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Encyclopedia > Dacians
Dacian kingdom during the reign of Burebista, 82 BC
Dacian kingdom during the reign of Burebista, 82 BC

The Dacians (Lat. Daci, Gr. Dákai) were the ancient inhabitants of Dacia (located in the area in and around the Carpathian mountains and east of there to the Black Sea) and parts of Moesia (mostly in northern Bulgaria) in southeastern Europe. They spoke the Dacian language, closely related with Thracian and Albanian[citation needed]. The first mention of them is in Roman sources, but classical authors are unanimous in considering the Dacians a branch of the Getae, a Thracian people known from Greek writings. Strabo specified that the Daci are the Getae who lived in the area towards the Pannonian plain (Transylvania), while the Getae proper gravitated towards the Black Sea coast (Scythia Minor). Dacian Kingdom, under the rule of Burebista, 82 BC Made with Xara X - ask User:Bogdangiusca for vectorial Xara-X sources, if you need them. ... Dacian Kingdom, under the rule of Burebista, 82 BC Made with Xara X - ask User:Bogdangiusca for vectorial Xara-X sources, if you need them. ... For other uses, see Dacia (disambiguation). ... Dacian Kingdom, during the rule of Burebista, 82 BC Burebista,[1] the greatest king of Dacia, ruled between 70 BC and 44 BC. He unified the Thracian population from Hercynia (todays Moravia) in the west, to the Bug River in the east, and from the northern Carpathians to Dionysopolis... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Medieval Greek (Μεσαιωνική Ελληνική) is a linguistic term that describes the fourth period in the history of the Greek language. ... For other uses, see Dacia (disambiguation). ... Moesia (Greek: , Moisia; Bulgarian: Мизия, Miziya; Serbian: Мезија, Mezija) is an ancient province situated in the areas of modern Serbia and Bulgaria. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Dacian language was an Indo-European language spoken by the ancient people of Dacia. ... The Thracian language was the Indo-European language spoken in ancient times by the Thracians in South-Eastern Europe. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Getae (Γέται, singular Γέτης; Getae) was the name given by the Greeks to several Thracian tribes that occupied the regions south of the Lower Danube, in what is today northern Bulgaria, and north of the Lower Danube, in the Muntenian plain (todays southern Romania), and especially near modern Dobruja. ... The Thracians were an Indo-European people, inhabitants of Thrace and adjacent lands (present-day Bulgaria, Romania, northeastern Greece, European Turkey and northwestern asiatic Turkey, eastern Serbia and parts of Republic of Macedonia). ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... The Pannonian Plain is a large plain in Central Europe that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea (see below) dried out. ... This article is about the region in Romania. ... Major ancient towns and colonies in Schythia Minor Scythia Minor (Greek: Μικρά Σκυθία, Mikrá Scythia) was in ancient times the region surrounded by the Danube at the north and west and the Black Sea at the east, corresponding to todays Dobruja (a large part in Romania and a smaller part in...


The Roman Emperor Trajan invaded Dacia mostly to benefit from its vast gold mines. Trajan's Column was constructed to celebrate the invasion of Dacia. This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Trajans Column is a monument in Rome raised by Apollodorus of Damascus at the order of the Senate. ...


The Dacian kingdom reached its maximum expansion during King Burebista. The capital of the kingdom was the city Argedava (also called Sargedava in some historical writings) situated close to river Danube. Dacian Kingdom, during the rule of Burebista, 82 BC Burebista,[1] the greatest king of Dacia, ruled between 70 BC and 44 BC. He unified the Thracian population from Hercynia (todays Moravia) in the west, to the Bug River in the east, and from the northern Carpathians to Dionysopolis... Argedava (or Sargedava) was the capital of Burebistas Dacian kingdom. ... Argedava (or Sargedava) was the capital of Burebistas Dacian kingdom. ... This article is about the Danube River. ...


Greek geographer Strabo claimed that the Dacians and Getae once had been able to muster a combined army of 200,000 men, but that their entire population had dropped to 40,000 by Strabo's own era.[1] The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ...


Name

The Dacians (tribe) were known as Geton (plural Getae) in Greek writings, and as Dacus (plural Daci) and also Getae in Roman documents; also as Dagae and Gaete—see the late Roman map Tabula Peutingeriana. Strabo tells that the original name of the Dacians was "daoi", which could be explained with a possible Phrygian cognate "daos", meaning "wolf". This assumption may be supported by the fact that one of the Dacian standards, the Dacian Draco, had a wolf head. Phrygii was another cognate used within the region, and in later times, some Roman auxiliaries recruited from the area were referred to as Phrygi. For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The Tabula Peutingeriana (Peutinger table) is an itinerarium showing the cursus publicus, the road network in the Roman Empire. ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... The Phrygian language was the Indo-European language of the Phrygians, a people of the central Asia Minor. ... The Dacian Draco was the standard of the ancient Dacian military. ... Auxiliaries (Latin: auxilia, help) were troops in the Roman army of the late Republican and Imperial periods who provided specialist support to the legions. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Strabo, Geographia Book 7, chapter 13.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dacians - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (211 words)
Dacian kingdom during the reign of Burebista, 82 BC The Dacians (Lat.
The first mention of them is in Roman sources, but classical authors are unanimous in considering the Dacians a branch of the Getae, a Thracian people known from Greek writings.
Strabo specified that the Daci are the Getae who lived in the area towards the Pannonian plain (Transylvania), while the Getae proper gravitated towards the Black Sea coast (Scythia Minor).
Dacia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1556 words)
Dacian Kingdom, during the rule of Burebista, 82 BC Towards the west Dacia may originally have extended as far as the Danube where it runs from north to south at Waitzen (Vacz).
Dacians had developed the Murus dacicus, characteristic to their complexes of fortified cities, like their capital Sarmizegetusa in today Hunedoara (Romania).
The result of his first campaign (101-102) was the siege of the Dacian capital Sarmizegetusa and the occupation of a part of the country.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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