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Encyclopedia > Dana Gioia

Michael Dana Gioia (born December 24, 1950) is an American poet who retired early from his career as a corporate executive at General Foods to write. Since January 29, 2003, he has been chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, the United States government's arts agency, and has worked to revitalize an organization that had become gun-shy after the bitter controversies that surrounded it in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Gioia has sought to encourage what he calls the only uniquely American form of art, jazz, as well as promoting William Shakespeare and trying to increase the number of Americans reading literature. Before taking the NEA post, Gioia was a resident of Santa Rosa, California, and before that, Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. Image File history File links Official portrait of Dana Gioia, from the website of National Endowment for the Arts File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... A poet is some one who writes poetry. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Endowment for the Arts is a United States federally funded program that offers support and funding for projects that exhibit artistic excellence. ... The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive, informally sometimes including the years 1979, 1990 and 1991. ... This article is about the year. ... Jazz is an original American musical art form originating around the start of the 20th century in New Orleans. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center Luther Burbank Gardens, part of California Historical Landmark No. ...

Contents


Early years

Michael Dana Gioia—he does not use his first name and pronounces his surname "JOY-uh" — was born in Hawthorne, California (although Who's Who says Los Angeles), the son of Michael and Dorothy (Ortiz) Gioia. He grew up in Hawthorne, "speaking Italian in a Mexican neighborhood," he said. His father was the son of immigrants from Sicily and his mother was a native Californian of Mexican and Indian heritage. He grew up amid a jumble of languages: English, Italian, Spanish, and the Latin of the Catholic church. Hawthorne is a city located in southwestern Los Angeles County, California. ... Whos Who is the name of a number of publications, generally containing concise biographical information on a particular group of people. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Sicilian redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


He received his B.A. from Stanford University in 1973, an M.A. from Harvard University in 1975, and an M.B.A. from Stanford Business School in 1977. After college, he joined General Foods Corporation and served as vice-president of marketing from 1977 to 1992, when he quit to write full-time. But even when at General Foods, he was writing, producing several books of poetry and winning the Frederick Bock Award for poetry in 1986. Gioia is classed as one of the "New Formalists", who write in traditional forms and have declared that this return to rhyme and more fixed meters is the new avant-garde. A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B., from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... Stanford redirects here. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate (or graduate) course of one to three years in duration. ... Harvard University campus (old map) Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is an accredited private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Stanford Graduate School of Business, also known as Stanford Business School or Stanford GSB, is one of the top business schools in the world, and part of Stanford University. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... General Foods Corporation was a company established under that name by Marjorie Merriweather Post in 1929. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... New Formalism is a late-twentieth and early twenty-first century movement in Anglo-American poetry that has brought about a major revival in metrical and rhymed verse. ... A rhyme is a repetition of identical or similar sounds in two or more different words and is most often used in poetry. ... Meter (British English spelling: metre) describes the linguistic sound patterns of a verse. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ...


From 1971 to 1973 Gioia was editor of Sequoia Magazine and its poetry editor from 1975 to 1977. From 1977 to 1979, he was literary editor of Inquiry Magazine and its poetry editor from 1979 to 1983. See also: 1970 in literature, other events of 1971, 1972 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1972 in literature, other events of 1973, 1974 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1974 in literature, other events of 1975, 1976 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1976 in literature, other events of 1977, 1978 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1978 in literature, other events of 1979, 1980 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1982 in literature, other events of 1983, 1984 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


Writing full time

Since becoming a full-time writer, Gioia has served as vice-president of the Poetry Society of America from 1992 and as music critic for San Francisco magazine from 1997. He also wrote the libretto of the opera Nosferatu (2001). Poetry Society of America A literary orgnization founded in 1910. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A libretto is the complete body of words used in an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, sacred or secular oratorio and cantata, musical, and ballet. ... Sydney Opera House: one of the worlds most recognisable opera houses and landmarks. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...


Gioia objects to how marginalized poetry has become in America, faulting university English departments for appropriating the field from the public:

The voluntary audience of serious contemporary poetry consists mainly of poets, would-be poets, and a few critics. Additionally, there is a slightly larger involuntary and ephemeral audience consisting of students who read contemporary poetry as assigned course work. In sociological terms, it is surely significant that most members of the poetry subculture are literally paid to read poetry: most established poets and critics now work for large educational institutions. Over the last half-century, literary bohemia had been replaced by an academic bureaucracy.

Better known as a critic than as a poet, he wrote a book about these issues, Can Poetry Matter? and lectured widely on his thesis, which provokoved a spirited debate on the topic: Fellow poet Donald Hall said "Dana Gioia is full of shit," to cite one strong opinion. The two acclaimed poets have since reconciled their differences. Donald Hall (born September 20, 1928) is an American poet. ...


NEA chairman

Gioia was President George W. Bush's second choice to lead the NEA, the first, composer Michael P. Hammond, having died only a week after taking office as the NEA's eighth chairman in January 2002. "I found an agency that was demoralized, defensive, and unconfident. It had been under constant assault for about fifteen years and it was suffering from the institutional version of battered child syndrome," said Gioia. "I don't think the NEA has done a very good job of serving America," he declared. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... Michael P. Hammond (died January 2002) was an American composer who was the eighth chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, appointed by President George W. Bush. ...


Gioia brought a new visibility to the agency and wooed Congressional Republicans, actually getting a sizable increase in his agency's budget. "Dana is a superb politician. He knows how to talk to Congress and to the arts community, and to state and federal agencies and to the complex, gigantic, fire-breathing beast called the White House," said David Gelernter of Yale University. David Hillel Gelernter is a professor of computer science at Yale University. ... Yale redirects here. ...


At the NEA, Gioia created new programs such as Shakespeare in Communities, bringing the Bard to small towns, and NEA Jazz Masters, promoting jazz music. The NEA presents an annual award for jazz that Gioia would like to see become the jazz equivalent of a Pulitzer Prize. "We have a generation of Americans growing up who have never been to the theatre, the symphony, opera, dance, who have never heard fine jazz, and who increasingly don't read," said Gioia in justifying his new efforts. The NEA, or National Endowment for the Arts, every year honors up to seven jazz musicians with Jazz Master Awards. ... For other article subjects named Jazz see jazz (disambiguation). ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ...


Gioia is not without critics, however. Some Republicans in Congress, such as Colorado's Tom Tancredo believe the government has no business funding the arts and wants the NEA abolished. In the arts community, some fault the NEA for abandoning its grants to individual artists that were terminated after controversy over Robert Mapplethorpe, Andres Serrano, and others; though, "Fellowships in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) or poetry are available to published creative writers of exceptional talent." And Gioia's new programs, for which the NEA has sought corporate and foundation support, worry other arts organizations because the NEA is now competing with them for funding. Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Tom Tancredo Thomas Gerard Tom Tancredo (born December 20, 1945) is an American politician from the Republican Party. ... Robert Mapplethorpe (November 4, 1946 – March 9, 1989) was an American photographer, famous for his large-scale, highly-stylized black & white portraits, photos of flowers and male nudes. ... Andres Serrano Andres Serrano (born August 15, 1950) is an American photographer who has become most notorious for his controversial piece Piss Christ, a red-tinged photograph of a crucifix submerged in the artists own urine. ...


Gioia has also sought to promote reading among Americans. In July 2004, the NEA released a study showing how little time Americans were dedicating to literature. In 2005, he began what he called the "Big Read" program, seeking to get Americans to reading serious literature, akin to the city-wide reading programs undertaken by several American cities such as Seattle, Cincinnati, and Chicago. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


But Gioia is keen to do anything that can make the arts more available to the public. "Arts are not a luxury," he says.

Preceded by:
Michael P. Hammond
Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts
2003 to date
Succeeded by:
Incumbent

Michael P. Hammond (died January 2002) was an American composer who was the eighth chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, appointed by President George W. Bush. ... The National Endowment for the Arts is a United States federally funded program that offers support and funding for projects that exhibit artistic excellence. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Books

  • Daily Horoscope (1986)
  • Eugenio Montale's Motteti: Poem's of Love (translator) (1990)
  • New Italian Poets (editor, with Michael Palma (1991)
  • The Gods of Winter (1991)
  • Can Poetry Matter? (1992)
  • The Madness of Hercules (Hercules Furens) (translator). Included in Seneca: The Tragedies, Volume II, published by Johns Hopkins (1995)
  • Certain Solitudes: On the Poetry of Donald Justice (editor, with William Logan) (1998)
  • Interrogations at Noon (2001)
  • California Poetry: From the Gold Rush to the Present (California Legacy) (editor, with others) (2003)
  • Barrier of a Common Language: An American Looks at Contemporary British Poetry (Poets on Poetry) (2003)
  • The Misread City: New Literary Los Angeles (editor, with Scott Timberg) (2003)
  • My California: Journeys by Great Writers (contributor / 2004)
  • Disappearing Ink: Poetry at the End of Print Culture (2004)

Gioia has also written or co-written a number of texts used in college courses, including the anthology (edited with Dan Stone) 100 Great Poets of the English Language (2004).He is also the author of a great many essays and reviews. 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Writings about Dana Gioia and His Work

  • April Lindner. Dana Gioia (Boise State University Western Writers Series, No. 143) (2003)
  • Jack W. C. Hagstrom and Bill Morgan. Dana Gioia: A Descriptive Bibliography with Critical Essays (2002)

2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...

References

  • American Perspectives. C-SPAN. February 21, 2004. (Presentation of talk Gioia gave at the Agassi Theatre, Harvard University, February 9, 2004).
  • Cynthia Haven. "Dana Gioia Goes to Washington". Commonweal. November 21, 2003.
  • Cynthia Haven. "Poet Provocateur", Stanford Magazine, July/August 2000.
  • Belinda Lanks. "Bush Picks Poet for NEA", ARTnews December 2002
  • John J. Miller. "Up from Mapplethorpe". The National Review. March 8, 2004.
  • Jim Milliot. "Gioia vows to change America's reading habits." Publisher's Weekly. June 27, 2005.
  • "Reviving the Bard" (editorial). The New Criterion. December 2003.
  • Bruce Weber. "Poet Brokers Truce in Culture Wars." The New York Times. September 7, 2004.
  • World Authors 1990-1995 New York: H.W. Wilson, 1999

February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...

See also

The poetry of the United States began as a literary art during the colonial era. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
washingtonpost.com: Poet Dana Gioia to Be Named NEA Chairman (653 words)
Dana Gioia, a prolific poet who left one of the top jobs at General Foods to pursue a literary career, is expected to be named the next chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, sources close to the selection process said yesterday.
Gioia, 51, who since the 1980s has championed poetry concerned with everyday life, is the author of "Daily Horoscope," published in 1986; "The Gods of Winter," published in 1991; and last year's "Interrogations at Noon." He has also translated the poetry of Italian Nobel Prize winner Eugenio Montale and "The Madness of Hercules" by Seneca.
Gioia was born near Los Angeles, the son of a Sicilian American cabdriver and a telephone operator.
Dana Gioia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1152 words)
Gioia is classed as one of the "New Formalists", who write in traditional forms and have declared that this return to rhyme and more fixed metres is the new avant-garde.
Gioia was President George W. Bush's second choice to lead the NEA, the first, composer Michael P. Hammond, having died only a week after taking office as the NEA's eighth chairman in January 2002.
Gioia has also written or co-written a number of texts used in college courses, including the anthology (edited with Dan Stone) 100 Great Poets of the English Language (2004).He is also the author of a great many essays and reviews.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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