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Encyclopedia > Daniel Pipes
Daniel Pipes in Copenhagen

Daniel Pipes (born September 9, 1949) is an American historian and analyst who specializes in the Middle East. He has written or co-written 18 books, maintains a blog, and lectures around the world presenting his analysis of world trends. His work contends that militant Islam is incompatible with democracy, freedom, multiculturalism, and human rights. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...


Pipes is the founder and director of the Middle East Forum, a former member of the board of the U.S. Institute of Peace, and a regular columnist for the New York Sun and The Jerusalem Post. He contributes regularly to David Horowitz's online publication FrontPage Magazine, and he has had his work published by many newspapers across North America, including the Washington Post, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal.[citation needed] He is frequently invited to discuss the Middle East on American network television, as well as by universities and think tanks, has appeared on the BBC and Al Jazeera, and has lectured in 25 countries.[citation needed] The Middle East Forum, a think tank, works to define and promote the interests of the United States in the Middle East. ... The United States Institute of Peace is an independent, nonpartisan federal institution created by Congress to promote the prevention, management, and peaceful resolution of international conflicts. ... The modern New York Sun is a daily newspaper published in New York City. ... The May 16, 1948 Palestine Post headline announcing the creation of the state of Israel The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli daily English language broadsheet newspaper, originally founded on December 1, 1932, by American journalist-turned-newspaper-editor Gershon Agron as the The Palestine Post. ... For other persons named David Horowitz, see David Horowitz (disambiguation). ... FrontPage Magazine is a conservative internet publication edited by David Horowitz Link [1] Categories: Computer stubs | Magazines stubs ... ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Al Jazeera logo Al Jazeera (الجزيرة), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula (whence also Algiers) is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ...


Pipes is also the founder of Campus Watch, an organization and website which exposes and publicizes what it claims is anti-U.S. and anti-Israel bias on campus. Pipes and the organization were criticised in 2002 of attacking academic freedom by publishing a list of academics critical of Israel and U.S. foreign policy.[1] However, the site has thrived on contributions from numerous individuals on campuses who share Pipes' concerns and viewpoints about the state of academia. Recently, Pipes joined Rudolph Giuliani's presidential campaign as an advisor.[2] Campus Watch is a project of the Middle East Forum, an American pro-Israel think tank. ... Academic freedom is the freedom of teachers, students, and academic institutions to pursue knowledge wherever it may lead, without undue or unreasonable interference. ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III, KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ...

Contents

Background

Pipes was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Harvard historian Richard Pipes[3] and his wife Irene (née Roth), and grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Both Pipes' parents were from assimilated Polish Jewish families that fled from Poland in 1939. The couple met in the United States in 1944 and married two years later. Pipes was their first child. Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Richard Pipes, Warsaw (Poland), October 20, 2004 Richard Edgar Pipes (b. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ...


Pipes attended the Harvard pre-school, then received a private school education, partly abroad. He enrolled in Harvard University, where his father was then still a professor, in the fall of 1968; for his first two years he studied mathematics, but has said: "I wasn't smart enough. So I chose to become a historian."[18] He said he "found the material too abstract."[19] He credits visits to the Sahara Desert in 1968 and the Sinai Desert in 1969 for piquing his interest in the Arabic language,[20] and visits to Niger and Tunisia for piquing his interest in the Islamic world, and he changed his major to Middle East history.[21] For the next two years Pipes studied Arabic and the Middle East, obtaining a B.A. in history in 1971; his senior thesis was titled A Medieval Islamic Debate: The World Created in Eternity, a study of Al-Ghazali, one of the greatest jurists, theologians and mystical thinkers in the Islamic tradition.[22] After graduating in 1971, Pipes spent nearly three years in Cairo. He learned Arabic and studied the Quran, which he said gave him an appreciation for Islam.[23] For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... The Sahara is the worlds second largest desert (second to Antarctica), over 9,000,000 km² (3,500,000 mi²), located in northern Africa and is 2. ... Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Suez (west), Gulf of Aqaba (east) from Space Shuttle STS-40 The Sinai Peninsula (in Arabic, Shibh Jazirat Sina) is a triangle-shaped peninsula lying between the Mediterranean Sea (to the north) and Red Sea (to the south). ... Arabic redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... This article is about the study of time in human terms. ... Abu Hāmed Mohammad ibn Mohammad al-GhazzālÄ« (1058-1111) (Persian: ), known as Algazel to the western medieval world, born and died in Tus, in the Khorasan province of Persia (modern day Iran). ... A jurist is a professional who studies, develops, applies or otherwise deals with the law. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ...


He returned to Harvard in 1973 and obtained a Ph.D. in medieval Islamic history[3] in 1978. His Ph.D. dissertation eventually became his first book, Slave Soldiers and Islam, in 1981. He studied abroad for six years, three of which were spent in Egypt, where he wrote a book on colloquial Egyptian Arabic which was published in 1983. He taught world history at the University of Chicago from 1972 to 1982, history at Harvard from 1983 to 1984, and policy strategy at the Naval War College from 1984 to 1986. He switched from medieval Islamic studies to modern Islam in the late 1970s.[3] Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Egyptian Arabic (Marī مصري) is part of the Arabic macrolanguage of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... The Naval War College. ...


Pipes has served in various capacities at the Departments of State and Defense, while his father served on the National Security Council, and he has testified to the United States Congress. He speaks French, English and Arabic and has a reading knowledge of German. [citation needed] The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...


He has been married twice and has three daughters.


As of January 2007, Pipes held the position of Distinguished Visiting Professor at Pepperdine University teaching a course titled "International Relations: Islam and Politics."[4] Distinguished Visiting Professor is an academic title bestowed by Amercian Univeristies on prominent scholars who have been invited to teach a course in their area of expertise for one semester or more to enrolled undergraduate and graduate students. ... Pepperdine University is a private institution of higher learning affiliated with the Church of Christ. ...


Pipes is also a prolific book reviewer , having published over 530 book reviews on Middle Eastern studies.[24]


Campus Watch

Pipes' think tank the Middle East Forum established a website in 2002 called Campus Watch, which identified what it saw as five problems in the teaching of Middle Eastern studies at American universities: "analytical failures, the mixing of politics with scholarship, intolerance of alternative views, apologetics, and the abuse of power over students." Students were encouraged to submit reports regarding teachers, books and curricula. The project was accused of "McCarthyesque intimidation" of professors who criticized Israel when it published a "blacklist" of professors. In protest, more than 100 academics demanded to be listed as well. Campus Watch subsequently removed the list from their website.[5][6][7] The Middle East Forum, a think tank, works to define and promote the interests of the United States in the Middle East. ... Campus Watch is a project of the Middle East Forum, an American pro-Israel think tank. ... Apologists are authors, writers, editors of scientific logs or academic journals, and leaders known for taking on the points in arguments, conflicts or positions that are either placed under popular scrutinies or viewed under persecutory examinations. ... For a curriculum vitae, see Résumé. In formal education, a curriculum (plural curricula) is the set of courses, and their content, offered at a school or university. ... A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the dangers of a Communist takeover. ...


Peace Institute appointment

In April 2003, George W. Bush nominated Pipes for the board of the federally sponsored U.S. Institute of Peace, on which Douglas Feith was already serving.[citation needed] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The United States Institute of Peace is an independent, nonpartisan federal institution created by Congress to promote the prevention, management, and peaceful resolution of international conflicts. ... Douglas Feith. ...


Some defended the appointment, including Muslims. Akbar Ahmed, chair of Islamic studies at American University, asked "Who is better placed to act as a bridge than the scholar of Islam?" Pakistani-American Tashbih Sayyed, editor of the Muslim World Today and the Pakistan Times, called Pipes "a Cassandra. He must be listened to. If there is no Daniel Pipes, there is no source for America to learn to recognize the evil which threatens it. Historians will write later that Pipes saved us. There are Muslims in America that are like Samson; they have come into the temple to pull down the pillars, even if it means destroying themselves." Sheikh Dr. Ahmed Subhy Mansour, a former visiting fellow in the human-rights program at Harvard Law School, said, "We Muslims need a thinker like Dr. Pipes, who can criticize the terrorist culture within Islam, just as I usually do."[25] For other universities known as American University, see American University (disambiguation). ... Tashbih Sayyed is Pakistani scholar, journalist, and author and is the Editor in Chief of Our Times, Pakistan Today, and In Review. ... Pakistan Times is a newspaper. ... For other uses, see Cassandra (disambiguation). ... Sheik Ahmed Subhy Mansour is an exiled Egyptian cleric who founded a small Egyptian sect that is neither Sunni nor Shiite, the so-called Quranists. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ...


Several senators, including Ted Kennedy (D-Massachusetts) and Christopher Dodd (D-Connecticut), expressed opposition to the nomination and stalled a vote in Chairman Judd Gregg's (R-NH) committee, and President Bush bypassed the Republican-led Senate and proceeded with a recess appointment on August 23, 2003. Pipes served until January 2005. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... A recess appointment occurs when the President of the United States fills a vacant Federal position during a recess of the United States Senate. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Views and positions

Pipes' strong support of Israel and his argument that militant Islamism is a threat to the West—conflicts with the views of establishment Middle East scholars, such as John Esposito, who describes Islamist movements as political forces leading to democratic progress. For the religion of Islam, see Islam. ... Occident redirects here. ... For the pianist named John Esposito, see John Esposito (pianist). ... For other uses, see Democracy (disambiguation). ...


Pipes was a firm supporter of the Vietnam War, and when his fellow students occupied the Harvard administration building to protest it in the 1960s, he sided with the administration.[3] Pipes had always considered himself to be a Democrat, but after anti-war George McGovern gained the 1972 Democratic nomination for president, he switched to the Republican Party.[3] Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ...


Radical Islam

Pipes has long expressed concern about the danger, as he sees it, of radical or militant Islam to the Western world. In 1985, he wrote in Middle East Insight that "[t]he scope of the radical fundamentalist's ambition poses novel problems; and the intensity of his onslaught against the United States makes solutions urgent."[8] In the fall 1995 issue of National Interest, he wrote: "Unnoticed by most Westerners, war has been unilaterally declared on Europe and the United States."[9] He wrote this in the aftermath of the Oklahoma City bombing; investigative journalist Steven Emerson had said in the aftermath of the bombing that it bore a "Middle Eastern trait." Pipes agreed with Emerson and told USA Today that the United States was "under attack" and that Islamic fundamentalists "are targeting us."[3] Four months before the September 11, 2001 attacks, Pipes and Emerson wrote in the Wall Street Journal that al Qaeda was "planning new attacks on the U.S." and that Iranian operatives "helped arrange advanced ... training for al Qaeda personnel in Lebanon where they learned, for example, how to destroy large buildings."[10] The Oklahoma City bombing was an attack on April 19, 1995 aimed at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, a U.S. government office complex in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... Steven Emerson is an American investigative journalist specializing in national security, terrorism, and Islamic extremism. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... Map of major attacks attributed to al-Qaeda Al-Qaeda (also al-Qaida or al-Qaida or al-Qaidah) (Arabic: ‎ , translation: The Base) is an international alliance of terrorist organizations founded in 1988[4] by Osama bin Laden and other veteran Afghan Arabs after the Soviet War in...


Moderate Muslims

Pipes said that the American government and other powerful institutions should give priority to locating, meeting with, funding, forwarding, empowering, and celebrating those Muslims who, at personal risk, stand up and confront the totalitarians.[11]


Pipes suggested that radical Islam is the problem and moderate Islam is the solution. "Is it not telling that great numbers of moderate Muslims see danger where so many non-Muslims are blind? Do developments in Pakistan and Turkey not confirm my oft-repeated point that radical Islam is the problem and moderate Islam the solution? And do they not suggest that ignorant non-Muslim busybodies should get out of the way of those moderate Muslims determined to relegate Islamism to its rightful place in the dustbin of history?"[12]


American Muslims

In October, 2001 Pipes said, before the convention of the American Jewish Congress. "[The] increased stature, and affluence, and enfranchisement of American Muslims...will present true dangers to American Jews." [13]


Support for Japanese Internment during World War II

Pipes expressed his support of "the internment of Japanese Americans in World War II because...given what was known and not known at the time...the U.S. government made the correct and sensible decisions."[14][15] Pipes does not "advocate the internment of anyone today."[26] Jerome War Relocation Center in Jerome, Arkansas Japanese people heading off to an internment camp. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Arab-Israeli conflict

He wrote in Commentary in April 1990: "There can be either an Israel or a Palestine, but not both. To think that two states can stably and peacefully coexist in the small territory between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea is to be either naïve or duplicitous. If the last seventy years teach anything, it is that there can be only one state west of the Jordan River. Therefore, to those who ask why the Palestinians must be deprived of a state, the answer is simple: grant them one and you set in motion a chain of events that will lead either to its extinction or the extinction of Israel."[16] The Jordan River runs along the border between the West Bank and the Kingdom of Jordan Northern part of the Great Rift Valley as seen from space (NASA) The Jordan River Road sign In spring The Jordan River (Hebrew: נהר הירדן nehar hayarden, Arabic: نهر الأردن nahr al-urdun) is a river in Southwest... Mediterranean redirects here. ...


Policy toward Iraq

In 1987, Pipes encouraged the United States to provide Saddam Hussein with upgraded weapons and intelligence,[27] ostensibly to counterbalance Iran's successes in the Iran-Iraq War. In April 1991, when a debate was raging about the desirability of a U.S. intervention against the Saddam Hussein regime, Pipes wrote in the Wall Street Journal about the prospect of U.S. forces occupying Iraq, "with Schwartzkopf Pasha ruling from Baghdad": "It sounds romantic, but watch out. Like the Israelis in southern Lebanon nine years ago, American troops would find themselves quickly hated, with Shi'as taking up suicide bombing, Kurds resuming their rebellion, and the Syrian and Iranian governments plotting new ways to sabotage American rule. Staying in place would become too painful, leaving too humiliating."[28] Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... A suicide bombing is an attack using a bomb in which the individual(s) carrying the explosive materials composing the bomb intend(s) and expect(s) to die upon detonation (see suicide). ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ...


Pipes was a strong backer of the Iraq War, saying that Saddam Hussein posed an "imminent threat" to the United States.[3] In a New York Post article published April 8, 2003, Pipes expressed his opposition to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's concerned prediction that "[the] war [in Iraq] will have horrible consequences...Terrorism will be aggravated...Terrorist organizations will be united...Everything will be insecure." Though this concern was echoed by various other politicians and academics cited by Pipes in his article,[17] Pipes argued that "the precise opposite is more likely to happen: The war in Iraq will lead to a reduction in terrorism." For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Muhammad Hosni Said Mubarak (Arabic: محمد حسنى سيد مبارك Muḥammad Ḥusnī Mubārak), commonly known as Hosni Mubarak (Arabic: حسنى مبارك Ḥusnī Mubārak), has been the President of Egypt since 14 October 1981. ... Terrorist redirects here. ...


Arafat's intentions at Oslo

Writing in The Forward within days of the signing of the Oslo Accords, Pipes said: "Mr. Arafat has merely adopted a flexible approach to fit adverse circumstances, saying whatever needed to be said to survive. The PLO had not a change of heart — merely a change of policy ... the deal with Israel represents a lease on life for the PLO, enabling it to stay in business until Israel falters, when it can deal a death blow."[18] The Forward is a Jewish-American newspaper published in New York. ... Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat during the Oslo Accords on September 13, 1993. ... Not to be confused with Yasir Arafat (cricketer). ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the...


On Muslims

Daniel Pipes' political views have been in general critical of many of the cultures which have adopted forms of militant Islam, as well a as general criticism of many streams of the Muslim faith as expressed and practiced around the world.[citation needed] His emphasis has been on his perception of a clash of civilizations between the West and pointed out closeted militant beliefs and actions by what many think are mainstream Muslim groups. He has also concerned himself with the problem of integration between various cultures within the Muslim-dominated world into European countries and the United States. He has outlined obstructing factors which are intrinsic to Muslim faith as well as those within the many different cultures which have adopted Islam and which makes integration difficult, and even at times violent. He has equally been critical of European efforts with regard to integrating these foreign nationals in their countries. Pipes outlines and exposes many Islamist elements within general "Muslim society" and believes that the strain between followers of Islam and the West requires rational scrutiny.[citation needed] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


First Gulf War

Pipes said: "True, it was Saddam Husayn of Iraq who started the Gulf War in September 1980, but Iranian forces went on the offensive in July 1982, and it was Khomeini who continued the fighting for another six years."[19] Ayatollah Khomeini founded the first modern Islamic republic Ayatollah Seyyed Ruhollah Khomeini (آیت‌الله روح‌الله خمینی in Persian) (May 17, 1900 – June 3, 1989) was an Iranian Shia cleric and the political...


On Europe

Pipes has been heavily critical of European welfare states, which he views as a consequence of the U.S. 'taking over' the defence of Europe during the Cold War. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


On Iran

  • Economy:

In 1980, Pipes wrote that "Iran made the transition to a post-oil economy. It is the only major oil exporter to abandon the heady billions and return to live by its own means."[20]

  • Armed Opposition:

Pipes suggested in his article at the New York Sun that the Iranian armed "terrorist"[21][22][23][24] group known as Mujahedeen-e Khalq should be unleashed.[25] “MKO” redirects here. ...


On Saudi Arabia

Pipes wrote: "The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia - friend or foe of America? Having been asked exactly this question on such shows as CNN's "Crossfire" and ABC's "Nightline," I've come to the conclusion that the answer is "neither." Rather, Saudi Arabia is a rival."[26] Pipes also wrote: "The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia's massive implication in the death of 3,000 Americans on 9/11, I argued in February, is reason for the victims and their families to consider suing it for compensation."[27]


Praise, criticism and controversy

The Wall Street Journal has called Pipes "an authoritative commentator on the Middle East."[28] Michael Moran of MSNBC described him as one of the best-known "Mideast policy luminaries".[29] CNN referred to him one "of the country’s leading experts" on the Middle East. In the Boston Globe, Jeff Jacoby wrote, "If Pipes's admonitions had been heeded, there might never have been a 9/11."[30] The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... Michael P. Moran (born Michael Peter Moran, February 8, 1944-February 4, 2004) was an American actor and playwright. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Jeff Jacoby (b. ...


A 1984 Business Week book review by Ronald Taggiasco stated that "Pipes has handled his subject well. It is difficult these days to address the question of Islam, the Arabs, and their relations with Israel and remain nonpartisan. Pipes has managed to do just that. He has wended his way through that minefield unscathed."[31] BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ...


On the other hand, a 1983 Washington Post book review by Thomas W. Lippman stated that Pipes displays "a disturbing hostility to contemporary Muslims ... he professes respect for Muslims but is frequently contemptuous of them".[3] It said his book "is marred by exaggerations, inconsistencies, and evidence of hostility to the subject" while admitting that "[f]ew other writers have explained so lucidly such complex developments in Muslim history" and that his "book is a valuable contribution to our understanding."[32] ...


When in 2003 Pipes was nominated to the board of the United States Institute of Peace, the British historian and commentator Christopher Hitchens, himself an ardent critic of militant Islamism, published a scathing critique of Pipes in Slate Magazine entitled 'Pipes the Propagandist' [29]. In this article, Hitchens accused Pipes of being "so consumed by dislike that he will not recognize good news from the Islamic world even when it arrives," and concluded that he "confuses scholarship with propaganda and [...] pursues petty vendettas with scant regard for objectivity." Proposed new USIP headquarters, construction to begin 2007. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... Categories: Magazines stubs | Microsoft subsidiaries | Websites | The Washington Post ...


The Nation stated Pipes is an "anti-Arab propagandist."[33] The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. [2] Founded on July 6, 1865 as an Abolitionist publication, it is the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the United States. ...


Continued friction

In a publication of Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs in a May 2, 2004 Pipes, in The End of American Jewry's Golden Era, foresees the end of the golden era for Jews in the United States.


Pipes has criticised and exposed various U.S-based Islamic groups, especially the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR). He considers CAIR to be an apologist for Islamist terrorist groups like Hezbollah and Hamas. Robert Spencer described the campaign against Pipes on the CAIR website as a "lynching." The Council for an American Islamic Republic(CAIR) is an Islamic advocacy group in North America, funded by American Muslims and also in significant part by sources with connections to Arab Middle Eastern governments. ... Apologetics is the field of study concerned with the systematic defense of a position. ... For other uses, see Hezbollah (disambiguation). ... Hamas (Arabic: ; acronym: Arabic: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Sunni Muslim militant organization. ... Robert Bruce Spencer (born 1962) is an American writer on Islam. ...


Pipes was invited to speak at the University of Toronto in March 2005 by a new student group at the University called The Middle East Forum at U of T. A letter from professors, staff and students asserted that Pipes had a "long record of xenophobic, racist and sexist [speeches] that goes back to 1990."[34] University officials said they would not interfere with Pipes' visit.[30] The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Xenophobia means fear of strangers or the unknown and comes from the Greek ξενοφοβια, xenophobia, literally meaning fear of the strange. It is often used to describe fear of or dislike of foreigners, but racism in general is sometimes described as a... This box:      Racism has many definitions, the most common and widely accepted is that members of one race are intrinsically superior or inferior to members of other races. ... Sexism is discrimination between people based on their Sex rather than their individual merits. ...


On April 29, 2005 Wahida Valiante, the vice-president of the Canadian Islamic Congress, published on its website's regular "Friday Bulletin" the article Worth Repeating: Media Propaganda: Hitler, Bush and the "Big Lie", which suggested Pipes was a follower of Hitler and/or used tactics like Hitler and that he wanted to ethnically cleanse Muslims from the United States.[31] In the June 10 edition of the Friday Bulletin an "Apology and Retraction" appears, stating: is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian Islamic Congress is the main lobby group for the Muslim community in Canada. ... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... Ethnic cleansing refers to various policies or practices aimed at the displacement of an ethnic group from a particular territory in order to create a supposedly ethnically pure society. ...

The Canadian Islamic Congress and Ms. Valiante apologize without reservation and retract remarks in the column that suggest that Dr. Daniel Pipes is a follower of Hitler or that he uses the tactics of Hitler or that he wants to ethnically cleanse America of its Muslim presence."[32][35]

Awards and honors

On March 11, 2006, Daniel Pipes was awarded the "Free Speech Award" from the Danish far-right organisation Free Press Society of 2004 (Trykkefrihedsselkabet af 2004).[36] He has been awarded honorary doctorates from universities in Switzerland and the United States.[citation needed] is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In May 2006, Pipes received the Guardian of Zion Award. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian of Zion Award is an annual award given to Jews who have been supportive to the State of Israel. ...


The Forward, a Jewish publication, named Pipes as one of America's "50 Most Influential Jews."[3] The Forward is a Jewish-American newspaper published in New York. ...


Books and policy papers

  • Miniatures: Views of Islamic and Middle Eastern Politics (2003), Transaction Publishers, ISBN 0-7658-0215-5
  • Militant Islam Reaches America (2002), W.W. Norton & Company; paperback (2003) ISBN 0-393-32531-8
  • with Abdelnour, Z. (2000), Ending Syria's Occupation of Lebanon: The U.S. Role Middle East Forum, ISBN 0-9701484-0-2
  • In the Path of God: Islam and Political Power (2002), Transaction Publishers, ISBN 0-7658-0981-8
  • Muslim immigrants in the United States (Backgrounder) (2002), Center for Immigration Studies
  • The Long Shadow : Culture and Politics in the Middle East (1999), Transaction Publishers, ISBN 0-88738-220-7
  • The Hidden Hand : Middle East Fears of Conspiracy (1997), Palgrave Macmillan; paperback (1998) ISBN 0-312-17688-0
  • Conspiracy : How the Paranoid Style Flourishes and Where It Comes From (1997), Touchstone; paperback (1999) ISBN 0-684-87111-4
  • Syria Beyond the Peace Process (Policy Papers, No. 41) (1995), Washington Institute for Near East Policy, ISBN 0-944029-64-7
  • Sandstorm (1993), Rowman & Littlefield, paperback (1993) ISBN 0-8191-8894-8
  • Damascus Courts the West: Syrian Politics, 1989-1991 (Policy Papers, No. 26) (1991), Washington Institute for Near East Policy, ISBN 0-944029-13-2
  • with Garfinkle, A. (1991), Friendly Tyrants: An American Dilemma Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN 0-312-04535-2
  • From a distance: Influencing foreign policy from Philadelphia (The Heritage lectures) (1991), Heritage Foundation, ASIN B0006DGHE4
  • The Rushdie Affair: The Novel, the Ayatollah, and the West (1990), Transaction Publishers, paperback (2003) ISBN 0-7658-0996-6
  • Greater Syria: The History of an Ambition (1990), Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-506021-0
  • An Arabist's guide to Colloquial Egyptian (1983), Foreign Service Institute
  • Slave Soldiers and Islam: The Genesis of a Military System (1981), Yale University Press, ISBN 0-300-02447-9

This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Documentaries

  • Obsession: Radical Islam's War Against the West

See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Daniel Pipes

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an ongoing dispute between the State of Israel and Arab Palestinians. ... Criticism of Islam has existed since Islams formative stages on philosophical, scientific, ethical, political and theological grounds. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949, in Portsmouth, England) is an Anglo-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... { Front cover of From Time Immemorial: The Origins of the Arab-Jewish Conflict over Palestine From Time Immemorial is an 1984 book by Joan Peters arguing that Jews had lived in and around Palestine since the dawn of recorded history. ...

References

  1. ^ "The War on Academic Freedom", The Nation, November 11, 2002.
  2. ^ http://www.nydailynews.com/news/wn_report/2007/09/16/2007-09-16_neocon_hawks_go_allout_for_giuliani.html
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Template error: argument title is required. 
  4. ^ "School of Public Policy Announces 2007 Distinguished Visiting Professor: Daniel Pipes", University of Pepperdine.
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ [3]
  8. ^ [4]
  9. ^ [5]
  10. ^ [6]
  11. ^ Daniel Pipes. "Bolstering Moderate Muslims" New York Sun. April 17, 2007
  12. ^ Daniel Pipes. "A Million Moderate Muslims on the March" New York Sun. May 8, 2007
  13. ^ Ferguson, Barbara. Daniel Pipes Continuing His Campaign Against Muslims. Arab News.
  14. ^ [7]
  15. ^ See also his article Japanese Internment: Why It Was a Good Idea--And the Lessons It Offers Today.[8])
  16. ^ [9]
  17. ^ [10]
  18. ^ [11]
  19. ^ Daniel Pipes. "Iran after Khomeini" World and I. August 1989
  20. ^ Daniel Pipes. "Iran's Good Fortune" Washington Post. July 10, 1980
  21. ^ [12]
  22. ^ [13]
  23. ^ [14]
  24. ^ [15]
  25. ^ Daniel Pipes. "Unleash the Iranian Opposition[, the Mujahedeen-e Khalq"] New York Sun. July 10, 2007
  26. ^ Daniel Pipes. [http://www.danielpipes.org/article/401 "Saudi Arabia: Not Friend or Foe" New York Post. May 14, 2002
  27. ^ Daniel Pipes. [http://www.danielpipes.org/article/158 "Make the Saudis Pay for Terror" New York Post. April 15, 2002
  28. ^ Steigerwald, Bill, "Pipes calls war a success", Pittsburgh Tribune Review, April 1, 2006
  29. ^ Moran, Michael, "The evolution of peacemaking", MSNBC, November 21, 2001
  30. ^ [16]
  31. ^ Business Week, January 30, 1984
  32. ^ Washington Post, December 11, 1983)
  33. ^ McNeil, Kristine. "The War on Academic Freedom". The Nation (2002-11-11). Retrieved on 2007-10-21.
  34. ^ http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20050329/PIPES29/TPNational/Toronto
  35. ^ [17]
  36. ^ Beila Rabinowitz, "Dr Daniel Pipes To Be Awarded Danish "Free Speech Prize"", PipeLineNews, March 8, 2006

The modern New York Sun is a daily newspaper published in New York City. ... The modern New York Sun is a daily newspaper published in New York City. ... ... The modern New York Sun is a daily newspaper published in New York City. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review is a newspaper in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. It was founded in 1992 as an offshoot of the Greensburg Tribune-Review following a press strike at the two previously dominant Pittsburgh dailies. ... Michael P. Moran (born Michael Peter Moran, February 8, 1944-February 4, 2004) was an American actor and playwright. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. [2] Founded on July 6, 1865 as an Abolitionist publication, it is the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the United States. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Daniel Pipes’s personal website
  • Los Angeles Times: “A Misdirected Attack”
  • Financial Times: Islam's battle with a hostile world
  • Truth on Terror in World Magazine
  • Reply to CAIR's Attack on Daniel Pipes Pipes' response
  • Harvard Magazine profile
  • In Defense of Steven Emerson and Daniel Pipes, a letter from Shaykh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi, Root and Branch Information Service, September 19, 1999
  • "Daniel Pipes Visits Hamilton College"
  • A60915-2003Aug14&notFound=true Protests against Pipes' appointment to the USIP *The Truth About Daniel Pipes, from the Muslim Public Affairs Council
  • Pipes the Propagandist
  • WHO IS DANIEL PIPES? by CAIR
  • Pipes, R. Memoirs of a Non-Belonger. Yale University Press, 2003.
  • Press, Eyal. Neocon Man, The Nation, May 10, 2004.
  • Rooij de, Paul. "Smear Mongers", CounterPunch, September 24, 2002.
  • Scherer, Michael. "Daniel Pipes, Peacemaker?", Mother Jones, May 26, 2003
  • Essay detailing Pipes views on Tariq Ramadan and Islamism
  • Daniel Pipes, a new kind of Israel-basher - article by Bradley Burston in Haaretz.
  • Daniel Pipes and the unfolding civil war in Iraq, World Socialist Website, April 11, 2006.

This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... The Council for an American Islamic Republic(CAIR) is an Islamic advocacy group in North America, funded by American Muslims and also in significant part by sources with connections to Arab Middle Eastern governments. ... Haaretz (Hebrew: (help· info), The Land) is an Israeli newspaper, founded in 1919. ... The International Committee of the Fourth International (ICFI) is a Trotskyist international. ...

Audio and video

  • International Conflict Resolution, NPR: Talk of the Nation, August 27 1998
  • Harry Kreisler in conversation with Daniel Pipes, UCSD, 2004
  • Rethinking Islam, The Connection, September 10 2002
  • U.S. Policy Towards Israel and Dreams of Democracy in the Middle East, On Point Radio, May 20 2004
  • Video Conversation with history with Daniel Pipes

Criticism

  • The Islamophobe who cried Islamist
  • The Right-Wing's War on the Gibran Academy
Persondata
NAME Pipes, Daniel
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION U.S. neoconservative columnist, author, counter-terrorism analyst, and scholar of Middle Eastern history
DATE OF BIRTH 9 September 1949
PLACE OF BIRTH Boston, Massachusetts
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
FrontPage magazine.com :: Frontpage Interview: Daniel Pipes by Jamie Glazov (2810 words)
Pipes: Their reaction shows again – as if one needed more proof – the radicalism and nihilism endemic to the Palestinians’ political life, the degree to which they reject existing realities and are attracted to whomever challenges the status quo.
Pipes: This was the subject of my recent column, “Do You Believe in Modernity,” in which I offered a series of questions to ask of Muslims in order to ascertain who is a moderate.
Pipes: There is a tendency to study that which one is attracted to; a desire to be accepted, even celebrated, by those one studies; and a winnowing out takes place, so those who do not fit the general outlook get excluded.
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Daniel Pipes (1878 words)
Pipes is the son of the historian Richard Pipes.
Pipes is also controversial in academia, where his neoconservative positions — especially his strong support for Israel and his argument that Islamism is a threat to the West — conflicts with the views of some Middle East scholars, such as John Esposito, who describes Islamist movements as political forces leading to democratic progress.
Pipes was invited to speak at the University of Toronto in March 2005 by a new student group at the University called The Middle East Forum at U of T.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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