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Encyclopedia > Daniel Pearl
Daniel Pearl

Daniel Pearl
Born October 10, 1963(1963-10-10)
Princeton, New Jersey
Died February 1, 2002 (aged 38)
Karachi, Pakistan
Occupation Journalist
Spouse Mariane Pearl

Daniel Pearl (October 10, 1963February 1, 2002) was an American journalist who was kidnapped and murdered in Karachi, Pakistan. At the time of his kidnapping, Pearl served as the South Asia Bureau Chief of the Wall Street Journal, stationed in Bombay, India, and had been investigating the case of Richard Reid, the shoe bomber, and alleged links between Al Qaeda and Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), for which he went to Pakistan, and was subsequently beheaded there.[1][2] Daniel Pearl is the name of: Daniel Pearl (1963-2002) - an American journalist beheaded in Karachi, Pakistan Daniel Pearl (cinematographer) - American cinematographer, who has filmed, amongst others, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and its 2003 remake. ... Download high resolution version (936x1403, 127 KB)from http://www. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Nassau Street, Princetons main street. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...   (Sindhi: , Urdu: ) is the largest city in Pakistan and is the provincial capital of Sindh province. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... Mariane Pearl (born Mariane van Neyenhoff, July 23, 1967, Clichy-la-Garenne, France) is the widow of Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter who was kidnaped and murdered by terrorists in Pakistan in early 2002. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ...   (Sindhi: , Urdu: ) is the largest city in Pakistan and is the provincial capital of Sindh province. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... This article or section should be merged with Mumbai (Bombay) This article is about the city formerly known as Bombay. ... Richard Reid, in a prison photograph Richard Colvin Reid (born August 12, 1973), also known as the shoe bomber, is a British citizen born in Bromley, South London and a Muslim allegedly working for Al-Qaeda. ... Map of major attacks attributed to al-Qaeda Al-Qaeda (also al-Qaida or al-Qaida or al-Qaidah) (Arabic: ‎ , translation: The Base) is an international alliance of terrorist organizations founded in 1988[4] by Osama bin Laden and other veteran Afghan Arabs after the Soviet War in... This article is about the Pakistani intelligence agency. ...


In July 2002, Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh, a British national of Pakistani origin was sentenced to death by hanging for Pearl's abduction and murder.[3][4] Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh (Arabic: احمد عمر سعید شیخ) (sometimes known as Omar Sheikh, Sheikh Omar[1], Sheik Syed[2], or by the alias Mustafa Muhammad Ahmad[3]) (b. ...


In March 2007, at a closed military hearing in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed said that he had personally beheaded Pearl.[5] Then he added, "for those who would like to confirm, there are pictures of me on the Internet holding his head."[6][7] Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism Wikisource has original text related to this article: Statement of Alberto J Mora on interrogation abuse, July 7, 2004 Guantanamo Bay detention camp is a joint military prison and... Khalid Sheikh Mohammed: Prosecution Exhibit from the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui Wikisource has original text related to this article: CSRT Summary of Evidence memo for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (Arabic: خالد شيخ محمد; also transliterated as Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, inter alia, and additionally known by as many as twenty-seven aliases... Beheading. ...

Contents

Early Life

Daniel Pearl was born in Princeton, New Jersey, and grew up in the Encino district of Los Angeles, California, where he attended Portola Middle School and Birmingham High School. His father, Judea Pearl, is a professor at UCLA. His mother Ruth, is of Iraqi Jewish descent. The history of the family and its connections to Israel are described by Judea Pearl in a book by Alan Dershowitz, What Israel means to me.[8] Danny, as he was known throughout his life, attended Stanford University from 1981 to 1985, where he stood out as a communications major with Phi Beta Kappa honors, a member of the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, and co-founded a student newspaper called the Stanford Commentator. Pearl graduated Stanford with a B.A. in Communications, after which he spent a summer as a Pulliam Fellow intern at the Indianapolis Star and a winter bussing tables as a ski bum in Idaho. Following a trip to the then-Soviet Union, China, and Europe, he joined the North Adams Transcript and the Berkshire Eagle in western Massachusetts, then moved on to the San Francisco Business Times. Nassau Street, Princetons main street. ... Encino is a neighborhood of the City of Los Angeles, California located in the San Fernando Valley. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Portola Middle School is a middle school located at Tarzana, California. ... Birmingham High School is a public coeducational high school in the neighborhood/district of Lake Balboa in the San Fernando Valley section of the County of Los Angeles, California. ... Judea Pearl is a computer science professor at UCLA. He was one of the pioneers of Bayesian networks and the probabilistic approach to artificial intelligence. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Stanford redirects here. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... The North Adams Transcript is a six-day daily newspaper published Monday through Saturday in North Adams, Massachusetts. ... The Berkshire Eagle is a daily newspaper published in Pittsfield, Massachusetts and covering all of Berkshire County, Massachusetts, as well as four New York communities near Pittsfield. ...


Pearl began at the Wall Street Journal's Atlanta bureau in 1990, moving to the Washington, D.C., bureau in 1993 to cover telecommunications. He jumped to the Journal's London bureau in 1996, writing articles such as the October 1994 story of a Stradivarius violin allegedly found on a highway on-ramp[9], and a June 2000 story about Iranian pop music. His most notable investigations covered the ethnic wars in the Balkans, where he discovered that charges of one alleged genocide committed in Kosovo were unsubstantiated, and the American missile attack on a supposed military facility in Khartoum, which he proved to be a pharmaceutical factory. Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... Antonio Stradivari, by Edgar Bundy, 1893: a romanticized image of a craftsman-hero One of the violins in the Stradivarius collection of the Palacio Real, Madrid, Spain A Stradivarius is a stringed instrument built by members of the Stradivari family, especially by Antonio Stradivari. ... Balkan redirects here. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Khartoums location in Sudan Coordinates: , Government  - Governor Abdul Halim al Mutafi Population (2005)  - Urban 2. ...


Later, he met and married Mariane Van Neyenhoff. Their son, Adam Daniel Pearl, was born in Paris on May 28, 2002, three months after Pearl's death. Mariane Pearl (born Mariane van Neyenhoff, July 23, 1967, Clichy-la-Garenne, France) is the widow of Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter who was kidnaped and murdered by terrorists in Pakistan in early 2002. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Murder

On January 23, 2002, on his way to what he thought was an interview with Sheikh Mubarak Ali Gilani at the Village restaurant in Karachi, Pearl was kidnapped by a militant group calling itself The National Movement for the Restoration of Pakistani Sovereignty. This group claimed Pearl was a CIA agent and — using the e-mail address [10] — sent the United States a range of demands, including the freeing of all Pakistani terror detainees, and the release of a halted U.S. shipment of F-16 fighter jets to the Pakistani government. is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Mubarak Ali Shah Gilani is a Pakistani Sufi cleric,[1] and the founder of Jamaat ul-Fuqra. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11, 2001. ... The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a modern multi-role jet fighter aircraft built in the United States and used by dozens of countries all over the world. ...


The message read:

We give you one more day if America will not meet our demands we will kill Daniel. Then this cycle will continue and no American journalist could enter Pakistan.

Photos of Pearl handcuffed with a gun at his head and holding up a newspaper were attached. There was no response to pleas from Pearl's editor, nor from his wife Mariane.


Nine days later, Pearl was murdered and beheaded: the cause of death was obvious by inspection or from the subsequent video (see below). Pearl's body was found cut into ten pieces and buried in a shallow grave in the outskirts of Karachi on May 16. When the police found his remains, Abdul Sattar Edhi arrived promptly on the scene, personally collected all ten body parts, and took them to the morgue. Pearl's body was returned to the United States and was interred in the Mount Sinai Memorial Park Cemetery in Los Angeles, California. Dr. Abdul Sattar Edhi Dr. Abdul Sattar Edhi, (Urdu: عبد الستار ایدھی), or Edhi, as he is often known, is one of the most active philanthropists in Pakistan and in the whole world. ... Mount Sinai Memorial Park is a Jewish cemetery located at 5950 Forest Lawn Drive in Los Angeles, California. ...


No autopsy was needed or performed. The subsequent video (see next section) made the sequence of events clear. Years later, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed confessed to cutting off Pearl's head, but didn't state whether he had cut his throat: it is likely that one person did both. This article is about the medical procedure. ... Khalid Sheikh Mohammed: Prosecution Exhibit from the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui Khalid Shaikh Mohammed (Arabic: خالد شيخ محمد; also transliterated as Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Khalid Shaikh Mohammad, , commonly referred to as KSM and also known by as many as twenty-seven aliases[1] (b. ...


The Daniel Pearl video

Daniel Pearl stating his identity in the video produced by his murderers.
Daniel Pearl stating his identity in the video produced by his murderers.

On February 21, 2002, a videotape titled The Slaughter of the Spy-Journalist, the Jew Daniel Pearl, was released. The video shows Pearl's mutilated body and lasts three minutes and thirty-six seconds. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


On the image to the right, the text in Arabic reads: My name is (Daniel Pearl), I am a Jewish-American... The English transcript of the text reads [sic] : For other uses, see SIC. Sic is a Latin word, originally sicut [1] meaning thus, so, or just as that. In writing, it is placed within square brackets and usually italicized — [sic] — to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, and/or other preceding quoted material has been...

  • "My name is Daniel Pearl. I am a Jewish American from Encino, California USA."
  • "I come from, uh, on my father's side the family is Zionist."
  • "My father's Jewish, my mother's Jewish, I'm Jewish!"
  • "My family follows Judaism. We've made numerous family visits to Israel."
  • "Back in the town of Bnei Brak there is a street named after my great grandfather Chayim Pearl who is one of the founders of the town."

According to Pearl's father, the fact revealed in the last sentence was not known outside the immediate family and, therefore, could not have been extracted from him by force. Pearl's father believes that his son chose to reveal it as a coded message to his family, that he was doing well and speaking freely in his own words.[11] A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ... Mentioned as one of the cities in the portion of the Tribe of Dan (Yehoshua 19:45), Bnei Brak is famous in the Talmud (Sanhedrin 32b) as the seat of Rabbi Akivas court, and in the Pesach Haggada as the site of the all-night Pesach Seder of Rabbi...


The second part of the video shows Pearl stating his captors' demands. A caption in Urdu is shown along the way. Pictures of dead Pakistanies and similar scenes are superimposed around the image of Pearl. Other images shown are those of United States President George W. Bush shaking hands with Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and those of Palestinian boy Muhammad al-Dura, filmed by a France 2 TV crew, who was killed in a crossfire between Palestinian militants and Israeli soldiers in Gaza. The phrase Zaban-e Urdu-e Mualla written in Urdu Urdu () is an Indo-European language of the Indo-Aryan family that developed under Persian, Turkish, Arabic, Hindi, and Sanskrit influence in South Asia during the Delhi Sultanate and Mughal Empire (1200-1800). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...   (Hebrew: , also known by his diminutive Arik אָרִיק) (born February 27, 1928) is a former Israeli politician and general. ... Muhammad al-Durrah (Arabic: محمد الدرة; born in 1988) was reported to have been killed by gunfire on September 30, 2000 near the Netzarim junction in the Gaza Strip at the beginning of the Al-Aqsa Intifada, based on video footage provided by freelance cameraman Talal Abu Rahma, working for France 2. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ...


Published reports say that a technical error prevents the first slashing of Pearl's throat from being captured on film. In the video, Pearl's body is shown naked from the waist up with his throat slit at about 1 minute and 55 seconds into the video, by which time he would have bled to death. A man then cuts his head off. A few more images, such as captives held at Guantánamo Bay detention camp, are shown near the image of Pearl's head. The last 90 seconds of the video show the list of demands scrolling, superimposed on an image of Pearl's severed head being held by the hair. Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism Wikisource has original text related to this article: Statement of Alberto J Mora on interrogation abuse, July 7, 2004 Guantanamo Bay detention camp is a joint military prison and...


The English transcript of the text reads [sic] : For other uses, see SIC. Sic is a Latin word, originally sicut [1] meaning thus, so, or just as that. In writing, it is placed within square brackets and usually italicized — [sic] — to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation, and/or other preceding quoted material has been...

NATIONAL MOVEMENT FOR THE RESTORATION OF PAKISTAN SOVEREIGNTY (NMRPS)
We still demand the following:
  • The immediate release of U.S. held prisoners in Guantinamo Bay, Cuba.
  • The return of Pakistani prisoners to Pakistan.
  • The immediate end of U.S. presence in Pakistan.
  • The delivery of F-16 planes that pakistan had paid for and never recieved.
We asure Americans that they shall never be safe on the Muslim Land of Pakistan.
And if our demands are not met this scene shall be repeated again and again...

The video made its way to the Pakistani and United States governments. A jihadist site leaked the video onto the Internet. In April 2002, Dan Rather reported on CBS TV that the video was used extensively as a recruiting tool by jihadis in Pakistan and Saudi Arabia. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a modern multi-role jet fighter aircraft built in the United States and used by dozens of countries all over the world. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Jihad (ǧihād جهاد) is an Arabic word which comes from the Arabic root word jahada, which means exerting utmost effort or to strive. The word connotes a wide range of meanings, from an inward spiritual struggle to attain perfect faith, to holy war. ... Daniel Irvin Rather, Jr. ...


Arrests

Three suspects were caught after the IP address of those who sent the ransom e-mail was traced by the Karachi Police. The arrests were carried out after investigation by Pakistani detective Mir Zubair Mahmood, assisted by Pakistan CIA computer experts.[12] The mastermind of the kidnapping, Ahmed Saeed Omar Sheikh, surrendered to a former ISI officer, Brig Aijaz Shah, who concealed Sheikh's whereabout from the Karachi Police for a whole week. An IP address (Internet Protocol address) is a unique address that certain electronic devices currently use in order to identify and communicate with each other on a computer network utilizing the Internet Protocol standard (IP)—in simpler terms, a computer address. ...


His father worried at the time that Pearl's Israeli citizenship would have an adverse effect on the investigation.[13] On March 21, 2002, in Pakistan, Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh and three other suspects were charged with murder for their part in the kidnapping and murder of Daniel Pearl. They were convicted on July 15, 2002, and Sheikh was sentenced to death. During the trial, Sheikh, the mastermind of the kidnapping, told investigators that he had kidnapped Pearl to "strike a blow at the United States and embarrass the Pakistani government."[citation needed] Another of the suspects said Pearl had been targeted "because he was a Jew working against Islam."[citation needed] Sheikh has appealed the sentence, but hearings in his case were postponed repeatedly — over 30 times — and no definitive date has been set. is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh (Arabic: احمد عمر سعید شیخ) (sometimes known as Omar Sheikh, Sheikh Omar[1], Sheik Syed[2], or by the alias Mustafa Muhammad Ahmad[3]) (b. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


On March 10, 2007, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, an alleged Al Qaeda operative reported to be third in command under Osama Bin Laden, claimed responsibility, before his Combatant Status Review Tribunal, for the murder of Daniel Pearl. He claimed to have beheaded him, but did not specify whether he had cut his throat before cutting off his head (Zarqawi-fashion) or cut off his head from the back with a sword or axe, as decapitations were done for millennia and are still done in Saudi Arabia.[14] In a confession read during his Tribunal hearing Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is on record repeating: is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Khalid Sheikh Mohammed: Prosecution Exhibit from the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui Wikisource has original text related to this article: CSRT Summary of Evidence memo for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (Arabic: خالد شيخ محمد; also transliterated as Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, inter alia, and additionally known by as many as twenty-seven aliases... Map of major attacks attributed to al-Qaeda Al-Qaeda (also al-Qaida or al-Qaida or al-Qaidah) (Arabic: ‎ , translation: The Base) is an international alliance of terrorist organizations founded in 1988[4] by Osama bin Laden and other veteran Afghan Arabs after the Soviet War in... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism Wikisource has original text related to this article: Declaration of Stephen Abraham, Lieutenant Colonel, United States Army Reserve, June 14th, 2007 This is the trailer where the Combatant Status... Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in one of eight photos from Rewards for Justice, all undated. ... Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ...

I decapitated with my blessed right hand the head of the American Jew Daniel Pearl, in the City of Karachi, Pakistan.[15]

This confession repeated, word for word, the phrasing leaked, in 2002, from his controversial interrogation in a clandestine CIA interrogation center.[16] Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism The Salt Pit in Afghanistan Black site is a military term that has been used by United States intelligence agencies to refer to any classified facility whose existence or...


On March 19, 2007 Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh's lawyers cited Khalid Sheikh Mohammed's confession in defense of their client.[15][17] They said they had always acknowledged that their client played a role in Pearl's murder, but they had always argued that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was the actual murderer. They plan for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed's confession to play a central role in their appeal of their client's death sentence. is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


In his book In the Line of Fire, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf states that Daniel Pearl's murderer was an agent of MI6 (British Intelligence), who at some point became a double agent.[18] Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Pervez Musharraf (Urdu: ) (born 11 August 1943, Delhi) is the current President of Pakistan, Chief of Army Staff of the Pakistan Army. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), more commonly known as MI6 (originally Military Intelligence Section 6), or the Secret Service, is the United Kingdom external security agency. ... A double agent pretends to spy on a target organization on behalf of a controlling organization, but in fact is loyal to the target organization. ...


Aftermath

A collection of Pearl's writings (At Home in the World) was published posthumously in 2002 demonstrating his "extraordinary skill as a writer" and his "eye for quirky stories -- many of which appeared in The Journal's iconic "middle column".[19] Six of these stories were adapted by composer Russell Steinberg into an album: Stories from My Favorite Planet -- a trio for violin, piano and reader.


The Daniel Pearl Foundation was formed by Pearl's family and friends to continue Pearl's mission and to address what they consider the root causes of his death, in the spirit, style, and principles that shaped Pearl's work and character.[20] The principles cited include uncompromised objectivity and integrity; insightful and unconventional perspective; tolerance and respect for people of all cultures; unshaken belief in the effectiveness of education and communication; and the love of music, humor, and friendship. Daniel Pearl World Music Days have been held worldwide since 2002, and have promoted over 1500 concerts in over 60 countries, with dedications to tolerance and humanity.


Pearl's widow, Mariane Pearl, wrote the memoir A Mighty Heart which tells the full story of Pearl and more about his life.[21] The book was adapted into a film starring Angelina Jolie and Dan Futterman,[22] who, like Daniel Pearl, is a member of Alpha Delta Phi.[citation needed]. Mariane Pearl (born Mariane van Neyenhoff, July 23, 1967, Clichy-la-Garenne, France) is the widow of Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter who was kidnaped and murdered by terrorists in Pakistan in early 2002. ... A Mighty Heart is a memoir by Mariane Pearl, the widow of the slain American journalist Daniel Pearl. ... A Mighty Heart is a 2007 film adaptation of Mariane Pearls memoir, A Mighty Heart. ... Angelina Jolie (born Angelina Jolie Voight on June 4, 1975) is an American film actor, a former fashion model, and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ... Daniel Futterman (born June 8, 1967) is an American actor and screenwriter. ...


On September 1, 2003, a book titled Who Killed Daniel Pearl?, written by Bernard-Henri Lévy was published.[23] The book, which the author characterized as an "investigative novel", stirred controversy for some of its speculative conclusions about the killing, and for some of its characterizations of Pakistan, and for the author's decision to engage in an exercise of fictionalizing Pearl's thoughts at the end of his life. Lévy was criticized for the book.[24][25][26][27] This book is being adapted into a film directed by Tod Williams and starring Josh Lucas focusing on the last few days of Daniel Pearl's life.[28] is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bernard-Henri Lévy (born November 5, 1948 in Béni-Saf, Algeria) is a French intellectual and businessman. ... Tod Culpan Kip Williams (born September 27, 1968 in New York) is an American director, producer and screenwriter. ... Josh Lucas (born June 20, 1971) is an American actor. ...


HBO Films produced a 79-minute documentary titled The Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniel Pearl. It premiered on HBO on October 10, 2006. The documentary chronicles Pearl's life and death, and features extensive interviews with his immediate family. It is narrated by Christiane Amanpour, and was nominated for two Emmy Awards. HBO Films is a division of the cable television network HBO that produces feature films and miniseries. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 2006 in film involved some significant events. ... Christiane Amanpour, CBE (born January 12, 1958) (in Persian: ) is the chief international correspondent for CNN. // Shortly after her birth in London, her British mother Patricia, and her father Mohammed, an Iranian airline executive, moved the family to Tehran. ... An Emmy Award. ...


American modernist composer Steve Reich wrote his 2006 work The Daniel Variations which interweaves Pearl's own words with verses from the Book of Daniel. Stephen Michael Reich (born October 3, 1936) is an American composer. ... For other uses, see Book of Daniel (disambiguation). ...


Pearl's parents, Judea and Ruth, edited and published a collection of responses sent to them from around the globe, entitled I Am Jewish: Personal Reflections Inspired by the Last Words of Daniel Pearl (Jewish Lights Publishing, 2004). Their son's final words on the video were "My father is Jewish, my mother is Jewish, I am Jewish," after which Pearl added one obscure detail, that a street in Israel's Bene Barak is named after his great grandfather who was one of the founders of the town[11]. The family has written that they understand this last detail authenticates his own voice and demonstrates his willingness to claim his identity, even in the hands of deadly captors. Judea Pearl has written that at first, this statement surprised him but he later understood it to be a reference to the town-building tradition of his family contrasted with the destructive aims of his captors. The seed idea to collect responses began when a girl from New York began to compile statements about being Jewish as her Bat Mitzvah project[citation needed] to create a future gift book for Pearl's son Adam. Judea Pearl then enlarged the idea by inviting responses from artists, government leaders, authors, journalists, scientists, scholars, rabbis and others. All wrote personal responses to what they thought upon hearing that these were Pearl's last words. Some responses are one sentence, others several pages.


The book is organized by five themes: Identity; Heritage; Covenant, Chosenness, and Faith; Humanity and Ethnicity; Tikkun Olam (Repairing the World) and Justice. Contributors include Theodore Bikel, Alan Dershowitz, Kirk Douglas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Larry King, Amos Oz, Shimon Peres, Daniel Schorr, Elie Wiesel, Peter Yarrow, and A.B. Yehoshua. Theodore Bikel. ... Alan Morton Dershowitz (born September 1, 1938) is an American lawyer and criminal law professor known for his extensive published works, career as an attorney in several high-profile law cases, and commentary on the Arab-Israeli conflict. ... Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch Demsky December 9, 1916) is an iconic American actor and film producer known for his gravelly voice and his recurring roles as the kinds of characters Douglas himself once described as sons of bitches. He is also father to Hollywood actor and producer Michael Douglas. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... This article is about the television show host. ... Amos Oz, November 7 2004 Amos Oz (born May 4, 1939), birth name Amos Klausner, is an Israeli writer, novelist, and journalist. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Schorr (left) and NPRs Scott Simon prepare for Saturday broadcast. ... Elie Wiesel (born Eliezer Wiesel on September 30, 1928)[1] is a writer, political activist, Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor. ... Peter Yarrow (born May 31, 1938) is an American singer who found fame with the 1960s folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary. ... Avraham Boolie Yehoshua (born in Jerusalem in 1936) is an Israeli novelist, essayist, and playwright, known publicly as A. B. Yehoshua, and familiarly as Boolie. Yehoshua was born in the fifth Jerusalem generation of a Sephardi Jewish family (Feld 2000). ...


Legacy

In 2002, Pearl posthumously received the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award from Colby College and in 2007, the Lyndon Baines Johnson Moral Courage Award from the Houston Holocaust Museum. Elijah Parish Lovejoy (November 9, 1802 – November 7, 1837) was an American Presbyterian minister, journalist and newspaper editor who was murdered by a mob in Alton, Illinois for his abolitionist views. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is an elite liberal arts college located on Mayflower Hill in Waterville, Maine. ... Holocaust Museum Houston The Holocaust Museum Houston, is located in Houston, Texas and was opened in 1996. ...


On April 16, 2007, Pearl was added to the Holocaust Memorial on Miami Beach as the first non-Holocaust victim. His father, Judea Pearl, gave his consent for the induction in order to remind generations to come that "The forces of barbarity and evil are still active in our world. The Holocaust didn't finish in 1945."[29] Journalist Bradley Burston criticized the addition of a post-Holocaust victim to the memorial, saying it diminishes the uniqueness of the Holocaust.[30] is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Holocaust Memorial on Miami Beach is a Holocaust memorial in Miami Beach, Florida. ... “Shoah” redirects here. ...


In May 2007, the Communications Technology Magnet School at Birmingham High School was renamed the Daniel Pearl Journalism and Communications Magnet. Birmingham High School is a public coeducational high school in the neighborhood/district of Lake Balboa in the San Fernando Valley section of the County of Los Angeles, California. ... The Daniel Pearl Journalism and Communications Magnet is a magnet school within Birmingham High School. ...


Shortly after his death, Pearl's parents, Ruth and Judea Pearl, founded the Daniel Pearl Foundation to further the ideals that inspired his life and work. The foundation's mission is to promote cross-cultural understanding through journalism, music, and dialogue. Its programs include: World Music Days which uses the power of music to promote tolerance and inspire respect for differences; PEARL World Youth News which provides an online journalist certification course for High School Students; Annual Daniel Pearl Journalism and Editorial Fellowships which brings mid-career foreign journalists and editors to work for six months in a US newsroom; the Daniel Pearl Media Internship Program which provides media internships to young Israelis and Palestinians who have attended a peace camp; and The Daniel Pearl Dialogues for Muslim-Jewish Understanding - a traveling public dialogue in which professors Judea Pearl and Akbar Ahmed discuss Muslim-Jewish relationships in a frank and respectful discourse. Judea Pearl is a computer science professor at UCLA. He was one of the pioneers of Bayesian networks and the probabilistic approach to artificial intelligence. ...


The honorary board of the Daniel Pearl Foundation includes Christiane Amanpour, President Bill Clinton, Abdul Sattar Edhi, Danny Gill, John Hennessy, Ted Koppel, Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan, Sari Nusseibeh, Mariane Pearl, Itzhak Perlman, Harold Schulweiss, Craig Sherman, Paul Steiger, and Elie Wiesel. Christiane Amanpour, CBE (born January 12, 1958) (in Persian: ) is the chief international correspondent for CNN. // Shortly after her birth in London, her British mother Patricia, and her father Mohammed, an Iranian airline executive, moved the family to Tehran. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Dr. Abdul Sattar Edhi Dr. Abdul Sattar Edhi, (Urdu: عبد الستار ایدھی), or Edhi, as he is often known, is one of the most active philanthropists in Pakistan and in the whole world. ... John L. Hennessy is the founder of MIPS Computer Systems Inc. ... Photo by Bob DAmico/ABC Ted Koppel, anchor of the ABC News program Nightline. ... Queen Noor (Arabic: الملكة نور) (born August 23, 1951 in Washington, D.C.) is the fourth wife and widow of the late King Hussein of Jordan; as such she is Queen Dowager of Jordan. ... Sari Nusseibeh Sari Nusseibeh (born in 1949), is a Palestinian professor of philosophy and president of the Al-Quds University in Jerusalem (Al Quds is the Arabic name for Jerusalem). ... Mariane Pearl (born Mariane van Neyenhoff, July 23, 1967, Clichy-la-Garenne, France) is the widow of Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter who was kidnaped and murdered by terrorists in Pakistan in early 2002. ... Itzhak Perlman (born August 31, 1945) is an Israeli-American violinist, conductor, and pedagogue. ... Elie Wiesel (born Eliezer Wiesel on September 30, 1928)[1] is a writer, political activist, Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor. ...


References

  1. ^ On the Trail of Daniel Pearl
  2. ^ Who killed Daniel Pearl?
  3. ^ BBC NEWS | UK | Profile: Omar Saeed Sheikh
  4. ^ Online NewsHour Update: Pakistan Convicts Four Men in Pearl Murder - July 15, 2002
  5. ^ Mount, Mike. "Khalid Sheikh Mohammed: I beheaded American reporter", CNN, March 15, 2007.
  6. ^ "Al-Qaida No. 3 says he planned 9/11, other plots", MSNBC, March 15, 2007
  7. ^ Katherine Shrader. "9/11 Mastermind Admits Killing Reporter", Houston Chronicle, 2007-03-15. Retrieved on 2007-03-20. 
  8. ^ Dershowitz, Alan (Editor). *What Israel Means to Me*, John Wiley & Sons (2006) pp. 279-286
  9. ^ Pearl, Daniel. Stradivarius Violin, Lost Years Ago, Resurfaces but New Owner Plays Coy. The Wall Street Journal Archive: 17 October 1994.
  10. ^ Pellegrini, Frank. "Daniel Pearl: 1963-2002", Time Magazine, 2002-02-21. 
  11. ^ a b Pearl, Ruth & Judea, eds. I Am Jewish: Personal Reflections Inspired by the Last Words of Daniel Pearl. Jewish Lights Pub., January 2004. ISBN 1-58023-183-7.
  12. ^ McCarthy, Rory. Pakistan holds three as net closes on US reporter's kidnappers. Guardian.co.uk. 6 February 2002.
  13. ^ Haaretz article February 2002
  14. ^ Verbatim Transcript of Combatant Status Review Tribunal Hearing for ISN 10024 (ie. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed). US Department of Defense (2007-03-10). Retrieved on 2007-03-10.
  15. ^ a b Unkovic, Alexis. Militant convicted of Pearl killing to rely on KSM Guantanamo confession on appeal. The Jurist. 3 March 2007. Access date: 20 March 2007
  16. ^ "Daniel Pearl.", The Herald (Glasgow), Scottish Media Newspapers Limited, 2002-02-25, p. 14. Retrieved on 2006-11-17. 
  17. ^ "Pearl murder convict to appeal after confession.", Reuters, 2007-03-19. Retrieved on 2007-03-19. 
  18. ^ "President dubs alleged Pearl killer MI6 spy.", Gulf Times, 2006-09-26. Retrieved on 2007-03-20. 
  19. ^ Pearl, Daniel. At Home in the World: Collected Writings from the Wall Street Journal. New York: Free Press, June 2002. ISBN 0-7432-4317-X.
  20. ^ Daniel Pearl Foundation. Daniel Pearl Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-03-20.
  21. ^ Pearl, Mariane, and Sarah Crichton. A Mighty Heart. New York: Scribner, 2003. ISBN 0-7432-4442-7. Access date: 2007-03-20.
  22. ^ Moerk, Christian.. "The Race To Put Pearl On Screen", New York Times, 2005-07-31. Retrieved on 2007-03-20. 
  23. ^ Lévy, Bernard-Henri (2003). Who Killed Daniel Pearl?. Melville House Publishing. ISBN 0971865949. 
  24. ^ Escobar, Pepe.. "Who Killed Daniel Pearl?". Retrieved on 2007-03-20. 
  25. ^ Dalrymple, William (2003-12-04). Murder in Karachi. New York Review of Books. Retrieved on 2007-03-20.
  26. ^ Levy, Bernard-Henri and William Dalrymple (2004-02-12). Murder in Karachi: An Exchange. New York Review of Books. Retrieved on 2007-03-20.
  27. ^ Levy, Bernard-Levy. "Who Killed Daniel Pearl?", BBC, 2003-10-23. Retrieved on 2007-03-20. 
  28. ^ Zwick to Make Film About Daniel Pearl. Rotten Tomatoes (2005-02-22). Retrieved on 2007-03-20.
  29. ^ Associated Press. "Slain Journalist Daniel Pearl Honored With Holocaust Victims.", Editor & Publisher, 2007-04-16. Retrieved on 2007. 
  30. ^ Burston, Bradley. Holocaust denial begins at home. Haaretz.com. 17 April 2007.
  • Burger, Timothy J. "Kidnappers Cut Pearl's Throat Videotape Shows Newsman's Brutal Slaying", 'Daily News (New York)', Daily News, L.P., 2002-02-22, p. 3. Retrieved on 2006-11-17.  - 'Fahad Naseem, one of the three militants accused of kidnapping Pearl, told a judge in Karachi yesterday that Pearl was kidnapped because he was "a Jew and is working against Islam."'
  • Masood, Salman; Talat Hussain. "Suspect in Reporter's Death Is Wanted in Attacks on Musharraf", 'The New York Times', The New York Times Company, 2004-05-29, p. Section A; Column 3; Foreign Desk; Pg. 2. Retrieved on 2006-11-17.  - 'The intelligence official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said that information from American intelligence agencies helped Pakistani investigators track down the ring involved in the plot. Information from Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, Al Qaeda's former head of operations who was captured in March 2002, aided the investigation, he said. American officials say they believe that Mr. Mohammed was the person who actually killed Mr. Pearl.'
  • Popham, Peter. "Video Reveals the Hideous Sacrifice of Captive Reporter; Pearl murder gruesome tape shows American speaking into camera as unknown killer slits his throat, then beheads him.", 'The Independent', Newspaper Publishing PLC, 2002-02-23, p. 2. Retrieved on 2006-11-17. 

For the news website, see msnbc. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Houston Chronicle is a daily newspaper in Houston, Texas, United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TIME redirects here. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jurist is a website hosted by the University of Pittsburghs faculty of law, which produces articles introducing cases and issues of legal significance. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Overview The Gulf Times newspaper was founded in 1978 as part of the Gulf Publishing and Printing Company in the capital city of Qatar, Doha (or ad-Dawhah. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Dalrymple (born 1965 in Scotland) is a historian, travel writer and journalist. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Review of Books (or NYRB) is a biweekly magazine on literature, culture, and current affairs published in New York which takes as its point of departure that the discussion of important books is itself an indispensable literary activity. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bernard-Henri L vy is a French philosopher and writer. ... William Dalrymple (born 1965 in Scotland) is a historian, travel writer and journalist. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Review of Books (or NYRB) is a biweekly magazine on literature, culture, and current affairs published in New York which takes as its point of departure that the discussion of important books is itself an indispensable literary activity. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bernard-Henri L vy is a French philosopher and writer. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Daily News Building, John Mead Howells and Raymond Hood, architects, rendering by Hugh Ferriss. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ...

See also

Amjad Farooqi (1972—September 26, 2004), known by the alias Amjad Hussain, was an Islamic militant. ... Screenshot of Olaf Wiig (left) and Steve Centanni (right) in tape released after capture Fox News Channel journalists Olaf Wiig, a New Zealander photojournalist, and Steve Centanni, an American reporter, were kidnapped in the Gaza Strip by the Holy Jihad Brigades, a previously unknown group of Palestinian militants, from their... Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ... Eugene Armstrong, in orange, seated, before his decapitation by the five men standing over him. ... Nicholas Berg (April 2, 1978 – May 7, 2004) was an American businessman seeking telecommunications work in Iraq during the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq. ... A family photo of Johnson. ... Kim Sun-il (September 13, 1970 – June 22, 2004) was a South Korean translator working in Iraq for Gana General Trading Company, a South Korean company under contract to the U.S. military. ... Jack Hensley, seated in orange, before his beheading by the five men standing over him Jack Hensley (September 22, 1955 – September 21, 2004) was an American engineer from Marietta, Cobb County, Georgia, near Atlanta. ... Kenneth Bigley and his wife Sombat at their wedding in 1998. ... Shosei Koda Shosei Koda (香田証生 Kōda Shōsei, November 29, 1979–November 3, 2004?) was a Japanese citizen who was kidnapped and later beheaded in Iraq of November 3, 2004 while touring the country. ... Margaret Hassan Margaret Hassan (also known as Madam Margaret) (April 18, 1945–November 2004?) was an aid worker who had worked in Iraq for many years until she was abducted and murdered by unidentified kidnappers in Iraq in 2004, at the age of 59. ... This article needs cleanup. ...

Further reading

  • Lévy, Bernard-Henri, Who Killed Daniel Pearl?, Melville House Publishing, 2003. ISBN 0-9718659-4-9
  • Pearl, Daniel, At Home in the World: Collected Writings from the Wall Street Journal, New York: Free Press, June 2002. ISBN 0-7432-4317-X
  • Pearl, Mariane, and Sarah Crichton, A Mighty Heart, New York: Scribner, 2003. ISBN 0-7432-4442-7
  • Pearl, Ruth and Judea, eds. I Am Jewish: Personal Reflections Inspired by the Last Words of Daniel Pearl. Jewish Lights Pub., January 2004. ISBN 1-58023-183-7.

Bernard-Henri Lévy (born November 5, 1948 in Béni-Saf, Algeria) is a French intellectual and businessman. ... Mariane Pearl (born Mariane van Neyenhoff, July 23, 1967, Clichy-la-Garenne, France) is the widow of Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter who was kidnaped and murdered by terrorists in Pakistan in early 2002. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Daniel Pearl at AllExperts (1338 words)
Pearl was investigating the case of Richard Reid, links between Al Qaeda and Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), and $100,000 wired to September 11 chief operative Mohammed Atta's account in the US by Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh, following instructions by Pakistani General Mahmoud Ahmad — the ISI director general at the time.
Daniel Pearl was born in Princeton, New Jersey, and grew up in Encino in Los Angeles, California where he attended Portola Middle School and Birmingham High School.
The Daniel Pearl Foundation [2] was formed by Pearl's family and friends to continue Pearl's mission and to address the root causes of this tragedy, in the spirit, style, and principles that shaped Pearl's work and character.
Daniel Pearl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1417 words)
Daniel Pearl was born in Princeton, New Jersey, and grew up in Encino in Los Angeles, California where he attended Portola Middle School and Birmingham High School.
Pearl's body was found in a shallow grave in the outskirts of Karachi on May 16.
The Daniel Pearl Foundation [2] was formed by Pearl's family and friends to continue Pearl's mission and to address what they consider the root causes of his death, in the spirit, style, and principles that shaped Pearl's work and character.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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