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Encyclopedia > Daily Mail

Daily Mail front page
Type Daily newspaper
Format Tabloid

Owner Daily Mail and General Trust
Publisher Associated Newspapers Ltd
Editor Paul Dacre
Founded 1896
Political allegiance Conservative/Right-Wing
Language English
Price £0.45 (Monday-Friday)
£0.70 (Saturday)
£1.50 (Sunday)
Headquarters 2 Northcliffe House, London
Circulation 2,353,807[1]
(October 2007)
ISSN 0307-7578

Website: Mail Online

The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, currently published in a tabloid format. First published in 1896 by Lord Northcliffe, it is Britain's second biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun. Its sister paper, The Mail on Sunday was launched in 1982. An Irish version of the paper was launched on 6 February 2006. The Daily Mail was Britain's first daily newspaper aimed at what is now considered the middle-market and the first to sell 1 million copies a day.[2] Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Daily Mail and General Trust plc (DMGT) is one of the UKs largest media companies and has interests in national and regional newspapers, television and radio. ... Associated Newspapers is a large national newspaper publisher, which is a subsidiary of the Daily Mail and General Trust. ... Paul Michael Dacre (born November 14, 1948) is a British journalist. ... Conservative may refer to: Conservatism, political philosophy A member of a Conservative Party Conservative extension, premise of deductive logic Conservativity theorem, mathematical proof of conservative extension Conservative Judaism britney spears Category: ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... GBP redirects here. ... GBP redirects here. ... GBP redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... A tabloid is a newspaper — especially in the United Kingdom — that uses the tabloid format, which is roughly 23½ by 14¾ inches per spread. ... Alfred Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe Alfred Charles William Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe ( 15 July 1865 - 14 August 1922) rose from childhood poverty to become a powerful newspaper and publishing magnate, famed for buying stolid, unprofitable newspapers and transforming (some say demeaning) them to make them lively and entertaining for the... This article is about a British tabloid. ... The Daily Mail and its Sunday edition the Mail on Sunday are British newspapers, first published in 1896. ... The Irish Daily Mail is a tabloid newspaper published in the Republic of Ireland by Associated Newspapers. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Middle Market Newspaper From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. ...


The Mail was originally a broadsheet, but switched to its current compact format[3] on 3 May 1971, the 75th anniversary of its founding. On this date it also absorbed the Daily Sketch, which had previously been published as a tabloid by the same company. Its long-standing rival, the Daily Express, has a broadly similar political stance and target readership, but nowadays sells one-third the number of copies. The publisher of the Mail, the Daily Mail and General Trust is currently a FTSE 100 company, and the paper has a circulation of more than two million, giving it one of the largest circulations of any English language daily newspaper, and the twelfth highest of any newspaper in the world.[4] Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... The Daily Sketch was a national tabloid newspaper founded in Manchester in 1909 by Sir Edward Hulton. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... Daily Mail and General Trust plc (DMGT) is one of the UKs largest media companies and has interests in national and regional newspapers, television and radio. ... The Financial Times Stock Exchange Index of 100 Leading Shares, or FTSE 100 Index (pronounced footsie), is a share index of the 100 largest companies listed on the London Stock Exchange. ... A newspapers circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day, although circulation rates are decreasing. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Circulation figures according to the Audited Bureau of Circulations, in October 2007 show gross sales of 2,400,143 for the Daily Mail, compared with 789,867 for the Daily Express. This is an increase of almost a third over the sales figures for the Daily Mail 25 years ago, when it sold 1.87 million copies a day. By comparison, the Daily Express was selling over 2 million copies a day, so its sales have reduced by 60% over the same period. According to a December 2004 survey, 53% of Daily Mail readers voted for the Conservative party, compared to 21% for Labour and 17% for the Liberal Democrats.[5] In the United Kingdom, the Audit Bureau of Circulations (UK) certifies and audits the circulations of major publications, including newspapers and magazines. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

Early history

The Daily Mail, devised by Alfred Harmsworth (later Lord Northcliffe) and his brother Harold (later Lord Rothermere), was first published on 4 May 1896 and was an immediate success. It cost a halfpenny at a time when other London dailies cost one penny, and was more populist in tone and more concise in its coverage than its rivals. Soon after its launch it had more than half a million readers. Alfred Charles William Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe (July 15, 1865, Dublin - August 14, 1922, London) was an influential and successful newspaper owner. ... Harold Sidney Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere (1868 - 1940) was a highly successful British newspaper proprietor, owner of Associated Newspapers. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ...


Controlled editorially by Alfred, with Harold running the business side of the operation, the Mail from the start adopted a imperialist political stance, taking a strongly patriotic line in the Second Boer War, leading to claims that it was not reporting the issues of the day objectively.[attribution needed] From the beginning, the Mail also set out to entertain its readers with human interest stories, serials, features and competitions (which were also the main means by which the Harmsworths promoted the paper). Cecil Rhodes: Cape-Cairo railway project. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians...


In 1906, the paper offered £1,000 for the first flight across the English Channel, and £10,000 for the first flight from London to Manchester. Punch magazine thought the idea preposterous and offered £10,000 for the first flight to Mars, but by 1910 both the Mail's prizes had been won. (For full list see Daily Mail aviation prizes.) For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... Punch was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire published from 1841 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... Between 1907 and 1919 the Daily Mail newspaper awarded fourteen prizes for achievements in aviation. ...


In 1908, the Daily Mail began the Ideal Home Exhibition, which it still runs today. The Ideal Home Exhibition is an annual event run by the Daily Mail. ...


The paper was accused of warmongering before the outbreak of World War I, when it reported that Germany was planning to crush the British Empire. Northcliffe created controversy by advocating conscription when the war broke out.[clarify] On 21 May 1915, Northcliffe wrote a blistering attack on Lord Kitchener, the Secretary of State for War. Kitchener was considered a national hero, and overnight the paper's circulation dropped from 1,386,000 to 238,000. 1,500 members of the London Stock Exchange ceremonially burned the unsold copies and launched a boycott against the Harmsworth Press. Prime Minister H. H. Asquith accused the paper of being disloyal to the country. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum PC, KBE, KCB, ADC ( June 24, 1850 - June 5, 1916) was a British Field Marshal and statesman. ... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ...


When Kitchener died, the Mail reported it as a great stroke of luck for the British Empire. The paper then campaigned against Asquith, who resigned on 5 December 1916. His successor, David Lloyd George, asked Northcliffe to be in his cabinet, hoping it would prevent him from criticising the government. Northcliffe declined. is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who was Prime Minister throughout the latter half of World War I and the first four years of the subsequent peace. ...


Inter-war period

In 1922, when Lord Northcliffe died, Lord Rothermere took full control of the paper. Lord Rothermere Harold Sidney Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere (26 April 1868 – 26 November 1940) was a highly successful British newspaper proprietor, owner of Associated Newspapers. ...


In 1924 the Daily Mail published the forged Zinoviev Letter which indicated that British Communists were planning violent revolution. It was widely believed that this was a significant factor in the defeat of Ramsay MacDonald's Labour Party in the 1924 general election, held four days later. (In some Labour circles, e.g. by former Labour leader Michael Foot, the paper is often referred to as 'The Forgers' Gazette'). The Zinoviev Letter is thought to have been instrumental in the Conservative Partys victory in the United Kingdom general election, 1924, which ended the countrys first Labour government. ... This article is about communism as a form of society, as an ideology advocating that form of society, and as a popular movement. ... For other uses, see Revolution (disambiguation). ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The 1924 UK general election was held on 29th October 1924. ... Michael Mackintosh Foot (born 23 July 1913) is an English politician and writer. ...


Support for Nazism and Fascism

In early 1934, Rothermere and the Mail were sympathetic to Oswald Mosley and the British Union of Fascists. Rothermere wrote an article, "Hurrah for the Blackshirts", in January 1934, in which he praised Mosley for his "sound, commonsense, Conservative doctrine", though after the violence of the 1934 Olympia meeting involving the BUF, the Mail withdrew its support for Mosley. Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet (November 16, 1896 – December 3, 1980), was a British politician known principally as the founder of the British Union of Fascists. ... The flag of the British Union of Fascists showing the Flash and Circle symbolic of action within unity The British Union of Fascists (BUF) was a political party of the 1930s in the United Kingdom. ...


Rothermere was a friend and supporter of both Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler, which influenced the Mail's political stance towards them up to 1939. During this period, it was the only British newspaper consistently to support the German Nazi Party.[6][7] Rothermere visited and corresponded with Hitler on many occasions. On 1 October 1938, Rothermere sent Hitler a telegram in support of Germany's invasion of the Sudetenland, and expressing the hope that 'Adolf the Great' would become a popular figure in Britain. Mussolini redirects here. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1937, the Mail's chief war correspondent, George Ward Price, to whom Mussolini once personally wrote in support of him and the newspaper, published a book, I Know These Dictators, in defence of Hitler and Mussolini.


Rothermere and the Mail supported Neville Chamberlain's policy of appeasement, particularly during the events leading up to the Munich Agreement. However, after the Nazi invasion of Prague in 1939, the Mail changed position and urged Chamberlain to prepare for war, not least, perhaps, because on account of its stance it had been threatened with closure by the British Government.[citation needed] This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... Appeasement is a policy of accepting the imposed conditions of an aggressor in lieu of armed resistance, usually at the sacrifice of principles. ... For the annual global security meeting held in Munich, see Munich Conference on Security Policy The Munich Agreement (Czech: ; Slovak: ; German: ) was an agreement regarding the Sudetenland Crisis among the major powers of Europe after a conference held in Munich, Germany in 1938 and signed in the early hours of... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ...


The paper continues to be referred to on occasion by critics as the Daily Heil, referring to its conservative stance and its past support for Mosley.[8]


Recent history

The Daily Mail was transformed by its editor of the seventies and eighties, Sir David English. Sir David began his Fleet Street career in 1951, joining The Daily Mirror before moving to The Daily Sketch, where he became features editor. It was the Sketch which brought him his first editorship, from 1969 to 1971. That year the Sketch was closed and he moved to take over the top job at the Mail, where he was to remain for more than 20 years. English transformed it from a struggling rival selling two million copies fewer than the Daily Express to a formidable journalistic powerhouse, which soared dramatically in popularity. Sir David English (1931 – 1998) was a British journalist and newspaper editor, best known for his twenty-year editorship of the Daily Mail. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ...


After 20 years perfecting the Mail, Sir David English became editor-in-chief and chairman of Associated Newspapers in 1992.


The paper enjoyed a period of journalistic success in the 1980s, employing some of the most inventive writers in old Fleet Street including the gossip columnist Nigel Dempster, Lynda Lee Potter and sportswriter Ian Wooldridge (who unlike some of his colleagues - the paper generally did not support sporting boycotts of white-minority-ruled South Africa - strongly opposed Apartheid). In 1982, a Sunday title, the Mail on Sunday was launched (the Sunday Mail was already the name of a newspaper in Scotland, owned by the Mirror Group.) There are Scottish editions of both the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday, with different articles and columnists. In 1992, the current editor, Paul Dacre, was appointed. Fleet Street in 2005 Fleet Street is a famous street in London, England, named after the River Fleet. ... Nigel Richard Patton Dempster (1 November 1941 in Calcutta, India – 12 July 2007 in Ham, Surrey) was a British journalist, author, broadcaster and diarist. ... Ian Wooldridge, OBE (circa 1932 – 4 March 2007) was a British sports journalist. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... The Sunday Mail is a Scottish tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... This article is about the country. ... Paul Michael Dacre (born November 14, 1948) is a British journalist. ...


It officially entered the Irish market with the launch of a local version of the paper on 6 February 2006; free copies of the paper were distributed on that day in some locations to publicise the launch. Its masthead differs from that of UK versions by having a green rectangle with the word "IRISH", instead of the Royal Arms. The Irish version includes stories of Irish interest alongside content from the UK version. According to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, the Irish edition had a circulation of 63,511 for July 2007 and is steadily increasing on each survey. Since 24 September 2006 Ireland on Sunday, the Irish Sunday newspaper acquired by Associated in 2001, was replaced by an Irish edition of the Mail on Sunday (the Irish Mail on Sunday), to tie in with the weekday newspaper. The newspaper entered India on November 16 2007 with the launch of Mail Today, a 48-page compact size newspaper printed in Delhi, Gurgaon and Noida with a print run of 110,000 copies. Based around a subscription model, the newspaper has the same fonts and feel as the Daily Mail and was set up with investment from Associated Newspapers and editorial assistance from the Daily Mail newsroom.[9] The Irish Daily Mail is a tabloid newspaper published in the Republic of Ireland by Associated Newspapers. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... We dont have an article called Coat of Arms of The United Kingdom Start this article Search for Coat of Arms of The United Kingdom in. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ireland on Sunday is a Sunday newspaper in the Republic of Ireland published by Associated Newspapers Ireland Limited, a subsidary of the Daily Mail and General Trust plc. ...


Editorial stance

Current columnists Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

The Daily Mail considers itself to be the voice of Middle England speaking up for "small-c" conservative[10] values against what it sees as a liberal establishment. It generally takes an anti-EU, anti-mass immigration, anti-abortion view, based around what it describes as "traditional values", and is correspondingly pro-family, pro-capitalism (though not always supportive of its aftereffects), and pro-monarchy, as well as, in some cases, advocating stricter punishments for crime. It also often calls for lower levels of taxation. The paper is generally critical of the BBC, which it argues is biased to the left. However, it is less supportive of deregulated commercial television than The Sun, and unlike Rupert Murdoch's tabloid it seems to be broadly nostalgic for what it believes the BBC once was. Alex Brummer (born 25 May 1949) is a British journalist, editor, and author. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Roy Sydney George Hattersley, Baron Hattersley, PC (born December 28, 1932) is a British Labour Party politician, published author and journalist from Sheffield, England. ... Liz Jones is an English journalist and writer. ... Des Kelly (born 1965) is a British journalist. ... Dame Ann Elizabeth Mary Leslie, DBE (b. ... Edward Lucas is an American film director. ... Richard William Littlejohn (born 18 January 1954 in Ilford, Essex) is an award-winning right wing British journalist, broadcaster, and author of three best-selling books. ... Graham Poll (born July 29, 1963 in Tring, Hertfordshire) is an English former football referee in the FA Premier League. ... Melanie Phillips (born June 4, 1951) is a British journalist and author, best known for her column about political and social issues which currently appears in the Daily Mail. ... Tom Utley is a British journalist who currently writes a witty weekly column for the Daily Mail. ... Paul Sheehan (born October 19, 1963) is a British born Canadian journalist who specializes in pop culture. ... Keith Waterhouse (born 6 February 1929 in Leeds, England) is a novelist, newspaper columnist, and the writer of many television series. ... Michael Winner (born 30 October 1935) is an English film director and producer, active in both Europe and the United States, also known as a food critic for the Sunday Times. ... Stephen Wright (born 8 February 1980) is an English professional football player, currently (2005) with Sunderland A.F.C. He was born in Liverpool and joined Liverpool F.C. He had a loan period at Crewe Alexandra F.C., and was signed by Sunderland in 2002. ... Middle England originally indicated the central region of England, now almost always referred to as the Midlands. ... Euroscepticism has become a general term for opposition to the process of European integration. ... This article is about family values as a political concept. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Left wing redirects here. ... Commercial broadcasting is the practice of broadcasting for profit. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ...


In the late 1960s the paper went through a phase of being liberal on social issues like corporal punishment, but this proved short-lived and it soon reverted to its traditional right-wing conservative line.


In Richard Littlejohn, who returned in 2005 from The Sun, it has one of the most right-wing columnists[citation needed] in popular British journalism, alongside Peter Hitchens, who joined its sister title the Mail on Sunday in 2001, when his former newspaper, the Daily Express, was purchased by Richard Desmond, the owner of a number of pornographic titles. The editorial stance was highly critical of Tony Blair, when he was still Prime Minister, and endorsed the Conservative Party in the 2005 general election[11] However, in Blair's earlier years as Labour leader and then Prime Minister the paper often wrote positively about him and his reforms of the party. Opponents of Littlejohn have accused the columnist of being preoccupied with homosexuality (which he frequently calls 'poovery') and lying about asylum seekers being 'hosed down in benefits'[12]. Richard William Littlejohn (born 18 January 1954 in Ilford, Essex) is an award-winning right wing British journalist, broadcaster, and author of three best-selling books. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... Peter Hitchens Peter Jonathan Hitchens (born 28 October 1951 in Sliema, Malta) is a British journalist, author and broadcaster. ... Private Eye cover depicting Desmond following his purchase of the Daily Express newspaper Richard Clive Desmond (born December 8, 1951) is a British publisher, current owner of Express Newspapers and founder of Northern and Shell plc. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... The Conservative and Unionist Party, more commonly known as the Conservative Party, is currently the largest majortiy opposition party in the United Knigdom. ... Barring a change in the law, the next general election in the United Kingdom must be held some time before June 30, 2006. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


To the surprise of some of its critics[citation needed], the Mail championed the case of Stephen Lawrence, a black teenager who was murdered in a racially motivated attack in Eltham, London in April 1993. In February 1997, the Mail led its front page with a picture of the five men accused of Lawrence's murder and the headline "MURDERERS", stating that it believed that the men had murdered Lawrence and adding "if we are wrong, let them sue us". This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eltham is a place in the London Borough of Greenwich. ...


The Mail has also opposed the growing of genetically-modified crops in the United Kingdom, a stance it shares with many of its left-wing critics.


Moral issues

The Mail is well-known for its strong stance on numerous issues which it sees as being of moral significance. These include continuing condemnation of convicted criminals such as Myra Hindley and Maxine Carr and television programmes such as Jerry Springer - The Opera or Brass Eye, abortion and reverse discrimination in the UK. Mug shots of Myra Hindley (left) and her partner Ian Brady at the time of their arrest in October 1965. ... Maxine Ann Carr[1] (born February 16, 1977)[2] was the girlfriend of Ian Huntley at the time he committed the August 4, 2002 Soham murders. ... David Soul stars as Jerry Springer. ... Brass Eye is a UK television series of satirical spoof documentaries which aired on Channel 4 in 1997 and was re-run in 2001. ... Reverse discrimination is a term that is used to describe policies or acts that are seen to benefit a historically socio-politically non-dominant group (typically minorities or women), at the expense of a historically socio-politically dominant group (typically men and majority races). ...


Immigration

The Mail is also known for its strong stance on immigration[citation needed]. Generally, its journalists argue emphatically in favour of managed migration whilst criticising what it calls Labour's "open door" immigration policy which, as is often quoted, has reportedly seen the UK's population increase by around 1.2 million.[13] However, its fervent treatment of issues such as asylum seekers has prompted opponents (including Mayor of London Ken Livingstone in a well-publicised argument)[14] to accuse the Mail of engendering racism. Ken Livingstone, the current Mayor of London The Mayor of London is an elected politician in London, United Kingdom. ... Kenneth Robert Livingstone (born June 17, 1945) became Mayor of London on the creation of the post in 2000 having previously been Labour Leader of the Greater London Council from 1981 until it was abolished in 1986. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota...


The paper has also been accused of misquoting information about immigration in order to support its anti-immigrant line, a move criticised by the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO), who warned that media campaigns against immigrants could lead to a risk of "significant public disorder". However, the paper chose to interpret this as meaning that the disorder would be caused by immigrants, and failed to mention the media's role when reporting ACPO's statement.[15] The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) is the lead organisation for developing police policy in the United Kingdom (except Scotland). ...


The newspaper is sometimes accused by its critics of having an anti-semitic past, being described by Ken Livingstone as having campaigned not to admit Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, that it described Jews as infiltrating and undermining the pre-Hitler German government, supporting the Nazis, and blaming the Jews for having caused bad feeling against them in Germany.[16]


The paper now strongly repudiates far-right groups, for instance on 3 February 2006 having the front page headline "In Britain: Two members of the odious BNP go free over remarks offensive to most decent people" on the same day as publishing the article "Cheers as BNP leader walks free".[17] Despite its anti-mass immigration stance the paper has campaigned for failed asylum seekers from Zimbabwe to be allowed to stay in Britain. is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ... Power lines leading to a trash dump hover just overhead in El Carpio, a Nicaraguan refugee camp in Costa Rica Under international law, a refugee is a person who is outside his/her country of nationality or habitual residence; has a well-founded fear of persecution because of his/her...


Reader feedback

The Daily Mail's online presence with its "comment" features beneath the articles has given some insight into the political views and allegiances of the paper's readers. However, this should be treated with caution as those reading the paper online may not be the same type of people who purchase the paper, and people may have been referred to specific articles from other sites.


An example of feedback which suggests that Daily Mail readers are not as "right wing" as some claim is a 2007 article by Lowri Turner regarding her feelings of anxiety about having had a mixed-race child. The article attracted 16 comments every one of which was critical of her stance and many of which accused her of harbouring racist attitudes.[18] Many articles feature large numbers of comments that are not supportive of the British National Party.[19] Lowri Gwyneth Turnerand got born (31 December 1964 in London, England) to Welsh parents Mervyn and Shirley, is a British television presenter. ...


Common satirical target

The paper, and the stereotypical "Daily Mail reader" have become stock characters in the UK (as the phrase "Guardian reader" has become for the left/liberal archetype), and are often featured in a negative light in other publications and media: This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ...

  • Alan Partridge, a television comedy character, states that it is "arguably the best newspaper in the world" in an episode of I'm Alan Partridge.
  • A stand up comedy show at the Edinburgh Festival 2007 was called All Daily Mail Writers Must Die, by a comedian called William Hanmer-Lloyd.
  • In the Harry Potter series, the hero's obnoxious uncle Vernon Dursley is shown reading the Daily Mail; series author JK Rowling has confessed to loathing the paper.[20]
  • In the adult satirical comic Viz strip Jack Black, a near-fascist "Boy's Own" adventure strip, the Daily Mail is the only newspaper anyone reads in the village, until in one episode an incoming Guardian reader is uncovered as protecting an Al Qaeda cell.
  • In the BBC comedy show Little Britain, the racist Women's Institute member Maggie Blackamoor is depicted as reading the Daily Mail.
  • The satirical magazine Private Eye often refers to the Daily Mail as the Daily Hate Mail.[citation needed] In the Eye's frequent spoofs of the Mail's style, the by-line is usually "Sir David Fester": this refers to Sir David English (see above) and to a court case between the two publications, which the Mail won and then ran the story under the title "Anatomy of a festering lie".
  • The satirical website theVoiceofReason.co.uk [2] spoofs the Daily Mail as the Daily Moan because of its frequently preachy editorial stance.
  • In the BBC comedy show Monkey Dust, the editor of the Daily Mail is portrayed as a pile of excrement, with overtly bigoted and racist front pages of the paper shown in the background on a regular basis.
  • On an episode of Room 101 Linda Smith referred to fans of Tim Henman as "awful people with copies of the Daily Mail in their pants". The show's presenter, Paul Merton, responded by saying "Well, it's very absorbent".
  • The spoof TV listings site and TV show TVGoHome included a reality show entitled Daily Mail Island in which contestants were denied access to any form of media except for the Daily Mail. As the show progresses the inhabitants become increasingly right-wing and irrational.
  • In the comedy series Extras a copy of the Daily Mail appears with the headline "Gypsies are eating our pets."
  • Stephen Fry, on the BBC series Comedy Connections, described some fans of A Bit Of Fry And Laurie as "…a massive audience out there for people who may not understand a single word... a rather strange constituency of Daily Mail readers..."
  • The Irish nationalist song "The Man from the Daily Mail" attacks the Daily Mail (and British media in general) for its coverage of Irish issues and portrayal of Irish people [3].
  • Bloc Party's "Hunting for Witches" from their 2007 album A Weekend In the City illustrates the Terrorist Attacks on London's transportation *system in July 2005 and contains the lyric "The Daily Mail says the enemy's among us, taking our women, and taking our jobs."
  • The title track from The Smiths' album The Queen Is Dead features the lines "I said Charles, don't you ever crave to appear on the front of the Daily Mail dressed in your Mother's bridal veil."
  • In Series E of BBC TV show QI the episode dedicated to Europe contained a round called Call My (Euro) Bluff given to lampoon the supposed euroscepticism the paper allegedly displays towards supposed European legislation - "laws" declaring that the sale of curved bananas is to be made illegal, tightrope walkers have to wear hard hats due to health and safety regulations, sausages can't be called sausages anymore and trawlermen have to wear hairnets whilst fishing were all revealed to be completely untrue, despite the Mail, and other newspapers such as The Sun, reporting them as fact.
  • Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds' 'Babe, I'm on Fire' includes 'The man from the Daily Mail / With his dead refugee' in a catalogue of grotesque figures.

Information Gender Male Date of birth April 2, 1955 ) Occupation Radio and Television Broadcaster Portrayed by Steve Coogan Alan Gordon Partridge is a fictional television and radio presenter portrayed by English comedian Steve Coogan. ... Im Alan Partridge is a British sitcom. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... The Dursleys are Harry Potters last living relatives. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: roll-ing; her former students used to joke with her name calling her the Rolling Stone), is a British fiction writer. ... Cover of Viz (issue 57) Viz is a popular British adult comic magazine that has been running since 1979. ... Jack Black is a character appearing in the adult Viz comic. ... Boys Own Paper was a British story paper aimed at young and teenage boys, published from 1879 to 1967. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Map of major attacks attributed to al-Qaeda Al-Qaeda (also al-Qaida or al-Qaida or al-Qaidah) (Arabic: ‎ , translation: The Base) is an international alliance of terrorist organizations founded in 1988[4] by Osama bin Laden and other veteran Afghan Arabs after the Soviet War in... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British TV show Little Britain. ... The Womens Institute (WI) is a membership organisation for women in England and Wales. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Monkey Dust is a British animated TV series that satirises the darker side of life in the United Kingdom. ... This page is about the TV series Room 101. ... Linda Smith Linda Smith (29 January 1958 – 27 February 2006) was an English stand-up comic and comedy writer. ... Timothy Henry Tim Henman OBE (born 6 September 1974 in Oxford) is a former English tennis player. ... Paul Merton (born Paul Martin 9 July 1957[1]) is an English actor, deadpan comedian and writer, who is best known as a panellist on the BBC TV show Have I Got News for You and Radio 4s Just a Minute, as well as Channel 4s Whose Line... TVGoHome was a website which parodied the television listings style of the British magazine Radio Times. ... Not to be confused with Extra (TV series). ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, humourist, novelist, columnist, filmmaker and television personality. ... Comedy Connections is a BBC One documentary series produced by BBC Scotland that aired from 2003 to 2007. ... This article is about the television series. ... Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... Bloc Party are an English indie rock band. ... Hunting For Witches is a song by Bloc Party, and it is the third single of their second studio album A Weekend in the City. ... Alternate cover Special CD+DVD edition A Weekend in the City is the second studio album by Bloc Party, which was released on February 5, 2007. ... The Smiths were an English rock band active from 1982 to 1987. ... The Queen Is Dead is the third studio album of The Smiths. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... For other uses, see QI (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Call My Bluff is a British game show between two teams of three contestants. ... Euroscepticism has become a general term for opposition to the process of European integration. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds is a successful rock band with international personnel. ...

Supplements and features

Daily Mail

  • City & Finance - City & Finance is the business part of the Daily Mail, and the Financial Mail is the business paper free with the Mail on Sunday. City & Finance features City News and the results from the London Stock Exchange, and also has its own website [4] called This is Money.
  • Travelmail - Contains travel articles, advertisements etc.
  • Femail - Femail is an extensive part of the Daily Mail's newspaper and website, being one of four main features on Mail Online others being News, TV & Showbiz and Sport. It is designed for women and is similar to magazines with life stories such as Bella Magazine and Take A Break.
  • Weekend - The Daily Mail Weekend is a TV guide published by the Daily Mail, included free with the Mail every Saturday. Weekend magazine, launched in October 1993, is issued free with the Saturday Daily Mail and has more ABC1 readers than any other national magazine. Weekend was originally launched with the intention of raising the Saturday circulation up to around 1.8 million copies. Today, the Daily Mail on a Saturday circulates over 3.2 million copies and is read by over 6.4 million adults. The guide does not use a magazine-type layout but chooses a newspaper style similar to the Daily Mail itself. In April 2007, the "Weekend" had a major revamp which included new articles and the end of other ones, such as the popular Nigel Andrew's View next to the guide every day. A feature changed during the revamp was a dedicated Freeview channel page to ensure that the guide was more 'user-friendly' for people with the most used digital box in Great Britain.
The Financial Mail on Sunday

Mail on Sunday The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... Mail Online (also known as dailymail. ... For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the United Kingdom digital terrestrial television service. ...

  • Financial Mail on Sunday - now part of the main paper, this section includes the award winning Financial Mail Enterprise, focusing on small business.
  • You - You magazine is a women's magazine featured in the Mail on Sunday. Its mix of in-depth features plus fashion, beauty advice, practical insights on health and relationships, food recipes and interiors pages make it a regular read for over 3 million women (and 2.3 million men) every week. The Mail markets it, with Live magazine, as the only paper to have a magazine for him (Live) and for her (You). The Mail on Sunday is read by over six million a week[21].
  • Live - this is the magazine is aimed at men. The main features are columms by well-known people such as Piers Morgan, Has a particular stance towards iPod style equipment, and as such has been criticised for brand favouritism.
  • Mail on Sunday 2 This pullout includes review, featuring articles on the arts, books and culture and it consists of reviews of all media and entertainment forms and interviews with sector personalities, property, travel and health.
  • Sportsmail - on the back pages of the Mail. It features different sports including an emphasis on alternative sports such as darts and snooker.
  • Football Mail on Sunday - this reviews Premier League, Championship and Football League games from Saturday as well as any important international games.

Piers Stefan Pughe-Morgan (born 30 March 1965 in Newick, East Sussex) is a former editor of British tabloid newspapers the News of the World (1994–1995) and the Daily Mirror (1995–2004). ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... The Football League is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales, and is the oldest such competition in world football. ...

Regular cartoon strips

Current cartoon strips that are in the Daily Mail include Garfield which moved from the Daily Express in 2006 and is also included in The Mail on Sunday. It is usually written by Jim Davis. I Don't Believe It is another 3/4 part strip, written by Dick Millington. Odd Streak and The Strip Show, which is shown in 3D are one part strips. Up and Running is a strip distributed by Knight Features and Fred Basset follows the life of the dog of the same name in a two part strip in the Daily Mail since July 8, 1963.[22] The Gambols are another feature in the Mail on Sunday. This article is about the comic strip. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... The Gambols is a British comic strip created by Barry Appleby in 1950 which was originally published in the Daily Express and is now seen in the Mail on Sunday. ... This article is about the UK-based comic strip. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... This article is about the comic strip. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the UK-based comic strip. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ...


The long-running Teddy Tail cartoon strip, was first published on 5 April 1915 was the first ever cartoon strip in a British Newspaper. It ran for over 40 years to 1960, spawning the popular Teddy Tail League Children's Club and many annuals from 1934 to 1942 and again from 1949 to 1962. Teddy Tail was an Mouse, with friends Kitty Puss (a cat), Douglas Duck and Dr. Beetle. Teddy Tail is always shown with a knot in his tail, the reason why is explained in one of his stories. [23] [24] April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Online media

Main article: Mail Online

The Daily Mail and its Sunday sibling, The Mail on Sunday publish most of their news online in a service called the Mail Online. It contains almost all of the stories from the Daily Mail as well as a large archive of important stories from years ago. The Daily Mail's sister paper has it's own website but the format and stories are all the same basically. The website is in the top 25 most visited English language websites in the world and one of the most read internet newspapers in the world, with 2 million more people visiting it regularly in the past year. Mail Online (also known as dailymail. ...


The search engine on the Daily Mail website is also widely used, being one of Internet Explorer 7 default web searches, alongside names such as Google, Yahoo! and eBay. Most of the site can be viewed for free and without registration, though some services require users to register. Windows Internet Explorer 7, commonly abbreviated IE7, is a web browser released by Microsoft in late 2006 for Windows Vista, Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. ... This article is about the corporation. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... This article is about the online auction center. ...


Contributors

In recent times, like some other British newspapers (see, for example, Bruce Anderson's contributions to The Independent), the Daily Mail has taken to including some columnists with a very different political stance from the paper's own editorial line. Notable in the Mail's case is Roy Hattersley, a former Labour minister, who still takes a classic social-democratic line and nowadays attacks his own party very much from the left. Hattersley has written frequently for both the Mail and its political antithesis The Guardian, as has Geoffrey Wheatcroft. Bruce Anderson is a United Kingdom conservative political columnist. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Geoffrey Wheatcroft (London 1945-) is a British conservative journalist and writer. ...


Notable regular contributors (past and present)

Columnists

  • Dennis Rice
  • Sharon Churcher
  • Antonio Hoyle
  • Daniel Boffey
  • Suzanne Moore
  • David Bennun
  • Freddie Windsor

Cartoonists This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Alex Brummer (born 25 May 1949) is a British journalist, editor, and author. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Roy Sydney George Hattersley, Baron Hattersley, PC (born December 28, 1932) is a British Labour Party politician, published author and journalist from Sheffield, England. ... Liz Jones is an English journalist and writer. ... Des Kelly (born 1965) is a British journalist. ... People named Tom Kelly include: Tom Kelly (baseball) Tom Kelly (engineer) Tom Kelly (Ireland) Tom Kelly (musician) Tom Kelly (UK) Tom Kelly (USA) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Dame Ann Elizabeth Mary Leslie, DBE (b. ... Edward Lucas is an American film director. ... Richard William Littlejohn (born 18 January 1954 in Ilford, Essex) is an award-winning right wing British journalist, broadcaster, and author of three best-selling books. ... Graham Poll (born July 29, 1963 in Tring, Hertfordshire) is an English former football referee in the FA Premier League. ... Melanie Phillips (born June 4, 1951) is a British journalist and author, best known for her column about political and social issues which currently appears in the Daily Mail. ... Paul Sheehan (born October 19, 1963) is a British born Canadian journalist who specializes in pop culture. ... // David Williams is the name of: David Williams (didgeridoo), (born 1983) Aboriginal musician and artist David Williams (Son of Dork), a guitarist in the British band Son of Dork David Williams, Welsh musician with the New Wave/Rock band, The Dear & Departed D. J. Williams (1885–1970), Welsh nationalist leader... Michael Winner (born 30 October 1935) is an English film director and producer, active in both Europe and the United States, also known as a food critic for the Sunday Times. ... Stephen Wright (born 8 February 1980) is an English professional football player, currently (2005) with Sunderland A.F.C. He was born in Liverpool and joined Liverpool F.C. He had a loan period at Crewe Alexandra F.C., and was signed by Sunderland in 2002. ... Patrick Collins, born in Fermoy, County Cork, Ireland was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts and mayor of Boston. ... Derek Draper was a New Labour insider and lobbyist who was at the centre of a scandal about political lobbying known as Lobbygate, the Cash for Access scandal, or Drapergate. Derek attended the University of Manchester, where he was first spotted by Peter Mandelson, and employed by the latter as... Peter Hitchens Peter Jonathan Hitchens (born 28 October 1951 in Sliema, Malta) is a British journalist, author and broadcaster. ... Keith Waterhouse (born 6 February 1929 in Leeds, England) is a novelist, newspaper columnist, and the writer of many television series. ... Julie Burchill (born July 3, 1959 in Frenchay, Bristol) is an English writer, renowned for her invective and often contentious prose. ... Sir John Donald Brown Junor (15 January 1919 – 3 May 1997) was a Scottish journalist. ... Norman Beresford Tebbit, Baron Tebbit, CH, PC (born 29 March 1931) is a British Conservative politician and former Member of Parliament (MP) for Chingford, who was born in Southgate in Enfield. ...

Photographers/Picture editors John Alexander Alex Graham (July 11, 1890 – April 1943) was a Scottish footballer. ... James Robert Jim Davis (born July 28, 1945), is an American cartoonist who created the popular comic strip Garfield. ...

  • Tobi Jenkins
  • David Crump
  • Colin Davey
  • Jenny Goodall
  • Roland Hoskins
  • Les Wilson
  • Mark Large
  • Dave Parker
  • Mark Richards
  • Murray Sanders
  • Jamie Wiseman
  • Terry Bradford
  • Dr. Kenneth Wilson

The name Dave Parker may refer to several notable individuals: Dave Parker, American baseball player Dave Parker, Canadian jazz musician with The Shuffle Demons Dave Parker, Samoan singer. ... Mark Richards is a surfer from Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. ...

Past writers

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... William Comyns Beaumont, also known as Comyns Beaumont, (1873–1956)[1] was a British journalist, author, and lecturer. ... William Comyns Beaumont, also known as Comyns Beaumont, (1873–1956)[1] was a British journalist, author, and lecturer. ... Nigel Richard Patton Dempster (1 November 1941 in Calcutta, India – 12 July 2007 in Ham, Surrey) was a British journalist, author, broadcaster and diarist. ... Simon James Heffer (born July 18, 1960) is an English journalist and writer. ... Paul Johnson (born Paul Bede Johnson on 2 November 1928 in Manchester, England) is a British Roman Catholic journalist, historian, speechwriter and author. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... Lynda Lee-Potter (born Lynda Higginson; May 2, 1935 – October 20, 2004) was a Daily Mail columnist. ... William Tufnell Le Queux (1864 - 1927) was a British journalist and writer. ... The Battle of Dorking (1871) triggered an explosion of invasion literature. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Ian Wooldridge, OBE (circa 1932 – 4 March 2007) was a British sports journalist. ...

See also

  • Daily Chronicle, a newspaper which merged with the Daily News to become the News-Chronicle and was finally absorbed by the Daily Mail

The Daily Chronicle was a London newspaper company founded in 1872 that merged its publication with the Daily News to become the News-Chronicle and the company then absorbed The Star which it retained as an evening publication. ...

References

  1. ^ Summary Report, Daily Mail - 01-Oct-2007 to 28-Oct-2007. Audited Bureau of Circulations (ABC) (2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-22.
  2. ^ Milestones in 20th Century Newspaper history in Britain. Eurocosm UK. Retrieved on 2008-04-12.
  3. ^ Associated Newspapers Ltd - Daily Mail
  4. ^ World’s 100 Largest Newspapers. World Association of Newspapers (2005). Retrieved on 2008-04-12.
  5. ^ MORI survey of newspaper readers. Retrieved on 2007-12-21.
  6. ^ Griffiths, Richard (1980). Fellow Travellers of the Right: British Enthusiasts for Nazi Germany, 1933-9. London: Constable. ISBN 0-09-463460-2. 
  7. ^ Taylor, S. J. (1996). The Great Outsiders: Northcliffe, Rothermere and the Daily Mail. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN 0-297-81653-5. 
  8. ^ Where Have All The Goals Gone?. The Guardian Sport. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-01-09.
  9. ^ Associated Newspapers launches Mail Today in India
  10. ^ "small c" referring to conservatism as a political philosophy. Capitalising the C would imply the Conservative Party, as "Conservative" is a proper noun.
  11. ^ However you vote, give Mr Blair a bloody nose, Daily Mail, 5th May 2005
  12. ^ Johann Hari. On Fantasy Island. The New Statesman.
  13. ^ Immigration increases UK population by over 1 million. Work Permit. Retrieved on 2007-11-23.
  14. ^ Ken Livingstone's statement in full. BBC Online (2005-02-22). Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  15. ^ Nick Davies, "None deadlier than the Mail" [1]
  16. ^ Ken Livingstone. The Mayor's response to the London Assembly. Mayor of London. Retrieved on 2007-11-23.
  17. ^ Cheers as BNP leader walks free'. Daily Mail (2006-02-03). Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  18. ^ Lowri Turner. 'I love my mixed race baby - but why does she feel so alien?'. Femail. Retrieved on 2007-11-23.
  19. ^ Paul Sims 'BNP ballerina' ditches Cuban immigrant lover to marry far right councillor, Daily Mail, 20 December 2007, accessed 20 December 2007
  20. ^ Lockerbie, Catherine. "All aboard the Hogwarts Express". The Scotsman. 11 July 2000. Accessed 30 October 2007.
  21. ^ Advertising for the Daily Mail
  22. ^ Maria Esposito. Fred Basset is back. C21 Media. Retrieved on 2007-03-27.
  23. ^ Teddy Tail of the Daily Mail.
  24. ^ Concise History of the British Newspaper in the Twentieth Century.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political philosophy is the study of fundamental questions about the state, government, politics, liberty, justice, property, rights, law and the enforcement of a legal code by authority: what they are, why (or even if) they are needed, what makes a government legitimate, what... The Conservative and Unionist Party, more commonly known as the Conservative Party, is currently the largest majortiy opposition party in the United Knigdom. ... A proper noun is a noun that picks out a unique entity. ... Johann Hari (born January 21, 1979) is a British journalist and writer. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Mail Online
  • This is Money
  • A biography of the 1st Lord Rothermere
  • Mailwatch
Daily Mail and General Trust plc (DMGT) is one of the UKs largest media companies and has interests in national and regional newspapers, television and radio. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... Chairman of the Board redirects here. ... Viscount Rothermere, of Hemsted in the County of Kent, is a peerage title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Paul Michael Dacre (born November 14, 1948) is a British journalist. ... Padraic Fallon (1905-1974) is an Irish poet. ... Charles Dunstone (born 21 November 1964) is the CEO and co-founder of mobile phone retailer Carphone Warehouse. ... Yes, Dear is a television sitcom which premiered in 2000 on CBS. It stars Anthony Clark, Jean Louisa Kelly, Mike OMalley, Liza Snyder, and Joel Homan. ... Associated Newspapers is a large national newspaper publisher, which is a subsidiary of the Daily Mail and General Trust. ... Northcliffe Media (formerly Northcliffe Newspapers Group) is a large regional newspaper publisher in the UK. The companys name was changed to Northcliffe Media in 2007. ... The Daily Mail and its Sunday edition the Mail on Sunday are British newspapers, first published in 1896. ... Ireland on Sunday is a Sunday newspaper in the Republic of Ireland published by Associated Newspapers Ireland Limited, a subsidary of the Daily Mail and General Trust plc. ... Metro is the trading name of a free daily newspaper, published by Associated Newspapers (part of Daily Mail and General Trust) in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. ... London Lite is the trading name of a British free newspaper, published by Associated Newspapers (part of Daily Mail and General Trust). ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ... Pathé or Pathé Frères is the name of various businesses founded and originally run by the Pathé Brothers of France. ... GCap Media plc is a British commercial radio company formed from the merger of the Capital Radio Group and GWR Group. ... Classic FM is the United Kingdoms first national commercial radio station, broadcasting classical music in a popular and accessible style. ... Core was a digital radio station broadcasting across the UK on the Digital One and streamed online. ... The One Network is the collective name for the thirty-eight regional Independent Local Radio licences operated by GCap Media in the United Kingdom. ... ITN may refer to: Independent Television News In the news, a section on the Main Page of English Wikipedia This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Teletext Ltd is the provider of Teletext services for ITV, Channel 4 and Five in the United Kingdom. ... DMG Radio Australia operates commercial radio networks in metropolitan and regional areas of Australia. ... Vega FM is a network of Australian commercial radio stations operated by DMG Radio Australia. ... Nova is a name given to a group of Australian radio stations. ... Star FM is an Australian radio network, consisting of stations in New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. ... FIVEaa is Adelaides only commercial talkback radio station. ... 97. ... Emex is a genus of herbaceous plants of the Polygonaceae family. ... ISA logo ISA - The Instrumentation, Systems, and Automation Society is a non-profit technical society for engineers, technicians, businessmen, educators and students, who work, study or are interested in instrumentation, industrial automation, and pursuits related to these fields. ... Farm World is a weekly USA farming technology magazine that has been published 51 weeks a year, every Wednesday, since 1955 and is owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust. ... The Ideal Home Show is an annual event run by the Daily Mail. ... Big five can have the following meanings: // In international diplomacy, it refers to the five permanent members of the UN Security Council: the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Russia, and the Peoples Republic of China. ... Guerilla News Network (GNN) is an underground news organization. ... Euromoney Institutional Investor PLC, 70%-owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust Group, was founded in 1969. ... Euromoney Institutional Investor PLC, 70%-owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust Group, was founded in 1969. ... Euromoney magazine [1] is a monthly publication focusing on international banking and capital markets. ... Compliance Reporter (CR) is a weekly news-breaking source that covers compliance initiatives at broker/dealers and investment advisers, as well as regulations and enforcement actions from entities such as the National Association of Securities Dealers, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the U.S. Court of Appeals and state regulatory... Engel Publishing Partners is a provider of business and marketing information to the $350 billion dollar worldwide pharmaceutical industry. ... Petroleum Economist is a monthly magazine that provides macro-economic and geopolitical analysis of the energy industry. ... Dolphin may refer to: Dolphins, several species of aquatic mammal in the order Delphinidae. ... The Australian Radio Network (ARN) is a network of commercial radio stations. ... GBP redirects here. ... A fiscal year (or financial year or accounting reference date) is a 12-month period used for calculating annual (yearly) financial statements in businesses and other organizations. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... // Traditionally newspapers could be split into quality, serious-minded newspapers (usually referred to as broadsheets due to their large size) and tabloid, less serious newspapers. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... Charles Mackintoshs Glasgow Herald building, now The Lighthouse The Herald is a national broadsheet newspaper published Monday to Saturday in Glasgow, Scotland, with an audited circulation of 71,000, making it the best-selling national Scottish broadsheet newspaper. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... The Sunday Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper, founded in 1961. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... Newspapers with the Berliner format. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Middle Market Newspaper From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... The Daily Mail and its Sunday edition the Mail on Sunday are British newspapers, first published in 1896. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... The Daily Sport is a tabloid newspaper published in the United Kingdom by Sport Newspapers. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Morning Star. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a British tabloid daily newspaper. ... The People, formerly known as the Sunday People, is a British red-top Sunday-only newspaper, owned by the Trinity Mirror Group. ... The News of the World is a British tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... The Sunday Sport is a British newspaper which established itself in 1986 as a tabloid. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

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The Daily Wail, also known as The Daily Heil is a hugely popular British comic for those who believe themselves (usually mistakenly) to be members of the middle classes.
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The Daily Mail (big fans of law n' order and all that) was the first newspaper (sic) in Britain to publish Horoscopes.
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The objective of such (wireless) experiments as the Daily Mail has initiated and intends to continue is to enable this country to take the lead.
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