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Encyclopedia > Damon Runyon
Damon Runyon
Damon Runyon

Damon Runyon (4 October 188410 December 1946) was a newspaperman and writer.[1] Damon Runyon (photograph c. ... Damon Runyon (photograph c. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He was best known for his short stories celebrating the world of Broadway in New York City that grew out of the Prohibition era. He spun humorous tales of gamblers, hustlers, actors, and gangsters; few of whom go by "square" names, preferring instead to be known as "Nathan Detroit," "Big Jule," "Harry the Horse," "Good Time Charley," "Dave the Dude," and so on. These stories were written in a very distinctive vernacular style: a mixture of formal speech and colorful slang, almost always in present tense, and always devoid of contractions. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine underground brewery during the prohibition era. ...


Here is an example from the story Tobias the Terrible, collected in More than Somewhat (1937):

If I have all the tears that are shed on Broadway by guys in love, I will have enough salt water to start an opposition ocean to the Atlantic and Pacific, with enough left over to run the Great Salt Lake out of business. But I wish to say I never shed any of these tears personally, because I am never in love, and furthermore, barring a bad break, I never expect to be in love, for the way I look at it love is strictly the old phedinkus, and I tell the little guy as much.

To New Yorkers of his generation, a "Damon Runyon character" evoked a distinctive social type from the Brooklyn or Midtown demi-monde. The adjective "Runyonesque" refers to this type of character as well as to the type of situations and dialog that Runyon depicted. This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ...


The musical Guys and Dolls was based on two Runyon stories, "The Idyll of Miss Sarah Brown" and "Blood Pressure"; the play Little Miss Marker grew from his short story of the same name. Guys and Dolls is a musical, with the music and lyrics written by Frank Loesser and book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows, based on The Idyll Of Miss Sarah Brown, a short story by Damon Runyon. ... A short story that the musical guys and dolls is based on. ... Little Miss Marker (also known as The Girl in Pawn) is a 1934 film which tells the story of a young girl whose father gives her to a gangster as collateral to pay off a gambling debt. ...


Runyon was also a newspaperman. He wrote the lead article for United Press on Franklin Delano Roosevelt's inauguration in 1933. Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ...

Contents

Biography

He was born Alfred Damon Runyan in Manhattan, Kansas, and grew up in Pueblo, Colorado, where Runyon Field, The Damon Runyon Repertory Theater Company, and Runyon Lake are named after him. He was a third-generation newspaperman and started in the trade under his father in Pueblo. He worked for various newspapers in the Rocky Mountain area; at one of those, the spelling of his last name was changed from "Runyan" to "Runyon," a change he let stand. Riley County Courthouse, Manhattan Manhattan is a town located in northeastern Kansas at the junction of the Kansas River and Big Blue River. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The City of Pueblo (IPA: //) is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat of Pueblo County, Colorado, USA. Pueblo is situated at the confluence of the Arkansas River and Fountain Creek. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ...


After a notable failure in trying to organize a Colorado minor baseball league, Runyon moved to New York City in 1910. For the next ten years he covered the New York Giants and professional boxing for the New York American. In his first New York byline, the American editor dropped the "Alfred," and the name "Damon Runyon" appeared for the first time. Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–85) Other nicknames The Jints, The Gigantes, The G... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... The New York Journal American was a newspaper published from 1895 – 1966. ...


A heavy drinker as a young man, he seems to have quit the bottle soon after arriving in New York, after his drinking nearly cost him the courtship of the woman who became his first wife, Ellen Egan. He remained a heavy smoker.


His best friend was mobster accountant Otto Berman, and he incorporated Berman into several of his stories under the alias "Regret, the horse player." When Berman was killed in a hit on Berman's boss, Dutch Schultz, Runyon quickly assumed the role of damage control for his deceased friend, correcting erroneous press releases (including one that stated Berman was one of Schultz's gunmen, to which Runyon replied, "Otto would have been as effective a bodyguard as a two-year-old.") Mobster is a slang term for a person who participates in organized crime, which is known as belonging to the Mob. In western stories and movies, cowboys as mobsters are known as outlaws. ... Otto Abbadabba Berman, c. ... Dutch Schultz (August 6, 1902 – October 24, 1935) was a New York City-area gangster of the 1920s and 30s. ... Damage control is the term used in the Merchant navy, maritime industry and navies for the emergency control of situations that may hazard the sinking of the ship. ...


Runyon frequently contributed sports poems to the American on boxing and baseball themes, and also wrote numerous short stories and essays. He was the Hearst newspapers' baseball columnist for many years, beginning in 1911, and his knack for spotting the eccentric and the unusual, on the field or in the stands, is credited with revolutionising the way baseball was covered. Perhaps as confirmation, Runyon was inducted into the writers' wing (the J. G. Taylor Spink Award) of the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1967. He is also a member of the International Boxing Hall Of Fame and is known for dubbing heavyweight champion James J. Braddock, the "Cinderella Man." The J. G. Taylor Spink Award is the highest award given by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) to its members. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... The modern International Boxing Hall of Fame (IBHOF) is located in Canastota, New York, United States, within driving distance from the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown and the National Soccer Hall of Fame in Oneonta. ... (September , 1991) was an American heavyweight boxing champion. ... This article is about a movie. ...


Gambling was a common theme of Runyon's works, and he was a notorious gambler himself. A well-known saying of his paraphrases Ecclesiastes: "The race is not always to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, but that's the way to bet." Gamble redirects here. ... Ecclesiastes, Qohelet in Hebrew, is a book of the Hebrew Bible. ...


Runyon's marriage to Ellen Egan produced two children (Mary and Damon, Jr.), and broke up in 1928 over rumors that Runyon had become infatuated with a Mexican girl he had first met while covering the Pancho Villa raids in 1916 and discovered once again in New York, when she called the American seeking him out. Runyon had promised her in Mexico that, if she would complete the education he paid for her, he would find her a dancing job in New York. Her name was Patrice Amati del Grande, and she became his companion after he separated from his wife. After Ellen Runyon died of the effects of her own drinking problems, Runyon and Patrice married. Though Runyon forged a better relationship with his children, the marriage ended when Patrice left him for a younger man in the same year he died (1946). For the Filipino boxer, see Francisco Guilledo. ...


He died in New York City from throat cancer in 1946, at age 62. His body was cremated, and his ashes were scattered over Manhattan by Captain Eddie Rickenbacker on December 18, 1946. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Esophageal cancer is malignancy of the esophagus. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Eddie Rickenbacker (October 8, 1890 – July 27, 1973) was best known as a World War I fighter ace and Medal of Honor recipient. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation [1], established in his honor, was set up to fund promising scientists in the field of cancer research.


Media

Bibliography

  • The Tents of Trouble (Poems; 1911)
  • Rhymes of the Firing Line (1912)
  • Guys and Dolls (1932)
  • Damon Runyon's Blue Plate Special (1934)
  • Money From Home (1935)
  • More Than Somewhat (1937)
  • Furthermore (1938)
  • Take It Easy (1938)
  • My Wife Ethel (1939)
  • My Old Man (1939)
  • The Best of Runyon (1940)
  • A Slight Case of Murder (with Howard Lindsay, 1940)
  • Damon Runyon Favorites (1942)
  • Capt. Eddie Rickenbacker (with W. Kiernan, 1942)
  • Runyon a la Carte (1944)
  • The Damon Runyon Omnibus (1944)
  • Short Takes (1946)
  • In Our Town (1946)
  • The Three Wise Guys and Other Stories (1946)
  • Trials and Other Tribulations (1947)
  • Poems for Men (1947)
  • Runyon First and Last (1949)
  • Runyon on Broadway (1950)
  • More Guys and Dolls (1950)
  • The Turps (1951)
  • Damon Runyon from First to Last (1954)
  • A Treasury of Damon Runyon (1958)
  • The Bloodhounds of Broadway and Other Stories (1985)
  • Guys, Dolls, and Curveballs: Damon Runyon on Baseball (2005; Jim Reisler, editor)
  • A Dangerous Guy Indeed (Unknown)

Films

Numerous Damon Runyon stories were adapted for the stage and the screen. Some of the best of these include:

  • Lady for a Day (1933)—Adapted by Robert Riskin, who suggested the name change from Runyon's title "Madame La Gimp," the film garnered Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Best Director (Frank Capra), Best Actress (May Robson), and Best Adaptation for the Screen (Riskin). It was remade as Pocketful of Miracles in 1961, with Bette Davis in the Apple Annie role; Frank Sinatra recorded the upbeat title song (his rendition is not used in the film). The film received Oscar nominations for composers Sammy Cahn and Jimmy Van Heusen and for co-star Peter Falk (Best Supporting Actor). In 1989, Jackie Chan adapted the story yet again for the Hong Kong action film Miracles, adding several of his trademark stunt sequences.
  • Little Miss Marker (1934)—The film that made Shirley Temple a star, launched her career as perhaps America's most beloved child film star, and pushed her past Greta Garbo as the nation's biggest film draw of the year. Subsequent remakes include Sorrowful Jones (1949; Bob Hope, Lucille Ball), Forty Pounds of Trouble (1963; Tony Curtis), and Little Miss Marker (1980)— Walter Matthau, Julie Andrews, Bob Newhart, Tony Curtis.
  • The Lemon Drop Kid (1934); also filmed in 1951 starring Bob Hope and future I Love Lucy co-star William Frawley as a racetrack tout.
  • A Slight Case of Murder (1938)— with Edward G. Robinson, remade in 1953 as Stop, You're Killing Me with Broderick Crawford and Claire Trevor.
  • The Big Street (1942)— adapted from Runyon's story, "Little Pinks"; Henry Fonda, Lucille Ball
  • Butch Minds the Baby (1942)— Broderick Crawford, Shemp Howard
  • It Ain't Hay (1943)—adapted from "Princess O'Hara"; Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Patsy O'Connor

Lady for a Day is a 1933 film which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... Robert Riskin (March 30, 1897–September 20, 1955) was an American screenwriter and playwright, best known for his collaborations with director-producer Frank Capra. ... This article is about the film director. ... May Robson (April 19, 1858 - October 20, 1942) was an Australian-born actress and playwright. ... This article is about the actress. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... Sammy Cahn (June 18, 1913 – January 15, 1993) was an award-winning American lyricist, songwriter and musician, best known for his romantic lyrics to tin pan alley and Broadway songs, as recorded by Frank Sinatra, Doris Day and many others. ... Jimmy Van Heusen (January 26, 1913 - February 7, 1990), was an American composer. ... Chan Kong-Sang (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Jackie Chan Sing Lung (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) or Jackie Chan SBS, (born on April 7, 1954) is a Chinese martial artist, action star, actor, director, screenwriter, film producer, singer and stunt performer. ... Miracles is a Hong Kong action film starring, directed by and written by Jackie Chan It is set in the 1930s and is said to be a variation of Frank Capras A Pocketful of Miracles. Jackie plays Cheng Wah Kuo, a country boy who loses all he owns... Little Miss Marker (also known as The Girl in Pawn) is a 1934 film which tells the story of a young girl whose father gives her to a gangster as collateral to pay off a gambling debt. ... For the cocktail named after this person, see Shirley Temple cocktail. ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 – April 26, 1989) was an iconic American comedienne, film, television, stage and radio actress, glamour girl and star of the landmark sitcoms I Love Lucy, The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show and Heres Lucy. ... For other persons named Tony Curtis, see Tony Curtis (disambiguation). ... Walter Matthau (October 1, 1920 – July 1, 2000) was an Academy Award-winning American comedy actor best known for his role as Oscar Madison in The Odd Couple and his frequent collaborations with fellow Odd Couple star Jack Lemmon. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... George Robert Bob Newhart (born September 5, 1929 in Oak Park, Illinois) is an American stand-up comedian and actor. ... The Lemon Drop Kid is a 1951 comedy film based on the short story by writer Damon Runyon. ... I Love Lucy is a popular American situation comedy, starring Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance and William Frawley. ... A Slight Case of Murder is a 1938 comedy film directed by Lloyd Bacon. ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... It Aint Hay is a 1943 film starring the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. ... William Alexander “Bud” Abbott (October 2, 1895 – April 24, 1974) was an American actor, producer and comedian born in Asbury Park, New Jersey. ... Lou Costello (born Louis Francis Cristillo; March 6, 1906 - March 3, 1959), was an American actor and comedian best known as half of the comedy team of Abbott and Costello, with Bud Abbott. ... Money From Home was filmed from March 9 - May 1, 1953. ... Guys and Dolls is a 1955 musical film made by the Samuel Goldwyn Company and released by MGM. It was directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz and produced by Samuel Goldwyn. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ...

Radio

Broadcast from January to December 1949, "The Damon Runyon Theatre" dramatized 52 of Runyon's short stories for radio.


Literary Style

The near total avoidance of past tense (it is used only once, in the short story "The Lily of St Pierre") is not the only oddity of Runyon's use of tense; he also avoided the conditional, using instead the future indicative in situations that would normally require conditional. An example: "Now most any doll on Broadway will be very glad indeed to have Handsome Jack Madigan give her a tumble ..." (Guys and dolls, "Social error"). There is an homage to Runyon that makes use of this peculiarity ("Chronic Offender" by Spider Robinson) which involves a time machine. Grammatical tense is a way languages express the time at which an event described by a sentence occurs. ... Spider Robinson (born November 24, 1948 in New York City) is a Canadian science fiction writer. ... A time machine is a device for traveling through time. ...


Some examples of Runyonesque slang terms include the following:

  • pineapple—pineapple grenade
  • roscoe/john roscoe/the old equalizer/that thing—gun
  • shiv—knife
  • noggin—head
  • snoot—nose

There are many recurring composite phrases such as: Grenade may refer to: The well-known hand grenade commonly used by soldiers. ...

  • ever-loving wife (occasionally "ever-loving doll")
  • more than somewhat (or "no little, and quite some")
  • loathe and despise
  • one and all

Runyon's stories also employ occasional rhyming slang, similar to the cockney variety but native to New York (e.g.: "Miss Missouri Martin makes the following crack one night to her: ‘Well, I do not see any Simple Simon on your lean and linger.’ This is Miss Missouri Martin’s way of saying she sees no diamond on Miss Billy Perry’s finger.” (from "Romance in the Roaring Forties").


The comic effect of his style results partly from the juxtaposition of broad slang with mock-pomposity. Women, when not "dolls" (or "Judies", "pancakes", "tomatoes", "broads" etc.), may be "characters of a female nature".


Legacy

The 2005 Telethon on Seven Perth. ... Milton Berle (July 12, 1908 - March 27, 2002) was an Emmy-winning American comedian who was born Milton Berlinger. ... Riley County Courthouse, Manhattan Manhattan is a town located in northeastern Kansas at the junction of the Kansas River and Big Blue River. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... For the processor with the same codename , see Athlon. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Aqueduct Racetrack, known as the Big A, is a horse racetrack in the neighborhood of Ozone Park in the New York City borough of Queens. ... Leo Seltzer was the creator of the unique sport called Roller Derby and was the founder of the original Roller Derby League in 1935. ... Blading redirects here. ...

See also

  • World War I draft card

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (830x570, 80 KB)Alfred Damon Runyan (1884-1946) World War I draft File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Listen to

  • Damon Runyon Theater radio shows (all 52 episodes)

References

  1. ^ Philip Pullman, Nick Hardcastle (1998). Detective stories. Kingfisher Publications. ISBN 0753456362. 
  2. ^ Turczyn, Coury. "Blood on the Tracks", Metro Pulse, 1999-01-28. Retrieved on 2008-02-11.  (link points to the archived article in the Spring 2000 edition of the author's own PopCult Magazine Web site) “The faster skaters would break out and try and get laps so they would get ahead in the race, and some of the slower skaters started to band together to try and hold them back,” says Seltzer. “And at first, they didn’t want to let them do that–but then the people liked it so much, they kind of allowed blocking. Then they came down to Miami–I think it was 1936, early ’37–and Damon Runyon, a very famous sports writer, saw it and he sat down with my father and hammered out the rules, almost exactly as they are today.”

Metro Pulse is a weekly newspaper in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Damon Runyon
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... This is a list of members of the Baseball Hall of Fame, in order of induction. ... official logo The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... Joseph Michael Medwick (November 24, 1911 - March 21, 1975), nicknamed Ducky, was an American player in Major League Baseball. ... The Veterans Committee, officially the Committee on Baseball Veterans, is a committee of the National Baseball Hall of Fame that provides a second chance for Hall of Fame election to players passed over in regular Hall of Fame balloting. ... Hazen Shirley Kiki Cuyler (b. ... Leon Allen Goslin (October 16, 1900 – May 15, 1971), better known as Goose Goslin, was a left fielder in Major League Baseball known for his powerful left-handed swing and dependable clutch hitting. ... The J. G. Taylor Spink Award is the highest award given by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) to its members. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Damon Runyon (1287 words)
Damon Runyon was born in Manhattan, Kansas, but he grew up in Pueblo, Colorado.
Runyon was educated in public schools before being expelled from the sixth grade.
Runyon's underworld stories became popular and his feature 'As I See It' was syndicated in the Hearst newspapers across the country.
Damon Runyon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1366 words)
Damon Runyon (October 4, 1884 – December 10, 1946) was a newspaperman and writer.
Runyon's marriage to Ellen Egan produced two children (Mary and Damon, Jr.), and broke up in 1928 over rumors that Runyon had become infatuated with a Mexican girl he had first met while covering the Pancho Villa raids in 1916 and discovered once again in New York, when she called the American seeking him out.
The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, established in his honor, was set up to fund promising scientists in the field of cancer research.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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