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Encyclopedia > Daniel Schorr
Daniel Schorr
Born August 31, 1916 (1916-08-31) (age 91)
Flag of New York New York City, New York, United States
Occupation Journalist
Schorr (left) and NPR's Scott Simon prepare for Saturday broadcast.(photo: Geneva Collins, Copyright © 2001 Current Publishing Committee. Reproduced by permission.)
Schorr (left) and NPR's Scott Simon prepare for Saturday broadcast.
(photo: Geneva Collins, Copyright © 2001 Current Publishing Committee. Reproduced by permission.)

Daniel Schorr (b. August 31, 1916) is an American journalist who has covered the world for more than 60 years. He is now a Senior News Analyst for National Public Radio (NPR). is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_York. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... “NPR” redirects here. ...

Contents

Birth and early years

Born in the Bronx, New York City, Schorr is the son of Gedaliah Tchornemoretz (d. 2-Sep-1922) and Tillie Godiner,[1] two Russian Jewish immigrants. He began his journalism career at the age of twelve, when he came upon a woman who had jumped or fallen from the roof of his apartment building. After calling the police, he phoned the Bronx Home News and was paid $5 for his information.[2] For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ...


He attended DeWitt Clinton High School in the West Bronx, where he worked on the Clinton News, the school paper. He graduated from City College of New York in 1939, whilst working for the Jewish Daily Bulletin. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... “City College” redirects here. ...


During World War II, Schorr served in Army Intelligence at Camp Polk, Louisiana and at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Army intelligence logo. ... Fort Polk is a United States Army base located in Leesville, Louisiana. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Fort Sam Houston is a U.S. Army post in San Antonio, Texas. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...


In January of 1967, he married Lisbeth Bamberger, a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley.[2] Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


Journalism during the Cold War

Following several years as a stringer, in 1953 he joined CBS News as one of the recruits of Edward R. Murrow (becoming part of the later generation of Murrow's Boys). In 1955, with the post-Stalin thaw in the Soviet Union, he received accreditation to open a CBS bureau in Moscow. In June 1957, he obtained an exclusive interview with Nikita Khrushchev, the Soviet Communist party chief. It aired on CBS's Face the Nation, Schorr's first television interview. Schorr left the Soviet Union later that year, because of Soviet censorship laws. When he applied for a new visa, it was denied by the Soviets.[2] Stringer can have different meanings, including: In journalism, a stringer is a freelance journalist, who is paid for each piece of published or broadcast work, rather than receiving a regular salary. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... CBS News logo, used from Sept. ... Edward R. Ed Murrow (April 25, 1908 – April 27, 1965) was an American journalist and media figure. ... Murrow’s Boys, or “The Murrow Boys,” were the CBS broadcast journalists most closely associated with Edward R. Murrow during his years at the network, specifically the years before and during World War II. Murrow recruited a number of newsmen and women to CBS during his years as a correspondent... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (Georgian: , Ioseb Besarionis Dze Jughashvili; Russian: , Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (alternatively transliterated Josef Stalin), was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Unions Central Committee from... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (Russian: , Nikita Sergeevič Chruščiov; IPA: , in English, , or , occasionally ); surname more accurately romanized as Khrushchyov[1]; April 17 [O.S. April 5] 1894[2]–September 11, 1971) was the chief director of the Soviet Union after the death of Joseph Stalin. ... Face The Nation logo, used until 2002. ...


In January 1962, he aired the first examination of everyday life under communism in East Germany, The Land Beyond the Wall: Three Weeks in a German City, which The New York Times called a "journalistic coup". After agreeing not to foster "propaganda" for the United States, Schorr was granted the rights to conduct the interviews in the city of Rostock. By airing everyday life, Schorr painted a picture of the necessity for a Communist state to seal itself off from the west in order to survive. Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... This article is about the state which existed from 1949 to 1990. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Motto: Within your walls be concordance and public welfare Rostock (pronounced // from Polabian Roz toc, literally to flow apart) is the largest city in the north German state Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. ...


CBS executives were not amused when Schorr reported that Barry Goldwater was said to "travel to Germany to join-up with the right-wing there," and visit "Hitler's one-time stomping ground" in Berchtesgaden, immediately after he became the Republican nomination for president. For obvious reasons, this did not fare well with Goldwater, who demanded an apology for the "CBS conspiracy" against his campaign for president.[2] Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... Berchtesgaden is a town in the German Bavarian Alps. ...


The 1970s

Schorr attracted the anger of the Nixon White House. In 1971, after a dispute with White House aides, Schorr's friends, neighbors, and co-workers were questioned by the FBI about his habits. They were told that Schorr was under consideration for a high-level position in the environmental area. Schorr knew nothing about it. Later, during the Watergate hearings, it was revealed that Nixon aides had drawn up what became known as Nixon's Enemies List, and Daniel Schorr was on that list. Famously, Schorr read the list aloud on live TV, surprised to be reading his own name in that context. Schorr won Emmys for news reporting in 1972, 1973, and 1974. Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... “Watergate” redirects here. ... Nixons enemies list was compiled by Charles Colson and sent to John Dean Nixons Enemies List is the informal name of what started as a list of President Richard Nixons major political opponents compiled by Charles Colson, written by George T. Bell [1] (assistant to Colson, special... An Emmy Award. ...


Schorr provoked intense controversy in 1976 when he received and made public the contents of the secret Pike Committee report on illegal CIA and FBI activities. Called to testify before Congress, he refused to identify his source on First Amendment grounds, risking imprisonment. This did not mollify CBS executives, and Schorr ultimately resigned from his position at CBS in September 1976. The Pike Committee is the common name for the House Select Committee on Intelligence during the period when it was chaired by Democratic Representative Otis G. Pike of New York. ... “CIA” redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... “First Amendment” redirects here. ...


On May 14, 2006, on NPR's Weekend Edition, Schorr mentions a meeting at the White House that took place with colleague A. M. Rosenthal and president Gerald Ford. Ford mentioned that the Rockefeller Commission had access to various CIA documents, including those referring to political assassinations.[3] Although scalded at first for his television report by former CIA director Richard Helms[4], Schorr was vindicated by the text of the Pike Committee, which he obtained from an undisclosed source and leaked to The Village Voice.[2] May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Weekend Edition is the name given to a set of American radio news magazines produced and distributed by National Public Radio (NPR). ... Abraham Michael A.M. Rosenthal (May 2, 1922 – May 10, 2006), born in Sault Ste. ... The U.S. Presidents Commission on CIA activities within the United States was set up under President Gerald Ford in 1975 to investigate the activities of the CIA and other intelligence agencies within the United States. ... Richard Helms, Director of Central Intelligence, 1966-1973 Richard McGarrah Helms (March 30, 1913 – October 23, 2002) was the Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) from 1966 to 1973. ... The Pike Committee is the common name for the House Select Committee on Intelligence during the period when it was chaired by Democratic Representative Otis G. Pike of New York. ... This article is about a New York newspaper. ...


Career as an elder statesman of journalism

In 1979, Schorr was among the first hired by Ted Turner and Reese Schoenfeld to deliver commentary and news analysis on the fledgling Cable News Network (CNN). His contract was not renewed in 1985, one of the two times he stated he was "fired" [1]. He then took the position that he currently holds, as Senior News Analyst at NPR. In that position, he regularly comments on current events for programs including All Things Considered and Weekend Edition. Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... For other persons named Ted Turner, see Ted Turner (disambiguation). ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... All Things Considered (ATC), is a news radio program in the United States, broadcast on the National Public Radio network. ... Weekend Edition is the name given to a set of American radio news magazines produced and distributed by National Public Radio (NPR). ...


In 1994, Schorr narrated the TV miniseries, Watergate. In the late 1990s, he appeared briefly as a newscaster in three Hollywood movies; The Game, The Net, and The Siege. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Game is a 1997 psychological thriller film directed by David Fincher and produced by Polygram, telling the story of an investment banker who is gifted with prepaid access to a game that integrates in strange ways with his life. ... The Net is a 1995 film directed by Irwin Winkler and starring Sandra Bullock, Jeremy Northam and Dennis Miller. ... For other uses, see The Siege (disambiguation). ...


Schorr was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2002. The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

Trivia

Though by no means a fan of rock music, Daniel Schorr became friends with composer Frank Zappa after the former contacted him, asking for help with a voter-registration drive. Perhaps earning the envy of journalists half his age, Schorr made an appearance with Zappa on February 10, 1988, where he sang "It Ain't Necessarily So" and "Summertime". Schorr delivered the eulogy on NPR after Zappa's untimely death on December 4, 1993; he professed not to understand Zappa's lengthy discourses on music theory, but he found a kindred spirit—a serious man with a commitment to free speech. For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... Voter registration is the shit in some democracies for citizens to check in with some central registry before being allowed to vote in elections. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... It Aint Necessarily So is a popular song. ... Summertime is the name of an aria composed by George Gershwin for the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Music theory is a field of study that investigates the nature or mechanics of music. ... This article is about the general concept. ...


When Daniel Schorr met Richard Nixon several years after his illegal investigation, Nixon responded to Schorr's introduction by saying, "Dan Schorr, damn near hired you once!"


Schorr had a small role playing himself in the 1997 film The Game starring Michael Douglas, where he spoke to the main character through his television. For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Game is a 1997 psychological thriller film directed by David Fincher and produced by Polygram, telling the story of an investment banker who is gifted with prepaid access to a game that integrates in strange ways with his life. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation) Michael Kirk Douglas (born September 25, 1944) is an American actor and producer, primarily in movies and television. ...


Schorr has won three Emmy Awards for his television journalism An Emmy Award. ...


Awards

  • Emmy Award for "for outstanding achievement within a regularly scheduled news program," 1972, 1973, and 1974.
  • George Polk Award for Radio Commentary, for his work on NPR, 1993.
  • Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University "Golden Baton" for "Exceptional Contributions to Radio and Television Reporting and Commentary", 1996.
  • Edward R. Murrow Award for Lifetime Achievement in Broadcasting, 2002.

The George Polk Awards is an American journalism award. ... Alma Mater Columbia University in the City of New York is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ...

Books by Daniel Schorr

  • (2005) The Senate Watergate Report. Carroll & Graf. ISBN 0-7867-1709-2.
  • (2002) Staying Tuned: A Life in Journalism. Washington Square Press. ISBN 0-671-02088-9.
  • (1998) Forgive Us Our Press Passes, Selected Works (1972-1998). O'Brien Center for Scholarly Pubns. ISBN 0-9626954-6-7.
  • (1978) Clearing The Air. Berkley. ISBN 0-425-03903-X.
  • (1970) Don't get sick in America. Aurora Publishers. ISBN 0-87695-103-5.

References

  1. ^ Daniel Schorr (NNDB)
  2. ^ a b c d e Philip Hilts. "Daniel Schorr Had A Secret; Then he passed it on-and all hell broke loose", The Washington Post, 1976-03-28. 
  3. ^ Remembering Journalist Abe Rosenthal. Weekend Edition Sunday. NPR (2006-05-14).
  4. ^ "Helms Terms Newsman 'Killer' for Hint of Murders by C.I.A.", The New York Times, 1975-04-29. 

Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Multimedia

  • 1996 lecture from UCTV University of California Television
  • 2003 panel discussion with Helen Thomas and Daniel Laidlaw from UCTV University of California Television
  • Daniel Schorr analysis of Iraq war buildup, NPR, July 13, 2005 - (Real Audio)

President George W. Bush conveys birthday wishes to reporter Helen Thomas in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room. ... Photo submitted by Martin Hornby - (Gallaher Cigarette Cards) Daniel Laidlaw was a Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Daniel Schorr (391 words)
Daniel Schorr (born August 31, 1916) is a journalist who has covered the world for more than 60 years.
Schorr attracted the anger of the Nixon White House.
In 1971, after a dispute with White House aides, Schorr's friends, neighbors, and co-workers were questioned by the FBI about his habits.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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