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A 'dagger' (from Vulgar Latin: 'daca' - a Dacian knife) is a double-edged knife used for stabbing, thrusting, or as a secondary defense weapon in close combat. In most cases, a tang extends into the handle along the center line of the blade. For the weapon, see Dagger. ... Vulgar Latin, as in this political engraving at Pompeii, was the language of the ordinary people of the Roman Empire, distinct from the Classical Latin of literature. ... Alternate meanings: see Dacia (disambiguation) Dacia, in ancient geography the land of the Daci or Getae, was a large district of Central Europe, bounded on the north by the Carpathians, on the south by the Danube, on the west by the Tisa (Tisza river, in Hungary), on the east by... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The term companion weapon is used in Historical European Martial Art disciplines to refer to an item used in the non-sword hand while fencing with a rapier or sword. ... Close Combat is the name of a series of tactical real-time (RTT) computer games by Atomic Games, as well as a first-person shooter by Destineer Games. ... A protrusion of the blade of a tool, such as a chisel or knife, onto which the handle is fastened. ... A blade is the flat part of a tool or weapon that normally has a cutting edge and/or pointed end typically made of a metal, such as steel used to cut, stab, slice, throw, thrust, or strike. ...


Much like battle axes, daggers evolved out of prehistoric tools. They were initially made of flint, ivory, or even bone and were used as weapons since the earliest periods of human civilization. The earliest metal daggers appear in the Bronze Age, in the 3rd millennium BC, predating the sword, which essentially developed from oversized daggers. Although the standard dagger would at no time be very effective against axes, spears, or even maces due to its limited reach, it was an important step towards the development of a more useful close-combat weapon, the sword. Swedish halberds from 16th century A halberd is a two-handed pole weapon that came to prominent use during the 14th and 15th centuries. ... A modern hammer is directly descended from ancient hand tools A tool or device is a piece of equipment which typically provides a mechanical advantage in accomplishing a physical task. ... A flint nodule from the Onondaga limestone layer, Buffalo, New York. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Grays Anatomy illustration of a human femur. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... The 3rd millennium BC spans the Early to Middle Bronze Age. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... axes is the plural of both axis and axe, and may thus be: Axe An axe is a tool with a metal blade fastened to a handle at 90 degrees, commonly used to split wood. ... A spear is an ancient weapon, used for hunting and war. ... This article is about the personal weapon and its ceremonial derivative, for other meanings of mace please see mace (disambiguation) An advance on the club, a mace is a wooden, metal-reinforced, or metal shaft, with a head made of stone, copper, bronze, iron or steel. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Celtic dagger and sheath

However, almost from the very beginning of Egyptian history, daggers were adorned as ceremonial objects with golden hilts and later even more ornate and varied construction. Traditionally, military and naval officers wore dress daggers as symbols of power, and soldiers are still equipped with combat knives. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x576, 90 KB) Summary Celtic dagger, scabbard and a buckle. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x576, 90 KB) Summary Celtic dagger, scabbard and a buckle. ... A ceremonial weapon is an object used for ceremonial purposes to display power or authority. ... Combat knives are mainly used in close combat. ...


Historically, knives and daggers were always considered secondary or even tertiary weapons. Babylonians, Greeks, Spartans, Persians, Romans, Vikings, and crusaders all mainly fought with pole weapons, swords, and axes at arm's length if not already utilizing bows, spears, slings, or other long-range weapons. Roman soldiers were issued a pugio. A pole weapon or polearm is a close combat weapon with the main fighting part of the weapon placed on the end of a long shaft, typically of wood. ... Home-made sling. ... Pugio reconstruction: a Roman soldier from AD 70 Pugio reconstruction: a Roman soldier AD 175 from a northern province A pugio is a small dagger used by Roman soldiers. ...


The dagger is symbolically ambiguous. It may be associated with cowardice and treachery due to the ease of concealment and surprise that someone could inflict with one on an unexpecting victim — many assassinations were reportedly carried out using one. The most famous victim of all was certainly Julius Caesar, who suffered from 23 stab wounds from irate members of the Senate. On the other hand, the dagger may symbolically suggest a determination to courageously close with the enemy. Gaius Julius Caesar[1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC – March 15, 44 BC), often simply referred to as Julius Caesar, was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ...


From the year 1250 onward, gravestones and other contemporary images show knights with a dagger or combat knife at their side. The hilt and blade shapes began to resemble smaller versions of swords and led to a fashion of ornamented sheaths and hilts in the late-15th century.


The increasing sophistication of sword fighting and a prevailing sense of chivalrous honour caused knives and daggers to lose their popularity as weapons in Medieval times, only to regain it during the Renaissance in the form of the stiletto, which proved to be very effective against the plated body armor popular at the time. Woman under the Safeguard of Knighthood, allegorical Scene. ... Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ... A stiletto is a long, narrow-bladed dagger. ...


In that age, books offering instruction on the use of weapons prescribed that the dagger be held in the hand with the blade pointing from the heel of the hand, and used by making downward jabs. This technique would differentiate a dagger wound from that of a sword. A sword wound was noble and, as the possession of swords was limited to aristocrats, could be caused only by such weapons. Murder by dagger thrusts was ignoble, and could be done by commoners or vengeful aristocrats who wished to remain anonymous. This is why a group of political murders is called Night of the Long Knives, although daggers were not literally used. Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Night of the Long Knives (Saturday June 30 and Sunday July 1, 1934) (German, Nacht der langen Messer), also known as Reichsmordwoche, Operation Hummingbird or the Blood Purge, was a lethal purge of Adolf Hitlers potential political rivals in the Sturmabteilung (SA; also known as storm troopers or...


With the development of firearms, the dagger lost more and more of its usefulness in military combat; multipurpose knives and handguns replaced them. However, beginning with the 17th Century, another form of dagger -- the plug bayonet and later the socket bayonet -- was used to convert muskets and other longarms into spears by mounting them on the barrel. A firearm is a kinetic energy weapon that fires either a single or multiple projectiles propelled at high velocity by the gases produced by action of the rapid confined burning of a propellant. ... The US Marine Corps OKC-3S Bayonet A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife- or dagger-shaped weapon designed to fit on or over the muzzle of a rifle barrel or similar weapon. ... Muskets and bayonets aboard the frigate Grand Turk. ... A long gun is a firearm with an extended barrel, usually designed to be fired braced against the shoulder. ... Hunting spear and knife, from Mesa Verde National Park. ...


Daggers achieved public notoriety in the 20th Century as ornamental uniform regalia during the fascist dictatorships of Mussolini's Italy and Hitler's Germany, but dress daggers were used by several other countries as well, including Japan. As combat equipment they were carried by many infantry and commando forces during the Second World War. British commandos had an especially slender dagger, the Fairbairn-Sykes fighting knife, developed from that used in Shanghai. U.S. Marine Corps Raiders in the Pacific carried a similar fighting dagger, and others were fashioned for American forces and their allies from cut-down World War I Patton sabers. In military science, the term commando can refer to an individual, a military unit or a raiding style of military operation. ... Combatants Allied Powers: United Kingdom France Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Axis Powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Charles de Gaulle Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33... Diagram of F&S Fighting Knife, taken from FMFRP 12-80, Kill or Be Killed, by Rex Applegate, who worked extensively with Fairbairn. ... Marine Raider insignia The Marine Raiders were elite units established by the United States Marine Corps during World War II to conduct amphibious light infantry warfare, particularly in landing in rubber boats and operating behind the lines. ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Franz... George Smith Patton Jr. ...


Although not technically a dagger, the rondel, a stabbing weapon with a circular, triangular, or rectangular cross-section, is commonly included in the term. A rondel (pronounced or ) or roundel was a type of stiff-bladed dagger in Europe in the late Middle Ages (from the 14th century onwards), used by a variety of people from merchants to knights. ...


References

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Dagger - LoveToKnow 1911 (664 words)
The principal medieval dagger was the misericorde, which from the end of the 12th century was used, in all countries in which chivalry flourished, to penetrate the joints of the armour of an unhorsed adversary (hence Ger.
The distinction between the dagger and the poniard is arbitrary, and in ordinary language the latter is taken as being the shorter and as having less resemblance to a short sword or cutlass.
The Scottish "dirk" was a long dagger, and survives in name in the dirk worn by midshipmen of the royal navy, and in fact in that worn by officers of Highland regiments.
Dagger at AllExperts (765 words)
Although the standard dagger would at no time be very effective against axes, spears or even maces due to its limited reach, it was an important step towards the development of a more useful close combat weapon: the sword.
The increasing sophistication of sword fighting and a prevailing sense of chivalrous honour caused knives and daggers to lose their popularity as weapons in medieval times, only to regain it during the Renaissance in the form of the Stiletto, which proved to be very effective against the plated body armor popular at the time.
Daggers achieved public notoriety in the 20th Century as ornamental uniform regalia during the fascist dictatorships of Mussolini's Italy and Hitler's Germany, but dress daggers were used by several other countries as well, including Japan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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