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Encyclopedia > Daniel Barenboim
Daniel Barenboim

Background information
Born November 15, 1942 (1942-11-15) (age 64)
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Genre(s) Classical
Occupation(s) Conductor, pianist
Instrument(s) Piano
Years active 1950-present
Associated
acts
Berlin State Opera
Berlin Staatskapelle
La Scala
Chicago Symphony
Orchestre de Paris
West-Eastern Divan Orchestra

Daniel Barenboim (b. November 15, 1942) is a pianist and conductor. He lives in Berlin and holds citizenship in Argentina, Israel, and Spain. He was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina; his parents were Russian Jews. Barenboim first came to fame as a pianist but now is as well-known as a conductor, and for his work with an orchestra of young Arab and Jewish musicians, based in Israel, called the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, which he co-founded with the late Palestinian American intellectual and activist Edward Said, whom Barenboim has called his best friend. Barenboim has been an outspoken critic of the Israeli settlements and of Israel's government since Rabin, and supporter of Palestinian rights. In 2001, he sparked a controversy in Israel by conducting the music of Wagner in concert. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Daniel_Barenboim. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Classical music is a term with three distinct meanings: The European tradition of music which is associated with high culture, as distinct from popular or folk forms (including works in this tradition in non-European countries). ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Pianist Claudio Arrau, Carnegie Hall, 1954. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Staatsoper Unter den Linden, 2003 Berlin State Opera (in German: Staatsoper Unter den Linden) is a prominent German opera company. ... The Staatskapelle Berlin is the orchestra of the Berlin State Opera (Berliner Staatsoper Unter den Linden). ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, by night. ... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the major orchestras in the United States. ... The Orchestre de Paris is a French orchestra created in 1967, based in Paris, whose current Music Director is Christoph Eschenbach. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Location of Berlin within Germany / EU Coordinates Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE3 City subdivisions 12 boroughs Governing Mayor Klaus Wowereit (SPD) Governing parties SPD / Left. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predomiantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Maronite, Alawite Islam, Druze, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism An Arab (Arabic: ) is any member of the Semitic group of people whose cultural, linguistic, and in certain cases, ancestral origins trace back to... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Edward Wadie Said (Arabic: , transliteration: ) (1 November 1935 – 25 September 2003) was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and outspoken Palestinian activist. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Israeli settlement. ... Rabin is a Hebrew surname. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ...

Contents

Marriages

Daniel Barenboim married Jacqueline du Pré at the Western Wall, Jerusalem in 1967.[1] The marriage lasted until her death in 1987. His friendship with musicians Itzhak Perlman, Zubin Mehta, and Pinchas Zukerman, and marriage to du Pré led to the famous film by Christopher Nupen of their Schubert "Trout" Quintet. Collectively, the five referred to themselves as The Kosher Nostra.[2] Jacqueline Mary du Pré OBE (January 26, 1945 – October 19, 1987) was an English cellist. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Itzhak Perlman Itzhak Perlman (born August 31, 1945 in Jaffa) is an Israeli virtuoso violinist and teacher. ... Zubin Mehta (born April 29, 1936) is an Indian conductor of Western classical music. ... Image:Zukerman. ...


Du Pré developed advanced multiple sclerosis and retired in 1973. In the early 1980s, Barenboim began a relationship with the Russian pianist Elena Bashkirova, with whom he had two sons; David Arthur, a manager-writer for the German hip-hop band Level 8, born 1982 in Paris and Michael Barenboim, a violinist, born 1985 in Paris. Both were born prior to Du Pré's death. Barenboim tried to keep the relationship with Bashkirova hidden from Du Pré and believes he succeeded.[3] Barenboim and Bashkirova married in 1988. 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Elena Bashkirova is a pianist and wife of Argentini-Israeli pianist Daniel Barenboim. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Career

Barenboim started piano lessons at the age of five with his mother, continuing to study with his father Enrique, who remained his only teacher. In August 1950, when he was only seven years old, he gave his first formal concert in Buenos Aires. 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday. ...


In 1952, the Barenboim family moved to Israel. Two years later, in the summer of 1954, his parents brought him to Salzburg to take part in Igor Markevitch's conducting classes. During that summer he also met and played for Wilhelm Furtwängler, who has remained a central musical influence and ideal for Barenboim [4]. Furtwängler called the young Barenboim a "phenomenon" and invited him to perform the Beethoven First Piano Concerto with the Berlin Philharmonic, but Barenboim's father told the maestro that it was too soon after the Holocaust for a Jewish child to be performing in Berlin. 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...   is the fourth-largest city in Austria and the capital of the federal state of Salzburg. ... Igor Markevitch (July 27, 1912-March 7, 1983) was a Ukrainian composer and conductor. ... Wilhelm Furtwängler (January 25, 1886 – November 30, 1954) was a German conductor and composer. ... ...


In 1955 Barenboim studied harmony and composition with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... Musical composition is: a piece of music the structure of a musical piece the process of creating a new piece of music // A piece of music exists in the form of a written composition in musical notation or as a single acoustic event (a live performance or recorded track). ... Nadia Boulanger (September 16, 1887 – October 22, 1979) was an influential French composer, conductor, and music professor. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ...


Barenboim made his debut as a pianist in Vienna and Rome in 1952, Paris in 1955, London in 1956, and New York in 1957 under the baton of Leopold Stokowski. Regular concert tours of Europe, the United States, South America, Australia and the Far East followed thereafter. Vienna (German: , see also other names) is the capital of Austria, and also one of the nine States of Austria. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... NY redirects here. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Leopold Stokowski (born Antoni StanisÅ‚aw BolesÅ‚awowicz April 18, 1882 in London, England, died September 13, 1977 in Nether Wallop, England) was the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Symphony of the Air. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... The far east as a cultural block includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Asia. ...


Barenboim made his first recording in 1954, and later recorded complete cycles of the piano sonatas of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Ludwig van Beethoven and piano concertos by Mozart (as both conductor and pianist), Beethoven (with Otto Klemperer and later as conductor and pianist with the Berlin Philharmonic), Johannes Brahms with John Barbirolli and Zubin Mehta, and Bartók with Pierre Boulez. 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A piano sonata is a sonata written for unaccompanied piano. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (IPA: , baptized Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart) (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. ... portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler, 1820 Ludwig van Beethoven (IPA: ), (baptised December 17, 1770[1] – March 26, 1827) was a German composer. ... A piano concerto is a concerto for solo piano and orchestra. ... Otto Klemperer (May 14, 1885 – July 6, 1973) was a German-born conductor and composer. ... The Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra is one of the worlds leading orchestras. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Sir John (Giovanni Battista) Barbirolli (December 2, 1899 - July 29, 1970), was a British conductor and cellist who led the London Symphony Orchestra and the London Philharmonic Orchestra, among many others. ... Zubin Mehta (born April 29, 1936) is an Indian conductor of Western classical music. ... Béla Bartók in 1927 Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and collector of Eastern European and Middle Eastern folk music. ... Pierre Boulez Pierre Boulez (IPA: /pjɛʁ.buˈlÉ›z/) (born March 26, 1925) is a conductor and composer of classical music. ...


Following his debut as a conductor with the Philharmonia Orchestra in London in 1967, Barenboim was invited to conduct by many European and American symphony orchestras. Between 1975 and 1989 he was music director of the Orchestre de Paris, where he conducted much contemporary music. The Philharmonia is an orchestra based in London. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Orchestre de Paris is a French orchestra created in 1967, based in Paris, whose current Music Director is Christoph Eschenbach. ... 20th century classical music, the classical music of the 20th century, was extremely diverse, beginning with the late Romantic style of Sergei Rachmaninoff, Impressionism of Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel, and continuing through the Neoclassicism of middle-period Igor Stravinsky, and ranging to such distant sound-worlds as the complete...


Barenboim made his opera conducting debut in 1973 with a performance of Mozart's Don Giovanni at the Edinburgh Festival. He made his debut at Bayreuth in 1981, conducting there regularly until 1999. 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Don Giovanni (K.527) is an opera in two acts with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte. ... There is no one Edinburgh Festival but those using the term are usually referring to the collection of various festivals in August and early September of each year in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The Bayreuth Festspielhaus (Bayreuth Festival Theatre) is an opera house built to the north of the town of Bayreuth in Germany, dedicated to the performance of Richard Wagners operas. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


Barenboim served as music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra from 1991 through June 17, 2006. Barenboim expressed frustration at his fund-raising duties in America as part of being a music director of an American orchestra.[5] The title of music director is used by many symphony orchestras to designate the primary conductor and artistic leader of the orchestra. ... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the leading orchestras in the world. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Barenboim, whose home is in Berlin, has been music director of the Staatsoper Unter den Linden (Berlin State Opera) and the Berlin Staatskapelle since 1992. He has tried to maintain the orchestra's traditional East-Germanic sound and style. He has constantly worked to maintain the independent status of the Staatsoper.[6] He now is conductor for life at the Berlin State Opera.[7] On May 15th, 2006 Barenboim was named principal guest conductor of the La Scala opera house, in Milan, Italy.[8] The title of music director is used by many symphony orchestras to designate the primary conductor and artistic leader of the orchestra. ... Berlin State Opera (in German: Staatsoper Berlin) is a prominent German opera company. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ...


In 2006, Barenboim was the BBC Reith Lecturer, giving five lectures called 'In the Beginning was Sound' from London, Chicago, Berlin, and twice from Jerusalem in which he meditated on music, how it is created, one's experience of it, and its place in life. [9] In the fall of 2006, Barenboim gave the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard University entitled 'Sound and Thought'.[10] A Reith Lecture is a lecture in a series of annual radio lectures given by leading figures of the day, and broadcast by the BBC. They were begun in 1948, in honour of the first Director-General of the BBC, John Reith. ... The brothers Charles Benjamin Norton, Frank Henry Norton, and Charles Eliot Norton, between 1853-1855. ... Lectures held at Harvard University by distinguished academics. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ...


In November 2006, Lorin Maazel caused some controversy by submitting to the board of directors of the New York Philharmonic (NYP) Barenboim's name as his nominee to succeed him as the NYP's music director.[11] Barenboim, in turn, responded that while he was flattered, "nothing could be further from my thoughts at the moment than the possibility of returning to the United States for a permanent position."[12] In January 2007, Barenboim further demurred on this question by generally stating his lack of interest in any American music directorship, "at the moment."[13] In April 2007, it was reported that Barenboim expressed no interest in either the New York Philharmonic's music directorship or their newly created principal conductor position.[14] Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Lorin Varencove Maazel (born March 6, 1930) is a conductor, violinist and composer. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States. ...


Music

Daniel Barenboim is considered one of the most prominent musicians of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, as both pianist and conductor. He is noted for his mastery of conveying musical structure, and for a deep sensitivity to harmonic nuances[citation needed]. The term musical form is used in two related ways: a generic type of composition such as the symphony or concerto the structure of a particular piece, how its parts are put together to make the whole; this too can be generic, such as binary form or sonata form Musical... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ...


In the beginning of his career, Barenboim gained widespread acceptance mainly as a pianist. He concentrated on music of the Classical Era, as well as some Romantic composers. Notable Classical recordings include: the complete cycles of Mozart's and Beethoven's piano sonatas, and Mozart's piano concertos (in the latter, taking part as both soloist and conductor). Notable Romantic recordings include: Brahms's piano concertos (with John Barbirolli), Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte, and Chopin's nocturnes. Barenboim also recorded many chamber works, especially in collaboration with his first wife, Jacqueline du Pre, the violinist Itzhak Perlman, and the violinist and violist Pinchas Zukerman. Noted performances include: the complete Mozart violin sonatas (with Perlman), Brahms's violin sonatas (live concert with Perlman, previously in the studio with Zukerman), Beethoven's and Brahms's cello sonatas (with du Pre), Beethoven's and Tchaikovsky's piano trios (with du Pre and Zukerman), and Schubert's Trout Quintet (with du Pre, Perlman, Zukerman, and Zubin Mehta). The Classical period in Western music occurred from about 1730 through 1820, despite considerable overlap at both ends with preceding and following periods, as is true for all musical eras. ... The era of Romantic music is defined as the period of European classical music that runs roughly from the early 1800s to the first decade of the 20th century, as well as music written according to the norms and styles of that period. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Sonata (From Latin and Italian sonare, to sound), in music, literally means a piece played as opposed to cantata (Latin and Italian cantare, to sing), a piece sung. ... The term concerto (plural is concerti or concertos) usually refers to a musical work in which one solo instrument is accompanied by an orchestra. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of classical music. ... Sir John (Giovanni Battista) Barbirolli (December 2, 1899 - July 29, 1970), was a British conductor and cellist who led the London Symphony Orchestra and the London Philharmonic Orchestra, among many others. ... Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born and known generally as Felix Mendelssohn (February 3, 1809 – November 4, 1847) was a German composer and conductor of the early Romantic period. ... Lieder ohne Worte (Songs without Words) are a series of eight musical volumes consisting of six songs each (a total of 48) written for the solo piano by Romantic composer Felix Mendelssohn. ... Frédéric François Chopin as portrayed by Eugène Delacroix in 1838. ... A nocturne (from the French for nocturnal) is usually a musical composition that is inspired by, or evocative of, the night. ... Chamber music is a form of classical music, written for a small group of instruments which traditionally could be accommodated in a palace chamber. ... Jacqueline Mary du Pré (1945-1987) was an English cellist. ... Itzhak Perlman Itzhak Perlman (born August 31, 1945 in Jaffa) is an Israeli virtuoso violinist and teacher. ... Image:Zukerman. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October... Trio is generally used in any of the following ways: Three musicians playing the same or different musical instrument. ... For the crater on the moon, see Schubert (crater) Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828), was an Austrian composer. ... The Trout Quintet is the popular name for the piano quintet in A major by Franz Schubert. ... Zubin Mehta (born April 29, 1936) is an Indian conductor of Western classical music. ...


There are some who praise Barenboim's conducting, especially in his later years[citation needed]. Notable recordings include: the complete symphonies of Beethoven, Brahms, Bruckner and Schumann, many operas by Wagner, and various concertos. He has also written about his changing attitude to the music of Gustav Mahler[15]; he has recorded Mahler's Fifth and Ninth Symphonies and Das Lied von der Erde. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of classical music. ... Anton Bruckner Anton Bruckner (4 September 1824 – 11 October 1896) was an Austrian composer of the Romantic era. ... Schumann is the name of several notable people: Robert Schumann (1810 - 1856), German composer (husband of composer Clara Schumann) Clara Wieck Schumann (1819 - 1896), German pianist and composer, (wife of composer Robert Schumann) Georg Schumann (1886 - 1945), German Communist and resistance fighter against the Nazis Georg Schumann (1866 - 1952), German... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth) is particularly interesting among Gustav Mahlers symphonic works. ...


In his later years, Barenboim widened his concert repertoire, performing works by Baroque as well as twentieth-century classical composers. Examples include: Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier (which he has played since childhood) and Goldberg Variations, Albeniz's Iberia, and Debussy's preludes. In addition, he turned to other musical genres, such as Jazz[16], and folk music of his birthplace, Argentina. Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 and 1750 (see Dates of classical music eras for a discussion of the problems inherent in defining the beginning and end points). ... 20th century classical music, the classical music of the 20th century, was extremely diverse, beginning with the late Romantic style of Sergei Rachmaninoff, Impressionism of Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel, and continuing through the Neoclassicism of middle-period Igor Stravinsky, and ranging to such distant sound-worlds as the complete... In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ... Title-page of Das wohltemperirte Clavier A flat major (As-dur) fugue from the second part of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (manuscript) The Well-Tempered Clavier (in the original German: Das wohltemperierte Clavier[1]) is a collection of solo keyboard music composed by Johann Sebastian Bach. ... The Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, original title Aria mit verschiedenen Veränderungen[1] published as Clavierübung, bestehend in einer Aria. ... ... Iberia can mean: The Iberian peninsula of South west Europe; That part of it once inhabited by the Iberians, who spoke the Iberian language. ... Claude Debussy Claude Achille Debussy (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918), composer of impressionistic classical music. ... A prelude is a short piece of music, usually in no particular internal form, which may serve as an introduction to succeeding movements of a work that are usually longer and more complex. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States around the start of the 20th century. ... “Folk song” redirects here. ...


Barenboim has rejected musical fashions based on current musicological research, such as the authentic performance movement (see quotation at the end of this paragraph). Barenboim has, for example, opposed the practice of choosing the tempo of a piece based on historical evidence, such as composer metronome marks. He argues instead for finding the tempo from within the music, especially from its harmony and harmonic rhythm. Similarly, in Barenboim's recording of the Well-Tempered Clavier he makes frequent use of the right-foot sustaining pedal, a device absent from the keyboard instruments of Bach's time (although the harpsichord was highly resonant) producing a sonority very different from the "dry" and often staccato sound favored by the influential (and highly individual) pianist Glenn Gould[citation needed]. Moreover, in the fugues, one voice is often played considerably louder than the others, a practice impossible on a harpsichord, but which, according to some scholarship, began in Beethoven's time, according to the scholar Matthew Dirst (in the book The Iconic Bach). Indeed, when justifying his interpretation of Bach, Barenboim claims that he is interested in the long tradition of playing Bach, that has existed for two and a half centuries, rather than in the exact style of performance that existed in Bach's time: Musicology is reasoned discourse concerning music (Greek: μουσικη = music and λογος = word or reason). In other words: the whole body of systematized knowledge about music which results from the application of a scientific method of investigation or research, or of philosophical speculation and rational systematization to the facts, the processes and the... The authentic performance movement is an effort on the part of musicians and scholars to perform works of classical music in ways similar to how they were performed when they were originally written. ... The first two measures of Mozarts Sonata XI, which indicates the tempo as Andante grazioso and the metronome marking as = 120. (Metronome markings were not used in Mozarts day. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... Harmonic rhythm is the rate of harmonic change. ... Title-page of Das wohltemperirte Clavier A flat major (As-dur) fugue from the second part of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (manuscript) The Well-Tempered Clavier (in the original German: Das wohltemperierte Clavier[1]) is a collection of solo keyboard music composed by Johann Sebastian Bach. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... Glenn Herbert Gould (September 25, 1932 – October 4, 1982) was a Canadian pianist, noted especially for his recordings of the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. ... In music, a fugue (IPA: ) is a type of contrapuntal composition or technique of composition, for a fixed number of parts or voices (referred to as voices regardless of whether the work is vocal or instrumental). ... The word voice can be used to refer to: Sound: The human voice. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is any of a family of European keyboard instruments, including the large instrument currently called a harpsichord, but also the smaller virginals, the muselar virginals and the spinet. ...

"The study of old instruments and historic performance practice has taught us a great deal, but the main point, the impact of harmony, has been ignored. This is proved by the fact that tempo is described as an independent phenomenon. It is claimed that one of Bach's gavottes must be played fast and another one slowly. But tempo is not independent!... I think that concerning oneself purely with historic performance practice and the attempt to reproduce the sound of older styles of music-making is limiting and no indication of progress. Mendelssohn and Schumann tried to introduce Bach into their own period, as did Liszt with his transcriptions and Busoni with his arrangements. In America Leopold Stokowski also tried to do it with his arrangements for orchestra. This was always the result of "progressive" efforts to bring Bach closer to the particular period. I have no philosophical problem with someone playing Bach and making it sound like Boulez. My problem is more with someone who tries to imitate the sound of that time..."
(cited from "Ich bin mit Bach aufgewachsen" ["I was reared on Bach"], article by Daniel Barenboim, published in the booklets of his recordings of the Well-Tempered Clavier. Translated by Gery Bramall.)

Title-page of Das wohltemperirte Clavier A flat major (As-dur) fugue from the second part of Das wohltemperirte Clavier (manuscript) The Well-Tempered Clavier (in the original German: Das wohltemperierte Clavier[1]) is a collection of solo keyboard music composed by Johann Sebastian Bach. ...

Conducting Wagner in Israel

On July 7, 2001, Barenboim led the Berlin Staatskapelle in part of Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde at the Israel Festival in Jerusalem. The concert sparked controversy. Wagner's music had been unofficially taboo in Israel concert halls (although recordings of it were widely purchased and listened to) since the Kristallnacht in 1938, because of Wagner's "racial" anti-Semitism, which presaged and quite likely influenced Hitler's; previously the Palestine Philharmonic had performed Wagner's music. Barenboim had long opposed the ban, regarding it as reflecting what he calls a "diaspora" mentality that is no longer appropriate to Israel. In a conversation with Edward Said (published in the book Parallels and Paradoxes) he says that "Wagner, the person, is absolutely appalling, despicable, and, in a way, very difficult to put together with the music he wrote, which so often has exactly the opposite kind of feelings ... noble, generous, etc." He calls Wagner's anti-Semitism obviously "monstrous," and feels it must be faced, and argues that "Wagner did not cause the Holocaust." July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Staatskapelle Berlin is the orchestra of the Berlin State Opera (Berliner Staatsoper Unter den Linden). ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Tristan und Isolde (Tristan and Isolde) is an opera in three acts by Richard Wagner to a German libretto by the composer, based largely on the romance by Gottfried von Strassburg, which in turn was based on the story of Tristan and Iseult as told in French by Thomas of... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... This article is about cultural prohibitions in general, for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ... Kristallnacht, also known as Reichskristallnacht, Pogromnacht, Crystal Night and the Night of Broken Glass, was a pogrom[1] against Jews throughout Germany and parts of Austria on November 9–10, 1938. ... Edward Wadie Said (Arabic: , transliteration: ) (1 November 1935 – 25 September 2003) was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and outspoken Palestinian activist. ...


Barenboim originally had been scheduled to perform the first act of Die Walküre with three singers, including tenor Plácido Domingo. However strong protests by some Holocaust survivors, as well as the Israeli government, led the festival authorities to ask for an alternative program. (The Israel Festival's Public Advisory board, which included some Holocaust survivors, had originally approved the program.) [17] Die Walküre (The Valkyrie) is the second of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ... In music, a tenor is a male singer with a high voice. ... José Plácido Domingo Embil (born January 21, 1941[1]), better known as Plácido Domingo, is a world-famous Spanish operatic tenor. ... ...


Barenboim agreed to substitute music by Robert Schumann and Igor Stravinsky, for the offending piece, but expressed regret at the decision. At the end of the concert he announced that he would play Wagner as an encore and invited those who objected to hearing the music to leave, saying, "Despite what the Israel festival believes, there are people sitting in the audience for whom Wagner does not spark Nazi associations. I respect those for whom these associations are oppressive. It will be democratic to play a Wagner encore for those who wish to hear it. I am turning to you now and asking whether I can play Wagner.” [18] [19] [20] [21]. A half-hour debate ensued in Hebrew in the hall, with some audience members calling Barenboim a "fascist." In the end, according to reports in the Israeli press, about 50 attendees walked out, and about 1000 remained, applauding loudly after the performance. (According to Israeli newspaper interviews, at least one who remained in attendance was a Holocaust survivor, again undermining the simple assertion that all survivors opposed the performance of Wagner in Israel.) For others with the same name see Robert Schumann (disambiguation). ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ...


Barenboim regarded the performance of Wagner as a political statement, and said he had decided to defy the taboo on Wagner when a news conference he held the previous week was interrupted by the ringing of a mobile phone to the tune of Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries[22]. "I thought if it can be heard on the ring of a telephone, why can't it be played in a concert hall?" he said.


Sympathies

With respect to the Israel-Palestinean conflict, Barenboim has spoken about the need for both sides to begin to understand each other:

"There is no way Israel will deal with the Palestinians if the Palestinians do not understand the suffering of the Jewish people."
"Now fifty years after that we have to accept co-responsibility for Palestinian suffering. Until an Israeli leader is able to utter those words there will be no peace."[23]

Other reports have stated that "It has been said that Barenboim is a vehement critic of the Israeli presence in the West Bank, saying his adopted homeland is, "losing its moral capital [by] fighting against the identity of a people."[citation needed] In an interview with British music critic Norman Lebrecht in 2003, he accused the Israeli government of behaving in a manner which was, "morally abhorrent and strategically wrong", and, "putting in danger the very existence of the state of Israel."[24] Norman Lebrecht (born 11 July 1948 in London) is a British commentator on music and cultural affairs and also a novelist. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As a gesture of solidarity with the Palestinians, Barenboim has given performances in the Palestinian Territories[25], in particular on the West Bank. The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... This article is about the Palestinian territories as a geopolitical phenomenon. ...


In 1999, Barenboim jointly founded the West-Eastern Divan orchestra with the late Palestinian-American writer and activist Edward Said, who was a close friend[26] [27]. It is an initiative to bring together, every summer, a group of talented young classical musicians from Israel and Arab countries.[28] [29] [30] Barenboim and Said were among the recipients of the 2002 Prince of Asturias Awards for their work in "improving understanding between nations." 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... This page discusses the many projects that work to create a peaceful and productive co-existence between Israelis and Arabs including the Palestinians. ... Edward Wadie Said (Arabic: , transliteration: ) (1 November 1935 – 25 September 2003) was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and outspoken Palestinian activist. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The Prince of Asturias Awards (Spanish: Premios Príncipe de Asturias, Asturian: Premios Príncipe dAsturies) is a series of annual prizes given in Spain by the Fundación Príncipe de Asturias to individuals, entities, organizations or others from around the world who make notable achievements in the...


Barenboim wrote a book together with Said, Parallels and Paradoxes, based on a series of public discussions held at New York's Carnegie Hall.[31] Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ...


In September 2005 Barenboim refused to be interviewed by uniformed Israel Army Radio reporter Dafna Arad, considering the wearing of the uniform insensitive to the Palestinians present. Israeli Minister of Education, Limor Livnat, was quoted as describing Barenboim as "a real Jew hater" and "a real anti-semite".[32] 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Israel Army Radio, or Galèi Tzáhal as it is called in Hebrew (גלי צהל, lit. ... Dafna Arad and friend, downtown Tel Aviv, 2005 Dafna Arad (in Hebrew: דפנה ארד, elsewhere mentioned as Daphna Arad) is an Israeli singer, performer and journalist. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... Limor Livnat, Minister of Education, Culture and Sport Limor Livnat (לימור לבנת) (born in Haifa, September 22nd, 1950) is an Israeli Politician. ...


Wolf Prize

In May 2004, Barenboim was awarded the Wolf Prize at a ceremony at the Israeli Knesset. Education Minister Livnat originally held up the nomination until Barenboim apologized for his earlier performance of Wagner in Israel.[33] He took the opportunity to express his opinions on the political situation: shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Wolf Prize has been awarded annually since 1978 to living scientists and artists for achievements in the interest of mankind and friendly relations among peoples . ... The modern Knesset building, Israels parliament, in Jerusalem Though similar-sounding, Beit Knesset (בית כנסת) literally means House of Assembly, and refers to a synagogue. ...

"I am asking today with deep sorrow: Can we, despite all our achievements, ignore the intolerable gap between what the Declaration of Independence promised and what was fulfilled, the gap between the idea and the realities of Israel? Does the condition of occupation and domination over another people fit the Declaration of Independence? Is there any sense in the independence of one at the expense of the fundamental rights of the other? Can the Jewish people whose history is a record of continued suffering and relentless persecution, allow themselves to be indifferent to the rights and suffering of a neighboring people? Can the State of Israel allow itself an unrealistic dream of an ideological end to the conflict instead of pursuing a pragmatic, humanitarian one based on social justice?"[34]

Education Minister Livnat and Israeli President Moshe Katsav criticized Barenboim for his speech.[35]


Awards and Recognitions

  • Buber-Rosenzweig Medal, 2004
  • Wolf Prize in Arts, 2004
  • Wilhelm Furtwängler Prize, 2003 (with Staatskapelle Berlin)
  • Doctor Honoris Causa, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium), 2003
  • Tolerance Prize, Evangelische Akademie Tutzing, 2002
  • Prince of Asturias Concord Prize, 2002 (jointly with Edward Said)
  • Großes Bundesverdienstkreuz, 2002
  • Honorary Doctorate of Philosophy, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 1996

Grammy Award for Best Opera Recording: Past winners of the Wolf Prize in Arts: 1981 Painting¹: Marc Chagall, Antoni Tapies 1982 Music¹: Vladimir Horowitz, Olivier Messiaen, Josef Tal 1983/4 Architecture¹: Ralph Erskine 1984/5 Sculpture¹: Eduardo Chillida 1986 Painting: Jasper Johns 1987 Music: Isaac Stern, Krzysztof Penderecki 1988 Architecture: Fumihiko Maki, Giancarlo De Carlo 1989... The Staatskapelle Berlin is the orchestra of the Berlin State Opera (Berliner Staatsoper Unter den Linden). ... Edward Wadie Said (Arabic: , transliteration: ) (1 November 1935 – 25 September 2003) was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and outspoken Palestinian activist. ... The Bundesverdienstkreuz (the official name is Verdienstorden der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany) is the only general Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany. ... The Hebrew University of Jerusalem is one of Israels oldest, largest, and most important institutes of higher learning and research. ... The Grammy Award for Best Opera Recording has been awarded since 1961. ...

Grammy Award for Best Chamber Music Performance: Eberhard Sengpiel is a multiple Grammy award-winning sound engineer. ... Jane Eaglen (born April 4, 1960) is an English operatic soprano. ... Thomas Hampson is the name of: Thomas Hampson, the British athlete. ... Waltraud Meier (born January 9, 1956) is a Grammy-award winning German mezzo-soprano. ... René Pape (born 4 September 1964 in Dresden, Germany) is an Opera singer. ... The Staatskapelle Berlin is the orchestra of the Berlin State Opera (Berliner Staatsoper Unter den Linden). ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... In the Venusberg by John Collier, 1901: a gilded setting that is distinctly Italian quattrocento. ... The 45th Grammy Awards were held on February 23, 2003. ... The Grammy Award for Best Chamber Music Performance has been awarded since 1959. ...

Grammy Award for Best Orchestral Performance: Larry Combs is an United States American clarinetist. ... Hansjörg Schellenberger born in 1948. ... The Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra is one of the worlds leading orchestras. ... portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler, 1820 Ludwig van Beethoven (IPA: ), (baptised December 17, 1770[1] – March 26, 1827) was a German composer. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (IPA: , baptized Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart) (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. ... The 37th Grammy Awards were presented March 1, 1995. ... Itzhak Perlman Itzhak Perlman (born August 31, 1945 in Jaffa) is an Israeli virtuoso violinist and teacher. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The 33rd Grammy Awards were held on February 20, 1991. ... The Grammy Award for Best Orchestral Performance has been awarded since 1959. ...

Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with orchestra): The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the leading orchestras in the world. ... John Corigliano (born February 16, 1938) is an American composer of classical music. ... The 34th Grammy Awards were held on February 26, 1992. ... The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with orchestra) has been awarded since 1959. ...

Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with orchestra): Eberhard Sengpiel is a multiple Grammy award-winning sound engineer. ... Larry Combs is an United States American clarinetist. ... Alex Klein is an oboist who began his musical studies in his native Brazil at the age of nine, and made his solo orchestral debut the following year. ... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the leading orchestras in the world. ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... The 44th Grammy Awards were held on February 27, 2002. ... The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with orchestra) has been awarded since 1959. ...

Itzhak Perlman Itzhak Perlman (born August 31, 1945 in Jaffa) is an Israeli virtuoso violinist and teacher. ... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the leading orchestras in the world. ... Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, Bt OM GCVO (June 2, 1857 – February 23, 1934) was a British composer, born in the small Worcestershire village of Broadheath to William Elgar, a piano tuner and music dealer, and his wife Ann. ... The 25th Grammy Awards were held in 1983. ... For the 19th century Russian pianist and composer, see Anton Rubinstein Arthur Rubinstein photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Arthur Rubinstein (January 28, 1887 – December 20, 1982) was a Polish pianist who is widely considered as one of the greatest piano virtuosos of the 20th Century. ... The London Philharmonic Orchestra (frequently abbreviated to LPO), based in London, is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler, 1820 Ludwig van Beethoven (IPA: ), (baptised December 17, 1770[1] – March 26, 1827) was a German composer. ... The 19th Grammy Awards were held in 1977, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The Grammy Award for Best Classical Album has been awarded since 1962. ...

References

  1. ^ Jan Moir. "The maestro and his demons", The Telegraph, 6 Apr 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  2. ^ Julian Lloyd Webber. "Why make war when you can make music?", Telegraph, 21 Jul 2005. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  3. ^ Michael Shelden. "My affair? I don't think Jackie knew", Telegraph, 15 Jul 2004. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  4. ^ Daniel Barenboim, "Why Wilhelm Furtwängler Still Moves Us Today". Entry from Barenboim's blog, translated from an article originally published in Der Tagesspiegel, November 2004.
  5. ^ Michael Shelden. "My affair? I don't think Jackie knew", Telegraph, 15 Jul 2004. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  6. ^ Kate Connolly. "Barenboim in battle to save Berlin opera house", Telegraph, 15 Nov 2002. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  7. ^ Michael Henderson. "Goodbye Chicago, hello world", Telegraph, 20 Jun 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  8. ^ Barbara McMahon. "Barenboim to be La Scala's guest", The Guardian, 16 May 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  9. ^ a) Michael Henderson. "Daniel in the circus lions' den", Telegraph, 1 Apr 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
    b) Kate Connolly. "Maverick maestro plays a different tune", Telegraph, 9 Mar 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
    c) Daniel Barenboim. "In the beginning, there was sound. Then came Muzak", Telegraph, 8 Apr 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
    d) Peter Beaumont. "Maestro of the Middle East", The Observer, 2 Apr 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  10. ^ Richard Dyer. "Ideas, Appassionato", Harvard Magazine, January-February 2007, pp. pp. 14-15. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  11. ^ Daniel J. Wakin. "Unprompted, Lorin Maazel Nominates His Successor", New York Times, 29 Nov 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  12. ^ Mark Landler. "Proposed Philharmonic Candidate Is Flattered, if Coy", New York Times, 30 November 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  13. ^ The New York Times. "Musing on the Barenboim X-Factor", James R. Oestreich, 2 Mar 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  14. ^ Daniel J. Wakin, "Philharmonic to Add a Position at the Top". New York Times, 25 April 2007.
  15. ^ Daniel Barenboim, "Love, the hard way". The Guardian, 31 August 2001.
  16. ^ Stephen Moss, "Daniel in the lion's den". The Guardian, 22 October 1999.
  17. ^ Ohad Gozani, "Israeli battle over Wagner". Telegraph, 5 June 2001.
  18. ^ [http://www.wsws.org/articles/2001/aug2001/wagn-a01.shtml
  19. ^ Inigo Gilmore, "Barenboim shatters Israel taboo on Wagner". Telegraph, 9 July 2001.
  20. ^ Daniel Barenboim, "Those who want to leave, do so". The Guardian, 6 September 2002.
  21. ^ Will Hodgkinson, "Orchestral manoeuvres". The Guardian, 13 August 2004.
  22. ^ John Whitley, "Barenboim the taboo-breaker". Telegraph, 25 August 2001.
  23. ^ Luke Harding interview with Daniel Barenboim, 'Europe has to take the initiative now'. The Guardian, 30 November 2004.
  24. ^ Norman Lebrecht, "Daniel Barenboim - Playing Politics". La Scena Musicale, 3 December 2003.
  25. ^ Jonathan Steele (with Reuters), "Barenboim defies Israeli opinion". The Guardian, 11 September 2002.
  26. ^ Suzie Mackenzie, "In harmony". The Guardian, 5 April 2003.
  27. ^ Daniel Barenboim, "Sound and vision". The Guardian, 25 October 2004.
  28. ^ Martin Kettle, "Everything to play for". The Guardian, 4 August 2001.
  29. ^ Geraldine Bedell, "Daniel's codes of conduct". The Observer, 17 August 2003.
  30. ^ Avi Shlaim, "Playing for peace". New Statesman, 31 October 2005.
  31. ^ Michael Kennedy, "A duet for solo voice". Telegraph, 23 February 2003.
  32. ^ Conductor Barenboim in radio rowBBC News, 3 September 2005
  33. ^ Ohad Gozani, "Barenboim changes tune". Telegraph, 17 December 2003.
  34. ^ Daniel Barenboim, "The Statement of Daniel Barenboim on May 9th 2004 at the Knesset On the Occasion of Receiving the Wolf Prize."
  35. ^ "Barenboim Irks Israelis With Criticism". Associated Press, 10 May 2004.

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Preceded by
Georg Solti
Music Director, Orchestre de Paris
1975–1989
Succeeded by
Semyon Bychkov
Preceded by
Otmar Suitner
Music Director, Berlin State Opera
1992–
Succeeded by
incumbent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Daniel Barenboim (Conductor) - Short Biography (1417 words)
Daniel Barenboim made his debut as a pianist in Vienna and Rome in 1952, in Paris in 1955, in London in 1956 and in New York in 1957 with Leopold Stokowski conducting the Symphony of the Air.
Daniel Barenboim made his first gramophone recordings in 1954 and soon began recording the most important works in the piano repertory, including complete cycles of the piano sonatas of Mozart and Beethoven and concertos by Mozart, Beethoven (with Otto Klemperer), Brahms (with Sir John Barbirolli) and Bartok (with Pierre Boulez).
Barenboim’s first concert on the West Bank, a piano recital at the Palestinian Birzeit University in February 1999, and to a workshop for young musicians from the Middle East that took place in Weimar, Germany, in August 1999.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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