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Encyclopedia > Danaus

Danaus, or Danaos ("sleeper") was a Greek mythological character, twin brother of Aegyptus and son of Belus, a mythical king of Egypt. The myth of Danaus is a foundation legend (or re-foundation legend) of Argos, one of the foremost Mycenaean cities of the Peloponnesus. In Homer's Iliad, "Danaans" ("tribe of Danaus") and "Argives" commonly designate the Greek forces opposed to the Trojans. The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... This article is about the Aegyptus from Egyptian mythology. ... Belus (Greek Belos) the Egyptian is in Greek Mythology a son of Poseidon by Libya. ... Argos (Greek: Άργος, Árgos, IPA argos) is a city in Greece in the Peloponnese near Nafplio, which was its historic harbor, named for Nauplius. ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... Peloponnesos (Greek: Πελοπόννησος, sometime Latinized as Peloponnesus or Anglicized as The Peloponnese) is a large peninsula in Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Isthmus of Corinth. ... The Iliad (Ancient Greek , Ilias) is, together with the Odyssey, one of two ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer, a supposedly blind Ionian poet. ... This article is about the ancient people of the Achaeans. ... Argos (Greek: Άργος, Árgos) is a city in Greece in the Peloponnesus near Nafplio, which was its historic harbor, named for Nauplius. ... Trojan originally referred to a citizen of the city of Troy (Ilium) made legendary by the Trojan war. ...


Danaus had fifty daughters, the Danaides, and his twin brother, Aegyptus, had fifty sons. Aegyptus commanded that his sons marry the Danaides. Danaus elected to flee instead, and to that purpose he built a ship, the first ship that ever was. In it he fled to Argos, to which he was connected by his descent from Io, the maid wooed by Zeus and turned into a heifer and pursued by Hera until she found asylum in Egypt. So in a sense this was a homecoming for the sailor from Egypt. Argos at the time was ruled by King Pelasgus, the eponym of all autochthonous inhabitants who had lived in Greece since the beginning, also called there Gelanor (he who laughs). The Danaides ask Pelasgus for protection when they arrive, the event portrayed in The Suppliants by Aeschylus. Protection is granted after a vote by the Argives. Argos (Greek: Άργος, Árgos, IPA argos) is a city in Greece in the Peloponnese near Nafplio, which was its historic harbor, named for Nauplius. ... Jupiter and Io, Renaissance masterwork by Antonio da Correggio. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving In Greek mythology, Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Ζεύς Zeús, genitive... Olympian pantheon of classical Greek Mythology, Hera (IPA pronunciation: ; Greek or ) was the wife and older sister of Zeus. ... In Greek mythology, Pelasgus referred to several different people. ... An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, which has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery or other item. ... In Greek mythology, King Gelanor of Argos welcomed Danaus and his daughters. ... The Suppliants (Greek Hiketides, also translated as The Suppliant Maidens) is a play by Aeschylus. ... Bust of Aeschylus from the Capitoline Museums, Rome Aeschylus (525 BC—456 BC; Greek: Ασχύλος) was a playwright of Ancient Greece. ...


When Pausanias visited Argos in the 2nd century CE, he related the succession of Danaus to the throne, judged by the Argives, who "from the earliest times... have loved freedom and self-government, and they limited to the utmost the authority of their kings:" Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...

"On coming to Argos he claimed the kingdom against Gelanor, the son of Sthenelas. Many plausible arguments were brought forward by both parties, and those of Sthenelas were considered as fair as those of his opponent; so the people, who were sitting in judgment, put off, they say, the decision to the following day. At dawn a wolf fell upon a herd of oxen that was pasturing before the wall, and attacked and fought with the bull that was the leader of the herd. It occurred to the Argives that Gelanor was like the bull and Danaus like the wolf, for as the wolf will not live with men, so Danaus up to that time had not lived with them. It was because the wolf overcame the bull that Danaus won the kingdom. Accordingly, believing that Apollo had brought the wolf on the herd, he founded a sanctuary of Apollo Lycius."
—Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.19.3 - .4

The sanctuary of Apollo Lykeios ("wolf-Apollo", but also Apollo of the twilight) was still the most prominent feature of Argos in Pausanias' time: in the sanctuary the tourist might see the throne of Danaus himself, an eternal flame, called the fire of Phoronius. The eternal flame at the Monument to the Unknown Soldier in Sofia, Bulgaria Eternal Flame is also a single released by The Bangles in 1989, and covered by Atomic Kitten in 2001. ...

The Danaides by John William Waterhouse, depicting them in Tartarus
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The Danaides by John William Waterhouse, depicting them in Tartarus

When Aegyptus and his fifty sons arrived to take the Danaides, Danaus gave them, to spare the Argives the pain of a battle. However, he instructed his daughters to kill their husbands on their wedding night. Forty-nine followed through, but one, Hypermnestra (or Amymone, the "blameless" Danaid) refused because her husband, Lynceus, honored her wish to remain a virgin. Danaus was angry with his disobedient daughter and threw her to the Argive courts. Aphrodite intervened and saved her. (Lynceus later killed Danaus as revenge for the death of his brothers). Lynceus and Hypermnestra then began a dynasty of Argive kings (the Danaan Dynasty). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (572x766, 82 KB) John William Waterhouse, The Danaides - 1904 - Oil on canvas - Private collection Source : http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (572x766, 82 KB) John William Waterhouse, The Danaides - 1904 - Oil on canvas - Private collection Source : http://www. ... John William Waterhouse. ... Argos (Greek: Άργος, Árgos) is a city in Greece in the Peloponnesus near Nafplio, which was its historic harbor, named for Nauplius. ... Danaus was a Greek mythological character, twin of Aegyptus and son of Belus. ... In Greek mythology, Amymone (the blameless one) was a daughter of Danaus. ... Lynceus is the name of two people from Greek mythology. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη, pronounced in English as and in Ancient Greek as ) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, beauty, and sexuality. ...


In some versions of the legend, the Danaides were punished in Tartarus by being forced to carry water through a jug to fill a bath and wash off their sins, but the jugs were actually sieves, so the water always leaked out. Tartarus, or Tartaros is a place of eternal torment and suffering, similar to the Hell of Christianity, Netherworld of Pagan religions, the Hindu Naraka, Judaic Gehenna, Chinese Di Yu, Islamic Jahannam, and Roman Paradise. ...


The remaining forty-nine Danaides had their grooms chosen by a common mythic competition: a foot-race was held and the order in which the potential Argive grooms finished decided their brides (compare the myth of Atalanta). Detail from Atalanta and Hippomenes, Guido Reni, c. ...


Even a cautious reading of the subtext as a vehicle for legendary history suggests that a Pelasgian kingship in archaic Argos was overcome, not without violence, by seafarers out of Egypt (compare the Sea Peoples), whose leaders then intermarried with the local dynasty. The descendants of Danaus' "blameless" daughter Hypermnestra, through Danae, led to Perseus, founder of Mycenae, thus suggesting that Argos had a claim to be the metropolis, or "mother city" of Mycenae. A legend (Latin, legenda, things to be read) is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. ... Ancient Greek writers used the name Pelasgian to refer to groups of people who preceded the Greeks and dwelt in several locations in mainland Greece, Crete, and other regions of the Aegean as neighbors of the Hellenes. ... The Sea Peoples is the term used for a mysterious confederacy of seafaring raiders who sailed into the eastern shores of the Mediterranean, invaded Cyprus, Hatti and the Levant, and attempted to enter Egyptian territory during the late 19th dynasty, and especially during Year 8 of Ramses III of the... Danae by Gustav Klimt, 1907. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ...

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Danaides

Another Danaus, possibly the same as the one above, had three daughters, Ialysa, Kamira and Linda, who were worshipped on Rhodes, where he stopped and founded a sanctuary to Athena on the way from Egypt to Greece. Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... In Greek mythology, Ialysa was a daughter of Danaus who was worshipped on the island of Rhodes. ... In Greek mythology, Kamira was a daughter of Danaus who was worshipped on the Greek island of Rhodes. ... Linda is a female given name. ... Location map of Rhodes Rhodes, (Greek: Ρόδος (pron. ... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Danaus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (772 words)
Danaus, or Danaos ("sleeper") was a Greek mythological character, twin brother of Aegyptus and son of Belus, a mythical king of Egypt.
The myth of Danaus is a foundation legend (or re-foundation legend) of Argos, one of the foremost Mycenaean cities of the Peloponnesus.
Danaus was angry with his disobedient daughter and threw her to the Argive courts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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