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Encyclopedia > Dalmatia
Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia.
Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia.

Dalmatia (Croatian: Dalmacija; Latin: Dalmatia) is a region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, situated mostly in modern Croatia and spreading between the island of Rab in the northwest and the Gulf of Kotor (Montenegro) in the southeast. The hinterland, Dalmatinska Zagora, ranges from fifty kilometers in width in the north to just a few kilometers wide in the south. Bosnia has a few kilometers of seashore in southern Dalmatia. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Croatia with Dalmatia highlighted. ... Croatia with Dalmatia highlighted. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... Rab (Croatia) Coat of arms The historic town center of Rab For other uses, see Rab (disambiguation). ... Historic map of the Gulf, 16th century Gulf of Kotor or the Bay of Kotor (Serbian and Croatian: Бока которска Boka kotorska, Italian: ) in western Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Zagora or Dalmatinska Zagora (Dalmatian Zagora), sometimes also called Inner Dalmatia, is a the southern inland region of Croatia. ... This article is about the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...


Croatian Dalmatia is currently composed of four counties, the primary cities of which are Zadar, Šibenik, Split and Dubrovnik. Other large cities in Dalmatia include Biograd, Kaštela, Sinj, Solin, Omiš, Knin, Metković, Makarska, Trogir, Ploče, Trilj and Imotski. For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... Å ibenik Å ibenik (German: Sibenning, Italian: Sebenico) is an historic town in Croatia, population 51,553 (2001). ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ... Coat of arms Biograd na Moru is a town in northern Dalmatia, Croatia. ... KaÅ¡tela is a series of seven towns in central Dalmatia, located northeast of Split, east of Solin and west of Trogir, in Croatia. ... Sinj (Croatia) Sinj is a town in the continental part of Split-Dalmatia county, Croatia, at . ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... OmiÅ¡ on the map of Croatia OmiÅ¡ (Population: 15,800 ; Area: 266 km2 (103 mi2) - the City and port in Dalmatia, Croatia (Dalmacija, Hrvatska) located approximately 25 km (16 miles) south-east of the Croatias second largest City of Split. ... Knin Knin (Croatia) Knin (Serbian: Книн, Latin and medieval Hungarian: Tinin) is a historical town in the Å ibenik-Knin county of Croatia, located near the source of the river Krka at , in the Dalmatian hinterland, on the railroad Zagreb–Split. ... Metković is a city in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county of Croatia, with a population of 13,873, while its whole municipality has 15,384 inhabitants (2001). ... County Split-Dalmatia County Area 28 km² Geographic Coordinates Population 13,418(2004) Mayor SiniÅ¡a Srzić Makarska (Croatia) Makarska municipality within Split-Dalmatia county Makarska ( ) is a small town on the Adriatic coastline of Croatia, about 60 km southeast of Split and 140 km northwest of Dubrovnik. ... Coat of arms Trogir (Italian Traù, Latin Tragurium, Greek Tragurion, Hungarian Tengerfehérvár) is a historic town and harbour on the Adriatic coast in Split-Dalmatia county, Croatia, with a population of 10,907 (2001) and a total municipality population of 13,322 (2001). ... A ploce is a figure of speech in which a word is separated or repeated by way of emphasis. ... Trilj is a town in inland Dalmatia, Croatia. ... Imotski is a small town in the Dalmatian hinterland, population 4,347, total municipality population 10,213 (2001). ...


The largest Dalmatian islands include Dugi Otok, Ugljan, Pašman, Brač, Hvar, Korčula, Vis, Lastovo and Mljet. The largest Dalmatian mountains are Dinara, Mosor, Svilaja, Biokovo, Moseć and Kozjak. The rivers are Zrmanja, Krka, Cetina and Neretva. Dugi Otok Dugi Otok (Croatian for Long Island) is an island in the Adriatic Sea, part of Croatia. ... Ugljan is an Adriatic Sea island in the Zadar Archipelago, northwest of the island of PaÅ¡man and southeast of the islands of Rivanj and Sestrunj; area 50. ... Pasman is an island off the coast of Croatia. ... Location of Brač Brač (pronounced as Bra-tch; Latin Bratzis, Italian Brazza) is an island in the Adriatic Sea within Croatia, with an area of 396 km², making it the third largest island in the Adriatic, and thus the largest in Dalmatia. ... Hvar (Croatia) For the acronym, see HVAR. Hvar (Lesina in Italian) is a Croatian island in the Adriatic Sea, located off the Dalmatian coast. ... County Dubrovnik–Neretva Area 279 km² (entire island) Location Mayor Mirko Duhović (SDP) Population 3,232 (town); 16,138 (island) Korčula (Italian Curzola, Latin Corcyra Nigra, Greek Korkyra Melaina, Old-Slavic: Krkar) is an island in the Adriatic Sea, in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county of Croatia. ... Vis is a Croatian island in the Adriatic Sea, the furthest one from the coast that is also inhabited. ... Map showing the location of Lastovo in Croatia Lastovo (Italian: Lagosta, Latin: Augusta Insula, Greek: Ladestanos, Illyrian: Ladest) is an island, town and municipality in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county in Croatia. ... Mljet (Latin Melita, Italian Meleda) is the most southerly and easterly of the larger Adriatic islands of the Dalmatia region of Croatia. ... Dinara is one of the more prominent mountains located on the border of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Biokovo, a view from Tučepi. ... Zrmanja is a river in northern Dalmatia, Croatia. ... Skradinski buk Krka is a river in Croatias Dalmatia region, with length circa 73 km; famous for its numerous waterfalls. ... Cetina is a river in central Dalmatia, Croatia. ... River Neretva in Mostar, 2004 Neretva is a river in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia. ...


Because of the way sea currents and winds flow, the sea water of the Adriatic is, according to Croatian tourist authorities, cleaner and warmer on the Croatian side than it is on the Italian side.[citation needed] The Dalmatian concordant coastline also includes an immense number of coves, islands and channels. This makes it an attractive place for nautical races and nautical tourism in general. There is also a large number of marinas. Sea water is water from a sea or ocean. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... A concordant coastline is a coastline where bands of different rock types run parallel to the shore. ... Insert non-formatted text here Lulworth Cove, Dorset England This article is about the coastal feature. ... Simplified diagram A strait is a narrow channel of water that connects two larger bodies of water, and thus lies between two land masses. ... tourism by boat ... A small marina at Brixham, Devon, England. ...


Dalmatia also includes several national parks that are tourist attractions: Paklenica karst river, Kornati archipelago, Krka river rapids and Mljet island. Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada A national park is a reserve of land, usually, but not always (see National Parks of England and Wales), declared and owned by a national government, protected from most human development and pollution. ... Categories: Croatian geography stubs | National parks of Croatia ... Kornati Islands The Croatian Kornati archipelago (Italian: ) is located in central Dalmatia, south of Zadar. ... Categories: Croatian geography stubs | National parks of Croatia ... Mljet (Latin Melita, Italian Meleda) is the most southerly and easterly of the larger Adriatic islands of the Dalmatia region of Croatia. ...

Contents

Definitions

Ethnic map of Dalmatia in 2001
Ethnic map of Dalmatia in 2001

The historical region of Dalmatia was much larger than the present-day Dalmatia, stretching from Istria to historical Albania. Dalmatia signified not only a geographical unit, but it was an entity based on common culture and settlement types, a common narrow eastern Adriatic coastal belt, Mediterranean climate, sclerophyllous vegetation of the Illyrian province, Adriatic carbonate platform, and karst geomorphology. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 669 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1096 × 982 pixel, file size: 53 KB, MIME type: image/png)This is modified map of this map from Serbian Wikipedia: http://sr. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 669 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1096 × 982 pixel, file size: 53 KB, MIME type: image/png)This is modified map of this map from Serbian Wikipedia: http://sr. ... Istria (Croatian and Slovenian: Istra, Venetian and Italian: Istria), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ...  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is a climate that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin. ... Arid, largely treeless areas aside, most Australian bushland is sclerophyll forest. ... This article is about an ancient civilization in southeastern Europe; see also Illyria (software), Illyria (character in the TV series Angel). ... A carbonate platform is a geologic structure composed of carbonate sediments that have accumulated and lithified over a long period of time. ... Karst topography occurs when a landscape is marked by underground drainage patterns. ... Surface of the Earth Geomorphology is the study of landforms, including their origin and evolution, and the processes that shape them. ...


Among other things, the ecclesiastical primatical territory today continues to be larger because of the history: it includes part of modern Montenegro (another former republic of Yugoslavia), notably around Bar (Antivari), the (honorary) Roman Catholic primas of Dalmatia, but an exempt archbishopric without suffragans while the archbishoprics of Split (also a historical primas of Dalmatia) have provincial authority over all Croatian dioceses except the exempt archbishopric of Zadar. Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Coordinates Mayor Žarko Pavićević (DPS - SDP) Municipality area 598 km² Population (2003 census)  - city  - municipality  - density 13,719 40,037 67. ... A primate in the Western Church is an archbishop or bishop who has authority not just over the bishops of his own province, as a Metropolitan does, but over a number of provinces, such as a national church. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... A bishop is an ordained person who holds a specific position of authority in any of a number of Christian churches. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ...


The southernmost transitional part of historical Dalmatia, the Gulf of Kotor, is not part of present-day Croatian Dalmatia, but part of Montenegro. The regional coherent geographical unit of historical Dalmatia, the coastal region between Istria and the Gulf of Kotor, includes the Orjen mountain whose peak at 1894 m is the highest point, even if it is part of Montenegro. If we take present-day Dalmatia only as a geographical unit, the highest peak would be Dinara (1913 m), which is not a coastal mountain. On the other hand, Biokovo (Sv. Jure 1762 m) and Velebit (Vaganjski vrh 1758 m) are coastal Dinaric mountains but not as high as Orjen. In the tectonical sense, Orjen is the highest mountain of Austro-Hungarian province Dalmatia, while Biokovo is the highest mountain of the administrative unit of Split-Dalmatia county. Historic map of the Gulf, 16th century Gulf of Kotor or the Bay of Kotor (Serbian and Croatian: Бока которска Boka kotorska, Italian: ) in western Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Istria (Croatian and Slovenian: Istra, Venetian and Italian: Istria), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ... Orjen (42. ... Dinara is one of the more prominent mountains located on the border of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Biokovo, a view from Tučepi. ... The middle part of Velebit Velebit is the largest though not the highest mountain range in Croatia. ...


History

History of Dalmatia Croatia with Dalmatia highlighted. ... This is the history of Dalmatia. ...

Dalmatae
Dalmatia (Roman province)
Pagania
Republic of Ragusa
Republic of Poljica
Illyrian provinces
Kingdom of Dalmatia
Littoral Banovina
Main article: History of Dalmatia

Dalmatia (Croatian Dalmacija, Italian Dalmazia, Serbian Далмација) is a region of Croatia on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, spreading between the island of Pag in the northwest and the Bay of Kotor in the southeast. ... Dalmatia province, Roman Empire Roman Dalmatia and surrounding areas Dalmatia was an ancient Roman province. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Borders of the Republic of Ragusa, 1426-1808 Capital Ragusa Language(s) Latin, Italian since 1492 Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Duke  - 1808 Auguste Marmont Historical era Renaissance  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Invasion by France January 31, 1808  - Annexed October 14, 1808 Area  - 1808? 1,500 km2 579... Poljica republic or principality (croatian: Poljička republika) existed in the late Middle Ages and the early modern period in central Dalmatia, near modern-day OmiÅ¡, Croatia (then often referred to as Almissa). ... Illyrian Provinces (French Provinces illyriennes) were formed in 1809 when Austria ceded with the Treaty of Schoenbrunn its lands Carinthia, Carniola, Croatia southwest of the river Sava, Gorizia and Trieste to France after the defeat at the Battle of Wagram. ... Dalmatia (Croatian Dalmacija, Italian Dalmazia, Serbian Далмација) is a region of Croatia on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, spreading between the island of Pag in the northwest and the Bay of Kotor in the southeast. ... Map showing Yugoslav banovinas in 1929 (The Littoral Banovina is coloured purple, on the left part of the map) The Littoral Banovina or Littoral Banate (Croatian and Bosnian: Primorska banovina) was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1939. ... This is the history of Dalmatia. ...

Classical antiquity

Main article: Dalmatia (Roman province)
Dalmatia province, Roman Empire
Dalmatia province, Roman Empire

Dalmatia's name is probably derived from the name of an Illyrian tribe called the Dalmatae which lived in the area of the eastern Adriatic coast in the 1st millennium BCE. It was part of the Illyrian kingdom between the 4th century BCE until the Illyrian Wars in the 220s BCE and 168 BCE when the Roman Republic established its protectorate south of the river Neretva. The area north of the Neretva was slowly incorporated into Roman possessions until the province of Illyricum was formally established c. 32-27 BCE. Dalmatia province, Roman Empire Roman Dalmatia and surrounding areas Dalmatia was an ancient Roman province. ... Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Shortcut: WP:NPOVD Articles that have been linked to this page are the subject of an NPOV dispute (NPOV stands for Neutral Point Of View; see below). ... created from Image:REmpire-Noricum. ... created from Image:REmpire-Noricum. ... Illyria (disambiguation) Illyrians has come to refer to a broad, ill-defined Indo-European[1] group of peoples who inhabited the western Balkans (Illyria, roughly from northern Epirus to southern Pannonia) and even perhaps parts of Southern Italy in classical times into the Common era, and spoke Illyrian languages. ... Dalmatia (Croatian Dalmacija, Italian Dalmazia, Serbian Далмација) is a region of Croatia on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, spreading between the island of Pag in the northwest and the Bay of Kotor in the southeast. ... The Adriatic Sea is an arm of the Mediterranean Sea separating the Apennine peninsula (Italy) from the Balkan peninsula, and the system of the Apennine Mountains from that of the Dinaric Alps and adjacent ranges. ... (Redirected from 1st millennium BCE) (2nd millennium BC – 1st millennium BC – 1st millennium AD – other millennia) Events The Iron Age began in Western Egypt declined as a major power The Tanakh was written Buddhism was founded Cyrus the Great conquered Babylon and created the Persian Empire (6th... Location of Illyria Illyria (Albanian Iliria Land of the Free; Ancient Greek ; Latin Illyria [1] (see also Illyricum) was in Classical antiquity a region in the western part of todays Balkan Peninsula, founded by the tribes and clans of Illyrians, an ancient people who spoke the Illyrian languages. ... (5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Invasion of the Celts into Ireland Kingdom of Macedon conquers Persian empire Romans build first aqueduct Chinese use bellows The Scythians are beginning to be absorbed into the Sarmatian... In the Illyrian Wars of 229 BC and 219 BC, Rome overran the Illyrian settlements in the Neretva river valley and suppressed the piracy that had made the Adriatic unsafe. ... (Redirected from 220s BCE) Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC - 220s BC - 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 229 BC 228 BC 227 BC 226 BC 225 BC 224 BC... This article refers to the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For alternate meanings, see Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... River Neretva in Mostar, 2004 Neretva is a river in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia. ... This article is about an ancient civilization in southeastern Europe; see also Illyria (software), Illyria (character in the TV series Angel). ...


Dalmatia then became part of the Roman province of Illyricum. In 9 CE the Dalmatians raised the last in a series of revolts together with the Pannonians, but it was finally crushed, and in 10 CE, Illyricum was split into two provinces, Pannonia and Dalmatia. The province of Dalmatia spread inland to cover all of the Dinaric Alps and most of the eastern Adriatic coast. Dalmatia was later the birthplace of the Roman Emperor Diocletian. The Roman Empire ca. ... For other uses, see 9 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see 10 (disambiguation). ... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... Mt Orjen at the Bay of Kotor is the heaviest karstified range of the dinarids View of the central part of the Dinaric Alps (north=down) Valbona pass, northern Albania. ... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (c. ...


The historian Theodore Mommsen wrote (in his The Provinces of the Roman Empire) that all Dalmatia was fully romanized and Latin-speaking by the fourth century. Theodor Mommsen Theodor Mommsen Christian Matthias Theodor Mommsen (30 November 1817 - 1 November 1903) was a German classical scholar and historian, generally regarded as the greatest classicist of the 19th century. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...

Roman Dalmatia and surrounding areas

After the Western Roman Empire collapsed in 476, with the beginning of the Migration Period, the region was ruled by the Goths up to 535, when Justinian I added all Dalmatia to the Byzantine Empire. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 740 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2817 × 2284 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 740 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2817 × 2284 pixel, file size: 1. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus The Western Roman Empire in 395. ... Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... Human migration denotes any movement of groups of people from one locality to another, rather than of individual wanderers. ... This article is about the Germanic tribes. ... Events Beginning of the Western Wei Dynasty in China. ... This article is about the Roman emperor. ... “Byzantine” redirects here. ...


Middle Ages

The Avars invasions of the sixth century devastated all Dalmatia, and the decimated romanized Dalmatians survived only in the mountains, as shepherds called morlachs. The main city of the Roman Dalmatia, Salona, never recovered from the destruction. Some of these romanized Dalmatians took refuge in the Dalmatian islands, where they founded new small cities (as was done in Italy with Venice) and maintained a Romance language, called Dalmatian language, until the Renaissance. With the barbarian Avars came tribes of Slavs, who settled in the depopulated areas of Dalmatia under the orders of the Avar kings. The Eurasian Avars were a nomadic people of Eurasia who established a state in the Danube River area of Europe in the early 6th century. ... Morlachs (in Greek: Mavrovlachi or Mauro-Vlachs, meaning Black Vlachs; in Latin sources: Nigri Latini) were a population of Vlach shepherds that lived in the Dinaric Alps (western Balkans in modern use), constantly migrating in search for better pastures for their sheep flocks. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Dalmatian is an extinct Romance language formerly spoken in the Dalmatia region of Croatia, and as far south as Kotor (Cattaro) in Montenegro. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... The Eurasian Avars were a nomadic people of Eurasia who established a state in the Danube River area of Europe in the early 6th century. ...


Arrival of the Slavs

The Slavs started organizing their domain into increasingly powerful states. The Croats controlled the northern and central part of Dalmatia at the time and by the 10th century became an independent kingdom which persisted until the turn of the 12th century. The southern sections of inland Dalmatia were more fragmented, with the Duchies of Pagania (Narenta or the Principality of Narentines), Zahumlje (Hum), Travunia and Doclea/Zeta being occasionally prominent, especially in the later periods. The Serbian state of Rascia expanded at the expense of Travunia and Pagania in the 10th century. Zahumlje became a vassal of the new Croatian Kingdom in the early 10th century, while the Paganians joined the Croats in statehood in 1050. After the fall of Serbia in the second half of the 10th century, Duklja took over the leadership in the eastern part of the region creating a large kingdom in 1077. The Croatian Kingdom had its capital cities in Dalmatia: Biaći, Nin, Biograd, Šibenik (founded as a port of the Croatian kingdom, while Byzantium controlled Trogir and Split) Knin, Split, Omiš, Klis, Solin. In 1166-1168 the Serbian Grand Duke Stefan Nemanja took rule over the southern Dalmatian duchies.Croatian dukes and the Kingdom of Croatia ruled much of Dalmatia for extended periods from the ninth through to the eleventh centuries. Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... The Croatian people trace their origins to Slavic peoples which moved into the territory of the former Roman provinces Pannonia and Dalmatia between the 7th and 8th centuries, and formed dukedoms. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Zahumlje in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Zahumlje, also known as the Land of Hum and Chelm, was a medieval South Slavic principality located in todays Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ... Travunia in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Travunia (Travunija, Travunja; Latin: Terbounia) was a medieval Slavic realm centered at Trebinje in todays eastern Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... RaÅ¡ka (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Look up vassal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Croatian people trace their origins to Slavic peoples which moved into the territory of the former Roman provinces Pannonia and Dalmatia between the 7th and 8th centuries, and formed dukedoms. ... Leofric becomes Bishop of Exeter Hedeby is sacked by King Harald Hardraade of Norway during the course of a conflict with King Eric Estridsson of Denmark. ... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... Events January 26 - Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor visits Pope Gregory VII as a penitent, asking him remove sentence of excommunication Robert Curthose instigates his first insurrection against his father, William the Conqueror Seljuk Turks capture Nicaea Süleyman I of Rüm becomes the leader of the Sultanate of... Nin may refer to: Look up nin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Biograd na Moru is a city in Zadar County, Dalmatia, Croatia ... Å ibenik Å ibenik (German: Sibenning, Italian: Sebenico) is an historic town in Croatia, population 51,553 (2001). ... Coat of arms Trogir (Italian Traù, Latin Tragurium, Greek Tragurion, Hungarian Tengerfehérvár) is a historic town and harbour on the Adriatic coast in Split-Dalmatia county, Croatia, with a population of 10,907 (2001) and a total municipality population of 13,322 (2001). ... Knin Knin (Croatia) Knin (Serbian: Книн, Latin and medieval Hungarian: Tinin) is a historical town in the Å ibenik-Knin county of Croatia, located near the source of the river Krka at , in the Dalmatian hinterland, on the railroad Zagreb–Split. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... OmiÅ¡ on the map of Croatia OmiÅ¡ (Population: 15,800 ; Area: 266 km2 (103 mi2) - the City and port in Dalmatia, Croatia (Dalmacija, Hrvatska) located approximately 25 km (16 miles) south-east of the Croatias second largest City of Split. ... Klis (Italian Clissa) is a village in central Dalmatia, Croatia, located just northeast of Solin and Split near the eponymous mountain pass. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... // Events Marko III succeeds Yoannis V as patriarch of Alexandria. ... // Events December 22 - Afraid that Old Cairo would be captured by the Crusaders, its Caliph orders the city set afire. ... Stefan Nemanja (Old Church Slavonic: Стѣфань, Serbian: Стефан Немања, pronounced ) (1109-13 February 1199) was a Medieval Serb nobleman, descended from the Vukanović who was Grand Prince (Serbian: Велики Жупан) of the medieval Serb state of Rascia (Рашка) in 1166-1199. ... The Croatian people trace their origins to Slavic peoples which moved into the territory of the former Roman provinces Pannonia and Dalmatia between the 7th and 8th centuries, and formed dukedoms. ... The Croatian Kingdom existed between 925 and 1102 and was ruled mostly by native Croats Trpimirović dynasty. ...


Rivalry between Venice, Byzantium, Croatia and Hungary

The Romance population of Dalmatia started to develop coastal cities like Dubrovnik and Zadar, where the maritime commerce promoted a rich and powerful development. Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ...


The Republic of Venice made several attempts from the tenth century to attain control of the Dalmatian islands and city-states, while Byzantium also preserved an influence on them. This Byzantine influence faded towards the end of the eleventh century, by which time the Kingdom of Hungary also expanded its influence southwards when Croatia yielded to Hungarian rule resulting in the Pacta conventa agreement. Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pacta conventa (Lat. ...


The 13th, 14th and 15th centuries were marked by a rivalry between Venice and the Hungarian kingdom, as the Byzantine influence had fully faded.


In 1346, Dalmatia was struck by the Black Death. The economic situation was also poor, and the cities became more and more dependent on Venice. During this period, Dalmatia was briefly ruled by Croatian magnates Šubić[citation needed], the first Bosnian kings , and contested by the Angevins and Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor in the early 15th century, but the end result of this conflict was that the Venetians took control of most of Dalmatia by 1420. // Events Serbian Empire was proclaimed in Skopje by Dusan Silni, occupying much of the South-Eastern Europe Foundation of the University of Valladolid Foundation of Pembroke College, University of Cambridge August 26 Battle of Crecy after which Edward the Black Prince honored the bravery of John I, Count of Luxemburg... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... Coat of Arms of the Breberienses The Å ubić were one of the twelve tribes which constituted Croatian statehood in the Middle Ages; they held the county of Bribir (Varvaria) in inland Dalmatia. ... Angevin (IPA: ) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. ... Sigismund, aged approximately 50, depicted by unknown artist in the 1420s — the only contemporary portrait. ... Events May 21 - Treaty of Troyes. ...


Venetian Dalmatia, Republic of Ragusa (Dubrovnik), and Ottoman conquests

Republic of Ragusa (Dubrovnik) before 1808
Republic of Ragusa (Dubrovnik) before 1808

The Republic of Venice controlled most of Dalmatia from 1420 to 1797. The Venetian possessions were called "Venetian Dalmatia" and enjoyed a flourishing period of economic bonanza with huge development of the arts. In these centuries, the Venetian language became the lingua franca of all the Adriatic Balkans, assimilating the Dalmatian language and influencing partially even the coastal Croatian language and the Albanian language. The most southern area of Dalmatia was called Albania Veneta in those centuries. Image File history File links Dubrovacka_republika01. ... Image File history File links Dubrovacka_republika01. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dalmatian is an extinct Romance language formerly spoken in the Dalmatia region of Croatia, and as far south as Kotor (Cattaro) in Montenegro. ... Croatian language (hrvatski jezik) is a South Slavic language which is used primarily by the inhabitants of Croatia and Croats in Bosnia and Herzegovina and parts of the Croatian diaspora. ... Albanian ( IPA ) is a language spoken by about 7-8 million people, primarily in Albania and Kosovo, but also in other parts of the Balkans with an Albanian population (parts of the Republic of Macedonia, and some parts in Montenegro and Serbia), along the eastern coast of Italy and in... The Republic of Venice in 1560 and the Albania veneta shown as the pink area south of the Republic of Ragusa around Cattaro (Kotor) Albania Veneta (English: Venetian Albania) was the name for the possessions of the Republic of Venice in southern Dalmatia from 1420 to 1797. ...


The southern city of Dubrovnik (then called Ragusa) had managed to achieve complete independence as the Republic of Ragusa and preserved it despite the numerous foreign invasions. The Dalmatian language spoken in Ragusa was assimilated into Venetian by the thirteenth century, but was kept alive by the Senate and part of the nobility ("Gospari"), which declared its Ragusan dialect the only language allowed in the governing body. Croats started were settling in the city in large numbers by then, especially in an outskirt (called "Dubrovnik") of this city-state. The city's official name was Ragusa and was changed to Dubrovnik in 1918 with the fall of Austria-Hungary and the incorporation of the area into the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, later called the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ... Borders of the Republic of Ragusa, 1426-1808 Capital Ragusa Language(s) Latin, Italian since 1492 Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Duke  - 1808 Auguste Marmont Historical era Renaissance  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Invasion by France January 31, 1808  - Annexed October 14, 1808 Area  - 1808? 1,500 km2 579... Dalmatian is an extinct Romance language formerly spoken in the Dalmatia region of Croatia, and as far south as Kotor (Cattaro) in Montenegro. ... Venetian could mean of Venice of the venetia territory of the Republic of Venice of the venet nation the Venetian language The Venetian, a hotel and casino in Las Vegas, Nevada A venetian blind - a horizontally slatted window blind. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander...


The Ottoman wars in Europe had started affecting the area in the mid-15th century, and when the Venetian and Ottoman frontiers met, border wars became incessant. The Turks took control of much of the hinterland and helped the Republic of Ragusa maintain its independence, but under their suzerainty. The Ottoman invasion further contributed to the inclusion of the Croats in the cities, who were a minority in the coastal cities of Dalmatia in these centuries. The wars of the Ottoman Empire in Europe marked the better part of the history of southeastern Europe, notably, giving infamy to the Balkans. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... “Ottoman” redirects here. ... Suzerainty refers to a situation in which a region or people is a tributary to a more powerful entity which allows the tributary some limited domestic autonomy but controls its foreign affairs. ...


After the expansion of the Ottoman Empire was finally contained in the Great Turkish War at the turn of the 18th century, Dalmatia experienced a period of certain economic and cultural growth in the 18th century, as the trade routes with the hinterland were reestablished in peace. Slav and Albanian Christians also migrated from the Ottoman-held territory into the Christian-ruled Venice, changing the ethnic balance of the population and so reducing the percentage of Venetian-speaking people in Dalmatia. “Ottoman” redirects here. ... The Great Turkish War refers to a series of conflicts between the Ottoman Empire and contemporary European powers, then joined into a Holy League, during the second half of the 17th century. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


Modern Times

Napoleonic France

This period was abruptly interrupted with the fall of the Republic of Venice in 1797. Napoleon's troops stormed the region and ended the independence of the Republic of Ragusa as well, but saving it from occupation by the Russian Empire and Montenegro. Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Borders of the Republic of Ragusa, 1426-1808 Capital Ragusa Language(s) Latin, Italian since 1492 Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Duke  - 1808 Auguste Marmont Historical era Renaissance  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Invasion by France January 31, 1808  - Annexed October 14, 1808 Area  - 1808? 1,500 km2 579... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006...

The Venetian Dalmatia was part of the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy in 1805.
The Venetian Dalmatia was part of the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy in 1805.

In 1805, Napoleon created his Kingdom of Italy around the Adriatic Sea, annexing to it the former Venetian Dalmatia from Istria to Cattaro (Kotor). In 1809 he removed the Venetian Dalmatia from his Kingdom of Italy and created the Illyrian Provinces, which were annexed to France, and created his marshal Nicolas Soult duke of Dalmatia. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The flag of the Kingdom of Italy was a rectangular version of the flag of the Italian Republic, with Napoleons emblem on the green field. ... Nicolas Jean de Dieu Soult, duc de Dalmatie (March 29, 1769 – November 26, 1851) was a French general and statesman, named Marshal of France in 1804. ...


Napoleon's rule in Dalmatia was marked with many wars, which caused many rebellions. On the other side, French rule contributed a lot to the Italian and Croatian national awakenings (the first newspaper in Italian and Croatian was issued then, the Il Regio Dalmata-Kraglski Dalmatin in Zara). French rule brought a lot of improvements in infrastructure; many roads were built or reconstructed. Napoleon himself blamed Marechal Marmont, the governor of Dalmatia, that too much money was spent on Dalmatia. Auguste Frédéric Louis Viesse de Marmont, Marshal of France. ...


Austria-Hungary

Dalmatia and Croatia-Slavonia (red and pink) from 1868 to 1918
"Map of Dalmatia, Croatia, and Sclavonia. Engraved by Weller for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge under the Supervision of Charles Knight, dated Jan 1. 1852."

At the Congress of Vienna in 1815, Dalmatia was granted as a province to the Emperor of Austria. It was officially known as the Kingdom of Dalmatia. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (826x798, 117 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (826x798, 117 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Coat of arms Slavonia (Croatian: Slavonija) is a geographical and historical region in eastern Croatia. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Map of Croatia with Slavonia highlighted Historic Coat of arms of Slavonia Slavonia (Croatian: Slavonija) is a geographical and historical region in eastern Croatia. ... The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge was founded in 1828 in London, mainly at the instigation of Lord Brougham with the objects of publishing information to people who were unable to obtain formal teaching, or who preferred self-education. ... The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from late September, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Dalmatia (Croatian Dalmacija, Italian Dalmazia, Serbian Далмација) is a region of Croatia on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, spreading between the island of Pag in the northwest and the Bay of Kotor in the southeast. ...


In 1848, the Croatian Assembly (Sabor) published the People's Requests, in which they requested among other things the abolition of serfdom and the unification of Dalmatia and Croatia. The Dubrovnik Municipality was the most outspoken of all the Dalmatian communes in its support for unification with Croatia. A letter was sent from Dubrovnik to Zagreb with pledges to work for this idea. In 1849, Dubrovnik continued to lead the Dalmatian cities in the struggle for unification. A large-scale campaign was launched in the Dubrovnik paper L'Avvenire (The Future) based on a clearly formulated programme: the federal system for the Habsburg territories, the inclusion of Dalmatia into Croatia and the Slavic brotherhood. The president of the council of Kingdom of Dalmatia was the politician Baron Biagio Ghetaldi. Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


In the same year, the first issue of the Dubrovnik almanac appeared, Flower of the National Literature (Dubrovnik, cvijet narodnog književstva), in which Petar Preradović published his noted poem "To Dubrovnik". This and other literary and journalistic texts, which continued to be published, contributed to the awakening of the national consciousness reflected in efforts to introduce the Croatian language into schools and offices, and to promote Croatian books. The Emperor Franz Joseph brought the so-called Imposed Constitution which prohibited the unification of Dalmatia and Croatia and also any further political activity with this end in view. The political struggle of Dubrovnik to be united with Croatia, which was intense throughout 1848 and 1849, did not succeed at that time. Petar Preradović (March 19, 1818 - August 18, 1872) was a Croatian poet. ... Franz Joseph I (in Hungarian I. Ferenc József, in English Francis Joseph I) (August 18, 1830 – November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria, Apostolic King of Hungary, King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and a German prince (Deutscher Fürst). ...


In 1861 was the meeting of the first Dalmatian Assembly, with representatives from Dubrovnik. Representatives of Kotor (the Venetian "Cattaro") came to Dubrovnik to join the struggle for unification with Croatia. The citizens of Dubrovnik gave them a festive welcome, flying Croatian flags from the ramparts and exhibiting the slogan: Ragusa with Cattaro (Kotor). The Kotorans elected a delegation to go to Vienna; Dubrovnik nominated Niko Pucić. Niko Pucic went to Vienna to demand not only the unification of Dalmatia with Croatia, but also the unification of all Croatian territories under one common Assembly. Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1883 was the death of politician Niko Pucić (born 1820). He was a member of the Croatian Assembly and champion of the unification of Dalmatia (particularly Dubrovnik) with Croatia. He was the editor of the review Ragusa and founder of the review Slovinac. In the same year died Ivan August Kaznacić (born 1817), publicist and promoter of the Illyrian cause. He edited the review Zora dalmatinska (Dalmatian Dawn) and founded the Dubrovnik review L'Avvenire. Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Niko Pucić (also Conte Pozza) (February 9, 1820 - March 13, 1883) was a Croatian politician from Dalmatia. ...


In 1893, the minister of the city, the Baron Francesco Ghetaldi-Gondola, opened the monument for Ivan Gundulić in Piazza Gundulic (Gondola). Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Francesco Ghetaldi-Gondola (II) August 8, 1833 was the son of Segismondo Ghetaldi-Gondola and Malvina Orsola Bosdari. ... The unveiling of the Gundulić monument in Dubrovnik on May 20, 1893, was a symbolical event in the political history of Dubrovnik, since it brought to the surface the wider tensions between the Croats and the Serbs in the pre-World War I political struggles in the region. ...


At the same time, part of the population of the coastal cities identified themselves with Italian ethnicity and gave rise to irredentistic movements, especially around Zadar, called Zara in Italian. irredentism is position advocating annexation of territories administered by another state on the grounds of common ethnicity and/or prior historical possession, actual or alleged. ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ...


After 1918

In the First World War, the Austrian Empire disintegrated, and Dalmatia was again split between the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (later the Kingdom of Yugoslavia) which controlled most of it, and the Kingdom of Italy which held small portions of northern Dalmatia around Zadar and the islands of Cres, Lošinj and Lastovo. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Motto: One nation, one king, one country Anthem: Medley of Bože pravde, Lijepa naÅ¡a domovino, and Naprej zastava slave Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croato-Slovenian (see: Serbo-Croat and Slovenian) [1] Government Value specified for government_type does not comply King  - 1918-1921 Peter I  - 1921-1934 Alexander... “Italian Republic” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... Location of Cres in Croatia Cres (Italian Cherso, Latin Crepsa) is an Adriatic island in Croatia. ... LoÅ¡inj (pronounced low-sheen) (Italian Lussino, Latin Apsorrus) is a Croatian island in the northern Adriatic Sea, in the Kvarner gulf. ... Map showing the location of Lastovo in Croatia Lastovo (Italian: Lagosta, Latin: Augusta Insula, Greek: Ladestanos, Illyrian: Ladest) is an island, town and municipality in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county in Croatia. ...


After 1918, nearly all the Italian population of Dalmatia incorporated into Yugoslavia took refuge in Zadar. In 1922, the Dalmatian region of Yugoslavia was divided into two provinces, the District of the City of Split (Splitska oblast), with capital in Split, and the District of the City of Dubrovnik (Dubrovačka oblast), with capital in Dubrovnik. Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ...


In 1929, the Maritime Banovina (Primorska Banovina), a province of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, was formed. Its capital was Split, and it included most of Dalmatia and parts of present-day Bosnia and Herzegovina. Southern parts of Dalmatia were in Zeta Banovina, from the Gulf of Kotor to Pelješac peninsula including Dubrovnik. Map showing Yugoslav banovinas in 1929 (The Littoral Banovina is coloured purple, on the left part of the map) The Littoral Banovina or Littoral Banate (Croatian and Bosnian: Primorska banovina) was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1939. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Map showing Yugoslav banovinas in 1929 (The Zeta Banovina is coloured pink, in the central part of the map) The Zeta Banovina or Zeta Banate (Serbian Bosnian, and Croatian: Зетска бановина Zetska banovina) was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1941. ... Historic map of the Gulf, 16th century Gulf of Kotor or the Bay of Kotor (Serbian and Croatian: Бока которска Boka kotorska, Italian: ) in western Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... PeljeÅ¡ac (Italian Sabioncello) is a peninsula in southern Croatia, in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county. ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ...


In 1939, the Maritime Banovina was joined with Sava Banovina (and with smaller parts of other banovina's) to form a new province named the Banovina of Croatia. In 1939, ethnic Croatian areas of the Zeta Banovina from the Gulf of Kotor to Pelješac including Dubrovnik were merged with a new Banovina of Croatia. Map showing Yugoslav banovinas in 1929 (The Sava Banovina is coloured pink, on the top left part of the map) The Sava Banovina or Sava Banate (Croatian: Savska banovina) was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1939. ... The Banovina of Croatia (1939-1941). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Historic map of the Gulf, 16th century Gulf of Kotor or the Bay of Kotor (Serbian and Croatian: Бока которска Boka kotorska, Italian: ) in western Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... PeljeÅ¡ac (Italian Sabioncello) is a peninsula in southern Croatia, in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county. ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ... The Banovina of Croatia (1939-1941). ...

Map of Dalmatia in 1942, with Independent State of Croatia (light brown) and the Kingdom of Italy's Governatorato di Dalmazia (green)
Map of Dalmatia in 1942, with Independent State of Croatia (light brown) and the Kingdom of Italy's Governatorato di Dalmazia (green)

During World War II, in 1941, Nazi Germany, Italy, Hungary and Bulgaria occupied Yugoslavia, redrawing their borders. A new Nazi puppet state, the Independent State of Croatia (NDH), was formed, and the Kingdom of Italy was assigned some parts of the Dalmatian coast, notably around Zadar and Split, as well as many islands. The remaining parts of Dalmatia became part of the NDH. Many Croats moved away from the Italian Governatorato di Dalmazia (as the Italian Dalmatia was called) and took refuge in the Fascist state of Croatia, which became the fighting ground for a guerrilla war between the Axis and the Partisans. Image File history File links Map_of_ndh. ... Image File history File links Map_of_ndh. ... Capital Zagreb Language(s) Croatian Religion Roman Catholicism Political structure Puppet-state King  - 1941-1943 Tomislav II Poglavnik  - 1941-1945 Ante Pavelić Legislature None Historical era World War II  - Established April 10, 1941  - Disestablished May 8, 1945 Population  - 1941 est. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Capital Zagreb Language(s) Croatian Religion Roman Catholicism Political structure Puppet-state King  - 1941-1943 Tomislav II Poglavnik  - 1941-1945 Ante Pavelić Legislature None Historical era World War II  - Established April 10, 1941  - Disestablished May 8, 1945 Population  - 1941 est. ... Anthem Marcia Reale dOrdinanza (Royal March of Ordinance)¹ The Kingdom of Italy at the height of its power in 1940. ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... The Axis Powers is a term for the loose alliance of Germany, Italy, and Japan. ... Yugoslav Partisan Flag The Yugoslav Partisans were one of the two main resistance movements engaged in the fight against the Axis forces in the Balkans during World War II, alongside rival Chetniks, the Yugoslav Peoples Liberation War. ...


After the surrender of Italy in September 1943, the Italian population concentrated in Zara was harassed for over a year by allied bombardments carried out at the request of Tito[citation needed] (Zara is nicknamed "The Italian Dresden") and finally was forced to escape en masse from Tito's partisans. There were more than 20,000 Italians in Zara before World War II, but only 80 Italians remained in this city after 1946.[citation needed] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Josip Broz Tito (May 7, 1892 - May 4, 1980) was the ruler of Yugoslavia between the end of World War II and his death in 1980. ...


After the defeat of Italy and NDH, Dalmatia was restored to Croatia, more precisely, to the People's Republic of Croatia, part of the Second Yugoslavia (then called the Federative People's Republic of Yugoslavia). Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throuout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ...


Dalmatia was divided between three federal republics of Yugoslavia - almost all of the territory went to Croatia, leaving the Gulf of Kotor to Montenegro and a small strip of coast at Neum to Bosnia and Herzegovina. When Yugoslavia dissolved in 1991, the republican borders became country borders as they are now. The Federal Republic of Germany and its sixteen Bundesländer (federal states) A federal republic is a federation of states with a republican form of government. ... Historic map of the Gulf, 16th century Gulf of Kotor or the Bay of Kotor (Serbian and Croatian: Бока которска Boka kotorska, Italian: ) in western Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... Municipality of Bosnia and Herzegovina General Information Entity Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina Land area Population (1991 census) 4,268 Population density Coordinates Area code +387 36 Mayor Đure Obradović (HDZ) Website http://www. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...


Postage stamps

Italy issued special postage stamps for the part of northern Dalmatia it had occupied during World War I, necessitated by the locals' use of Austrian currency. The stamps were produced as surcharges of Italian stamps; the first appeared 1 May 1919, and consisted of the Italian one-lira overprinted "una / corona". A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... An overprint is the addition of text (and sometimes graphics) to the face of a postage stamp after it has been printed. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


5c and 10c overprints were issued in 1921, reading "5[10] / centesimi / di corona", followed by an additional five values in 1922. Similar overprints were made for special delivery and postage due stamps. Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Postage due is the term used for mail sent with insufficient postage. ...


Soon after, the annexed territories switched to Italian currency and stamps. As a result, usage was uncommon and validly-used stamps are today worth about 50-100% more than unused. They are easily confused with the Italian issues used in occupied Austria; the Dalmatian overprints are distinguished by their use of a sans serif typeface. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Gallery

See also

Dalmatia (Croatian Dalmacija, Italian Dalmazia, Serbian Далмација) is a region of Croatia on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, spreading between the island of Pag in the northwest and the Bay of Kotor in the southeast. ... Dalmatian is an extinct Romance language formerly spoken in the Dalmatia region of Croatia, and as far south as Kotor (Cattaro) in Montenegro. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Binomial name Pelecanus crispus Bruch, 1832 The Dalmatian Pelican (Pelecanus crispus) is a member of the pelican family. ... Location of Illyria Illyria (Albanian Iliria Land of the Free; Ancient Greek ; Latin Illyria [1] (see also Illyricum) was in Classical antiquity a region in the western part of todays Balkan Peninsula, founded by the tribes and clans of Illyrians, an ancient people who spoke the Illyrian languages. ...

External links

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Dalmatia - LoveToKnow 1911 (4968 words)
Dalmatia is bounded, on the landward side, by Croatia and Bosnia, in the N. and N.E.; and by Herzegovina and Montenegro, in the S.E. and S. Its area amounts to 49 2 3 sq.
Dalmatia possesses a magnificent anchorage in the Bocche di Cattaro, and there are numerous lesser havens, at Sebenico, Trail, Zara and elsewhere along the coast and among the islands.
Rivalry of Venice and Hungary in Dalmatia, 1 102-1420.
Dalmatia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1660 words)
Dalmatia (Croatian: Dalmacija Serbian: Далмација) is a region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, in modern Croatia, spreading between the island of Rab in the northwest and the Gulf of Kotor (Boka Kotorska) in the southeast.
In 1922, the Dalmatia region was divided into two provinces, the District of the City of Split (Splitska oblast), with capital in Split, and the District of the City of Dubrovnik (Dubrovačka oblast), with capital in Dubrovnik.
Dalmatia was divided between three federal republics of Yugoslavia - almost all of the territory went to Croatia, leaving the Gulf of Kotor to Montenegro and a small strip of coast at Neum to Bosnia and Herzegovina.
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