, in part to be near his ailing father. During this time, Webster took a more active interest in politics. Raised by an ardently Federalist father and taught by a predominantly Federalist-leaning faculty at Dartmouth, Webster, like many New Englanders, supported Federalism. Accordingly, he accepted a number of minor local speaking engagements in support of Federalist causes and candidates.[5] In the United States, admission to the bar is permission granted by a particular court system to a lawyer to practice law in that system. ... Boscawen is a town located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ...


After his father's death in 1806, Webster handed over his practice to his older brother Ezekiel, who had by this time finished his schooling and been admitted to the bar. Webster then moved to the larger town of Portsmouth in 1807, and opened a practice there.[6] During this time the Napoleonic Wars began to affect Americans as Britain, short of sailors, strengthened its navy through the impressment of American sailors thought to be British deserters. President Thomas Jefferson retaliated with the Embargo Act of 1807, ceasing all trade to both Britain and France. As New England was heavily reliant upon commerce with the two nations, the region vehemently opposed Jefferson's attempt at "peaceable coercion," including Webster, who wrote an anonymous pamphlet attacking it.[7] Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Sicily  Spain[3]  Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Italy Naples [5] Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[6] Saxony[7] Denmark-Norway [8] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich João Francisco de Saldanha Oliveira e Daun Gebhard von... Look up Impressment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... The Embargo Act was a series of laws passed by the Congress of the United States between the years 1806-1808, during the second term of President Thomas Jefferson. ...


Eventually the trouble with England escalated into the War of 1812. That same year, Daniel Webster gave an address to the Washington Benevolent Society, an oration that proved critical to his career. The speech decried the war and the violation of New England's shipping rights that preceded it, but it also strongly denounced the extremism of those more radical among the unhappy New Englanders who were beginning to call for the region's secession from the Union. This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ...


The Washington oration was widely circulated and read throughout New Hampshire, and it led to Webster's 1812 selection to the Rockingham Convention, an assembly that sought to formally declare the state's grievances with President James Madison and the federal government. There, he was a member of the drafting committee and was chosen to compose the Rockingham Memorial to be sent to Madison. The report included much of the same tone and opinions held in the Washington Society address, except that it, uncharacteristically of its chief architect, alluded to the threat of secession saying, "If a separation of the states shall ever take place, it will be, on some occasion, when one portion of the country undertakes to control, to regulate, and to sacrifice the interest of another."[6] Madison redirects here. ... This article describes the government of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of...

"The Administration asserts the right to fill the ranks of the regular army by compulsion...Is this, sir, consistent with the character of a free government? Is this civil liberty? Is this the real character of our Constitution? No sire, indeed it is not....Where is it written in the Constitution, in what article or section is it contained, that you may take children from their parents, and compel them to fight the battles of any war in which the folly or the wickedness of government may engage it? Under what concealment has this power lain hidden which now for the first time comes forth, with a tremendous and bailful aspect, to trample down and destroy the dearest rights of personal liberty?
Daniel Webster (December 9, 1814 House of Representatives Address)

Webster's efforts on behalf of New England Federalism, shipping interests, and war opposition resulted in his election to the House of Representatives in 1812, where he served two terms ending March 1817. He was an outspoken critic of the Madison administration and its wartime policies, denouncing its efforts at financing the war through paper money and opposing Secretary of War James Monroe's conscription proposal. Notable in his second term was his support of the reestablishment of a stable specie-based national bank; but he opposed the tariff of 1816 (which sought to protect the nation's manufacturing interests) and House Speaker Henry Clay's American System. Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The U.S. House election, 1812 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1812. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... For other persons named James Monroe, see James Monroe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the history of central banking in the United States, from the 1790s to the present. ... The Tariff of 1816 was put in place after the War of 1812, Britain had developed a large stockpile of goods, such as iron and textile. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... The Monkey System or Every One For Himself Henry Clay says Walk in and see the new improved original grand American System! The cages are labeled: Home, Consumption, Internal, Improv. This 1831 cartoon ridiculing Clays American System depicts monkeys, labeled as being different parts of a nations economy...


This opposition was in accordance with a number of his professed beliefs (and the majority of his constituents') including free trade, that the tariff's "great object was to raise revenue, not to foster manufacture," and that it was against "the true spirit of the Constitution" to give "excessive bounties or encouragements to one [industry] over another."[8][9] Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ...


After his second term, Webster did not seek a third, choosing his law practice instead. In an attempt to secure greater financial success for himself and his family (he had married Grace Fletcher in 1808, with whom he had four children), he moved his practice from Portsmouth to Boston.[10]


Notable Supreme Court Cases

Webster pleads Dartmouth's case before the Court.

Webster had been highly regarded in New Hampshire since his days in Boscawen, and had been respected throughout the House during his service there. He came to national prominence, however, as counsel in a number of important Supreme Court cases.[2] These cases remain major precedents in the Constitutional jurisprudence of the United States. Image File history File links DanielWebster_DartmouthCollegeCase. ... Image File history File links DanielWebster_DartmouthCollegeCase. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... In law, a precedent or authority is a legal case establishing a principle or rule that a court may need to adopt when deciding subsequent cases with similar issues or facts. ... In the United States, constitutional law generally refers to the provisions of the United States Constitution, as interpreted by the United States Supreme Court. ...


In 1816, Webster was retained by the Federalist trustees of his alma mater, Dartmouth College, to represent them in their case against the newly elected New Hampshire Republican state legislature. The legislature had passed new laws converting Dartmouth into a state institution, by changing the size of the college's trustee body and adding a further board of overseers, which they put into the hands of the state senate.[11] New Hampshire argued that they, as successor in sovereignty to George III, who had chartered Dartmouth, had the right to revise the charter. Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... The New Hampshire General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... “George III” redirects here. ...

"This, sir, is my case. It is the case not merely of that humble institution, it is the case of every college in our land... Sir, you may destroy this little institution; it is weak; it is in your hands! I know it is one of the lesser lights in the literary horizon of our country. You may put it out. But if you do so you must carry through your work! You must extinguish, one after another, all those greater lights of science which for more than a century have thrown their radiance over our land. It is, sir, as I have said, a small college. And yet there are those who love it!"

Daniel Webster (Dartmouth College v. Woodward)

Webster argued Dartmouth College v. Woodward to the Supreme Court (with significant aid from Jeremiah Mason and Jeremiah Smith), invoking Article I, section 10 of the Constitution (the Contract Clause) against the State. The Marshall court, continuing with its history of limiting states' rights and reaffirming the supremacy of the Constitutional protection of contract, ruled in favor of Webster and Dartmouth 3–1. This decided that corporations did not, as many then held, have to justify their privileges by acting in the public interest, but were independent of the states.[12] Trustees of Dartmouth College vs. ... Jeremiah Mason (April 27, 1768 - October 14, 1848) was a United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... Jeremiah Smith (November 29, 1759–September 21, 1842) was an American lawyer, jurist and politician from Exeter, New Hampshire. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Article One of the United States Constitution Article One of the United States Constitution describes the powers of the legislative branch of the United States government, known as Congress, which includes the House of Representatives and the Senate. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For other persons named John Marshall, see John Marshall (disambiguation). ... States rights refers to the idea, in U.S. politics and constitutional law, that U.S. states possess certain rights and political powers in relation to the federal government. ... Corporations law or corporate law is the law concerning the creation and regulation of corporations. ...


Other notable appearances by Webster before the Supreme Court include his representation of James McCulloch in McCulloch v. Maryland (1819), the Cohens in Cohens v. Virginia, and Thomas Gibbons in Gibbons v. Ogden (1824), cases similar to Dartmouth in the court's application of a broad interpretation of the Constitution and strengthening of the federal courts' power to constrain the states, which have since been used to justify wide powers for the federal government. Webster's handling of these cases made him one of the era's foremost constitutional lawyers, as well as one of the most highly paid.[13] Holding Although the Constitution does not specifically give Congress the power to establish a bank, it does delegate the ability to tax and spend, and a bank is a proper and suitable instrument to assist the operations of the government in the collection and disbursement of the revenue. ... Cohens v. ... Holding Judgment of the New York courts was reversed. ...


Return to politics

Webster's growing prominence as a constitutional lawyer led to his election as a delegate to the 1820 Massachusetts Constitutional Convention. There he spoke in opposition to universal suffrage (for men), on the Federalist grounds that power naturally follows property, and the vote should be limited accordingly; but the constitution was amended against his advice.[14] He also supported the (existing) districting of the State Senate so that each seat represented an equal amount of property.[15] This article is about the U.S. state. ... Constitutional convention may refer to: Constitutional convention (political meeting), a meeting of delegates to adopt a new constitution or revise an existing constitution Philadelphia Convention, of 1787, resulted in the United States Constitution Missouri Constitutional Convention (1861-63), Missouris provisional government during American Civil War Constitutional Convention (Australia), four... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of the right to vote to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, intelligence, or economic or social status. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Massachusetts Senate is the upper house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ...


Webster's performance at the convention furthered his reputation. Joseph Story (also a delegate at the convention) wrote to Jeremiah Mason following the convention saying "Our friend Webster has gained a noble reputation. He was before known as a lawyer; but he has now secured the title of an eminent and enlightened statesman."[16] Webster also spoke at Plymouth commemorating the landing of the Pilgrims in 1620; his oration was widely circulated and read throughout New England. He was elected to the Eighteenth Congress in 1822, from Boston. American jurist Joseph Story Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 - September 10, 1845), American jurist, was born at Marblehead, Massachusetts. ...   Settled: 1620 â€“ Incorporated: 1620 Zip Code(s): 02360 â€“ Area Code(s): 508 / 774 Official website: http://www. ... Plymouth Rock, described by some as the most disappointing landmark in America because of its small size and poor visitor access. ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ... Year 1620 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... (Redirected from 18th United States Congress) Eighteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... The U.S. House election, 1822 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1822. ...


In his second term, Webster found himself a leader of the fragmented House Federalists who had split following the failure of the secessionist-minded 1814 Hartford Convention that he avoided. Speaker Henry Clay made Webster chairman of the Judiciary Committee in an attempt to win his and the Federalists' support. His term of service in the House between 1822 and 1828 was marked by his legislative success at reforming the United States criminal code, and his failure at expanding the size of the Supreme Court. He largely supported the National Republican administration of John Quincy Adams, including Adams' candidacy in the highly contested election of 1824 and the administration's defense of treaty-sanctioned Creek Indian land rights against Georgia's expansionist claims.[17] The Secret Journal of the Hartford Convention, published 1823. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... For his namesake son, see Henry Clay, Jr. ... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... it can also be known as NRP.The National Republican Party was a United States political party that existed for a relatively brief period in the 1820s at the start of the Second Party System. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... In the United States presidential election of 1824, John Quincy Adams was elected President on February 9, 1825 after the election was thrown into the House of Representatives. ... The Creek are an American Indian people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ...


While a Representative, Webster continued accepting speaking engagements in New England, most notably his oration on the fiftieth anniversary of Bunker Hill (1825) and his eulogy on Adams and Jefferson (1826). With the support of a coalition of both Federalists and Republicans, Webster's record in the House and his celebrity as an orator led to his June 1827 election to the Senate from Massachusetts. His first wife, Grace, died in January 1828, and he married Caroline LeRoy in December 1829. For a list of numerous places and things that are named after this battle, see Bunker Hill. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


Senate

Webster Replying to Hayne by George P.A. Healy

When Webster returned to the Senate from his wife's funeral in March 1828, he found the body considering a new tariff bill that sought to increase the duties on foreign manufactured goods on top of the increases of 1824 and 1816, both of which Webster had opposed. Now, however, Webster changed his position to support a protective tariff. Explaining the change, Webster stated that after the failure of the rest of the nation to heed New England's objections in 1816 and 1824, "nothing was left to New England but to conform herself to the will of others," and now consequently being heavily invested in manufacturing, he would not now do them injury. It is the more blunt opinion of Justus D. Doenecke that Webster's support of the 1828 tariff was a result of "his new closeness to the rising mill-owning families of the region, the Lawrences and the Lowells."[6] Webster also gave greater approval to Clay's American System, a change that along with his modified view of the tariff brought him closer to Henry Clay. Image File history File links 06-18-2006_10;50;42PM_(2). ... Image File history File links 06-18-2006_10;50;42PM_(2). ... The Tariff of 1828, also known as the Tariff of Abominations, was a protective tariff passed by the U.S. Congress in 1828. ... In economics, a duty is a kind of tax, often associated with customs, a payment due to the revenue of a state, levied by force of law. ... Abbott Lawrence (December 16, 1792–August 18, 1855) was a prominent American businessman, politician, and philanthropist. ... The Lowell family was founded in America by Percival Lowle (1571–1664); his grown sons John (1595–1647) and Richard (1602–82); and his daughter, Joanna Oliver (1609–77), when their families sailed from England to the newly established settlement of Newburyport on the north shore of the Merrimack...


The passage of the tariff brought increased sectional tensions to the U.S., tensions that were agitated by then Vice President John C. Calhoun's promulgation of his South Carolina Exposition and Protest. The exposition espoused the idea of nullification, a doctrine first articulated in the U.S. by Madison and Jefferson that held that states were sovereign entities and held ultimate authority over the limits of the power of the federal government, and could thus "nullify" any act of the central government it deemed unconstitutional. While for a time the tensions increased by Calhoun's exposition lay beneath the surface, they burst forth when South Carolina Senator Robert Young Hayne opened the 1830 Webster-Hayne debate. The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century, at the center of the foreign policy and financial disputes of his age and best known as a spokesman for... The South Carolina Exposition and Protest, also known as Calhouns Exposition , was written in 1828 by John C. Calhoun,in disguise under the pseudonym Mr. ... The process of nullification may refer to: The Hartford Convention, in which New England Federalists considered secession from the United States of America. ... Madison redirects here. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... “Sovereign” redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Robert Young Hayne (November 10, 1791–September 24, 1839) was an American political leader. ... The Webster-Hayne debate was a famous debate in the U.S. between Senator Daniel Webster of Massachusetts and Senator Robert Y. Hayne of South Carolina that took place on January 19-27, 1830 regarding protectionist tariffs. ...


By 1830, Federal land policy had long been an issue. The National Republican administration had held land prices high. According to Adams' Secretary of the Treasury Richard Rush, this served to provide the federal government with an additional source of revenue, but also to discourage westward migration that tended to increase wages through the increased scarcity of labor.[18] Senator Hayne, in an effort to sway the west against the north and the tariff, seized upon a minor point in the land debate and accused the north of attempting to limit western expansion for their own benefit. As Vice President Calhoun was presiding officer over the Senate but could not address the Senate in business, James Schouler contended that Hayne was doing what Calhoun could not.[19] The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Wikipedia also has an entry for Richard Rush (director) Richard Rush Richard Rush (August 29, 1780–July 30, 1859) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... A government map, probably created in the mid-20th century, that depicts a simplified history of territorial acquisitions within the continental United States. ... The President of the Senate is the title often given to the presiding officer, or chairman, of a senate. ...

An early daguerreotype of Daniel Webster

The next day, Webster, feeling compelled to respond on New England's behalf, gave his first rebuttal to Hayne, highlighting what he saw as the virtues of the North's policies toward the west and claiming that restrictions on western expansion and growth were primarily the responsibility of southerners. Hayne in turn responded the following day, denouncing Webster's inconsistencies with regards to the American system and personally attacking Webster for his role in the so called "corrupt bargain" of 1824. The course of the debate strayed even further away from the initial matter of land sales with Hayne openly defending the "Carolina Doctrine" of nullification as being the doctrine of Jefferson and Madison. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... An 1837 daguerreotype by Daguerre. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Three deals cut in connection with the Presidency of the United States, two in contested United States presidential elections and one involving a Presidential appointment of a Vice President, have been described as Corrupt Bargains. ...

When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious Union; on States dissevered, discordant, belligerent; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood! Let their last feeble and lingering glance rather behold the gorgeous ensign of the republic... not a stripe erased or polluted, nor a single star obscured, bearing for its motto, no such miserable interrogatory as "What is all this worth?" nor those other words of delusion and folly, "Liberty first and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable."; but everywhere, spread all over in characters of living light, blazing on all its ample folds, as they float over the sea and over the land, and in every wind under the whole heavens, that other sentiment, dear to every true American heart,— Liberty and Union, now and for ever, one and inseparable!

Daniel Webster (Second Reply to Hayne)

On January 26, Webster gave his Second Reply to Hayne, in which Webster openly attacked Nullification, negatively contrasted South Carolina's response to the tariff with that of his native New England's response to the Embargo of 1807, rebutted Hayne's personal attacks against him, and famously concluded in defiance of nullification (which was later embodied in John C. Calhoun's declaration of "The Union; second to our liberty most dear!"), "Liberty and Union, now and for ever, one and inseparable!" is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

The so-called "Black Dan" Portrait
The so-called "Black Dan" Portrait

While the debate's philosophical presentation of nullification and Webster's abstract fears of rebellion were brought into reality in 1832 when Calhoun's native South Carolina passed its Ordinance of Nullification, Webster supported President Andrew Jackson's sending of U.S. troops to the borders of South Carolina and the Force Bill, not Henry Clay's 1833 compromise that eventually defused the crisis. Webster thought Clay's concessions were dangerous and would only further embolden the south and legitimize its tactics. Especially unsettling was the resolution affirming that "the people of the several States composing these United States are united as parties to a constitutional compact, to which the people of each State acceded as a separate sovereign community." The usage of the word accede would, in his opinion, lead to the logical end of those states' right to secede. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The Ordinance of Nullification declared the tariff of 1828 and 1832 null and void within the state borders of South Carolina. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... pie is good ...

Since I have arrived here [in Washington], I have had an application to be concerned, professionally, against the bank, which I have declined, of course, although I believe my retainer has not been renewed or refreshed as usual. If it be wished that my relation to the Bank should be continued, it may be well to send me the usual retainers. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...

Daniel Webster (A letter to officials at the bank)

At the same time however, Webster, like Clay, opposed the economic policies of Andrew Jackson, the most famous of those being Jackson's campaign against the Second Bank of the United States in 1832, an institution that held Webster on retainer as legal counsel and of whose Boston Branch he was the director. Clay, Webster, and a number of other former Federalists and National Republicans united as the Whig Party, in defense of the Bank against Jackson's intention to replace it. There was an economic panic in 1837, which converted Webster's heavy speculation in midwestern property into a personal debt from which Webster never recovered. His debt was exacerbated by his propensity for living "habitually beyond his means", lavishly furnishing his estate and giving away money with "reckless generosity and heedless profusion", in addition to indulging the smaller-scale "passions and appetites" of gambling and alcohol.[20] The Second Bank of the United States was a bank chartered in 1816, five years after the expiration of the First Bank of the United States. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Whig campaign poster blames Van Buren for hard times (1840). ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ...


In 1836, Webster was one of three Whig Party candidates to run for the office of President, but he only managed to gain the support of Massachusetts. This was the first of three unsuccessful attempts at gaining the presidency. In 1839, the Whig Party nominated William Henry Harrison for president. Webster was offered the vice presidency, but he declined. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The 1839 Whig National Convention was held in December of 1839. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ...


As Secretary of State

Following his victory in 1840, President Harrison appointed Webster to the post of Secretary of State in 1841, a post he retained under President John Tyler after the death of Harrison a month after his inauguration. In September 1841, an internal division amongst the Whigs over the question of the National Bank caused all the Whigs (except Webster who was in Europe at the time) to resign from Tyler's cabinet. In 1842, he was the architect of the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, which resolved the Caroline Affair, established the definitive Eastern border between the United States and Canada (Maine and New Brunswick), and signaled a definite and lasting peace between the United States and Britain. Webster succumbed to Whig pressure in May 1842 and finally left the cabinet. Seal of the United States Department of State. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... The Webster-Ashburton Treaty, signed August 9, 1842, settled the dispute over the location of the Maine-New Brunswick border between the United States and Great Britain and the shared use of the Great Lakes. ... The Caroline Affair refers to a series of events beginning in 1837 that strained relations between the United States and Canada (and thus Britain). ... The Peace Arch border between Surrey, British Columbia and Blaine, Washington Canada and the United States of America share the longest common border in the world. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...

Daniel Webster: New England's choice for twelfth President of the United States

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 427 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (430 × 604 pixel, file size: 51 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 427 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (430 × 604 pixel, file size: 51 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...

Later career and death

In 1845 he was re-elected to the Senate, where he opposed both the annexation of Texas and the resulting Mexican-American War for fear of its upsetting the delicate balance of slave and non-slave states. In 1848, he sought the Whig Party's nomination for President but was beaten by military hero Zachary Taylor. Webster was once again offered the vice presidency, but he declined saying, "I do not propose to be buried until I am dead." The Whig ticket won the election; Taylor died 16 months later. Republic of Texas The Texas Annexation of 1845 was the voluntary annexation of the Republic of Texas by the United States of America as Texas, the 28th state, and additional land that later became major parts of the states of New Mexico and Colorado, where the headwaters of the Rio... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850)[2] was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. ...


The Compromise of 1850 was the Congressional effort led by Clay and Stephen Douglas to compromise the sectional disputes that seemed to be headed toward civil war. On March 7, 1850, Webster gave one of his most famous speeches, characterizing himself "not as a Massachusetts man, nor as a Northern man but as an American..." In it he gave his support to the compromise, which included the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 that required federal officials to recapture and return runaway slaves. Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... Stephen A. Douglas Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 - June 3, 1861), American politician from Illinois, was one of the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860 (the other being John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky). ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... An April 24, 1851 poster warning colored people in Boston about policemen acting as slave catchers. ...


Webster was bitterly attacked by abolitionists in New England who felt betrayed by his compromises. Rev. Theodore Parker complained, "No living man has done so much to debauch the conscience of the nation." Horace Mann described him as being "a fallen star! Lucifer descending from Heaven!" James Russell Lowell called Webster "the most meanly and foolishly treacherous man I ever heard of."[21] Webster never recovered the popularity he lost in the aftermath of the Seventh of March speech. This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Theodore Parker (August 24, 1810 - May 10, 1860) was a reforming American minister of the Unitarian church, and a Transcendentalist. ... Horace Mann (May 4, 1796 – August 2, 1859) was an American education reformer and abolitionist. ... This article is about the star or fallen angel. ... James Russell Lowell (b. ...

I shall stand by the Union...with absolute disregard of personal consequences. What are personal consequences...in comparison with the good or evil which may befall a great country in a crisis like this?...Let the consequences be what they will.... No man can suffer too much, and no man can fall too soon, if he suffer or if he fall in defense of the liberties and constitution of his country.

Daniel Webster (July 17, 1850 address to the Senate)

Resigning the Senate under a cloud in 1850, he resumed his former position as Secretary of State in the cabinet of Whig President Millard Fillmore. Notable in this second tenure was the increasingly strained relationship between the United States and Austria in the aftermath of what was seen by Austria as American interference in its rebellious Kingdom of Hungary. As chief American diplomat, Webster authored the Hülsemann Letter, in which he defended what he believed to be America's right to take an active interest in the internal politics of Hungary, while still maintaining its neutrality. He also advocated for the establishment of commercial relations with Japan, going so far as to draft the letter that was to be presented to the Emperor Kōmei on President Fillmore's behalf by Commodore Matthew Perry on his 1852 voyage to Asia. Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Emperor Kōmei of Japan Emperor Kōmei ) (July 22, 1831 - January 30, 1867) was the 121st imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858) Matthew Calbraith Perry (April 10, 1794 – March 4, 1858) was the Commodore of the U.S. Navy who compelled the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854. ...


In 1852 he made his final campaign for the Presidency, again for the Whig nomination. Before and during the campaign a number of critics asserted that his support of the compromise was only an attempt to win southern support for his candidacy, "profound selfishness," in the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Though the Seventh of March speech was indeed warmly received throughout the south, the speech made him too polarizing a figure to receive the nomination and Webster was again defeated by a military hero, this time General Winfield Scott. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... In politics, polarization is the process by which the public opinion divides and goes to the extremes. ... For other uses of Winfield Scott, see Winfield Scott (disambiguation). ...


He died on October 24, 1852 at his home in Marshfield, Massachusetts, after falling from his horse and suffering a crushing blow to the head, complicated by cirrhosis of the liver, which resulted in a brain hemorrhage.[22] is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Marshfield is a town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Cirrhosis is a consequence of chronic liver disease characterized by replacement of liver tissue by fibrotic scar tissue as well as regenerative nodules, leading to progressive loss of liver function. ... A cerebral hemorrhage is a bleed into the substance of the cerebrum. ...


His son, Fletcher Webster, went on to be a Union Colonel in the Civil War commanding the 12th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, but was killed in action on August 29, 1862 during the Second Battle of Bull Run. Today a monument stands in his honor in Manassas, Virginia, as well as a regimental monument on Oak Hill at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Colonel Fletcher Webster, the son of statesman Daniel Webster, was the commanding officer of the 12th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... For other uses, see Colonel (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Temporary grave of an American machine-gunner during the Battle of Normandy. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders John Pope Robert E. Lee James Longstreet Stonewall Jackson Strength 63,000 54,000 Casualties 1,747 killed 8,452 wounded 4,263 captured/missing 1,553 killed 7,812 wounded 109 captured/missing For other uses, see Bull Run... Manassas redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Gettysburg is a borough 38 miles (68 km) south by southwest of Harrisburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania, USA, of which it is the county seatGR6. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ...


Historical evaluations and legacy

Monument to Daniel Webster located on Scott Circle in Washington, D.C.
Monument to Daniel Webster located on Scott Circle in Washington, D.C.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, who had criticized Webster following the Seventh of March address, remarked in the immediate aftermath of his death that Webster was "the completest man", and that "nature had not in our days or not since Napoleon, cut out such a masterpiece." Others like Henry Cabot Lodge and John F. Kennedy noted Webster's vices, especially the perpetual debt against which he, as Lodge reports, employed "checks or notes for several thousand dollars in token of admiration" from his friends. "This was, of course, utterly wrong and demoralizing, but Mr. Webster came, after a time, to look upon such transactions as natural and proper. [...] He seems to have regarded the merchants and bankers of State Street very much as a feudal baron regarded his peasantry. It was their privilege and duty to support him, and he repaid them with an occasional magnificent compliment."[23] PD image from http://www. ... PD image from http://www. ... Statue of Winfield Scott at the center of Scott Circle. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician, and noted historian. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... “STT” redirects here. ...


Several historians suggest Webster failed to exercise leadership for any political issue or vision. Lodge describes (with the Rockingham Convention in mind) Webster's "susceptibility to outside influences which formed such an odd trait in the character of a man so imperious by nature. When acting alone, he spoke his own opinions. When in a situation where public opinion was concentrated against him, he submitted to modifications of his views with a curious and indolent indifference."[24] Similarly, Arthur Schlesinger cites Webster's letter requesting retainers for fighting for the Bank, one of his most inveterate causes; he then asks how the American people could "follow [Webster] through hell or high water when he would not lead unless someone made up a purse for him?" This article is about the Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. ...


He served the interest of the wealthy Boston merchants who elected and supported him, first for free trade, and later, when they had started manufacturing, for protection; both for the Union and for a compromise with the South in 1850. Schlesinger remarks that the real miracle of The Devil and Daniel Webster is not a soul sold to the devil, or the jury of ghostly traitors, but Webster speaking against the sanctity of contract. Daniel argues while the Devil whispers in the judges ear. ...


Webster has garnered respect and admiration for his Seventh of March speech in defense of the 1850 compromise measures that helped to delay the Civil War. In Profiles in Courage, Kennedy called Webster's defense of the compromise, despite the risk to his presidential ambitions and the denunciations he faced from the north, one of the "greatest acts of courageous principle" in the history of the Senate. Conversely, Seventh of March has been criticized by Lodge who contrasted the speech's support of the 1850 compromise with his 1833 rejection of similar measures. "While he was brave and true and wise in 1833," said Lodge, "in 1850 he was not only inconsistent, but that he erred deeply in policy and statesmanship" in his advocacy of a policy that "made war inevitable by encouraging slave-holders to believe that they could always obtain anything they wanted by a sufficient show of violence."[25] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Profiles in Courage book cover Profiles in Courage is a book written by John F. Kennedy, describing acts of bravery and integrity by eight United States Senators from throughout the Senates history. ...


More widely agreed upon, notably by both Senator Lodge and President Kennedy, is Webster's skill as an orator with Kennedy praising Webster's "ability to make alive and supreme the latent sense of oneness, of union, that all Americans felt but few could express."[26][27] Schlesinger, however, notes that he is also an example of the limitations of formal oratory: Congress heard Webster or Clay with admiration, but they rarely prevailed at the vote. Plainer speech and party solidarity were more effective; and Webster never approached Jackson's popular appeal.[28]


Commemorative measures

Portrait of Daniel Webster chosen by Senator Kennedy to adorn the Senate Reception Room.
Portrait of Daniel Webster chosen by Senator Kennedy to adorn the Senate Reception Room.

Webster has been commemorated in numerous forms: the popular short story, play and movie The Devil and Daniel Webster by Stephen Vincent Benét; one of the two statues representing New Hampshire in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol; a U.S. Navy submarine, the USS Daniel Webster; a peak in New Hampshire's Presidential Range, Mount Webster; a college, Daniel Webster College, located in Nashua, New Hampshire; and on U.S. stamps (in 1890 on a 10 cent stamp and in 1932 on a 2 cent stamp on the occasion of the 150th anniversery of his birth). A reference to Webster is also made in the 1939 film Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, when James Stewart's character is amazed to find out that he will be sitting in the same Senate seat that Webster once occupied. Also, New Hampshire's Boy Scout council bears his name, Daniel Webster Council. In 1957 a senatorial committee chaired by then-Senator John F. Kennedy named Webster as one of their five greatest predecessors, selecting Webster's oval portrait (seen to right) to adorn the Senate Reception Room off the Senate floor.[29] In World War II the United States liberty ship SS Daniel Webster was named in his honor. Webster Township and Webster United Church of Christ of Dexter, Washtenaw County, Michigan, are named for Webster; he is reported to have contributed the sum of one hundred dollars to the church's construction in 1834.[30] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (610x721, 418 KB)Daniel Webster by Adrian S. Lamb. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (610x721, 418 KB)Daniel Webster by Adrian S. Lamb. ... Daniel argues while the Devil whispers in the judges ear. ... Stephen Vincent Benét (July 22, 1898 – March 13, 1943) was a United States author, poet, short story writer and novelist. ... Part of the National Statuary Hall Collection The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... USN redirects here. ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... USS Daniel Webster (SSBN-626), a Lafayette-class ballistic missile submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Senator Daniel Webster. ... The Presidential Range of mountains is located in the White Mountains of the state of New Hampshire, almost entirely in Coos County. ... Mount Webster is a mountain located on the border between Coos County and Carroll County, New Hampshire. ... Daniel Webster College is a four-year, private college in Nashua, NH. Their undergraduate degrees are aviation/air traffic management, aviation flight operations (professional pilot training), aviation management, business management, computer science, information systems, management and information technology, social science, sport management, mechanical engineering, and aeronautical engineering. ... Nickname: Gate City Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough Incorporated 1746 Government  - Mayor Bernard A. Streeter Area  - City  31. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... Mr. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... // Early history (1910-1950) Recent history (1950-1990) Scouting in New Hampshire today There are two Boy Scouts of America local councils in New Hampshire. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Liberty ships were cargo ships built in the United States during World War II. They were cheap and quick to build, and came to symbolize U.S. wartime industrial output. ... The SS Daniel Webster (Hull Number 211) was a Liberty ship built in the United States during World War II. Named after Daniel Webster, an American statesman, the ship was laid down by South Portland Shipbuilding Corporation in South Portland, Maine at their West Yard. ... Webster Township is a township located in Washtenaw County, Michigan. ... Dexter is a village in Washtenaw County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Washtenaw County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ...


The Daniel Webster Family Home in West Franklin, New Hampshire was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1974. Daniel Webster Family Home is a site significant for its . ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


Daniel Webster Middle School (formerly Daniel Webster Junior High School) in West Los Angeles, California is named for him.


See also

This article covers the History of the United States from 1789 through 1849. ... The battle of Fort Sumter was the first stage in a conflict that had been brewing for decades. ... Daniel argues while the Devil whispers in the judges ear. ... Webster is a town located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Worcester County Settled 1713 Incorporated 1832 Government  - Type Open town meeting  - Town    Administrator Raymond W. Houle, Jr. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Barnstable County Settled 1637 Incorporated 1639 Government type Open town meeting Area    - Town  44. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Daniel Webster College is a four-year, private college in Nashua, NH. Their undergraduate degrees are aviation/air traffic management, aviation flight operations (professional pilot training), aviation management, business management, computer science, information systems, management and information technology, social science, sport management, mechanical engineering, and aeronautical engineering. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Allan Nevins, Ordeal of the Union" (1947) 1:288
  2. ^ a b "Daniel Webster." American Eras, Volume 5: The Reform Era and Eastern U.S. Development, 1815–1850. Gale Research, 1998. Student Resource Center. Thomson Gale. 16 June 2006.
  3. ^ (1902]) Fryeburg Webster Centennial: Celebrating the Coming of Daniel Webster to Fryeburg 100 Years Ago. [1]
  4. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 12. 
  5. ^ Cheek, H. Lee, Jr. "Webster, Daniel." In Schultz, David, ed. Encyclopedia of American Law. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2002. Facts On File, Inc. American History Online.
  6. ^ a b c "Daniel Webster." Discovering Biography. Online Edition. Gale, 2003. Student Resource Center. Thomson Gale. 16 June 2006
  7. ^ Norton (2005). A People & A Nation, 228. 
  8. ^ WEBSTER, DANIEL (1782–1852). Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th Edition.. Retrieved on 2006-06-18.
  9. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 54. 
  10. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 25. 
  11. ^ Baker, Thomas E. "Dartmouth College v. Woodward." In Schultz, David, ed. Encyclopedia of American Law. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2002. Facts On File, Inc. American History Online.
  12. ^ O'Brien, Patrick K., gen. ed. "Dartmouth College case." Encyclopedia of World History. Copyright George Philip Limited. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2000. Facts On File, Inc. World History Online. Schlesinger Age of Jackson. p. 324–5
  13. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved June 18, 2006, from Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service: entry
  14. ^ Schlesinger (1945). The Age of Jackson, 12–15. 
  15. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 113. 
  16. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 38. 
  17. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 49. 
  18. ^ Schlesinger (1945). The Age of Jackson, 347. 
  19. ^ Schouler, James (1891). History of the United States. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company. 
  20. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 118. 
  21. ^ Kennedy (2004). Profiles in Courage, 69–70. 
  22. ^ Remini, p. 761
  23. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 118. 
  24. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 18. 
  25. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 103,105. 
  26. ^ Kennedy (2004). Profiles in Courage, 58. 
  27. ^ Lodge (1883). Daniel Webster, 66. 
  28. ^ Schlesinger (1945). The Age of Jackson, 50-2. 
  29. ^ The "Famous Five" Now the "Famous Seven". Senate Historical Office. Retrieved on 2006-10-26.
  30. ^ Webster Corners

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Bartlett, Irving H. (1978). Daniel Webster. 
  • Baxter, Maurice G. Daniel Webster and the Supreme Court (1966)
  • Brown, Thomas (1985). Politics and Statesmanship: Essays on the American Whig Party. 
  • Current, Richard Nelson. Daniel Webster and the Rise of National Conservatism (1955), short biography
  • Curtis, George Ticknor. Life of Daniel Webster (1870)
  • Formisano, Ronald P. (1983). The Transformation of Political Culture: Massachusetts Parties, 1790s–1840s. 
  • Hammond, Bray. Banks and Politics in America from the Revolution to the Civil War (1960), Pulitzer prize; the standard history. Pro-Bank
  • Holt, Michael F. (1999). The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-505544-6. 
  • Kennedy, John F. (2004). Profiles In Courage. New York: Perennial Classics. ISBN 0-06-054439-2. 
  • Lodge, Henry Cabot. Daniel Webster (1883)
  • Allan Nevins, Ordeal of the Union: Fruits of Manifest Destiny, 1847–1852" (1947), highly detailed narrative of national politics.
  • Norton, Mary Beth (2005). A People & A Nation. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company. ISBN 0-618-37589-9. , college textbook
  • Ogg, Frederic Austin. Daniel Webster (1914)
  • Remini, Robert V. (1997). Daniel Webster. , the standard scholarly biography
  • Shade, William G. (1983). "The Second Party System", in Paul Kleppner, et al.: Evolution of American Electoral Systems. 
  • Smith, Craig R. "Daniel Webster's Epideictic Speaking: A Study in Emerging Whig Virtues" online

Primary sources

  • The works of Daniel Webster edited in 6 vol. by Edward Everett, Boston: Little, Brown and company, 1853. online edition
  • Howe, Daniel Walker (1973). The American Whigs: An Anthology. 
  • Wiltse, Charles M., Harold D. Moser, and Kenneth E. Shewmaker (Diplomatic papers), eds., The Papers of Daniel Webster, (1974–1989). Published for Dartmouth College by the University Press of New England. ser. 1. Correspondence: v. 1. 1798–1824. v. 2. 1825–1829. v. 3. 1830–1834. v. 4. 1835–1839. v. 5. 1840–1843. v. 6. 1844–1849. v. 7. 1850–1852 -- ser. 2. Legal papers: v. 1. The New Hampshire practice. v. 2. The Boston practice. v. 3. The federal practice (2 v.) -- ser. 3. Diplomatic papers: v. 1. 1841–1843. v. 2. 1850–1852 -- ser. 4. Speeches and formal writings: v. 1. 1800–1833. v. 2. 1834–1852.

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:


Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician, and noted historian. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

Preceded by
George Sullivan
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-large congressional district

March 4, 1813March 3, 1817
Served alongside: Bradbury Cilley, Samuel Smith, Charles Atherton, William Hale, Roger Vose and Jeduthun Wilcox
Succeeded by
Arthur Livermore
Preceded by
Benjamin Gorham
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 1st congressional district

March 4, 1823May 30, 1827
Succeeded by
Benjamin Gorham
Preceded by
Elijah H. Mills
United States Senator (Class 1) from Massachusetts
June 8, 1827February 22, 1841
Served alongside: Nathaniel Silsbee, John Davis
Succeeded by
Rufus Choate
Preceded by
Samuel Smith
Maryland
Chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance
1833–1836
Succeeded by
Silas Wright
New York
Preceded by
(none)
Whig Party presidential candidate
1836 (lost)(1)
Succeeded by
William Henry Harrison
Preceded by
John Forsyth
United States Secretary of State
March 6, 1841May 8, 1843
Succeeded by
Abel P. Upshur
Preceded by
Rufus Choate
United States Senator (Class 1) from Massachusetts
March 4, 1845July 22, 1850
Served alongside: John Davis
Succeeded by
Robert C. Winthrop
Preceded by
John M. Clayton
United States Secretary of State
July 23, 1850October 24, 1852
Succeeded by
Edward Everett
Preceded by
''
Union Party presidential candidate
1852 (lost)(2)
Succeeded by
''
Notes & References
1. The Whig Party ran regional candidates in 1836. Webster ran in Massachusetts, William Henry Harrison ran in the Northern states, and Hugh Lawson White ran in the Southern states.
2. Daniel Webster died on October 25, 1852, one week before the election. However, his name remained on the ballot in Massachusetts and Georgia and he still managed to poll nearly seven thousand votes.
Persondata
NAME Webster, Daniel
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American statesman during the nation's antebellum era
DATE OF BIRTH 1782-01-18
PLACE OF BIRTH Salisbury, New Hampshire
DATE OF DEATH 1852-10-25
PLACE OF DEATH Marshfield, Massachusetts

  Results from FactBites:
 
Daniel Webster - definition of Daniel Webster in Encyclopedia (1332 words)
In 1822, Webster was returned to U.S. Congress from Boston, and in 1827 he was elected to the Senate from the state of Massachusetts.
Webster, however, was successful in defending his stance in a Senate debate of 1830, which culminated in his second reply to Hayne [2] (http://www.dartmouth.edu/~dwebster/speeches/hayne-speech.html), possibly one of the greatest speeches ever delivered in the U.S. Senate.
Daniel Webster died on October 24, 1852 at his home in Marshfield as a result of a brain hemorrhage after he fell from his horse and took a crushing blow to the head.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m