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Encyclopedia > Dance Dance Revolution
Dance Dance Revolution


An original Dance Dance Revolution arcade machine. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Namcos Pac-Man is one of the most popular video games ever made. ... Gameplay includes all player experiences during the interaction with game systems, especially formal games. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1164x1545, 317 KB) Original picture taken by User:SPUI at DisneyQuest in Orlando, FL. Edited in Adobe Photoshop. ...

Developer(s) Konami Computer Entertainment Japan, other subsidiaries
Publisher(s) KCEJ, other subsidiaries
Distributor(s) KCEJ, other subsidiaries, Betson Enterprises (North America)
Designer(s) KCEJ, other subsidiaries
Series Bemani
Picture format NTSC-J / NTSC / PAL, horizontal and vertical
Platform(s) Arcade, PlayStation, Bemani Pocket, Dreamcast, Game Boy Color, Nintendo 64, Windows, Cellphone, TV game, PlayStation 2, Xbox, GameCube, DVD game, Xbox 360, Wii
Release date JP November 21, 1998

EU September 1999
U/C Fall 1999
Asia Fall 1999
AU February 16, 2000
KR 2000 A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... Konami JPN Ltd. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Bemani (ビーマニ, biimani) is Konamis music video game division. ... The aspect ratio of a two-dimensional shape is the ratio of its longer dimension to its shorter dimension. ... NTSC-J is a videogame region which covers Japan. ... NTSC is the analog television system in use in Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, the United States, and some other countries, mostly in the Americas (see map). ... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ... In computing, a platform describes some sort of framework, either in hardware or software, which allows software to run. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... PlayStation redirects here. ... The Bemani Pocket series was a short-lived attempt by Konami to capitalize on the market of portable entertainment in the late 1990s They were introduced on the Japanese market circa 1998 and they featured versions of most Bemani games, from Beatmania to ParaParaParadise. ... The Dreamcast , code-named White Belt, Black Belt, Dural, Dricas, Vortex, Katana, Shark and Guppy during development) is Segas last video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ... The Game Boy Color , shortened to GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... 1. ... Cellular redirects here. ... The Atari Classic 10-in-1 TV game by Jakks Pacific A TV game is an interactive entertainment device designed for use on a television set that does not require the use of an actual video game console for operation. ... PS2 redirects here. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... The Nintendo GameCube (Japanese: ゲームキューブ; originally code-named Dolphin during development; abbreviated as GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the 128-bit era; the same generation as Segas Dreamcast, Sonys PlayStation 2, and Microsofts Xbox. ... DVD Television Games are standalone games that can be played on set-top DVD players. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Australia (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ...

Genre(s) Music, Exercise
Mode(s) 1 to 4 players
Rating(s) ESRB: E to E10 (Mild & Suggestive Lyrics)

CERO: A
ELSPA: 3+
PEGI: 3+ to 12+
PEGI: 4+ to 12+ PT
KMRB: All Ages
OFLC: G Further information: Game classification Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay interaction. ... A music video game, also commonly known as a music game or rhythm game, is a type of video game where the gameplay is oriented almost entirely around the players ability to follow a musical beat and stay with the rhythm of the games soundtrack. ... Exergaming (formed from exercise and gaming) is a term used for video games that also provide exercise. ... A video game content rating system is a system used for the classification of video games into suitability-related groups. ... The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) is a self-regulatory organization that applies and enforces ratings, advertising guidelines, and online privacy principles for computer and video games in the United States. ... Computer Entertainment Rating Organization (CERO) is the organization that rates video game and computer software in Japan with levels of rating that informs the customer of the nature of the product and what age group it is suitable for. ... The Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association (or ELSPA) is an organisation set up in 1989 by British software publishers. ... PEGIs logo Pan European Game Information, or more commonly PEGI, is a European system for rating the content of computer and video games, and other entertainment software. ... PEGIs logo Pan European Game Information, or more commonly PEGI, is a European system for rating the content of computer and video games, and other entertainment software. ... Anthem A Portuguesa Capital (and largest city) Lisbon5 Official languages Portuguese1 Government Parliamentary democracy  -  President Cavaco Silva  -  Prime Minister José Sócrates Formation June 24, 1128   -  Founding of the First County of Portugal 868   -  Battle of São Mamede June 24, 1128   -  Kingdom 25 July 1139   -  Recognized 5 October 1143... The Korea Media Rating Board (KMRB) is the Korean equivalent of the ESRB. The board rates movies, videos, videogames, arcade games, computer games, online games, stage performances, and phonogrames. ... The Office of Film and Literature Classification is a statutory censorship and classification body which provides day to day administrative support for the Classification Board which classified films, video games and publications in Australia, and the Classification Review Board which reviews films, computer games and publications when a valid application...

Input methods Pressure sensitive panels & Buttons (arcade), Dance mat & PlayStation controller (console)
Cabinet Custom (DDR & Solo)
Arcade system Bemani System 573 (Analog, Digital, Solo), PlayStation 2[1]
Display 29" CRT/flat CRT (Raster, 256x224 & 740x480)

Dance Dance Revolution, commonly abbreviated to DDR, is a music video game series produced by Konami. It was first introduced to Japanese video arcades in 1998, after being shown at the Tokyo Game Show earlier that year. Since then, the game has gained significant popularity elsewhere in the world, including large portions of North America, Europe and Australia. The Dance Dance Revolution series is a subset of the larger Bemani series of music games. As of 2008, over 100 official versions, or "mixes" of DDR have been produced, with over 1,000 songs featured across the various games. It has been suggested that Dance Pad Games be merged into this article or section. ... The DualShock (officially DUALSHOCK and occasionally referred to as Dual Shock) is the standard game controller available for the PlayStation and PlayStation 2 video game consoles. ... Cathode ray tube employing electromagnetic focus and deflection Cutaway rendering of a color CRT: 1. ... Suppose the smiley face in the top left corner is an RGB bitmap image. ... Open source music video game StepMania A music video game, also commonly known as a music game or rhythm game, is a video game where the gameplay is oriented almost entirely around the players ability to follow a musical beat and stay with the rhythm of the games... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ... arcade, see Arcade. ... Gamers play Sonys PS3 in TGS 2006 Booths at the Tokyo Game Show in 2004 The Tokyo Game Show , or simply TGS) is a video game expo / convention held in Tokyo, Japan. ... North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Bemani (ビーマニ, biimani) is Konamis music video game division. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The series is marketed and sold under the name Dancing Stage in Europe and Australia, as well as in certain Japanese versions.


The game is typically played on a dance pad with four arrow panels: left, right, up, and down. Additional gameplay modes may utilize two four-panel pads side-by-side (doubles mode), or a single six-panel pad with additional arrows corresponding to the upper diagonals (solo mode). These panels are pressed using the player's feet, in response to arrows that appear on the screen in front of the player. The arrows are synchronized to the general rhythm or beat of a chosen song, and success is dependent on the player's ability to time and position his or her steps accordingly. It has been suggested that Dance Pad Games be merged into this article or section. ... Synchronization (or Sync) is a problem in timekeeping which requires the coordination of events to operate a system in unison. ... For the popular Tamil film, see Rhythm (film). ... putang ina. ... For other uses, see Song (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Common gameplay elements

The core gameplay involves the player moving his or her feet to a set pattern, stepping in time to the general rhythm or beat of a song. During normal gameplay, arrows scroll upwards from the bottom of the screen and pass over stationary, transparent arrows near the top (referred to as the "guide arrows" or "receptors"). When the scrolling arrows overlap the stationary ones, the player must step on the corresponding arrows on the dance platform. Longer green and yellow arrows referred to as "freeze arrows" must be held down for their entire length for them to count. Successfully hitting the arrows in time with the music fills the "Dance Gauge", or life bar, while failure to do so drains it. If the Dance Gauge is fully depleted during gameplay, the player fails the song, usually resulting in a game over. Otherwise, the player is taken to the Results Screen, which rates the player's performance with a letter grade and a numerical score, among other statistics. The player may then be given a chance to play again, depending on the settings of the particular machine (the limit is usually 3-5 songs per game). Screenshot of Metal Gear Solid. ... For other uses, see Game Over (disambiguation). ... A grade in education can mean either a teachers evaluation of a students work or a students level of educational progress, usually one grade per year (often denoted by an ordinal number, such as the 3rd Grade or the 12th Grade). This article is about evaluation of... In video games the score is usually an indicator of the players skill or progress. ...


Depending on the version of the game, dance steps are broken into varying levels of difficulty. The main difficulty levels are "Basic/Light/Standard" (Japanese: 楽 raku, "ease"), "Another/Trick/Standard/Difficult" (Japanese: 踊 , "dance") and "Maniac/Heavy/Expert" (Japanese: 激 geki, "violent"). Some versions also include "Beginner" (Japanese: 習 shũ, "learning") and "Challenge/Oni" (Japanese: 鬼 oni, "devil"), which typically fall on the lower and higher ends of the difficulty scale, respectively. Songs are also given a "foot rating", ranging from one to ten feet to indicate the overall difficulty of the step sequence. Beginning in DDRMAX, a "Groove Radar" was introduced, showing how difficult a particular sequence is in various categories, such as the maximum density of steps, how many jumps are in the steps, etc.


Groove Radar

The Groove Radar is a graphical representation of the difficulty of a song which debuted on DDRMAX: Dance Dance Revolution 6thMIX - which exclusively used the system to represent difficulty instead of foot ratings, the only version to do this. Due to this, the only songs that have no known foot ratings are FOLLOW ME and FLASH IN THE NIGHT, because both songs have yet to appear on a different mix.


The radar uses 5 categories to represent the difficulty:

  • Stream - the overall density of the steps in the song.
  • Voltage - the measure of the peak density of the steps (the highest density of arrows that ever appear on the screen at once).
  • Air - the amount of jump steps within the song
  • Freeze - the number of freezes (requiring the player to hold a note after it has been pressed initially) in the song (but not the length of the freezes).
  • Chaos - the number of steps in the song that don't occur on quarter or eighth notes.

The Groove Radar displays up to two graphs, one for each player, depending on the difficulty they select.


Modifiers

Modifiers are changes that can be made to modify the step routine. Prior to DDRMAX, codes were entered with the pad to activate modifiers. DDRMAX debuted an options menu accessed by holding down the start button when selecting a song. The options menu is still in use, however as of SuperNOVA, the codes are no longer able to be entered on the pad.


Some of the available modifiers include:

  • Speed mods change the speed at which the arrows scroll on the screen. You can increase it to multipliers of x1.5, x2, x3, x5 or x8. The default is "x1." This option was introduced in DDRMAX and was the only mod that had no equivalent code that could be entered on the pad.
  • Boost, when turned on, causes the arrows to accelerate as they near the step zone. The default is "Off." This option was introduced in DDRMAX.
  • Appearance mods change how the arrows appear on the screen. The default is "Visible." "Hidden" makes the arrow fade out halfway up the screen. "Sudden" makes the arrow fade in halfway up the screen. "Stealth" means the arrows are not visible at all.
  • Turn mods affect the pattern of the arrows themselves. The default is "Off." "Left" turns all the arrows 90 degrees left. "Right" turns all the arrows 90 degrees right. "Mirror" flips the step pattern so that all left and right arrows swap, and all up and down arrows swap. "Shuffle" creates a random swap of the arrows, and can vary from turn to turn.
  • Other mods affect the difficulty of the step routine. The default is "Off." "Little" eliminates all steps that are more frequent than standard 1/4 steps. "Flat" makes all the arrows appear the same color, regardless of their step fraction. "Rainbow" (or "Solo" before SuperNOVA) changes the colors of the arrows to the colors used in DDR Solo 2000. "Dark", a new modifier in DDRMAX2, removes the "step zone," forcing the player to rely solely on the beat to determine when to step.
  • Scroll mods affect the direction in which arrows scroll. The default is "Normal." "Reverse" makes the arrows scroll from top to bottom instead of bottom to top. The health bar is also moved to the bottom. This option was introduced in DDRMAX.
  • Freeze can turn the Freeze Arrows on or off. The default is "On." This option was introduced in DDRMAX, as freeze arrows did not exist prior to this mix.
  • Step allows a last chance to change the difficulty of the song. The default is whichever difficulty was selected before choosing the song.

Dance Dance Revolution Solo, or DDR Solo, is a music video game series introduced by Konami in 1999. ...

Extra Stage

The Extra Stage, introduced in DDRMAX and appearing in subsequent arcade versions, rewards a player for receiving a grade of "AA" or higher on either Heavy or Challenge difficulties on the final stage. The player receives the opportunity to play a free extra song, which is often a very difficult song with difficult song modifiers. Originally, the song for the extra stage was predetermined (MAX300 for DDRMAX, MAXX Unlimited for DDRMAX2). The option of choosing any song was not available until DDR Extreme. A player who attains a grade of "AA" (or "A" as of 'SuperNOVA') on the Extra Stage is invited to play "One More Extra Stage," which is usually a somewhat easier song, but with much more difficult modifiers, and a single mistake will cause the player to fail the song. A player who choose a song other than the default song was not eligible for One More Extra Stage.


Modes & other features

Several other gameplay modes have appeared throughout the DDR series.

  • DDRMAX2 Dance Dance Revolution 7thMix introduced a more challenging variant of Nonstop mode, known as Challenging Mode or "Oni" Mode (Japanese:鬼). In arcade versions of the game, these courses range from five to ten predetermined songs in length, and can reach upwards of twenty in home releases. Unlike Nonstop mode, a battery divided into three segments is displayed at the top of the screen, with one segment disappearing every time the player scores less than a "Great" judgment, or receives an "N.G." on a freeze arrow. If one of these errors is made while the battery is empty, the player immediately fails the course. The battery is replenished upon successful completion of each song, although the amount given back is dependent on the unique settings of each course.
  • Another "Challenge Mode", unrelated to the "Oni" Challenging Mode, is only featured in certain home releases. Gameplay consists of several "challenges" that may be attempted one at a time. In each challenge, the player must complete a certain song or section of a song while meeting certain conditions, sometimes with various gameplay modifiers applied to the song.
  • Endless Mode is another mode exclusive to home versions. Similar to Nonstop Mode, this mode allows the player to play through numerous songs one after another. However, Endless Mode continues to queue up songs indefinitely, until the player quits or the Dance Gauge is depleted. The song order is random, but options are available to limit the songs to a certain difficulty or category.
  • Event Mode is a game option whose function differs between arcade and home versions of DDR. On arcade machines, Event Mode is an operator setting that disables all menu timers, and not cause a player to fail a song immediately even when their dance gauge drops to zero. This setting is used primarily in tournaments, to give judges more time to take an accurate tally of the players' Dance Points.
  • Unison Mode appears in DDR 4th Mix, in which both players must dance to a special set of steps for a song. Steps are a single color (usually green) and fly out from the bottom-center of the screen to each player's guide arrows. Players are not necessarily guaranteed to have the same set of steps.
  • Battle Mode, introduced in Dance Dance Revolution Disney Mix as Dance Magic mode, but revived as Battle Mode on SuperNOVA, is a competitive mode between two players. Each player must play on the same difficulty and is given a shuffled version of the stepchart. Creating combos can send one of many different attacks to the other player's side to make it more difficult for them to read their notes. Creating longer combos results in more damaging attacks. These attacks (especially the stronger ones) can include strange modifiers that cannot be selected under normal circumstances. The health bar is replaced by a balance meter on the top of the screen; whoever's side of the bar is longer at the end of the song wins.

Dance Dance Revolution 3rdMIX, or DDR 3rd Mix, is the third game in the Dance Dance Revolution series of music video games. ... Dance Dance Revolution (Disney version) is a music video game based on the popular Dance Dance Revolution series with animated Disney characters and electronic dance music remixes of past Disney songs. ...

Installments and mixes

Dance Dance Revolution has been released in many forms, in arcades and on various video game consoles. Although the majority of these releases have been limited to Japan, localized versions of the game have been released in Europe, North America, Korea, and other areas of Asia, to varying degrees of success. Japanese versions have also found their way outside the country through importing and bootlegging, especially in North America. According to popular fansite DDR Freak, as of September 2005, more than 2100 arcade DDR machines exist in the United States, with over 25% of them located in California. This list covers every known game from the Dance Dance Revolution, Dance Dance Revolution Solo, and Dancing Stage series. ... Game console redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... The Cathach of St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


The first game in the series was simply titled Dance Dance Revolution. Subsequent versions in the main line were released as "mixes". For example, Dance Dance Revolution 4thMIX. Each release typically introduced new game modes (see above), a new main interface, and/or a new selection of songs. After 5thMIX a surname was added to the DDR titles (DDRMAX Dance Dance Revolution 6thMIX) but was also referred to by its mix number. Numerical installments were omitted from EXTREME onward.


During DDR's arcade span, several spin-off versions have also been released. Dancing Stage is the name of the series in Europe and Australia, and includes Dancing Stage Disney MIX, a special version that includes techno and eurobeat versions of popular Disney songs. A special single-staged version titled Dance Dance Revolution Solo introduced a six-way style arrow set (Adding arrows to the upper-left and upper-right corners of the standard four arrow stage). Before recently, only two versions of Dance Dance Revolution have been officially released in North America, Dance Dance Revolution and Dance Dance Revolution USA, essentially a localized version of DDR 3rdMIX. For the first time Konami is releasing a new arcade in North America along side sister machines in Japan and Europe titled SuperNOVA. There are currently two SuperNOVA titles on the market. Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... The standard dance pad for DDR Solo BASS MIX. A Solo 2000 dance pad with optional lighted frame and bar. ...


Arcade machines

A standard Dance Dance Revolution arcade machine consists of two parts, the cabinet and the dance platform. The cabinet has a wide bottom section, which houses large floor speakers and glowing neon lamps. Above this sits a narrower section that contains the monitor, and on top is a lighted marquee graphic, with two small speakers and flashing lights on either side. Below the monitor are two sets of buttons (one for each player), each consisting of two triangular selection buttons and a center rectangular button, used mainly to confirm a selection or start the game. The dance stage is a raised metal platform divided into two sides. Each side houses a set of four acrylic glass pads[2] arranged and pointing in the orthogonal directions (left, up, down and right), separated by metal squares. Each pad sits atop four pressure activated switches, one at each edge of each pad, and a software-controlled cold cathode lamp illuminating the translucent pad. A metal safety bar in the shape of an upside-down "U" is mounted to the dance stage behind each player. Some players make use of this safety bar to help maintain proper balance, and to relieve weight from the legs so that arrows can be pressed with greater speed and accuracy. arcade, see Arcade. ... A Donkey Kong upright arcade cabinet An arcade cabinet, also known as an arcade machine or coin-op, is the housing within which an arcade games hardware resides. ... Lighting neon lamp, two 220/230 volt and 110 V neon lamps and a screwdriver with neon lamp inside A neon lamp is a gas discharge lamp containing primarily neon gas at low pressure. ... A computer display monitor, usually called simply a monitor, is a piece of electrical equipment which displays viewable images generated by a computer without producing a permanent record. ... It has been suggested that Dance Pad Games be merged into this article or section. ... Perspex redirects here. ... Note: Principles are mostly the same for cold cathode ion sources as in particle accelerators to create electrons. ...


Some DDR cabinets are equipped with Sony PlayStation memory card slots, allowing the player to insert a compatible memory card before starting a game and save their high scores to the card. Additionally, the equivalent home versions of DDR allow players to create and save custom step patterns (edits) to their memory card — the player can then play those steps on the arcade machine if the same song exists on that machine. This feature is supported in DDR 2ndMIX through DDR EXTREME. It was expected that DDR SuperNOVA would include memory card support. However, the division of Konami which handled the production of the memory card slots shut down, causing Konami to pull memory card support out at the last minute. Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... PlayStation redirects here. ...


The DDR Solo arcade cabinet is smaller and contains only one dance pad, modified to include six arrow panels instead of four (the additional panels are "upper-left" and "upper-right"). These pads generally don't come with a safety bar, but include the option for one to be installed at a later date. The Solo pad also lacks some of the metal plating that the standard pad has, which can make stepping difficult for players who are used to playing on standard machines. Additionally Solo machines only incorporate two sensors, located horizontally in the center of the arrow, instead of four sensors (one on each edge).


Home releases

DDR has been released on PC, as well as a number of video game consoles, including the PlayStation, Dreamcast, PlayStation 2, GameCube, Xbox, Xbox 360 and Wii. Home versions are commonly bundled with soft plastic dance pads that are similar in appearance and function to the Nintendo Power Pad. Some third-party manufacturers produce hard metal pads at a higher price. Game console redirects here. ... PlayStation redirects here. ... The Dreamcast , code-named White Belt, Black Belt, Dural, Dricas, Vortex, Katana, Shark and Guppy during development) is Segas last video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ... PS2 redirects here. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... It has been suggested that Dance Pad Games be merged into this article or section. ... For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... The Power Pad (known in Japan as Family Trainer, and in Europe and briefly in the United States as Family Fun Fitness) is a floor mat game controller released in the United States for the Nintendo Entertainment System. ...


DDR has even reached Nintendo's Game Boy Color, with five versions of Dance Dance Revolution GB released in Japan; these included a series of three mainstream DDR games, a Disney Mix, and an Oha Sta! mix. The games come with a small thumb pad that fits over the Game Boy Color's controls to simulate the dance pad. The Game Boy Color , shortened to GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States and 1999 in Europe. ...


A version of DDR was also produced for the PC in North America. It uses the interface of DDR 4thMix, and contains around 40 songs from the first six mainstream arcade releases. It has not been as well received as the console versions. Dance Dance Revolution 4thMIX, or DDR 4th Mix, is the fourth game in the main Dance Dance Revolution series of music video games. ...


The most common criticism of DDR home console versions is that they tend to provide a more limited selection of songs than in the arcade, despite the increased capacity of DVD storage media in more recent releases. In addition, many fan-favorite songs don't make it to the home versions, usually due to licensing restrictions. This is especially true of North American home versions of DDR. Another common criticism points to the relatively poor quality of most home dance pads, though dedicated fans of the series can find high-quality pads from third-party manufacturers. Some also build their own pads from raw parts (see the dance pad article for more information). It has been suggested that Dance Pad Games be merged into this article or section. ...


Similar games

Screenshot of StepMania, an open-source DDR clone for personal computers
Screenshot of StepMania, an open-source DDR clone for personal computers

The success of the DDR franchise has spawned many games with similar game play, for many different systems, such as personal computers and video game consoles. Most of these games use their own music and step files, and a variety of both are widely available. Many of these programs hold the ability to create a step pattern for any song. An example of such a program is StepMania. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... StepMania is a rhythm video game for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS, and Linux created by Chris Danford. ... For other uses, see Open source (disambiguation). ... The tower of a personal computer. ... The Nintendo GameCube is an example of a popular video game console. ... StepMania is a rhythm video game for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS, and Linux created by Chris Danford. ...


In the Groove is an arcade dance game based on the aforementioned StepMania engine, developed by Roxor Games. ITG features a number of gameplay mechanics used in Dance Dance Revolution, but also introduces new concepts and mechanics that generally appeal to the experienced player. In 2005, Konami filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against Roxor, claiming that the ITG conversion kit, which enables arcade machine owners to install ITG in existing DDR cabinets, violated Konami's intellectual property rights. This lawsuit resulted in a settlement in which Konami acquired all intellectual property rights to In the Groove.[3] In the Groove (abbreviated ITG) was a series of music video games that use a four-panel dance pad. ... Roxor Games Logo Roxor Games, Inc. ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ...


One other noteworthy competing product is Dance Factory, a PlayStation 2 program from Codemasters that converts music from any CD into dance steps. Dance Factory is a PlayStation 2 game developed by Codemasters. ... Codemasters (earlier known as Code Masters) is one of the oldest British video game developers. ...


Flow: Urban Dance Uprising by UbiSoft has a Hip-Hop dance theme. A PC game is also coming out entitled Dance! which, like StepMania, will allow the player to create homemade tracks. Ubisoft Entertainment (formerly Ubi Soft) is a computer and video game publisher and developer with headquarters in Montreuil-sous-Bois, France. ... For other uses, see Hip hop (disambiguation). ...


A partial list of DDR simulators and competing products follows:

In addition, the popularity of DDR has also influenced other music video games with similar mechanics, many actually made by Konami, such as Beatmania, the initial music gaming offering by Konami. Konami's other music video games are branded under the Bemani brand, and many Bemani titles, including DDR, have been known to have "crossovers" between other Bemani games. “NES” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... MC Groovz Dance Craze is a dance game with customized dance mats. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... Dance Factory is a PlayStation 2 game developed by Codemasters. ... Dancing with the Stars (US TV series) List of Wii games Best Buy Product Information Trailer of the Game Source Categories: | | | | ... PlayStation redirects here. ... Superstar Dance Hits is a game created by XS Games. ... PS2 redirects here. ... Dance Factory is a PlayStation 2 game developed by Codemasters. ... Dancing with the Stars (US TV series) List of Wii games Best Buy Product Information Trailer of the Game Source Categories: | | | | ... In the Groove (abbreviated ITG) was a series of music video games that use a four-panel dance pad. ... This article is about the video game. ... The PlayStation Portable , officially abbreviated as PSP) is a handheld game console released and currently manufactured by Sony Computer Entertainment. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... This article is about the video game. ... The Dreamcast , code-named White Belt, Black Belt, Dural, Dricas, Vortex, Katana, Shark and Guppy during development) is Segas last video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ... Feet of Fury is a beat/dancing game for the Sega Dreamcast. ... A stylised illustration of a modern personal computer A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose original sales price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals. ... Audition Online (Korean: 오디션 온라인), also known as Dancin Paradise in Japan, is a downloadable multiplayer online casual rhythm game produced by T3 Entertainment. ... DANCE! Online, created by Acclaim, is a free-to-download PC title that largely resembles the Dance Dance Revolution videogame series, although taking place entirely in an online space. ... StepMania is a rhythm video game for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS, and Linux created by Chris Danford. ... In the Groove (abbreviated ITG) was a series of music video games that use a four-panel dance pad. ... Dance Praise is a Christian rhythm video game for PC. Published by Digital Praise, it utilizes contemporary Christian music, and a Dance Dance Revolution-type USB dance pad to provide a non-secular alternative to rhythm games. ... This article is about the video game. ... arcade, see Arcade. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... In the Groove (abbreviated ITG) was a series of music video games that use a four-panel dance pad. ... This article is about the video game. ... Pump It Up Pro (abbreviated as PIUPRO or Pump Pro, and marketed as Pump it up PRO) is an upcoming game in the Pump It Up series. ... For the Playstation 2 North America beatmania release, based on beatmania IIDX, see beatmania (North America). ... Bemani (ビーマニ, biimani) is Konamis music video game division. ...


Cultural impact

Tournaments are held worldwide, with participants usually competing for higher scores or number of Perfects (referred to as "Perfect Attack" tournaments). Less common are "freestyle" tournaments, where players develop actual dance routines to perform while following the steps in the game. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...


Playing styles

Many DDR players, in order to better focus on timing and pattern reading, will minimize any extraneous body movement during gameplay. These players are commonly referred to as "technical", "tech" or "perfect attack" (PA) players. These technical players usually play the most difficult songs on the highest difficulty levels in an attempt to perfect their scores.


Other DDR players choose to incorporate complex or flashy techniques into their play movements, and some of these "freestyle" players develop intricate dance routines to perform during a song. Freestyle players tend to choose songs on lower difficulty levels, so that the player is not restricted in their movements by large quantities of required steps. Some players can even dance facing away from the screen. A freestyling act can also involve preforming other stunts whilst playing. On an episode of ABC's short-lived series Master of Champions, Billy Matsumoto played DDR 5th Mix's "Can't Stop Fallin' In Love (Speed Mix)" on Heavy mode while juggling three lit torches, and ultimately won the episode. The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Master of Champions is a show scheduled to begin airing June 22, 2006 on ABC. Rumored to be produced by Simon Cowell, the competition involves unique sports. ...


As exercise

Many news outlets have reported how playing DDR can be good aerobic exercise; some regular players have reported weight loss of 10–50 pounds (5–20 kg). In one example, a player found that including DDR in her day-to-day life resulted in a loss of 95 pounds.[4] Although the quantity of calories burned by playing DDR have not been measured, the amount of active movement required to play implies that DDR provides at least some degree of healthy exercise. Aerobic exercise refers to exercise that is of moderate intensity, undertaken for a long duration. ... Weight loss, in the context of medicine or health or physical fitness, is a reduction of the total body weight, due to a mean loss of fluid, body fat or adipose tissue and/or lean mass, namely bone mineral deposits, muscle, tendon and other connective tissue. ...


Many schools use DDR as a physical education activity in gym,[5] and in Norway, DDR has even been registered as an official sport.[6]


Many home versions of the game have a function to estimate calories burned, given a player's weight. Also, players can use "workout mode" to make a diary of calories burned playing DDR and any self-reported changes in the player's weight.


Use in schools

At the start of 2006, Konami announced that the DDR games would be used as part of a fitness program to be phased into West Virginia's 765 state schools, starting with its 103 middle schools, over the next two years.[7] The program was conceived by a researcher at West Virginia University's Motor Development Center. Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... West Virginia University is an institution of higher learning based in Morgantown, West Virginia, USA. Other campuses include: West Virginia University at Parkersburg in Parkersburg; West Virginia University Institute of Technology in Montgomery; Potomac State College of West Virginia University in Keyser; and a clinical campus for the Universitys...


Caltech allows its students to use DDR to fulfill its physical education requirements, as students may design their own fitness program.[8] The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational research university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Physical education (PE) is the interdisciplinary study of all area of science relating to the transmission of physical knowledge and skills to an individual or a group, the application of these skills, and their results. ...


See also

This is a comparison of popular proprietary dancing video games in which players must step on panels on a dance pad in time with music. ... A DDI player at Burning Man 2005 makes one wrong move too many and gets hit with a flamethrower Dance Dance Immolation (DDI) is an interactive fire art game based on the music video game Dance Dance Revolution (DDR). ... This article is about the upcoming television series. ... Exergaming (formed from exercise and gaming) is a term used for video games that also provide exercise. ...

External links

  • Official Konami website for its music game titles, including DDR
  • Betson Enterprises-US Distributor for DDR arcade machine

References

  1. ^ Konami arcade hardware page. System 16. Retrieved on 2008-01-24.
  2. ^ http://www.betson.com/parts/Konami/1-10
  3. ^ "Publisher acquires rights to Roxor game", GamesIndustry.biz, 2006-10-20. Retrieved on 2006-10-20. 
  4. ^ Welcome to Get Up Move!
  5. ^ "West Virginia Adds 'Dance Dance Revolution' to Gym Class", MTV News, MTV. Retrieved on 2007-09-22. 
  6. ^ "Positive Gaming: Machine Dance as Fitness and Sport". Retrieved on 2007-09-22. 
  7. ^ "West Virginia Adds 'Dance Dance Revolution' to Gym Class", MTV News, MTV. Retrieved on 2007-02-02. 
  8. ^ "Dancing video game helps kids avoid weight gain", The Washington Post, 2007-02-01. Retrieved on 2008-02-25. 
Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... GamesIndustry. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bemani (ビーマニ, biimani) is Konamis music video game division. ... beatmania IIDX (alternately beatmaniaIIDX or just IIDX, pronounced two dee-ecks or two deluxe) is a series of rhythm video games introduced by Konami in 1999. ... This list covers every known game from the Dance Dance Revolution, Dance Dance Revolution Solo, and Dancing Stage series. ... Popn Music 7 arcade machine Popn Music (ポップンミュージック), commonly shortened to Popn or PNM), is a music video game in Konamis Bemani series. ... GuitarFreaks (also GUITARFREAKS, abbreviated GF) is a music video game series produced by Konami. ... DrumMania (alternately drummania, abbreviated DM) is a video game created by Konami as part of the Bemani series. ... For the Playstation 2 North America beatmania release, based on beatmania IIDX, see beatmania (North America). ... Beatmania III is a video game created by Konami. ... The standard dance pad for DDR Solo BASS MIX. A Solo 2000 dance pad with optional lighted frame and bar. ... This list covers every known game from the Dance Dance Revolution, Dance Dance Revolution Solo, and Dancing Stage series. ... Dance Maniax is a game from the Bemani series of rhythm games, published by Konami, with songs mostly from the Dancemania series of music, and shares many songs with Dance Dance Revolution. ... Popn Music (ポップンミュージック), commonly shortened to Popn or PoMu), is a music video game in Konamis Bemani series. ... Keyboardmania (alternately KEYBOARD MANIA, and abbreviated KBM) is a rhythm video game created by the Bemani division of Konami. ... Para Para Paradise is also a video compilation showing Para Para routines. ... The Bemani Pocket series was a short-lived attempt by Konami to capitalize on the market of portable entertainment in the late 1990s They were introduced on the Japanese market circa 1998 and they featured versions of most Bemani games, from Beatmania to ParaParaParadise. ... In the Bemani series of rhythm video games by Konami, it appears that seemingly hundreds of different musicians and groups perform the songs. ... {{Mergeto ... Dance Dance Revolution Solo, or DDR Solo, is a music video game series introduced by Konami in 1999. ... Dance Dance Revolution 3rdMIX, or DDR 3rd Mix, is the third game in the Dance Dance Revolution series of music video games. ... Dance Dance Revolution Solo, or DDR Solo, is a music video game series introduced by Konami in 1999. ... Dance Dance Revolution 4thMIX, or DDR 4th Mix, is the fourth game in the main Dance Dance Revolution series of music video games. ... Dance Dance Revolution (Disney version) is a music video game based on the popular Dance Dance Revolution series with animated Disney characters and electronic dance music remixes of past Disney songs. ... Dance Dance Revolution BEST HITS is a music video game that is part of the Dance Dance Revolution and Bemani series. ... Dance Dance Revolution 5thMIX, or DDR 5th Mix, is the fifth game in the Dance Dance Revolution series of music video games. ... Dance Dance Revolution EXTRA MIX is a music video game that is part of the Dance Dance Revolution and Bemani series. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Dance Dance Revolution Party Collection is a music video game that is part of the Dance Dance Revolution and Bemani series. ... Dance Dance Revolution: Mario Mix (known in Japan as Dance Dance Revolution with MARIO) is the first Dance Dance Revolution music video game to be co-developed by Konami and Nintendo. ... Dance Dance Revolution SuperNOVA (Dancing Stage SuperNOVA in Europe) is the latest arcade game in the Dance Dance Revolution series of music video games. ... Dance Dance Revolution SuperNOVA 2 is the latest arcade game in the Dance Dance Revolution series of music video games. ... Dance Dance Revolution: Hottest Party is an upcoming title for the Wii from Konami scheduled for a 2007 release. ... One of the first Dance Dance Revolution (North America) machines, now at DisneyQuest in Walt Disney World. ... Dance Dance Revolution (Disney version) is a music video game based on the popular Dance Dance Revolution series with animated Disney characters and electronic dance music remixes of past Disney songs. ... Dance Dance Revolution Konamix is the third home version of Dance Dance Revolution to be released in the United States. ... Dance Dance Revolution ULTRAMIX, or DDR Ultramix, is the sixth home version of Dance Dance Revolution to be released in the United States, and the first DDR game to be released on the Microsoft Xbox video game console. ... Dance Dance Revolution EXTREME is the seventh home version of Dance Dance Revolution to be released in the United States. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dance Dance Revolution. ... Dance Dance Revolution Extreme 2 is the tenth home version of Dance Dance Revolution to be released in the United States. ... Dance Dance Revolution: Mario Mix (known in Japan as Dance Dance Revolution with MARIO) is the first Dance Dance Revolution music video game to be co-developed by Konami and Nintendo. ... Dance Dance Revolution ULTRAMIX 3 will be the tenth home version of Dance Dance Revolution to be released in the United States. ... Dance Dance Revolution SuperNOVA (Dancing Stage SuperNOVA in Europe) is the latest arcade game in the Dance Dance Revolution series of music video games. ... This article, image, template or category belongs in one or more categories. ... Dance Dance Revolution UNIVERSE (known as Dancing Stage Universe in Europe) is the first entry in the musical dancing genre for the Xbox 360. ... Dance Dance Revolution: Hottest Party is an upcoming title for the Wii from Konami scheduled for a 2007 release. ... Dance Dance Revolution Universe 2 is the second installment of the Dance Dance Revolution series for the Xbox 360. ... Dance Dance Revolution SuperNOVA 2 is the latest arcade game in the Dance Dance Revolution series of music video games. ... PlayStation game cover. ... Dance Dance Revolution (Disney version) is a music video game based on the popular Dance Dance Revolution series with animated Disney characters and electronic dance music remixes of past Disney songs. ... Dancing Stage Party Edition is a home video game in the Dancing Stage series, the European counterpart to Dance Dance Revolution KONAMIX. It was released in 2002 by Konami, as part of their family-oriented Bemani series. ... Dancing Stage Fever is the european version of the best selling dance video game Dance Dance Revolution. ... Dancing Stage Fusion is a video game designed by Konami and is the PAL series equivalent of the Dance Dance Revolution games. ... Dance Dance Revolution: Mario Mix (known in Japan as Dance Dance Revolution with MARIO) is the first Dance Dance Revolution music video game to be co-developed by Konami and Nintendo. ... Dancing Stage Max is a video game designed by Konami and is the PAL series equivalent of the Dance Dance Revolution games. ... Dance Dance Revolution SuperNOVA (Dancing Stage SuperNOVA in Europe) is the latest arcade game in the Dance Dance Revolution series of music video games. ... Dance Dance Revolution: Hottest Party is an upcoming title for the Wii from Konami scheduled for a 2007 release. ... Dance Dance Revolution (Game boy versions) ... This list covers every known game from the Dance Dance Revolution, Dance Dance Revolution Solo, and Dancing Stage series. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dance Dance Revolution - Wikipedia (171 words)
Bei Dance Dance Revolution handelt es sich um ein relativ simpel aufgebautes Spiel, bei dem im Takt der ablaufenden Musik Pfeile am Bildschirm angezeigt werden.
In Europa wird die Spielreihe von Konami unter dem Namen Dancing Stage vertrieben.
Dance Dance Revolution gehört zur Familie der Bemani-Spiele, von der es verschiedene Varianten gibt, die sich vor allem durch unterschiedliche Eingabegeräte auszeichnen.
Dance Dance Revolution (1142 words)
DDR can also be played at home using the Sega Dreamcast, Sony Playstation, Playstation 2 or XBox consoles.
DDR is also a phenomenon, around which subcultures of fans and enthusiasts have gathered.
DDR fan sites offer Web forums in which players can chat about the game and discuss tournaments, scoreboards and media archives of past tournaments, and fan-created song and step files for clone games.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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