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Encyclopedia > Daily Express
Daily Express
Type Daily newspaper
Format Tabloid

Owner Richard Desmond
Publisher Northern and Shell Media
Editor Peter Hill
Founded 1900
Political allegiance Conservative/Right-Wing
Headquarters 10 Lower Thames Street,
London EC3R 6EN
Circulation 761,637[1]

Website: www.express.co.uk

The Daily Express is a conservative, middle-market British tabloid newspaper. It is the flagship title of Express Newspapers and is currently owned by Richard Desmond. As of February 2007, it has a circulation of 761,637.[1] Circulation figures according to the Audited Bureau of Circulations, in October 2007 show gross sales of its long standing rival the Daily Mail are at 2,400,143, compared with 789,867 for the Daily Express. This is an increase of almost a third over the sales figures for the Daily Mail 25 years ago, when it sold 1.87 million copies a day. By comparison, the Daily Express was selling over 2 million copies a day, so its sales have reduced by 60% over the same period. Private Eye cover depicting Desmond following his purchase of the Daily Express newspaper Richard Clive Desmond (born December 8, 1951) is a British publisher, current owner of Express Newspapers and founder of Northern and Shell plc. ... Peter Hill is the editor of the UK newspaper Daily Express. ... Conservative may refer to: Conservatism, political philosophy A member of a Conservative Party Conservative extension, premise of deductive logic Conservativity theorem, mathematical proof of conservative extension Conservative Judaism britney spears Category: ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Daily Express is a conservative, middle-market British tabloid newspaper and the a flagship title of Express Newspapers. ... Middle Market Newspaper From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. ... This article is about the newspaper size. ... Private Eye cover depicting Desmond following his purchase of the Daily Express newspaper Richard Clive Desmond (born December 8, 1951) is a British publisher, current owner of Express Newspapers and founder of Northern and Shell plc. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the United Kingdom, the Audit Bureau of Circulations (UK) certifies and audits the circulations of major publications, including newspapers and magazines. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, currently published in a tabloid format. ...


Express Newspapers publishes the Daily Express, Sunday Express (launched in 1918), Daily Star and Daily Star Sunday. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

History

The Daily Express was founded in 1900 by Cyril Arthur Pearson, publisher of Pearson's Own and other titles. Pearson sold the title after losing his sight and it was bought in 1916 by the future Lord Beaverbrook. It was one of the first papers to carry gossip, sports, and women's features, and the first newspaper in Britain to have a crossword. It moved in 1931 to 133 Fleet Street, a specially-commissioned art deco building. Under Beaverbrook the newspaper achieved a phenomenally high circulation, setting records for newspaper sales several times throughout the 1930s.[2] Its success was partly due to an aggressive marketing campaign and a vigorous circulation war with other populist newspapers. Beaverbrook also discovered and encouraged a gifted editor named Arthur Christiansen, who showed an uncommon gift for staying in touch with the interests of the reading public. The paper also featured Alfred Bestall's Rupert Bear cartoon and satirical cartoons by Carl Giles. An infamous front page headline of these years was "Judea Declares War on Germany", published on March 24, 1933. Cyril Arthur Pearson (24 February 1866–9 December 1921) was a British newspaper magnate and publisher, most noted for founding the Daily Express. ... Sir William Maxwell Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook (May 25, 1879 - June 9, 1964) was a Canadian–British business tycoon and politician. ... A crossword is a word puzzle that normally takes the form of a square grid of black and white squares. ... Fleet Street in 2005 Fleet Street is a famous street in London, England, named after the River Fleet. ... Asheville City Hall. ... Arthur Christiansen was the man who took Candy Roses vertical plate, thus resulting in the infamous injury to Gary OBrian. ... Alfred Edmeades Fred Bestall, MBE (Mandalay, Burma, 14 December 1892 – 15 January 1986 in Penlan, Wales), was the author and illustrator of Rupert Bear for the London Daily Express from 1935 to 1965. ... Rupert Bear Mary Tourtel, the author, lived in Ivy Lane, Canterbury towards the end of her life Rupert Bear is a cartoon character created by the English artist Mary Tourtel and who first appeared in the Daily Express on November 8, 1920. ... Ronald Carl Giles (September 29, 1916 – August 28, 1995), often referred to simply as Giles, was a cartoonist most famous for his work for the British newspaper the Daily Express. ... Frontpage of the Daily Express, March 24 Judea Declares War on Germany was a front-page headline on the March 24, 1933 edition of the British newspaper, the Daily Express. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The arrival of television and the public's changing interests took their toll on circulation, and following Beaverbrook's death in 1964, the paper's circulation declined for several years.[2]


The Daily Express switched from broadsheet to tabloid in 1977 and was bought by the construction company Trafalgar House in the same year. Its publishing company, Beaverbrook Newspapers, was renamed Express Newspapers. In 1982 Trafalgar House spun off its publishing interests into a new company, Fleet Holdings, but this succumbed to a hostile takeover by United Newspapers in 1985. Under United's ownership, the Express titles moved from Fleet Street to Blackfriars Road in 1989. As part of a marketing campaign designed to increase circulation, the paper was renamed The Express in 1996 (with the Sunday Express becoming "The Express on Sunday"). Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... This article is about the newspaper size. ... Trafalgar House was a United Kingdom conglomerate with interests in property, property development, construction, passenger shipping and engineering. ... Southwark tube station on the corner of Blackfriars Road and The Cut. ...


Express Newspapers was sold to publisher Richard Desmond in 2000, by which time the names had reverted to Daily Express and Sunday Express. In 2004 the newspaper moved to its present location on Lower Thames Street in the City of London.[2] Private Eye cover depicting Desmond following his purchase of the Daily Express newspaper Richard Clive Desmond (born December 8, 1951) is a British publisher, current owner of Express Newspapers and founder of Northern and Shell plc. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ...


On October 31, 2005 UK Media Group Entertainment Rights secured majority interest from the Daily Express on Rupert Bear. They paid £6 million for a 66.6% control of the character. The Express Newspaper retains minority interest in Rupert Bear of 33.33% plus the right to publish Rupert Bear stories in certain Express publications. is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Entertainment Rights Plc is a global media company, listed on the London Stock Exchange. ... Rupert Bear Mary Tourtel, the author, lived in Ivy Lane, Canterbury towards the end of her life Rupert Bear is a cartoon character created by the English artist Mary Tourtel and who first appeared in the Daily Express on November 8, 1920. ...


Desmond era

In 2000, it was bought by Richard Desmond, publisher of a range of magazines including the celebrity magazine OK!. Controversy surrounded the acquisition because, at the time, Desmond also owned a selection of pornographic magazines such as Big Ones and Asian Babes (which led to him being nicknamed "Dirty Des" by Private Eye). He is still the owner of the most popular pornographic television channel in the UK, Television X. Desmond's purchase of the paper led to the departure of many staff including the then editor, Rosie Boycott, and columnist Peter Hitchens moved to The Mail on Sunday, stating that he could not morally work for a newspaper owned by a pornographer. Boycott, despite her different politics, had an unlikely respect for Hitchens.[3] Stars of old Fleet Street, like the showbiz interviewer and feature writer Paul Callan, were brought in to restore some of the journalistic weight enjoyed by the paper in its peak years. Private Eye cover depicting Desmond following his purchase of the Daily Express newspaper Richard Clive Desmond (born December 8, 1951) is a British publisher, current owner of Express Newspapers and founder of Northern and Shell plc. ... OK! is a British weekly magazine, specialising in celebrity news. ... Porn redirects here. ... Asian Babes is a British pornographic magazine which features depictions of women of South Asian, Chinese, Japanese, and Thai origin. ... Television X is an adult television channel in the UK. It formed in June 1995 and has since expanded into four separate channels: Television X features UK made pornographic shows, including the hottest UK Adult Material Television X Raw shows tapes sent in by viewers in the best amateur footage... Rosel Marie Boycott (born 1951), better known as Rosie Boycott, is a British journalist. ... Peter Hitchens Peter Jonathan Hitchens (born 28 October 1951 in Sliema, Malta) is a British journalist, author and broadcaster. ... The Daily Mail and its Sunday edition the Mail on Sunday are British newspapers, first published in 1896. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Sunday Express

The Sunday Express was launched in 1918. It is currently edited by Martin Townsend. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Martin Ingham Townsend (February 6, 1810 - March 8, 1903) was a U.S. Representative from New York. ...


The Daily Express and the Daily Mail

The Daily Express has for many years been a rival of the Daily Mail, and each frequently attacks the other's journalistic integrity. In the late 1990s, as Tony Blair's New Labour government was at its most popular, the Express attempted to reinvent itself somewhat: it developed a less stridently right wing political stance than the Mail and, under editor Rosie Boycott, presented an agenda to the left of the Mail's, referring to itself as "the voice of New Britain". Since its acquisition by Richard Desmond, the paper has moved back considerably to the right. It is known for its frequent headlines about immigration. It also focuses frequently on Muslims, in cases such as Aishah Azmi, a teacher who wore a burka, and the establishment of Shariah courts.[4] In the 2001 general election it supported the Labour Party, in 2004 switched its support to the Conservative Party.[5] The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, currently published in a tabloid format. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... New Labour is an alternative name of the British political Labour Party. ... Right wing redirects here. ... Rosel Marie Boycott (born 1951), better known as Rosie Boycott, is a British journalist. ... Daily Express launched a crusade against the Veil Aishah Azmi is a Muslim woman who came to public attention after being suspended from her position as a classroom assistant in a Church of England school for refusing to take off her Niqab face veil when teaching small children. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


The Daily Express has a banner on its front page saying "The World's Greatest Newspaper". Circulation figures to July 2007 show gross sales of 794,252 for the Daily Express, compared with 2,400,143 for the Daily Mail, twenty five years ago the Daily Express was selling over 2 million copies a day, the Mail was selling 1.87 million copies a day.


Controversial themes

John Bodkin Adams

Suspected serial killer Dr John Bodkin Adams was arrested in 1956 on suspicion of killing up to 400 of his wealthy patients in Eastbourne, England.[6] The press, egged on by police leaks, unanimously declared Adams guilty except for Percy Hoskins, chief crime reporter for the Express.[7] Hoskins was adamant that Adams was merely a naive doctor prosecuted by an overzealous detective, Herbert Hannam, who Hoskins disliked from previous cases.[7] The Express, under Hoskins' direction, was therefore the only major paper to defend Adams, causing Lord Beaverbrook to frequently question Hoskins' stance on the matter[7]. Adams was tried on one count of murder in 1957 and found not guilty (a second count was withdrawn controversially). After the case a jubilant Beaverbrook phoned Hoskins and said: "Two people were acquitted today" - meaning Hoskins as well[7]. The Express then carried an exclusive interview with Adams, who Hoskins interviewed for two weeks after the trial in a safe house away from other newspapers. According to archives released in 2003, Adams was thought by police to have killed 163 patients.[6] Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... John Bodkin Adams, (January 21, 1899–July 4, 1983) was a general practitioner in Eastbourne cleared of murdering one of his patients. ... This article is about fatal harm. ... For other places with the same name, see Eastbourne (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Detective Superintendent Herbert Hannam was a British policeman who worked for Scotland Yard. ... Sir William Maxwell Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook (May 25, 1879 - June 9, 1964) was a Canadian–British business tycoon and politician. ... Edith Alice Morrell (?? ?? 1868 - 13 November 1949), was a resident of Eastbourne and patient of the suspected serial killer John Bodkin Adams. ...


"Diana Express"

The Daily Express has a reputation for consistently printing conspiracy theories based on the death of Princess Diana as front page news, earning it the nickname, the Daily Ex-Princess; this is often satirised in Private Eye, the newspaper being labelled the Diana Express or the Di'ly Express, possibly due to Desmond's close friendship with regular Eye target Mohamed Fayed. [8] Even on July 7, 2006, the anniversary of the London bombings (used by most other newspapers to publish commemorations) the front page was given over to Diana. This tendency was also mocked on Have I Got News for You when on 6 November 2006, the day other papers reported the death sentence given to Saddam Hussein on their front pages, the Express led with “SPIES COVER UP DIANA 'MURDER'”. According to The Independent "The Diana stories appear on Mondays because Sunday is often a quiet day." [9] Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances Mountbatten-Windsor, née Spencer) (1 July 1961–31 August 1997), commonly, but incorrectly, known as Princess Diana, was for fifteen years the wife of HRH The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... Mohamed Al-Fayed (b. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ...


"Madeleine Express"

In the second half of 2007 the Daily Express gave a large amount of coverage to the missing toddler Madeleine McCann. From August 3, 2007, the Express dedicated at least part of the next 100 front pages to Madeleine in a run that lasted until November 10, 2007. Of the 100, 82 of these were the main headline (often stylised by "MADELEINE" in red block capitals, plus a picture of the child). Main article: Disappearance of Madeleine McCann Appeal at the 2007 FA Cup Final On the evening of Thursday, 3 May 2007, shortly before her fourth birthday, a British child, Madeleine McCann, went missing from a holiday apartment in Praia da Luz in the Algarve in Portugal, in which she was... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Though the family initially said that some journalists may have "overstepped their mark" they acknowledged the benefits in keeping the case in the public eye[10], but argued that the coverage needed to be toned down as daily headlines are not necessarily helpful.[11] However, in March 2008, the McCanns launched a libel suit against the Daily Express and its sister newspaper, the Daily Star, as well as their Sunday equivalents, following the newspapers' coverage of the case. The action concerned more than 100 stories across the four newspapers, which accused the McCanns of involvement in their daughter's disappearance.[12] One immediate consequence of the action was that Express Newspapers pulled all references to Madeleine from its websites.[13] In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In a settlement reached at the High Court of Justice, the newspapers agreed to run a front-page apology to the McCanns on 19 March 2008, publish another apology on the front pages of the Sunday editions of 23 March and make a statement of apology at the High Court. These apologies were described by media commentator Roy Greenslade as "unprecedented". The newspapers also agreed to pay costs and substantial damages, which the McCanns said they would use to fund the search for their daughter.[12] In its apology, the Express stated that "a number of articles in the newspaper have suggested that the couple caused the death of their missing daughter Madeleine and then covered it up. We acknowledge that there is no evidence whatsoever to support this theory and that Kate and Gerry are completely innocent of any involvement in their daughter's disappearance."[14] Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of Judicature of England and Wales (which under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, is to be known as the... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Roy Greenslade is Professor of Journalism at London’s City University and has been a media commentator since 1992, most notably for The Guardian. ...


Editors

  • Arthur Pearson (April 1900 - 1901)
  • Fletcher Robinson (1901 - 1909)
  • R. D. Blumenfeld (1909 - 1929)
  • Beverley Baxter (1929 - October 1933)
  • Arthur Christiansen (1933 - August 1957)
  • Edward Pickering (1957 - 1961)
  • Robert Edwards (acting) (November 1961 - February 1962)
  • Roger Wood (1962 - May 1963)
  • Robert Edwards (1963 - July 1965)
  • Derek Marks (1965 - April 1971)
  • Ian McColl (1971 - October 1974)
  • Alastair Burnet (1974 - March 1976)
  • Roy Wright (1976 - August 1977)
  • Derek Jameson (1977 - June 1980))
  • Arthur Firth (1980 - October 1981)
  • Christopher Ward (1981 - April 1983)
  • Sir Larry Lamb (1983 - April 1986)
  • Sir Nicholas Lloyd (1986 - November 1995)
  • Richard Addis (November 1995 - May 1998)
  • Rosie Boycott (May 1998 - January 2001)
  • Chris Williams (January 2001 - December 2003)
  • Peter Hill (December 2003 - )

Sir Cyril Arthur Pearson, 1st Baronet GBE (24 February 1866–9 December 1921) was a British newspaper magnate and publisher, most noted for founding the Daily Express. ... Ralph David Blumenfeld (pen-name R.D.B., 7 April 1864 – 17 July 1948) was a United States-born journalist, writer and newspaper editor who is chiefly notable for having been in charge of the British Daily Express from 1902 to 1932. ... Sir (Arthur) Beverley Baxter, FRSL (8 January 1891 – 26 April 1964) was a Canadian born journalist and politician. ... Arthur Christiansen was the man who took Candy Roses vertical plate, thus resulting in the infamous injury to Gary OBrian. ... Sir Alastair Burnet (born July 12, 1928) is a British journalist and broadcaster, known for his work in news and current affairs programming. ... Broadcaster & journalist Derek Jameson, was born in Londons East End in 1929. ... Sir Albert Lamb, commonly known as Larry Lamb (July 15, 1929 – May 19, 2000) was a British newspaper editor. ... Richard Addis is a British journalist and former editor of the Daily Express newspaper. ... Rosel Marie Boycott (born 1951), better known as Rosie Boycott, is a British journalist. ... Chris Williams is a British journalist. ... Peter Hill is the editor of the UK newspaper Daily Express. ...

Columnists

Present columnists:

Past columnists: Vanessa Feltz (born February 21, 1962) is an English journalist and broadcaster. ... Ann Noreen Widdecombe (born 4 October 1947) is a British Conservative Party politician. ... Frederick Forsyth, CBE (born August 25, 1938) is an English author and occasional political commentator. ... Richard Madeley and Judy Finnigan are married co-stars of British daytime television programmes. ...

Peter Hitchens Peter Jonathan Hitchens (born 28 October 1951 in Sliema, Malta) is a British journalist, author and broadcaster. ... Andrew Marr (born 31 July 1959, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish journalist and political commentator. ... Jenni Murray OBE (born Jennifer Susan Bailey on May 12, 1950 in Barnsley, Yorkshire) is a British journalist and broadcaster. ...

See also

The Scottish Daily News (SDN) was a left-of-centre daily newspaper published in Glasgow, Scotland, from May 5 to November 8, 1975. ...

References

  1. ^ a b ABC Circulation Figures. Audit Bureau of Circulation. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  2. ^ a b c "Daily Express: A chequered history", BBC, January 25, 2001. 
  3. ^ Peter Hitchens "Everything you write is complete ****," she says, "but I like you", New Statesman, 18 Dece3mber 2000. Retrieved on 19 March 2008.
  4. ^ McKinstry, Leo We Cannot Sit Back And Let Sharia Law Take Root In Britain, Daily Express, April 30, 2007.
  5. ^ "Express switches after Euro shift", BBC, April 22, 2004. 
  6. ^ a b Cullen, Pamela V., "A Stranger in Blood: The Case Files on Dr John Bodkin Adams", London, Elliott & Thompson, 2006, ISBN 1-904027-19-9
  7. ^ a b c d Two Men Were Acquitted: The trial and acquittal of Doctor John Bodkin Adams, Secker & Warburg, 1984
  8. ^ For instance in the "Hackwatch" column of Private Eye #1174, December 19, 2006.
  9. ^ The Independent interview with Peter Hill 20 February 2006
  10. ^ "From Victims to Villains", ABC News, September 12, 2007. 
  11. ^ "I don’t think necessarily having newspaper headlines with the image of Madeleine being thrust on to people every single day helps. Clearly we have seen irresponsible reporting.", Sunday Herald, August 26, 2007. 
  12. ^ a b "Damages due over McCann stories", BBC News Online, March 18, 2008. 
  13. ^ Leigh Holmwood. "Express titles cut back McCann coverage", The Guardian, 13 March 2008. Retrieved on 2008-03-17. 
  14. ^ "Kate and Gerry McCann: Sorry", Daily Express, March 19, 2008. 
  • Derek Jameson, ‘Matthews, Victor Collin, Baron Matthews (1919–1995)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 9 September 2007

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

External links

  • Daily Express official website
  • Mail Watch - Archive of each Daily Mail cover featuring Princess Diana since January 2006.
  • Online e:edition
// Traditionally newspapers could be split into quality, serious-minded newspapers (usually referred to as broadsheets due to their large size) and tabloid, less serious newspapers. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... The Sunday Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper, founded in 1961. ... For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... Newspapers with the Berliner format. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Middle Market Newspaper From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, currently published in a tabloid format. ... The Daily Mail and its Sunday edition the Mail on Sunday are British newspapers, first published in 1896. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... This article is about the newspaper size. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... The Daily Sport is a tabloid newspaper published in the United Kingdom by Sport Newspapers, owned by the pornographer David Sullivan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Morning Star. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a British tabloid daily newspaper. ... The People, formerly known as the Sunday People, is a British red-top Sunday-only newspaper, owned by the Trinity Mirror Group. ... The News of the World is a British tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... The Sunday Sport is a British newspaper, printed by Sport Newspapers, which established itself in 1986 as a tabloid. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
THE DAILY EXPRESS NEWSPAPER LINKS (1624 words)
The Daily Express is a conservative, middle-market British tabloid newspaper.
The Daily Express switched from broadsheet to tabloid in 1977 and was bought by the construction company Trafalgar House in the same year.
Express Newspapers was sold to publisher Richard Desmond in 2000, by which time the names had reverted to Daily Express and Sunday Express.
Daily Express - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1084 words)
The Daily Express is a conservative, middle-market British tabloid newspaper.
It was briefly renamed The Express in 1996.
The Daily Express has a reputation for consistently printing conspiracy theories based on the death of Princess Diana as front page news; this is often satirised in Private Eye and the newspaper is joked as being called the Diana Express or the Di'ly Express.
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