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Encyclopedia > Daily newspaper

A newspaper is a lightweight and disposable publication (more specifically, a periodical), usually printed on low-cost paper called newsprint. It may be general or special interest, and may be published daily, weekly, biweekly, monthly, bimonthly, or quarterly. To publish is to make publicly known, and in reference to text and images, it can mean distributing paper copies to the public, or putting the content on a website. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... Newsprint is low-cost, low-quality, non-archival paper. ...


General-interest newspapers are usually journals of current news on a variety of topics. Those can include political events, crime, business, sports, and opinions (either editorials, columns, or political cartoons). Many also include weather news and forecasts. Newspapers increasingly use photographs to illustrate stories; they also often include comic strips and other entertainment, such as crosswords. A journal (through French from late Latin diurnalis, daily) is a daily record of events or business. ... NeWS, for Network extensible Window System, was a windowing system developed by Sun Microsystems in the late 1980s. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... Business refers to at least three closely related commercial topics. ... An editorial is a statement or article by a news organization (generally a newspaper) that expresses an opinion rather than attempting to simply report news. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... Composite satellite image showing the progress of a hurricane weather system approaching the east coast of America Weather comprises all the various phenomena that occur in the atmosphere of a planet. ... BBCs Alex Deakin presenting a weather report. ... A photograph (often just called a photo) is an image (or a representation of that on e. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... The crossword is the most common variety of word puzzle in the world. ...

Contents

Len Ganeway by Derek Wernher (in Brookgreen Gardens, South Carolina) Image taken by me, released under GFDL Pollinator 16:54, 19 Feb 2004 (UTC) File links The following pages link to this file: Newspaper Brookgreen Gardens Categories: GFDL images ... Brookgreen Gardens is a sculpture garden and wildlife preserve in Pawleys Island, South Carolina. ... Pawleys Island is a town located in Georgetown County, South Carolina. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population {{{2000Pop}}} (26th)  - Density 51. ...


Overview

The general variety is issued every day (a daily newspaper), often with the exception of Sundays and some national holidays. Weekly newspapers, printed once a week, are also common; they tend to be smaller and less prestigious than daily papers. Sunday is the day of the week between Saturday and Monday, and the second day of the weekend in some cultures. ...


Most nations have at least one newspaper that circulates throughout the whole country: a national newspaper, as contrasted with a local newspaper serving a city or region. In the United States and Canada, there are few truly national newspapers, with the notable exceptions of USA Today in the United States and The Globe and Mail and The National Post in Canada. Large metropolitan newspapers with expanded distribution networks such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Toronto Star can fill the role of de facto national newspapers. USA Today is a national American newspaper published by the Gannett Corporation. ... The Globe and Mail is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ... The National Post is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ... The Toronto Star is a major metropolitan newspaper produced in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...


The owner of the newspaper, or person in charge, is the publisher. The person responsible for content is the editor, editor in chief, or executive editor. A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Editor has four major senses: Print media There are various levels of editorial positions in publishing. ... The Editor in chief is a publications primary editor. ...


Newspapers have been developed around very narrow topic areas, such as news for merchants in a specific industry, fans of particular sports, fans of the arts or of specific artists, and participants in the same sorts of activities or lifestyles.


History

According to the World Association of Newspapers:


59 BC: Regular publications have been created and distributed by governments for millennia, including Acta Diurna, a listing of events ordered by Julius Caesar in ancient Rome. Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 64 BC 63 BC 62 BC 61 BC 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56... Gaius Julius Caesar (Latin: IMP·C·IVLIVS·CAESAR·DIVVS¹) (b. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that existed in Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East between 753 BC and its downfall in AD 476. ...


A.D. 713: The first newspaper, Mixed News in Kaiyuan, was published as hand-written newssheet in Beijing, China. Kaiyuan is the name given to the year in which the paper is published. Events Byzantine Emperor Philippicus deposed. ... Beijing   listen? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... Kaiyuan is also the name of Kaiyuan District, a former district of Xiamen City, Fujian Province. ...


1605: Johann Carolus publishes the first printed newspaper Relation aller fürnemmen und gedenckwürdigen Historien (Collection of all distiguished and commemorable news) in Strasbourg, now in France but at the time an independent city within the (mostly) German-speaking Holy Roman Empire. Events April 13 - Tsar Boris Godunow dies - Feodor II accedes to the throne May 16 - Paul V becomes Pope June 1 - Russian troops in Moscow imprison Feodor II and his mother. ... City motto: – City proper (commune) Région Alsace Département Bas-Rhin (67) Mayor Fabienne Keller (UMP) (since 2001) Area 78. ... This page is about the Germanic empire. ...


1621: The first English-language private newspaper, The Corante, was first published, in London. Events February 9 - Gregory XV is elected pope. ... St. ...


1631: La Gazette, the first French newspaper, was founded. // Events February 5 - Roger Williams emigrates to Boston. ...


1632: Courante uyt Italien ende Duytschlandt, the first Dutch newspaper, was founded. See also: 1632 (novel) Events February 22 - Galileos Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems is published July 23 - 300 colonists for New France depart Dieppe November 8 - Wladyslaw IV Waza elected king of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after Zygmunt III Waza death November 16 - Battle of Lützen...


1645: the oldest newspaper still in circulation, Post-och Inrikes Tidningar of Sweden, began publishing. // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill. ...


1650: The world's first daily printed newspaper, Einkommende Zeitungen (Incoming news) founded in Leipzig, Germany. // Events June 23 - Claimant King Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland arrives in Scotland, the only of the three Kingdoms that has accepted him as ruler. ... Map of Germany showing Leipzig   Leipzig? [ˈlaiptsɪç] (Polish; Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk) is the largest city in the federal state (Bundesland) of Saxony in Germany. ...


1690: Publick Occurrences Both Foreign and Domestick in Boston became the first newspaper published in British North America. It was suppressed after one issue. Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... Publick Occurrences Both Foreign and Domestick was the title of the first newspaper published in the Americas. ... British North America originally comprised all British colonies and territories on the North American continent, from Georgia to Labrador and Ruperts Land. ...


1701: (September 6) Estimated first issue of the Norwich Post in England, which was probably the first provincial newspaper. September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity...


1702: The first English daily newspaper, the Daily Courant, was founded by Samuel Buckley on 11 March. (Publication ceased in 1735). Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... The Daily Courant was the first newspaper to be published in the United Kingdom. ... 11 March is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... Events 16 April - The London premiere of Alcina by George Frideric Handel, his first the first Italian opera for the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. ...


1709: Worcester Post-Man founded, which became Berrow's Worcester Journal in 1753, The Worcester Post-Man/Berrow's Worcester Journal is Britain’s oldest surviving unofficial newspaper. 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


1728: St. Petersburg Vedomosti, the oldest Russian newspaper still in circulation, is founded in Saint Petersburg. St. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland...


1785: The Daily Universal Register was founded by John Walters. It became The Times on January 1, 1788. The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


1803: Just 15 years after the first British penal colony was established, Australia's military government published the Sydney Gazette and the New South Wales Advertiser, Australia's first newspapers. A Penal Colony is a colony used to house prisoners. ...


1821: The Guardian was founded. The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...


1834 The Gleaner was first published.


1871: Yokohama Mainichi Shimbun (Yokohama Daily News) is launched as the first daily newspaper in Japan. Today, on a per-capita basis, Japan ranks first in the world in circulation of newspapers.


1884: Otto Merganthaler invented the linotype machine which, casts type in full lines using hot lead, a quantum leap in newspaper publishing, and issuing in the era of "hot lead." The systems remained in general production in the industry well into the 1980s, when computerized pagination became prominent. Originally an American company, formed in 1886 to market the linecaster invented by Ottmar Mergenthaler, Mergenthaler Linotype (pronounced LINEotype ) became the worlds leading manufacturer of book and newspaper printing equipment. ... General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish white Atomic mass 207. ... // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 60s and 70s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ...


1962: The Los Angeles Times drives linotype hot metal typesetters with perforated tape created from RCA computers speeding up the typesetting. The key was development of a dictionary and method to automate the hyphenation and justification of text in columns (tasks that had taken 40 percent of a manual operator's time). The Los Angeles Times (also LA Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the western United States. ... RCA, formerly an initialism for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark used by two companies for products descended from that common ancestor: Thomson SA, which manufactures consumer electronics like RCA-branded televisions, DVD players, video cassette recorders, direct broadcast satellite decoders, camcorders, audio equipment, telephones, and related... Movable metal type Typesetting involves the presentation of textual material in an aesthetic form on paper or some other media. ... ... A hyphen ( - ) is a punctuation mark. ...


1973: Harris introduced editing terminals, which were quickly followed by terminals from Raytheon, Atex, Digital Equipment Corporation and others. The output was strips of type on film from phototypesetters ("cold type" replacing the "hot type" of linotype machines. Atex worked with the Minneapolis Star to develop the first pagination system that allowed the creation and output of full editorial pages, eliminating the need for manual paste-up of strips of film. The Atex system featured "Atex Messaging" which is widely believed to be the forerunner of both e-mail and instant messenger applications. Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) is a major United States military contractor based in Waltham, Massachusetts. ... Pioneering technology firm in the publishing world, founded in Massachusetts in 1973 by engineer brothers Danny and Charlie Ying. ... Digital Equipment Corporation - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Format

Most modern newspapers are in one of three sizes:

They are usually printed on a thin, somewhat rough, off-white coloured paper known as newsprint. Since the 1980s, many newspapers have been printed with three-color process photography and graphics. This highlights the fact that the layout of the newspaper is of major importance in getting attention so readers will see and enjoy large sections of the newspaper. Broadsheet is a size and format for newspapers, and a descriptive term applied to papers which use that format rather than the smaller tabloid format. ... Mid-19th century tool for converting between different standards of the inch An inch is an Imperial and U.S. customary unit of length. ... An intellectual is a person who uses his or her intellect to study, reflect, or speculate on a variety of different ideas. ... A tabloid is a newspaper format particularly popular in the United Kingdom, which is roughly 231/2 by 143/4 inches (597 by 375 mm) per spread. ... Sensationalism is a manner of being extremely controversial, loud, attention-grabbing, or otherwise sensationalistic. ... Berliner, or midi, is a newspaper format with pages normally measuring about 470×315 mm, i. ... Berliner, or midi, is a newspaper format with pages normally measuring about 470×315 mm, i. ... World map showing location of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Le Monde is a French daily evening newspaper with a circulation in 2002 of 389,200. ... Newsprint is low-cost, low-quality, non-archival paper. ... // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 60s and 70s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Layout, in publishing, is the process of arranging editorial content, advertising, graphics and other information in a manner that creates an effective presentation. ...


To help their titles stand out on the newsstands, some newspapers are not printed on conventional off-white coloured newsprint. For example, the Financial Times is printed on a distinctive salmon pink paper, the Italian sports newspaper La Gazzetta dello Sport is printed on pink paper, while L'Équipe (formerly L'Auto) is printed on yellow paper. (Both the latter promoted major cycling races and their newsprint colours were reflected in the colours of the jerseys used to denote the race leader; thus, the leader in the Giro d'Italia wears a pink jersey, while the Tour de France leader wears a yellow jersey, or maillot jaune). The Financial Times (FT) is an international business newspaper printed on distinctive salmon pink broadsheet paper. ... La Gazzetta dello Sport is an Italian newspaper dedicated to coverage of various sports. ... LÉquipe (French for the team) is a French nationwide newspaper devoted to sports. ... Cycling is a recreation, a sport, and a means of transport across land. ... The Giro dItalia, also simply known as the Giro, is a long distance road bicycle race for professionals held over three weeks in May or early June in and around Italy. ... The Tour de France (French for Tour of France), often referred to as La Grande Boucle, Le Tour or The Tour, is an epic long distance road bicycle racing competition for professionals held over three weeks in July in and around France. ... Maillot jaune (French for yellow jersey) is the t-shirt worn by the current overall leader of many bicycle races, originally and most notably the Tour de France. ...


Circulation and readership

The number of copies sold on an average day is called the newspaper's circulation, and is used to set advertising rates.

Newspaper vendor, Paddington, London, February 2005
Newspaper vendor, Paddington, London, February 2005

According to United Nations data from 1995 Japan has three daily papers - the Asahi Shimbun, Mainichi Shimbun and Yomiuri Shimbun - with circulations well above 4 million. Germany's Bild, with a circulation of 4.5 million, was the only other paper in that category. Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1158 KB)Opposite Paddington station, February 2005. ... Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1158 KB)Opposite Paddington station, February 2005. ... Paddington is an area in the west of London in the City of Westminster. ... St. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Asahi Shimbun (朝日新聞; Asahi Shinbun) is a national leading newspaper in Japan, though the circulation, which is 8,200,000 as of 2005, is behind that of Yomiuri Shimbun. ... The Mainichi Shimbun (毎日新聞 Mainichi Shinbun, lit. ... The Yomiuri Shimbun (読売新聞) is a Japanese newspaper published in Tokyo, Osaka, Fukuoka, and so on. ... The Bild-Zeitung (lit. ...


In the United Kingdom The Sun is the top seller, with around 3.2 million copies distributed daily (late-2004). The Suns most famous headline The Sun, a tabloid daily newspaper published in the United Kingdom, has the highest circulation of any daily English-language newspaper in the world, standing at around 3,200,000 copies daily in late-2004. ...


In India, The Times of India is the largest English newspaper with 2.14 million copies daily. The Common Man featured on a commemorative stamp released by the Indian Postal Service on the 150th Anniversary of the Times of India - 1988. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


In the United States and the United Kingdom at least, circulation has been declining for many years.


USA Today has daily circulation of approximately 2 million, making it the most widely distributed paper in the country. However, the validity of USA Today's circulation figures are disputed by some in the newspaper community. This is because of the newspaper's contracts with hotels. Many of its papers are delivered to hotel guests who do not realise they are being charged for it.


In 2004, several large U.S. newspapers were found to have overstated their circulation.


Business side

Almost all newspapers make nearly all their money from advertising. The income from the customer's payment at the newsstand is a pittance in comparison. That is why all newspapers cost little and some are free. The portion of the newspaper that is not advertising is called editorial content or editorial matter. Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ...


Publishers of commercial newspapers strive for higher circulation so that advertising in their newspaper becomes more effective, allowing the newspaper to attract more advertisers and charge more for the service. But some advertising sales also market demographics: Some newspapers might sacrifice higher circulation numbers in favor of an audience with a higher income.


Many paid-for newspapers offer a variety of subscription plans. For example, someone might only want a Sunday paper, or perhaps only Sunday and Saturday, or maybe only a workweek subscription, or perhaps a daily subscription. Sunday is the day of the week between Saturday and Monday, and the second day of the weekend in some cultures. ... Saturday is the day of the week between Friday and Sunday. ... The workweek, literally, refers to the period of time that an individual spends at paid occupational labor. ... A day is any of several different units of time. ...


Some newspapers provide some or all of their content on the Internet, either at no cost or for a fee. In some cases free access is only available for a matter of days or weeks, or readers must register and provide personal data. In other cases, extensive free archives are provided.


Newspaper journalism

Since newspapers began as a journal (record of current events), the profession involved in the making of newspapers began to be called journalism. Much emphasis has been placed upon the value of the journalist to be accurate and fair in the historical record. (See Ethics). A journal (through French from late Latin diurnalis, daily) is a daily record of events or business. ... Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, analyzing and presenting information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. ... Ethics is a general term for what is often described as the science (study) of morality. In philosophy, ethical behavior is that which is good or right. ...


In the yellow journalism era of the 19th century, many newspapers in the United States relied on sensational stories that were meant to anger or excite the public, rather than to inform. The more restrained style of reporting that relies on fact checking and accuracy regained popularity around World War II. Yellow journalism is a term given to any widespread tendencies or practices within media organizations which are detrimental to, or substandard from the point of view of, journalistic integrity. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: Immense human sacrifice, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons - the atom bomb being the ultimate. ...


Criticism of journalism is varied and sometimes vehement. Charges of sensationalism have diminished to a degree. But credibility is questioned because of anonymous sources; errors in facts, spelling, and grammar; real or perceived bias; and scandals involving plagiarism and fabrication. Grammar is the study of the rules governing the use of a language. ... Bias has several different meanings, most relating to an offset or prejudice of some sort. ... Plagiarism refers to the use of anothers ideas, information, language, or writing, when done without proper acknowledgment of the original source. ...


In the past newspapers have often been owned by so-called press barons, and were used either as a rich man's toy, or used as a political tool. More recently in the United States, a greater number of newspapers (and all of the largest ones) are being run by large media corporations such as Gannett (the largest in the United States) Cox, The Tribune Company, etc. Many industry watchers have concerns that the growing need for profit growth natural to corporations will have a negative impact on the overall quality of journalism. Green Razor Scooter This article is about things that people play with. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by...


Even though the opinions of the owners are often relegated to the editorial section, and the opinions of the readers are in the op-ed ("opposite the editorial page") and letters to the editors sections of the paper, newspapers have been used for political purposes by insinuating some kind of bias outside of the editorial section and into straight news. For example, The New York Times is often criticised for a leftist slant to its stories, or, by others, for supporting the American political establishment in nearly all cases, whereas The Wall Street Journal has a history of emphasising the position of the right. In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms that refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially but not exclusively in the American sense of the word... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with a worldwide average daily circulation of more than 2. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the Right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ...


Some ways newspapers have tried to improve their credibility are: appointing ombudsmen, developing ethics policies and training, using more stringent corrections policies, communicating their processes and rationale with readers, and asking sources to review articles after publication. Many larger newspapers are now using more aggressive random fact-checking to further improve the chances that false information will be found before it is printed. Look up Ombudsman in Wiktionary, the free dictionary An ombudsman is an official, usually but not always appointed by the government, who is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints reported by individual citizens. ...


The future of newspapers

The future of newspapers is cloudy, with overall readership slowly declining in most developed countries due to increasing competition from television and the Internet. The 57th annual World Newspaper Congress, held in Istanbul in June 2004, reported circulation increases in only 35 of 208 countries studied. Most of the increase came in developing countries, notably China. Shows the Location of the Province Ä°stanbul Istanbul (Turkish: Ä°stanbul; contraction of the citys previous Greek name Constantinople) is the largest city in Turkey, and arguably the most important. ...


A report at the gathering said China tops total newspaper circulation, with more than 85 million copies of papers sold every day, followed by India with 72 million—China and India are the two most populous countries in the world—followed by Japan with 70 million and the United States with 55 million. The report said circulation declined by an average of 2.2 percent across 13 of the 15 countries that made up the European Union before May 1. The biggest declines were in Ireland, down 7.8 percent; Britain, down 4.7 percent; and Portugal, where numbers fell by 4.0 percent. One growth area is the distribution of free newspapers, which are not reflected in the above circulation data. They grew 16 percent in 2003. May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ...


Another growth area is high-quality tabloids, particularly in the UK, where several of the major broadsheets are experimenting with the format (see Broadsheet#Switch to smaller sizes). Smaller and easier to hold than broadsheets, but presenting real journalism rather than traditional tabloid fodder, they appear to have drawn some younger readers who are otherwise abandoning newspapers. Broadsheet is a size and format for newspapers, and a descriptive term applied to papers which use that format rather than the smaller tabloid format. ... A tabloid is a newspaper format particularly popular in the United Kingdom, which is roughly 231/2 by 143/4 inches (597 by 375 mm) per spread. ...


Newspapers also face increased competition from the Internet for classified ads, especially for jobs, which have long been a key source of revenue. Classified advertising is a form of advertising which is particulalry common in newspapers and other periodicals. ...


Newspapers in different countries

Afghanistan

Printed in Afghanistan and other countries by Afghan nationals. List of newspapers in and out of print:

Kabul Weekly is currently the most widely distributed newspaper in Afghanistan, both in the center and the provinces. ... Kabul Times, established in 1962, was the first English language printed newspaper in Afghanistan. ... Khorasan (also spelled Khurasan and Khorassan; خراسان in Persian) is an area, located in eastern and northeastern Iran. ...

Argentina

In Argentina, the broadsheet format is almost non-existent. The only remaining national newspaper published in that format is La Nación.


Europe

There are several newspapers that target Europe, or the EU, as a whole. All are published in English and therefore rather unknown in non English speaking countries. Practically all are owned by USA-based companies. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ...

The Wall Street Journal Europe is a version of The Wall Street Journal with daily news and analysis of global business developments for a European audience. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... The International Herald Tribune (or IHT) is fully owned by the New York Times, which along with its own staff journalists and news agencies supplies it with news and features. ... The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) is an American media company best known as the publisher of its namesake, The New York Times. ... News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ...

Germany

Main article: List of German newspapers

Important national newspapers are the daily Die Welt and the weekly Die Zeit as well as the daily tabloid Bild, but summed up, local ones draw a much wider readership. Some local or regional newspapers assume the role of national papers, such as the Frankfurter Allgemeine of Frankfurt and the Süddeutsche Zeitung of Munich. The taz (long form: Die Tageszeitung) was founded 1978, partly in reaction to the terrorist events of the German Autumn, and considers itself as an alternative to the (in 1978) mostly conservative newspaper market. The now independent Neues Deutschland was the newspaper of the Socialist_Unity_Party_of_Germany, which ruled the communist East Germany until 1989. The following List of German newspapers is sorted according to circulations, which are given as of 1Q/2003 as listed at http://www. ... Die Welt is a German national daily newspaper published by the Axel Springer company. ... Die Zeit (pronounced, roughly, dee tSITE) is a German nationwide weekly quality newspaper (literally translated: The Time). ... The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ) is an influential high-quality national German newspaper, founded in 1949. ...   Frankfurt am Main? [ˈfraÅ‹kfÊŠrt] is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany. ... The Süddeutsche Zeitung is a quality German newspaper. ... Munich: Frauenkirche and Town Hall steeple Munich (German: München (pronounced listen) is the state capital of the German state of Bavaria. ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... The German Autumn (German: Deutscher Herbst) is a set of events revolving around the abduction of Hanns-Martin Schleyer and the hijacking of the Lufthansa airplane Landshut by the Red Army Faction (RAF) and the PFLP respectively in autumn 1977. ... The title of this article is incorrect because of technical limitations. ... East Germany, officially the German Democratic Republic (GDR), German Deutsche Demokratische Republik (DDR), was a socialist state that existed from 1949 to 1990 in the former Soviet occupation zone of Germany. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The distinction between serious and tabloid papers is, in addition to obvious differences in layout and content, sometimes also made according to whether they are available on subscription or not, as a rule of thumb, tabloids are not available on subscription.


The largest publishing companies are located in Hamburg, notably the Axel Springer Verlag and Gruner und Jahr. About one half of Germany's nation-wide newspapers and magazines are produced in Hamburg. The Axel Springer Verlag dominates the newspaper market with its tabloid Bild and a large number of local papers. Position of Hamburg in Germany Hamburgs central broadway Jungfernstieg at the Alster lake, between 1900 and 1914 This article is about the city in Germany. ...


Hong Kong

Main article: Newspapers in Hong Kong

Hong Kong has a vibrant newspaper publishing industry. Most papers use the broadsheet size. Almost all newspapers focus on the local Hong Kong market, but some may also target at the markets in Macao and Pearl River Delta. Although they are broadsheets, the three papers with the largest circulation are all considered tabloid-style, with large and colourful photos and sensational coverage to attract readers. Most papers adopt a daily magazine approach, with all sort of coverage ranging from local and international news, entertainment, culture, lifestyle, economic and finance, sport and horseracing. Hong Kong Economic Journal, Hong Kong Economic Times and South China Morning Post have are stronger focus on economics and finance. Ta Kung Pao, Wen Wei Po, Singtao Daily and Oriental Daily are the mouthpieces of the communist government in Beijing (Peking). There are also papers specifically published for horse racing tips. The newspapers of Hong Kong can be categorized by language: English newspapers South China Morning Post The Standard (formerly, the iMail) Eastern Express (now defunct) The three English publications are regarded as neutral towards the government and are mostly serious newspapers. ... Map of Pearl River Delta The Pearl River Delta (PRD, 珠江三角洲 pinyin: Zhū Jiāng Sānjiǎozhōu, Cantonese IPA: dzy1 gɔŋ1 sɑm1gɔk3dzɐʊ1), China, occupies the low-lying areas alongside the Pearl River estuary where the river flows into the South China Sea. ... Hong Kong Economic Journal The Hong Kong Economic Journal (HKEJ, ch. ... Hong Kong Economics Times (HKET) (香港經濟日報, Cantonese IPA: hœŋ1gɔŋ2 giŋ1dzɑɪ3 jɐt6bəʊ3, Mandarin Pinyin: Xiānggǎng Jīngjì Rìbào) is a Chinese business newspaper with an average daily circulation of 73,330 copies currently. ... The South China Morning Post (南華早報) (also referred to as the SCMP) and its Sunday edition, the Sunday Morning Post, is the leading English language newspaper in Hong Kong published by the SCMP Group Ltd. ... Economics (from the Greek οίκος [oikos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules, hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses and organizations raise, allocate and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... Cover of the first issue Ta Kung Pao (大公報; formerly LImpartial) is the oldest alive Chinese language newspapers in China which has based in Hong Kong and been funded by China Government after 1949. ... Yang Liwei and Shenzhou 5 on the cover of Wen Wei Po Wen Wei Po (文匯報) is a Hong Kong-based Chinese language newspaper, which was first established in Shanghai, Mainland China in January 1938; its Hong Kong version was launched on September 9, 1948. ... Oriental Daily News (東方日報) is a Chinese language newspaper in Hong Kong. ... Communism - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ...


India

Compared with many other developing countries, the Indian press has flourished since independence and exercises a large degree of independence. In 2001, India had 45,974 newspapers, including 5364 daily newspapers published in over 100 languages. The largest number of newspapers were published in Hindi (20,589), followed by English (7,596), Marathi (2,943), Urdu (2,906), Bengali (2,741), Gujarati (2,215), Tamil (2,119), Kannada (1,816), Malayalam(1,505) and Telugu (1,289). The Hindi daily press has a circulation of over 23 million copies, followed by English with over 8 million copies. There are four major publishing groups in India: the Times of India Group, the Indian Express Group, the Hindustan Times Group, and the Anandabazar Patrika Group. India has more than forty domestic news agencies. The Express News Service, the Press Trust of India, and the United News of India are among the major news agencies. Hindi (हिन्दी) is a language spoken in most states in northern and central India. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Marathi is one of the widely spoken languages of India, and has a long literary history. ... Urdu(اردو) is an Indo-European language which originated in India, most likely in the vicinity of Delhi, from whence it spread to the rest of the subcontinent. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Gujarati (ગુજરાતી, also sometimes Gujrati) is a language native to the state of Gujarat in western India. ... Tamil may refer to: The Tamil language, which is one of the Dravidian languages spoken in the Indian subcontinent. ... Kannada - aptly described as sirigannada (known to few as Kanarese) is one of the oldest Dravidian languages and is spoken in its various dialects by roughly 45 million people. ... Malayalam (മലയാളം) is the major language of the state of Kerala, in southern India. ... Telugu belongs to the family of Dravidian languages and is the official language of the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. ... The Common Man featured on a commemorative stamp released by the Indian Postal Service on the 150th Anniversary of the Times of India - 1988. ... The Indian Express is an Indian newspaper started by Ram Nath Goenka, and is published from New Delhi. ... The Hindustan Times is a leading newspaper in India. ... Press Trust of India is a nonprofit cooperative among the Indian newspapers. ... United News of India is one of the two primary Indian news agencies. ...


See Also: Mass media in India Media penetration as of 2003 Media in India, especially news media, are undergoing significant changes in the current liberalised environment. ...


Mexico

In Mexico, there are many publications, and none that can be considered a national newspaper. The most important ones, such as El Universal, La Jornada and Reforma are in Mexico City, and because of a heavy national centralisation, a lot of redistribution happens (newspapers from Mexico City are sold in almost every city in the country, some with a day or two lag). El Universal is a major Mexican newspaper. ... La Jornada is one of Mexicos leading daily newspapers. ... Reforma is one of the most prestigious, and often considered among the most reliable, newspapers in Mexico, in spite of its youth (it appeared in Mexico City in 1993). ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the name of a megacity located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus (altiplano) at the center of Mexico, about 2,240 metres (7,349 feet) above sea-level, surrounded on most sides...


The only attempts to create a national newspaper originate in Monterrey. One of them is Milenio, a midi format newspaper, which is distributed in Mexico City; Monterrey, Nuevo León; Veracruz, Veracruz; Guadalajara, Jalisco; Tampico, Tamaulipas; and the state of Tabasco. This article is about the Mexican city; for other uses, see Monterrey (disambiguation). ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the name of a megacity located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus (altiplano) at the center of Mexico, about 2,240 metres (7,349 feet) above sea-level, surrounded on most sides... This article is about the Mexican city; for other uses, see Monterrey (disambiguation). ... Veracruz from space, July 1997 The city of Veracruz is a major port city on the Gulf of Mexico in the Mexican state of Veracruz. ... Guadalajara is a large city in the Western-Pacific region of Mexico, located at 20. ... El Puente Tampico (finished in October 1988) links the states of Tamaulipas and Veracruz and is a major element in the Gulf of Mexico highway system. ... This article refers to Tabasco state; for the condiment see Tabasco sauce Other Mexican States Capital Villahermosa Other major cities List of municipalities Area 25,267 km² Ranked 24th Population (2000 census) 1,889,370 Ranked 20th Governor (2001-07) Manuel Andrade Díaz (PRI) Federal Deputies (6) PRI = 6...


The other attempt to make a national newspaper has been done by Reforma News Group, which also originated and is run in Monterrey but that has big coverage from Mexico City. Reforma publishes different newspapers with the same main content, but with specific local content in the major cities of the country: El Norte in Monterrey, Reforma in Mexico City, Mural in Guadalajara and Palabra in Saltillo. All of the newspapers by Reforma are published in the broadsheet format. For other uses, see El Norte (disambiguation). ... A mural is a painting on a wall, ceiling, or other large permanent surface. ... Saltillo is a city in northeast Mexico, located at 25°42′ N 101°00′ W. It is the current capital of the state of Coahuila. ...


Reforma is one of the most prestigious, and often considered among the most reliable news sources in Mexico, in spite of its youth (it appeared in Mexico City in 1993). It has gained its prestige with its attractive editorial design, wide-spectrum editorialists and denouncements of government corruption. 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ...


Until very recently, newsprint in Mexico was a product made only by the government-owned monopoly. Importing the product from other countries was illegal. This allowed the Mexican government, for many years, to put out of circulation any dissident newspaper. Reforma survived the boycott and fought heavily until the government allowed for importing the product in the 1990s. // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but keeping the same mind-set. ...


Since then, the Mexican press has been undergoing a process towards more freedom of speech, especially after the election of President Vicente Fox in the year 2000. Term of office: December 1, 2000 – present Preceded by: Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de León Succeeded by: incumbent Date of birth: July 2, 1942 Place of birth: Mexico City Profession: Industrialist First Lady: Marta Sahagún Political Party: National Action Party Vicente Fox Quesada (born July 2, 1942) is the... This article is about the year 2000. ...


Poland

Main article: List of Polish newspapers

List of Polish newspapers (the most popular ones) This is an ever-incomplete List of Polish newspapers. ...

  • Życie Warszawy
  • Trybuna
  • Nasz Dziennik

Gazeta Wyborcza (pronounce: [gazεta vibɔrʧa]) is, as of 2004, Polands largest distribution daily newspaper. ... Rzeczpospolita is Polands second largest nationwide daily newspaper with a circulation of 260-270,000 and an estimated readership of 1. ... Polish tabloid published in Warsaw since 1991. ...

United Kingdom

Main article: List of newspapers in the United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, newspapers can be classified by distribution as local or national, and by page size as tabloids and broadsheets. The principal newspapers of England are all nationals edited in London. Wales and Northern Ireland are also dominated by the London-based press; in Scotland, although the London-based press is widely available and widely read, two Scottish newspapers can claim quasi-national status: The Scotsman (based in Edinburgh) and the Glasgow Herald. // National newspapers Traditionally newspapers could be split into quality, serious-minded newspapers (usually referred to as Broadsheets due to their large size) and tabloid, less serious newspapers. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English(100%), Welsh(20. ... Northern Ireland is one of four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. ... Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country in northwest Europe and a constituent nation of the United Kingdom. ...


There is often an implication that tabloids cater for more vulgar tastes than broadsheet. Within the tabloid category the most down market titles are classed as red-tops because of the design of their front pages. This term is often used deprecatingly by newspapers that consider themselves more serious. There are also "middle-market" tabloids such as The Daily Mail. The front page of the Daily Mail on the 7th February 2005. ...


This distinction began to be blurred in October 2003 as two broadsheet newspapers, The Independent and The Times, began tabloid editions in some parts of the U.K. The Independent switched entirely to producing what it prefers to call a "compact" edition from May 2004, and The Times changed to this format at the beginning of November 2004, despite initial opposition from its more traditional and conservative readership. The Guardian is expected to switch to the unusual (for the U.K.) Berliner format, slightly larger than a traditional tabloid, sometime in 2006. For the movie starring Jerry Stiller, see The Independent (movie). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There are daily paid papers in most of the larger cities, and weekly paid papers in some other areas. These focus on local news and generally do not attempt to be a direct substitute for the London-based national newspapers, although some such as the Western Mail (based in Cardiff), Eastern Daily Press in Norwich and Yorkshire Post in Leeds offer competition to the London newspapers within their limited home territories. Most areas also typically have one or more free local papers, with extensive classified advertising. Cardiff (Welsh: Caerdydd, from caer, fort, and dydd, Aulus Didius) is the capital and largest city of Wales. ... Norwich (pronounced variously Norritch or Norridge) is a city in East Anglia, in Eastern England, the regional administrative centre and county town of Norfolk. ... Leeds Coat Of Arms Map sources for Leeds at grid reference SE297338 Leeds is a city in the county of West Yorkshire, in the north of England. ... Classified advertising is a form of advertising which is particulalry common in newspapers and other periodicals. ...


A significant recent trend is the launch of free morning newspapers for commuters in major metropolitan areas, offering a concise summary of the news designed to be read on public transport.


United States

Main article: List of newspapers in the United States
Front page of the New York Times on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918.
Enlarge
Front page of the New York Times on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918.

The vast majority of American newspapers are traditionally printed as broadsheets. A small number of daily papers are printed in the tabloid format. This is a list of newspapers made and distributed within the United States. ... Download high resolution version (707x894, 217 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (707x894, 217 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Armistice Day is the anniversary of the official end of World War I, November 11, 1918. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


U.S. dailies commonly separate the physical newspaper into sections on particular topics. Most major American cities' papers will have sections covering at least a few of the following topics:

  • National and international news, usually the first section. In the most prestigious newspapers like the New York Times, the majority of articles in this section are dispatched by the paper's own journalists from bureaus around the world. Smaller papers usually fill almost all of this section with stories taken from newswires like the Associated Press or Reuters.
  • Local and regional news, usually the second section. This is often called the metro (from metropolitan) section. Many large newspapers use "zoning," with different zones, receiving somewhat different articles, or the same articles arranged differently. Zoning is most predominant in the local section, but also plays a role in the front page.
  • Sports
  • Business
  • Classified ads
  • Features: This may include Arts, Home furnishing, Fashion, Style, or some combination. This section usually also includes general advice columns and amusements, such as comic strips, horoscopes and puzzles.
  • A weekly general-interest magazine-type feature, usually appearing on Sunday, such as Parade, USA Weekend, or their own magazine (for larger papers) such as The New York Times Magazine or the Washington Post Magazine.
  • Weekend or Entertainment. This section includes many ads for upcoming entertainment events which usually occur on the weekend; this section usually appears on a Friday, or the last newspaper printed before the weekend.
  • Comics. Typically only a separate section on Sundays; daily papers will include a page or more of comics in another section. Although new colour printing technology has seen the spread of the use of colour in comics (and other editorial content) to daily editions, for many years the expense of colour printing meant that only the Sunday editions of many newspapers carried most comics in full colour.
  • Opinion or Editorial. Includes both editorials by the newspaper's editorial staff and letters to the editor from readers. Typically only a separate section on Sundays; daily papers will include these materials in the back of the national, regional, metro, or local news sections. Sometimes may include commentaries or "op-ed pieces" from nationally renowned writers.

Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... Reuters Group plc (pronounced IPA: ) is a company supplying global financial markets and news media with a range of information products and transactional solutions, including real-time and historical market data, research and analytics, financial trading platforms, investment data and analytics plus news in text, video, graphics and photographs. ... Classified advertising is a form of advertising which is particulalry common in newspapers and other periodicals. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... In astrology, a horoscope is a chart or diagram representing the positions of the planets, other celestial bodies, and sensitive angles at the time of any moment in time or any event, such as a persons birth. ... A puzzle is a problem or enigma presented as entertainment; that is written down, acted out, etc. ... Sunday is the day of the week between Saturday and Monday, and the second day of the weekend in some cultures. ... In addition to its most general meaning, a parade is: a general term for a collected formation of troops, typically with restricted movement; or a place or avenue for the parading of troops on ceremonial occasions, for example Horse Guards Parade in London and ANZAC Parade in Canberra; It can...

See also

An alternative weekly, alternately referred to as an alternative newsweekly or alternative newspaper, is a form of alternative media newspaper found in many centres in the United States and Canada. ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public speech for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... Graphic design is the applied art of arranging image and text to communicate a message. ... A gazette is a newspaper. ... Regular newspaper publication dates from the mid 17th century. ... Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, analyzing and presenting information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. ... The following is a list of newspapers, divided by country and region. ... This a list of common newspaper names. ... A collection of magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles on various subjects. ... Mass media is the term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience (typically at least as large as the whole population of a nation state). ... McClures Magazine (cover, Jan, 1901) published many early muckraker articles. ... News design. ... Free online newspaper archives District of Columbia Washington Post, Washington, DC (1877- )Pay Illinois Chicago Tribune, Chicago, IL (1985- ) Pay Chicago Sun-Times, Chicago, IL (1986- ) Pay Missouri Historic Missouri Newspaper Project (various) Free New York Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, NY (1841-1902) Free New York Times, New York, NY... Sports photojournalists at Indianapolis Motor Speedway Photojournalism is a particular form of journalism (the collecting, editing, and presenting of news material for publication or broadcast) that creates images in order to tell a news story. ... The folder of newspaper web offset printing press Printing is an industrial process for reproducing copies of texts and images, typically with ink on paper using a printing press. ... The propaganda model is a theory advanced by Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky that seeks to explain the supposed systemic biases of the mass media in terms of structural economic causes. ... A student newspaper is a newspaper run by university or high or middle school students that covers local and in particular school/university news. ... The phrase underground press, especially underground newspapers (or simply underground papers) is, these days, most often used in reference to the alternative print media associated with the countercultural movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... A weekly newspaper, or semi-weekly newespaper is usually a smaller publication than a larger, daily newspaper (such as one that covers a metropolitan area). ...

External links

  • Worldwide Newspaper Directory by country
  • Registrar of Newspapers for India
  • Newspapers List Worldwide

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