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Encyclopedia > Dan Brown
Dan Brown

Born June 22, 1964 (1964-06-22) (age 43)
Exeter, New Hampshire, U.S.
Occupation Novelist
Genres Thriller,
Mystery fiction

Dan Brown (born June 22, 1964) is an American author of thriller fiction, best known for the 2003 bestselling novel, The Da Vinci Code. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 428 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (597 × 835 pixel, file size: 106 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Please see the file description page for further information. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638  - Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - Town 51. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Thriller fiction, sometimes called suspense fiction, is a genre of literature that typically entails fast-paced plots, numerous action scenes, and limited character development. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ...


Brown is interested in cryptography, keys, and codes, which are a recurring theme in his stories. Currently his novels have been translated into more than 40 languages.[1] The German Lorenz cipher machine, used in World War II for encryption of very high-level general staff messages Cryptography (or cryptology; derived from Greek κρυπτός kryptós hidden, and the verb γράφω gráfo write or λεγειν legein to speak) is the study of message secrecy. ...


Although many perceive Brown's books as anti-Christian, Brown is a Christian[2] who says that his book The Da Vinci Code is simply "an entertaining story that promotes spiritual discussion and debate" and suggests that the book may be used "as a positive catalyst for introspection and exploration of our faith".[3]

Contents

Early life and education

Dan Brown was born and raised in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, the eldest of three children. His mother Constance (Connie) was a professional musician, playing organ at church. Brown's father Richard G. Brown was a prominent mathematics teacher, writing textbooks and teaching high school mathematics at Phillips Exeter Academy from 1968 until his retirement in 1982. Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638  - Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - Town 51. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... Richard G. Brown was a prominent mathematician and the author of one of the most famous high-school advanced mathematics text books, Advanced Mathematics: Precalculus With Discrete Mathematics and Data Analysis. He is the father of best seller (The Da Vinci Code) American author Dan Brown. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... , Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres in Exeter, New Hampshire, U.S., fifty miles north of Boston [1]. In over two centuries of its existence, Phillips Exeter Academy has played...


Phillips Exeter Academy is an exclusive boarding school, which requires new teachers to live on campus for ten years, so Brown and his siblings were raised at the school. His own schooling was at public schools in Exeter until the 9th grade, at which time he enrolled in Phillips Exeter (Class of 1982), as did his younger siblings Valerie (1985) and Gregory (1993). A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ...


After graduating from Phillips Exeter in 1982, Brown attended Amherst College, where he was a member of Psi Upsilon fraternity. He played squash and sang in the Amherst Glee Club, and was a writing student of novelist Alan Lelchuk. Brown graduated from Amherst with a double major in Spanish and English in 1986. Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Psi Upsilon (ΨΥ, Psi U) is the fifth oldest college fraternity, founded at Union College in 1833. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball...


Songwriter and pop singer

After graduating from Amherst, Brown dabbled with a musical career, creating effects with a synthesizer, and self-producing a children's cassette entitled SynthAnimals which included a collection of tracks such as "Happy Frogs" and "Suzuki Elephants"; it sold a few hundred copies. He then formed his own record company called Dalliance, and in 1990 self-published a CD entitled Perspective, targeted to the adult market, which also sold a few hundred copies. In 1991 he moved to Hollywood to pursue a career as singer-songwriter and pianist. To support himself, he taught classes at Beverly Hills Preparatory School. Synth redirects here. ... ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... Beverly Hills Preparatory School is a private school in Beverly Hills, California. ...


While in Los Angeles he joined the National Academy of Songwriters, and participated in many of its events. It was there that he met Blythe Newlon, a woman 12 years his senior, who was the Academy's Director of Artist Development. Though not officially part of her job, she took on the seemingly unusual task of helping to promote Brown's projects; she wrote press releases, set up promotional events, and put him in contact with individuals who could be helpful to his career. She and Brown also developed a personal relationship, though this was not known to all of their associates until 1993, when Brown moved back to New Hampshire, and it was learned that Blythe would accompany him. They married in 1993, at Pea Porridge Pond, a location near North Conway, New Hampshire.[4] Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... The National Academy of Songwriters, originally Songwriters Resources and Services was a music industry association which provided a support network for songwriters, and gave out awards in various categories. ... From left to right: Blythe, father-in-law Richard, husband Dan, brother-in law Gregory, sister-in-law Valerie, mother-in-law Connie Blythe Newlon Brown (born c. ... North Conway is a census-designated place located in eastern Carroll County, New Hampshire. ...


In 1993, Brown released the self-titled CD Dan Brown, which included songs such as "976-Love" and "If You Believe in Love".


New England teacher

Brown and Blythe moved to his home town in New Hampshire in 1993. Brown became an English teacher at his alma mater Phillips Exeter, and gave Spanish classes to 6th, 7th, and 8th graders at Lincoln Akerman School, a small school for K–8th grade with about 250 students, in Hampton Falls. Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Hampton Falls is a town located in Rockingham County, New Hampshire. ...


Transition to writing

In 1994, Brown released a CD entitled Angels & Demons. Its artwork was the same ambigram by artist John Langdon which he later used for the novel Angels & Demons. The liner notes also again credited his wife for her involvement, thanking her "for being my tireless cowriter, coproducer, second engineer, significant other, and therapist." An animation of a rotationally symmetric ambigram for the word ambigram An ambigram, also sometimes known as an inversion, is a graphical figure that spells out a word not only in its form as presented, but also in another direction or orientation. ... John Langdon is an American graphic artist. ... Wikibooks has a book on the topic of Angels and Demons FUCK is a bestselling mystery novel by Dan Brown. ...


This CD included songs such as "Here in These Fields" and the religious ballad "All I Believe."[5]


Also in 1994, while on holiday in Tahiti, he read Sidney Sheldon's novel The Doomsday Conspiracy, and decided that he could do better.[6] He started work on Digital Fortress, and also co-wrote a humor book with his wife, 187 Men to Avoid: A Guide for the Romantically Frustrated Woman, under the pseudonym "Danielle Brown" (one of the 187 items in the book was "Men who write self-help books for women"). The book's author profile reads, "Danielle Brown currently lives in New England: teaching school, writing books, and avoiding men." The copyright, however, is listed as "Dan Brown". It sold a few thousand copies before going out of print. Tahiti is the largest island in the Windward group of the French Polynesia, located in the archipelago of Society Islands in the southern Pacific Ocean. ... Sidney Sheldon (February 11, 1917 – January 30, 2007) was an American writer who won awards in three careers—a Broadway playwright, a Hollywood TV and movie screenwriter, and a best-selling novelist. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Digital Fortress is a novel by American author Dan Brown and published in 1998 by St. ...


Writing career

In 1996, Brown quit teaching to become a full-time writer. Digital Fortress was published in 1998. Blythe did much of the book's promotion, writing press releases, booking Brown on talk shows, and setting up press interviews. A few months later, Brown and his wife released The Bald Book, another humor book. It was officially credited to his wife, though a representative of the publisher said that it was primarily written by Brown.

The Da Vinci Code
(US edition)

Brown's first three novels had little success, with fewer than 10,000 copies in each of their first printings; but the fourth novel, The Da Vinci Code, became a runaway bestseller, going to the top of the New York Times Best Seller list during its first week of release in 2003. It is now credited with being one of the most popular books of all time, with 60.5 million copies sold worldwide as of 2006.[7] Its success has helped push sales of Brown's earlier books. In 2004, all four of his novels were on the New York Times list in the same week,[citation needed] and in 2005, he made Time magazine's list of the 100 most influential people of the year. Forbes magazine placed Brown at #12 on their 2005 "Celebrity 100" list, and estimated his annual income at US$76.5 million. The Times estimated his income from 'Da Vinci Code' sales as $250 million. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (396x670, 336 KB) Summary United States book cover of the 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown Altered from the source : Barnes & Noble: [1] Licensing Herbert A. Ortillano This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (396x670, 336 KB) Summary United States book cover of the 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code, by Dan Brown Altered from the source : Barnes & Noble: [1] Licensing Herbert A. Ortillano This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... The New York Times Best Seller List is a weekly chart in The New York Times newspaper that keeps track of the best-selling books of the week. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ...


Characters in Brown's books are often named after real people in his life. Robert Langdon is named after John Langdon, the artist who created the ambigrams used for the Angels & Demons CD and novel. Camerlengo Carlo Ventresca is named after "On A Claire Day" cartoonist friend Carla Ventresca. In the Vatican Archives, Langdon recalls a wedding of two people named Dick and Connie, which are the names of his parents. Robert Langdon's editor Jonas Faukman, is named after Brown's real life editor Jason Kaufman. Brown also said that characters were based on a New Hampshire librarian, and a French teacher at Exeter, Andre Vernet. An animation of a rotationally symmetric ambigram for the word ambigram A mirror-image ambigram for the word Wiki A rotational ambigram for the word Wikipedia A 3-Dimensional ambigram of the letters A, B and C. An ambigram, also sometimes known as an inversion, is a graphical figure that... On A Claire Day is a nationally syndicated comic strip created by Henry Beckett and Carla Ventresca. ... Carla Ventresca is co-creator with husband Henry Beckett of the nationally syndicated comic strip On A Claire Day. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Film adaptations

In 2006, Brown's novel The Da Vinci Code was released as a film by Columbia Pictures, with director Ron Howard; the film starred Tom Hanks as Robert Langdon, Audrey Tautou as Sophie Neveu and Sir Ian McKellen as Sir Leigh Teabing. It was considered one of the most anticipated films of the year, and was used to launch the 2006 Cannes Film Festival, though it received overall poor reviews. It was later listed as one of the worst films of 2006,[8] but also the second highest grossing film of the year, pulling in $750 million USD worldwide.[9] Screenwriter Akiva Goldsman has been commissioned to adapt Angels & Demons, although whether Ron Howard will direct the project is as yet unknown.[10] The year 2006 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the film. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... Ronald William Howard (born March 1, 1954 in Duncan, Oklahoma) is an American actor, and an Academy Award winning film director, and producer, known for his roles on sitcoms, movies and television. ... Thomas Jeffrey Tom Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is a two-time Academy Award-, two-time Emmy-, four-time Golden Globe- and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American film actor, director, voice-over artist, writer and film producer. ... Robert Langdon (June 22, 1964 in Exeter, New Hampshire, United States) is a fictional professor of religious iconology and symbology at Harvard University who appeared in the Dan Brown novels Angels and Demons (2000) and The Da Vinci Code (2003). ... Audrey Tautou (IPA: ; , born August 9, 1976) is a French film actress, known to worldwide audiences for playing the title character in the award-winning French film Amélie (2001, Le Fabuleux Destin dAmélie Poulain) and also Sophie Neveu in The Da Vinci Code (2006). ... Sir Ian McKellen takes a day out at Universal Studios, Hollywood, April 2000. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... Akiva Goldsman (born July 7, 1962) is an American screenwriter, producer, and occasional actor in the motion picture industry. ... Angels and Demons is the upcoming feature film based on the 2000 novel of the same name by Dan Brown. ...


Brown was listed as one of the executive producers of the film The Da Vinci Code, and also created additional codes for the film. One of his songs, "Piano", which Brown wrote and performed, was listed as part of the film's soundtrack.


In the film, Brown and his wife can be seen in the background of one of the early booksigning scenes.


Copyright infringement cases

In August 2005, Brown won a court case in New York against author Lewis Perdue over charges of plagiarism, on the basis of claimed similarity between The Da Vinci Code and his novels, The Da Vinci Legacy (1983) and Daughter of God (2000). Judge George Daniels said, in part: "A reasonable average lay observer would not conclude that The Da Vinci Code is substantially similar to Daughter of God".[11] Lewis Perdue is the author of Daughter of God and The Da Vinci Legacy. ... For other uses, see Plagiarism (disambiguation). ...


On March 28, 2007, Brown's publisher, Random House, won an appeal copyright infringement case brought by authors Michael Baigent and Richard Leigh. England's Court of Appeal rejected the efforts from two authors who claimed that Brown stole their ideas for his novel The Da Vinci Code. Baigent and Leigh, who wrote Holy Blood, Holy Grail in 1982, argued that Brown stole significant elements from their book. Both are based on a theory that Jesus and Mary Magdalene married and had a child and that the bloodline continues to this day. Baigent and Leigh are liable for paying legal expenses of nearly $6 million USD.[12] Brown even alluded to the two authors' names in his book. Leigh Teabing, a lead character in both the novel and the film, anagrammatically derives his last name from Baigent's, while using Leigh's name verbatim. A contributing factor for the outcome of the case is that these authors presented their work as nonfiction. Fiction writers often draw upon nonfiction resources for content research. An agreement decision by the court would have proved a disaster for fiction writers everywhere.[citation needed] is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... The Cathach of St. ... Author Michael Baigent Reuters Michael Baigent, born March 1948 in Christchurch, New Zealand, is an author and conspiracy theorist who co-wrote (with Richard Leigh) a number of books that question mainstream perceptions of history and many commonly-held versions of the life of Jesus. ... For other people named Richard Leigh, see Richard Leigh. ... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The Courts of England and Wales are the civil and criminal courts responsible for the administration of justice in England and Wales; they are constituted and governed by the Law of England and Wales and are subordinate to the Parliament of the... Holy Blood, Holy Grail is a controversial New York Times bestselling book by authors Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln, which was published in 1982 by Dell (ISBN 055212138) in London. ... Sir Leigh Teabing portrayed by Sir Ian McKellen in The Da Vinci Code. ...


Planned works

Brown is working on a new novel, called The Solomon Key, which will reportedly take place in Washington D.C., and feature the "secret" society of the Freemasons. An exact release date has not been announced, but the most common media speculation says 2008. Brown's promotional website states that puzzles hidden in the bookjacket of The Da Vinci Code (including two referring to the Kryptos sculpture at CIA Headquarters in Langley, Virginia) give hints about the subject of this novel. This repeats a theme from some of Brown's earlier work. For example, a puzzle at the end of the book Deception Point decrypts to the message, "The Da Vinci Code will surface." (See: Deception Point) The book will probably explore the Skull and Bones fraternity at Yale, to which George Bush and John Kerry both belonged.[13] The Solomon Key is the working title of a unreleased novel currently being worked on by Dan Brown. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ... Kryptos on the grounds of the Central Intelligence Agency in Langley, Virginia (U.S. Government image). ... CIA redirects here. ... Langley is an unincorporated community in the census-designated place of McLean in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Deception Point book cover Deception Point (2001) is a thriller novel by Dan Brown, the author of The Da Vinci Code, Angels and Demons, and Digital Fortress. ... For the pirate flag, see Jolly Roger. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


He says that he has ideas for about 12 future books,[14] one of which involves a famous composer's "all factual" associations with a secret society. Speculation is that this may mean Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who was also a Freemason.[citation needed] “Mozart” redirects here. ...


Personal life

In a statement at trial in March 2006, Brown wrote that while he was growing up, on birthdays and Christmas, he and his siblings were led on elaborate treasure hunts to find their gifts, following cryptic clues and codes left by their father. This is the same event that he used to describe the fictional childhood of Sophie Neveu in The Da Vinci code. Robert Langdon and Sophie Neveu (Tom Hanks and Audrey Tautou) in the 2006 film The Da Vinci Code Sophie Neveu is a fictional character in the novel, The Da Vinci Code. ...


Brown plays tennis, and does his writing in his loft, often getting up at 4 a.m. to work. He keeps an antique hourglass on his desk, to remind himself to take breaks.


Brown has told fans that he uses inversion therapy to help with writer's block. He uses gravity boots and says, “hanging upside down seems to help me solve plot challenges by shifting my entire perspective.”[15] Inversion therapy involves hanging upside down or at an inverted angle to use gravity to naturally decompress the joints of the body. ... For other uses, see Writers block (disambiguation). ... Gravity boots are not boots at all, but in fact ankle supports designed to allow a person to hang upside down. ...


Philanthropy

In October 2004, Brown and his siblings donated US$2.2 million to Phillips Exeter Academy in honor of their father, to set up the "Richard G. Brown Technology Endowment," to help "provide computers and high-tech equipment for students in need."[16]


Criticism and disputed claims

See also: Criticisms of The Da Vinci Code

Though it is undisputed that Brown is a highly popular author, much criticism centers on his claims that details in his books are fact. As one example (alone) in Angels and Demons, Brown has a central plot device that requires Camerlengos are not cardinals and are not eligible for election as pope. Camerlengos are always cardinals and two have been elected as Pope: Leo XIII in 1878 and Pius XII in 1939.[citation needed] This article is about the controversies regarding the novel. ... Coat of arms of the Cardinal Camerlengo of the Holy Roman Church (the escutcheon and motto are proper to the incumbent) The title Camerlengo of the Holy Roman Church (plu camerlenghi, Italian for Chamberlain) refers to an official of the Papal court---either the Chamberlain of the Roman Church, the... Pope Leo XIII Supreme Pontiff (1878-1903) Leo XIII, né Gioacchino Pecci (March 2, 1810 - July 20, 1903) was Pope from 1878 to 1903. ... The Venerable Pius XII, born Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Eugenio Pacelli (Rome, March 2, 1876 - October 9, 1958) served as the Pope from March 2, 1939 to 1958. ...


In interviews, Brown has said that his wife is an "art historian" and "painter", though there was no record of her having worked professionally in this capacity. When they met, she was the Director of Artistic Development at the National Academy for Songwriters in Los Angeles. However, during the 2006 lawsuit over alleged copyright infringement in The Da Vinci Code, information was introduced at trial which showed that Blythe did indeed do a great deal of research for the book.[17] In one article, she was described as "chief researcher".[18]


In June 2006, The Colbert Report featured a humorous segment on how many monkeys it would take for various works. This was in response to comments made in the news on monkeys typing out the Bible or the Qur'an. According to Colbert, one million monkeys typing for eternity would produce a Shakespeare, ten thousand (drinking) monkeys typing for ten thousand years would produce Hemingway, and ten monkeys typing for three days would produce a work of Dan Brown. The Colbert Report (IPA ) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ...


Works

CDs

  • SynthAnimals, a children's album
  • Perspective, 1990, Dalliance. Music CD
  • Dan Brown, 1993, DBG Records
  • Angels & Demons, 1994, DBG Records
  • Musica Animalia 2003, a charity CD for the organization Families First

Musica Animalia Musica Animalia (2003) is a charity childrens CD with a collection of songs and poems by bestselling author Dan Brown, released to support the charity Families First Health and Support Center, in New Hampshire. ... Families First is a New Hampshire-based charity organization, also known as the Families First Health and Support Center. ...

Humor writing

  • 187 Men to Avoid: A Survival Guide for the Romantically Frustrated Woman, 1995, Berkley Publishing Group (co-written with his wife under the pseudonym Danielle Brown). ISBN 0-425-14783-5, Scheduled for re-release in August 2006
  • The Bald Book, 1998, co-written with his wife Blythe Brown. ISBN 0-7860-0519-X

Novels

Digital Fortress is a novel by American author Dan Brown and published in 1998 by St. ... Wikibooks has a book on the topic of Angels and Demons FUCK is a bestselling mystery novel by Dan Brown. ... Deception Point book cover Deception Point (2001) is a thriller novel by Dan Brown, the author of The Da Vinci Code, Angels and Demons, and Digital Fortress. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... The Solomon Key is the working title of a unreleased novel currently being worked on by Dan Brown. ...

Movies

This article is about the film. ... Angels and Demons is the upcoming feature film based on the 2000 novel of the same name by Dan Brown. ...

Notes

  1. ^ List of foreign-language versions, at Brown's webpage
  2. ^ Bookreporter.com, 2003
  3. ^ The Da Vinci Code » FAQs » Official Website of Dan Brown
  4. ^ Walters and O'Keeffe, 2006
  5. ^ Rogak, 2005
  6. ^ BBC News, August 10, 2004
  7. ^ Wall Street Journal
  8. ^ Guest reviewer Michael Phillips, sitting in for Roger Ebert, listed The Da Vinci Code at #2 on his list, second to All the King's Men. "Worst Movies of 2006", Ebert & Roeper, January 13, 2007
  9. ^ Box Office Mojo. The Da Vinci Code (2006)
  10. ^ ComingSoon.net: Akiva Goldsman Back for Angels & Demons
  11. ^ BBC News, August 6, 2005
  12. ^ Herman, 2007
  13. ^ Walters and O'Keeffe, 2006
  14. ^ Kirschling, 2006
  15. ^ BBC News, April 24, 2006
  16. ^ Phillips Exeter Academy, 2004
  17. ^ USA Today, March 1, 2006
  18. ^ Sullivan, 2006

Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Promotional poster for All the Kings Men All the Kings Men (2006) is an adaptation of the 1946 Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Robert Penn Warren and a remake of the 1949 Academy Award-winning movie, All the Kings Men. As of December 2005, extended post-production... At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper is a movie review television program featuring film critic Roger Ebert and columnist Richard Roeper, both of the Chicago Sun-Times. ...

References

The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Book List (IBList) is an online database with information about books, authors, short stories, etc. ... Earl Doherty, currently living in Canada, is the author of The Jesus Puzzle, a work published in 2000 by the Canadian Humanist Association arguing that Jesus never lived. ... Robert McNair Price was born July 7, 1954 in Mississippi and is a Professor of Theology and Scriptural Studies. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Digital Fortress is a novel by American author Dan Brown and published in 1998 by St. ... Wikibooks has a book on the topic of Angels and Demons FUCK is a bestselling mystery novel by Dan Brown. ... Angels and Demons is the upcoming feature film based on the 2000 novel of the same name by Dan Brown. ... Deception Point book cover Deception Point (2001) is a thriller novel by Dan Brown, the author of The Da Vinci Code, Angels and Demons, and Digital Fortress. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... This article is about the film. ... The Da Vinci Code is a video game for PlayStation 2, Xbox and Microsoft Windows based on the novel by Dan Brown. ... Composed by acclaimed, Oscar-winning film composer Hans Zimmer, The Da Vinci Code soundtrack underscored the 2006 film of the same name. ... The Solomon Key is the working title of a unreleased novel currently being worked on by Dan Brown. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Da Vinci Code » Book Reviews » Official Website of Dan Brown (1374 words)
Dan Brown's conspiracy-theory thriller is the pulp must-read of the season...an ingenious mixture of paranoid thriller, art history lesson, chase story, religious symbology lecture and anti-clerical screed, and it's the most fun you can have between the sort of covers that aren't 300-count Egyptian cotton.
Dan Brown masterfully concocts an intelligent and lucid thriller that marries the gusto of an international murder mystery with a collection of fascinating esoteria culled from 2,000 years of Western history.
Brown's hero and heroine embark on a lofty and intriguing exploration of some of culture's greatest mysteries--from the nature of the Mona Lisa's smile to the secret of the Holy Grail...
Dan Brown: Biography and Much More from Answers.com (2808 words)
Dan Brown was born and raised in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, the oldest of three children.
Brown's father Richard G. Brown was a prominent mathematics teacher, writing textbooks and teaching high school mathematics at Phillips Exeter Academy from 1968 until his retirement in 1997.
Brown states that during his junior year at Amherst College, he went to Europe to study art history at the University of Seville in Spain, which is where he first began seriously studying the works of Leonardo da Vinci.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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