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Encyclopedia > Daniel Ellsberg
Daniel and Patricia Marx Ellsberg - 2006 Jacob Appelbaum
Daniel and Patricia Marx Ellsberg - 2006 Jacob Appelbaum

Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is a former American military analyst employed by the RAND Corporation who precipitated a national uproar in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, the U.S. military's account of activities during the Vietnam War, to The New York Times. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... A fairly broad term for a person or tool with a primary function of information analysis, generally with a more limited, practical and short term set of goals than a researcher. ... Alternate meanings: See RAND (disambiguation) The RAND Corporation is an American think tank first formed to offer research and analysis to the U.S. military. ... The Pentagon Papers is the colloquial term for United States-Vietnam Relations, 1945-1967: A Study Prepared by the Department of Defense, a 47 volume, 7,000-page, top-secret United States Department of Defense history of the United States political and military involvement in the Vietnam War from 1945... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...

Contents

History

Ellsberg, the son of Jewish parents with a passion for Christian Science, grew up in Detroit and attended Cranbrook Kingswood School, then attended Harvard University, graduating with a Ph.D. in Economics in 1959 in which he described a paradox in decision theory now known as the Ellsberg paradox. He served as a company commander in the Marine Corps for two years, and then became an analyst at the RAND Corporation. A committed Cold Warrior, he served in the Pentagon in 1964 under Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara. He then served for two years in Vietnam as a civilian in the State Department, and became convinced that the Vietnam War was unwinnable. He further believed that nearly everyone in the Defense and State Departments felt, as he did, that the United States had no realistic chance of achieving victory in Vietnam, but that political considerations prevented them from saying so publicly. McNamara and others continued to state in press interviews that victory was "just around the corner." As the war continued to escalate, Ellsberg became deeply disillusioned. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Christian Science is a religious teaching regarding the efficacy of spiritual healing according to the interpretation of the Bible by Mary Baker Eddy, in her book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (First published in 1875). ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... This article is about the private Pre K-12 school in the United States; For alternate uses, including other Cranbrook Schools, see Cranbrook (disambiguation). ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Founded in 1636,[2] Harvard is the oldest institution of higher learning still operating in the United States. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Decision theory is an interdisciplinary area of study, related to and of interest to practitioners in mathematics, statistics, economics, philosophy, management and psychology. ... The Ellsberg paradox is a paradox in decision theory and experimental economics in which peoples choices violate the expected utility hypothesis. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces to global crises. ... The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit global policy think tank first formed to offer research and analysis to the United States armed forces. ... Cold warrior is a phrase used to describe the men and women involved in the shaping and executing of American and Soviet policy during the Cold War. ... This article is about the U.S. military building. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and The role of the Secretary of Defense is to be the principal defense policy advisor to the President and is responsible for the formulation of general defense... Robert Strange McNamara (born June 9, 1916) is an American business executive and a former United States Secretary of Defense. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ...


The Pentagon Papers

As a Vietnam expert, Ellsberg was invited to contribute to the assemblage of classified papers regarding the execution of the Vietnam War. These documents later became collectively known as the Pentagon Papers. They revealed the knowledge, early on, that the war would not likely be won and that continuing the war would lead to many times more casualties than was admitted publicly. Further, the papers showed a deep cynicism towards the public and a disregard for the loss of life and injury suffered by soldiers and civilians. A typical classified document. ... The Pentagon Papers is the colloquial term for United States-Vietnam Relations, 1945-1967: A Study Prepared by the Department of Defense, a 47 volume, 7,000-page, top-secret United States Department of Defense history of the United States political and military involvement in the Vietnam War from 1945...


Ellsberg knew that releasing these papers would most likely result in a conviction and sentence of many years in prison. Throughout 1970, Ellsberg covertly attempted to convince a few sympathetic Senators (among them J. William Fulbright) to release the Pentagon Papers on the Senate floor, because a Senator cannot be prosecuted for anything he says on record before the Senate. Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... James William Fulbright (April 9, 1905–February 9, 1995) was a well-known member of the United States Senate representing Arkansas. ...


When these efforts failed, Ellsberg, with the assistance of Anthony Russo, copied them and finally leaked the Pentagon Papers to Neil Sheehan at The New York Times. On June 12, 1971, the Times began publishing the first installment of the 7,000 page document. For 15 days, the Times was prevented from publishing its articles on the orders of the Nixon administration. However, the Supreme Court soon ordered publication to resume freely. Although the Times did not reveal Ellsberg as their source, he knew that the FBI would soon determine that he was the source of the leak. Ellsberg went underground, living secretly among like-minded people. He was not caught by the FBI, even though they were under enormous pressure from the Nixon Administration to find him. Anthony Tony James Russo assisted Daniel Ellsberg, his friend and former colleague at the Rand Corp. ... Cornelius Mahoney Neil Sheehan (born October 27, 1936) is an American journalist. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


The Nixon administration also began a campaign to discredit Ellsberg. Nixon's plumbers broke into Ellsberg's psychiatrist's office in an attempt to find damaging information. When they failed to find Ellsberg's file, they made plans to break into the psychiatrist's home. The White House Plumbers or simply The Plumbers is the popular name given to the covert Nixon White House Special Investigations Unit established July 24, 1971. ...


Fallout

Nixon's Oval Office tape from June 14 shows H. R. Haldeman describing the situation to Nixon. The Watergate tapes are an enormous collection of audio tape recordings, made on orders of U.S. President Richard Nixon, of discussions in the Oval Office with various members of his staff or visitors. ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... H.R. Haldeman, January 21, 1971. ...

To the ordinary guy, all this is a bunch of gobbledygook. But out of the gobbledygook comes a very clear thing: you can't trust the government; you can't believe what they say; and you can't rely on their judgment. And the implicit infallibility of presidents, which has been an accepted thing in America, is badly hurt by this, because it shows that people do things the President wants to do even though it's wrong, and the President can be wrong.

The release of these papers was politically embarrassing, not only to the incumbent Nixon Administration, but also to the previous Johnson and Kennedy Administrations. John Mitchell, Nixon's Attorney General, almost immediately issued a telegram to the Times ordering that it halt publication. The Times refused, and the government brought suit against it. Gobbledygook or gobbledegook (sometimes shortened to gobbledegoo) is an English term used to describe nonsensical language, sound that resembles language but has no meaning, or unintelligible encrypted text. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Mitchell (far left) meeting with Nixon, J. Edgar Hoover, and John Ehrlichman on May 26, 1971. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ...


Although the Times eventually won the trial before the Supreme Court, an appellate court ordered that the Times temporarily halt further publication. This was not the first successful attempt by the federal government to restrain the publication of a newspaper as Lincoln illustrated during the civil war; this was remarkable because prior restraint has historically been viewed as the most oppressive form of censorship. Ellsberg released the Pentagon Papers to other newspapers in rapid succession, making it clear to the government that they would have to obtain injunctions against every newspaper in the country to stop the story. The right of the press to publish the papers was upheld in New York Times Co. v. U.S.. i dont think so Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeal. ... Prior restraint is a legal term referring to a governments actions that prevent materials from being published. ... Censorship is the removal or withholding of information from the public by a controlling group or body. ... New York Times Co. ...


Trial and mistrial

On June 28, Ellsberg publicly surrendered to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Boston, Massachusetts. He was taken into custody believing he would spend the rest of his life in prison; he was charged with theft, conspiracy, and espionage. June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, Athens of America, The Hub (of the Universe)1 Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area    - City  89. ...


In one of Nixon's actions against Ellsberg, G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt, members of the White House Special Investigation Unit (also called the "White House Plumbers") broke into Ellsberg's psychiatrist's office in September 1971, hoping to find information they could use to discredit him. The revelation of the break-in became part of the Watergate scandal. Due to the gross governmental misconduct, all charges against Ellsberg were eventually dropped. White House counsel Charles Colson was later prosecuted and pled no contest for obstruction of justice in the burglary of Ellsberg's psychiatrist's office. G. Gordon Liddy George Gordon Battle Liddy (born November 30, 1930) was the chief operative for President Richard Nixons White House Plumbers unit. ... Everette Howard Hunt, Jr. ... The White House Plumbers or simply The Plumbers is the popular name given to the covert Nixon White House Special Investigations Unit established July 24, 1971. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Charles Wendell Chuck Colson (born October 16, 1931) was the chief counsel for President Richard Nixon from 1969 to 1973 and was one of the Watergate Seven, jailed for Watergate-related charges. ...


Later life

Daniel Ellsberg has continued as a political activist, giving lecture tours and speaking out about current events. Recently he garnered criticism from the George W. Bush administration for praising Katharine Gun and calling on others to leak any papers that reveal deception regarding the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Daniel Ellsberg also testified in 2004 at the conscientious objector hearing of Camilo Mejia at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Katharine Teresa Gun (born 1974) is a former employee of Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), a British intelligence agency. ... Combatants Coalition Forces: United States United Kingdom South Korea Australia Poland Romania others. ... John T. Neufeld was a WWI conscientious objector sentenced to 15 years hard labour in the military prison at Leavenworth. ... Camilo Mejia is a former member of the Florida National Guard charged with desertion after failing to return to his unit after an October furlough. ... Fort Sill is a United States Army post near Lawton, Oklahoma; about 85 miles southwest of Oklahoma City. ...


The Pentagon Papers is a 2003 movie documenting Ellsberg's life starting with his work for Rand Corp and ending with the day on which the judge declared his espionage trial a mistrial.


In 2004, Ellsberg signed the 9/11 Truth Statement along with 99 other prominent Americans and 40 family members of victims killed in the attacks of September 11th. The statement is a public appeal for a new inquiry into the attacks of September 11th, with an explicit call to examine evidence that suggests high-level government officials purposely allowed the attacks to occur. In July 2006, Ellsberg was interviewed on the Alex Jones radio show where he discussed his opinions on US Government involvement in the September 11 terrorist attacks. Interview available in MP3 format. 10 minute segment starts at 23:55 Alexander Emerick Jones (born February 11, 1974) is a American radio host, constitutionalist and filmmaker who is best known for his 9/11 conspiracy theories. ...


Ellsberg was arrested, in November 2005, for violating a county ordinance for trespassing while protesting against George W. Bush's conduct of the Iraq War. [1] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


In September 2006, Ellsberg wrote in Harper's Magazine that he hoped someone would leak information about a U.S. invasion of Iran before the invasion happened, to stop the war. [2] He reiterated this in a September 21, 2006 interview on The Colbert Report. An issue of Harpers Magazine from 1905 Another issue, from November 2004 Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly general-interest magazine covering literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts from a progressive, moderate left perspective in a fashion often not found in the ordinary news... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Colbert Report (pronounced )[1] is an American satirical television program on Comedy Central that stars comedian Stephen Colbert, who previously became well known as a senior correspondent for The Daily Show. ...


Ellsberg is the recipient of the Inaugural Ron Ridenhour Courage Award; a prize established by The Nation Institute and The Fertel Foundation. On September 28, 2006 he was awarded the Right Livelihood Award. Jakob von Uexkull, founder of the Right Livelihood Award The Right Livelihood Award, established in 1980 by Jakob von Uexkull, is presented annually in the building of the Swedish Parliament, usually on December 9, to honour those working on practical and exemplary solutions to the most urgent challenges facing the...


Works by Daniel Ellsberg

  • Daniel Ellsberg. 2002. Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers. New York: Viking. ISBN 0-670-03030-9
  • Daniel Ellsberg. 2001. Risk, Ambiguity and Decision Routledge. ISBN 0-8153-4022-2 (Ellsberg's 1962 PhD was released as a book)

External links

  • Official website for "Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers"
  • The Truth-Telling Project - Project formed by Ellsberg for whistleblowers
  • The Pentagon Papers TV, (Ellsberg played by James Spader) 2003
  • Interview starts at 9:30.
  • Ron Ridenhour Courage Award
  • Notes on Iraq War and Further Escalation
  • 2006 Right Livelihood Award Recipient Daniel Ellsberg
  • Bush as Col. Kurtz- Comparison of Vietnam and Iraq viz Apocalypse Now
  • Ellsberg at Roskilde Universitets Center
Persondata
NAME Ellsberg, Daniel
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION military analyst and anti-war activist
DATE OF BIRTH April 7, 1931
PLACE OF BIRTH Detroit, Michigan, United States
DATE OF DEATH living
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
CNN - Cold War: Chat with Daniel Ellsberg (3035 words)
Daniel Ellsberg: We live in a country, thank God, where telling the truth to Congress is not treason even though the president is determined to deceive Congress and the public.
Daniel Ellsberg: Charles Colson, who was the counsel to the president, called Jeb Magruder, who was running the Committee to Re-elect the President (CREEP), to arrange for counter-demonstrators to disrupt physically a demonstration, a rally, at which I would be speaking on May 3.
Daniel Ellsberg: In the series, so far, and what I know of what is to come, I'm sorry to see that the difficulty of ending the war under Johnson and Nixon may not come through clearly, and thus the essential role played in ending the war of the anti-war movement right through till 1975.
Daniel Ellsberg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1311 words)
Daniel Ellsberg (born April 7, 1931) is a former American military analyst employed by the RAND Corporation who precipitated a national uproar in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, the US military's account of activities during the Vietnam War, to The New York Times.
Ellsberg was arrested, in November 2005, for violating a county ordinance for trespassing while protesting against George W. Bush's conduct of the Iraq War.
Ellsberg is the recipient of the Inaugural Ron Ridenhour Courage Award; a prize established by The Nation Institute and The Fertel Foundation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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