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Encyclopedia > DC comics
DC Comics
Type Subsidiary of Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc.
Founded 1934, by Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson (as National Allied Publications)
Headquarters 1700 Broadway, New York City, New York
Key people Paul Levitz (President and Publisher)
Dan DiDio (Senior Vice President, DC Executive Editor)
Industry Comics
Products See list of DC Comics publications
Website dccomics.com

DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. A subsidiary of Warner Bros. Entertainment (part of Time Warner) since 1969, DC is the world's largest English language publisher of comic books,[1] with one of the largest shares of the direct market of the United States' comic book industry.[2] DC Comics produces material featuring a large number of characters — many of which have been considered among the most influential in their genre's history.[3] These include Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, and their teammates in the Justice League. 2005 DC Comics logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... Warner Bros. ... Major Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson, a pulp magazine writer and entrepreneur, pioneered the American comic book, publishing the first such periodical consisting of all-original material rather than reprints of newspaper comic strips. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... NY redirects here. ... Paul Levitz (born 21 October 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. ... Dan DiDio is an American comic book editor and executive. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Warner Bros. ... Time Warner Inc. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Direct market in the comic book industry is the dominant distribution and retail network in North America and elsewhere in the market for English-language comics. ... An American comic book is a small magazine originating in the United States containing a narrative in the comics form. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ...


DC Comics was founded as National Allied Publications in 1934 by Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson. The initials "DC" were originally an abbreviation for Detective Comics (one of their comic book titles), and later became the company's official name. DC has been succesively headquartered at different areas of New York City, including: 432 Fourth Avenue; 480 and later 575 Lexington Avenue; 909 Third Avenue; 75 Rockefeller Plaza; 666 Fifth Avenue; and 1325 Avenue of the Americas. DC moved to 1700 Broadway in the mid-1990s, relocating there with Warner Bros. Entertainment's Mad, which had moved from 485 Madison Avenue. Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson, a pulp magazine writer and entrepreneur, pioneered the American comic book, publishing the first such periodical consisting of all-original material rather than reprints of newspaper comic strips. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... Street sign at corner of Fifth Avenue and East 57th Street Fifth Avenue, early morning photograph, looking south from Thirty-eighth Street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the center of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... Sixth Avenue looking south from 18th Street Sixth Avenue is a major avenue in New York Citys borough of Manhattan. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Mad is an American humor magazine founded by editor Harvey Kurtzman and publisher William Gaines in 1952. ... Madison Avenue, looking north from 40th Street Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City that carries northbound one-way traffic. ...

Contents

History

Origins

New Fun: The Big Comic Magazine #1 (Feb. 1935), the first comic book with all original material rather than reprints of comic strips.
New Fun: The Big Comic Magazine #1 (Feb. 1935), the first comic book with all original material rather than reprints of comic strips.

The corporation is an amalgamation of several companies. National Allied Publications was founded by Major Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson in 1934 to publish New Fun: The Big Comic Magazine #1 (Feb. 1935), later known as More Fun. This groundbreaking comic book was the first such periodical consisting solely of original material rather than reprints of newspaper comic strips. Retitled New Fun after the first issue, it was a tabloid-sized, 10-inch by 15-inch, 36-page magazine with a card-stock, non-glossy cover. Issue #6 (Oct. 1935) brought the comic-book debut of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, the future creators of Superman, who began their careers with the musketeer swashbuckler "Henri Duval" and, under the pseudonyms "Leger and Reuths", the supernatural-crimefighter adventure "Doctor Occult". Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dc_comics#Origins. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Major Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson, a pulp magazine writer and entrepreneur, pioneered the American comic book, publishing the first such periodical consisting of all-original material rather than reprints of newspaper comic strips. ... More Fun Comics was a DC Comics title which began as New Fun Comics in February 1935 and changed to More Fun with its seventh issue. ... Jerome Jerry Siegel a. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ... For other uses, see Swashbuckler (disambiguation). ... Doctor Occult is a fictional magic user in the DC Comics universe. ...


Wheeler-Nicholson added a second magazine, New Comics, which premiered with a Dec. 1935 cover date and at a size close to what would become comic books' standard size during the period fans and historians call the Golden Age, with slightly larger dimensions than today's. That title evolved into Adventure Comics, which continued through issue #503 in 1983, becoming one of the longest-running comic-book series. Adventure Comics #296 Adventure Comics is a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Adventure Comics #296 Adventure Comics is a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ...


His third and final title was Detective Comics, advertised with a cover illustration dated Dec. 1936, but eventually premiering three months late, with a March 1937 cover date. The themed anthology series would become a sensation with the introduction of Batman in issue #27 (May 1939). By then, however, Wheeler-Nicholson was gone. In 1937, in debt to printing-plant owner and magazine distributor Harry Donenfeld — who was as well a pulp-magazine publisher and a principal in the magazine distributorship Independent News — Wheeler-Nicholson was compelled to take Donenfeld on as a partner in order to publish Detective #1. Detective Comics, Inc. was formed, with Wheeler-Nicholson and Jack S. Liebowitz, Donenfeld's accountant, listed as owners. The major remained for a year, but cash-flow problems continued, and he was forced out. Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


Shortly afterward came the launch of what would have been his fourth title, National Allied Publications' Action Comics, the premiere of which introduced Superman (a character with which Wheeler-Nicholson was not directly involved; editor Vin Sullivan chose to run the feature after Sheldon Mayer rescued it from the slush pile). Action Comics #1 (June 1938), the first comic book to feature the new character archetype soon to be called superheroes, proved a major sales hit and ushered in the period fans and historians call Golden Age of comic books. The company quickly introduced such other popular characters as Batman and Wonder Woman, and the first superhero team, the Justice Society of America. Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... Vincent Vin Sullivan (died on February 3, 1999) is an early comic book editor, artist, and publisher. ... Sheldon Mayer was an American comic book writer. ... In publishing, the slush pile is the pile of manuscripts sent in unsolicited by the publisher, or not sent through an agent known to the publisher. ... [[ For the bands, see Superheroes (band) and Super Heroines. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ...


The Golden Age

Action Comics #1 (June 1938), the debut of Superman. Cover art by Joe Shuster.
Action Comics #1 (June 1938), the debut of Superman. Cover art by Joe Shuster.

National Allied Publications and Detective Comics, Inc., soon merged to form National Comics, which in 1944 absorbed an affiliated concern, Max Gaines' and Liebowitz's All-American Publications. That year, Gaines let Liebowitz buy him out, and kept only Picture Stories from the Bible as the foundation of his own new company, EC Comics. At that point, "Liebowitz promptly orchestrated the merger of All-American and Detective Comics into National Comics.... Next he took charge of organizing National Comics, [the self-distributorship] Independent News, and their affiliated firms into a single corporate entity, National Periodical Publications". [4] National Periodical Publications became publicly traded on the stock market in 1961.[citation needed] Cover of Action Comics #1. ... Cover of Action Comics #1. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ... Maxwell Charles Gaines a. ... The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ... Entertaining Comics was headed by William Gaines but is better known by its publishing name of EC Comics. ...


Despite the official names National Comics and National Periodical Publications, the logo "Superman-DC" was used throughout the line, and the company known colloquially as DC Comics for years before the official adoption of that name.


The company began to aggressively move against imitators for copyright violations by other companies, such as Fox Comics' Wonder Man, which according to court testimony was created as a copy of Superman. This extended to DC suing Fawcett Comics for Captain Marvel, at the time comics' top-selling character, despite the fact that parallels between Captain Marvel and Superman were more tenuous. This started a years-long court battle that ended in 1955 when Fawcett capitulated and largely ceased comics publication, selling its character-rights to DC — which in 1973 ironically revived Captain Marvel, and his creator, C. C. Beck, in the new title Shazam!. [5] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Fox Feature Syndicate (a. ... This article is on the Fox Publications character. ... Whiz Comics #2, the first appearance of Captain Marvel, the companys most popular character. ... For other uses, see Captain Marvel. ... Clarence Charles Beck, (July 9, 1910_November 22, 1989), was an American cartoonist. ...


When the popularity of superheros faded in the late 1940s, the company focused on such genres as science fiction, Westerns, humor and romance. DC largely avoided the crime and horror trends of the time, thus avoiding the mid-1950s backlash against such comics. A handful of the most popular superhero titles (most notably Action Comics and Detective Comics, the medium's two longest-running titles) continued publication. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... i like western films The Western is an American genre in literature and film. ... Look up humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article refers to the wide variety of writing called romantic. For literature from the European Romantic movement of the 18th and 19th centuries, see Romanticism: Art and Literature. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle, or horrify the reader. ...


The Silver Age

Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956). Cover art by Carmine Infantino & Joe Kubert.
Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956). Cover art by Carmine Infantino & Joe Kubert.

In the mid-1950s, editorial director Irwin Donenfeld and publisher Liebowitz directed editor Julius Schwartz to do a one-shot Flash story in the try-out title Showcase. Instead of reviving the old character, Schwartz had writers Gardner Fox and Robert Kanigher, penciler Carmine Infantino and inker Joe Kubert create a new super-speedster, updating and modernizing the Flash's civilian identity, costume, and origin with a science-fiction bent. The Flash's reimagining in Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956) proved popular enough that it soon led to similar revamping of Green Lantern, the introduction of the modern all-star team Justice League of America, and many more superheros, heralded what historians and fans call the Silver Age of comic books. Showcase 4 This image is a book cover. ... Showcase 4 This image is a book cover. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... Joe Kubert (born September 18, 1926, Poland) is an American comic book artist who went on to found the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. ... Julius Schwartz, editor for DC Comics Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 - February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Robert Kanigher (June 18, 1915 - May 6, 2002) was a prolific comic book writer whose career spanned five decades. ... A penciller (or penciler) is one of a number of artists working within the comic industry. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... The inker is one of the two line artists in a traditional comic book, or graphic novel. ... Joe Kubert (born September 18, 1926, Poland) is an American comic book artist who went on to found the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. ... In times of armed conflict a civilian is any person who is not a combatant. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ...


National's continuing characters, primarily Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman, were not reimagined but spruced up. The Superman family of titles, under editor Mort Weisinger, introduced such enduring characters as Supergirl, Bizarro, and Brainiac. The Batman titles, under editor Jack Schiff, introduced the less successful Batwoman, Bat-Girl and Bat-Mite in an attempt to modernize the strip with science-fiction elements. Schiff's successor, Schwartz, together with artist Infantino, then revitalized Batman in what was promoted as the "New Look", reemphasizing Batman as a detective. Meanwhile, editor Kanigher successfully introduced a whole family of Wonder Woman characters having fantastic adventures in a mythological context. Mortimer Weisinger (1915-1978) was an American magazine and comic book editor. ... For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ... Bizarro is a fictional character, a doppelgänger of DC Comics’ Superman. ... Brainiac is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and frequent opponent of Superman. ... // Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... Bette Kane is a fictional character in DC comics. ... Bat-Mite, astride Ace the Bat-Hound, on the cover of Batman #133 (August 1960). ...


A 1960s Batman TV show on the ABC network sparked a temporary spike in comic-book sales, and a brief fad for superheros in Saturday morning animation and other media. Television series redirects here. ... The American Broadcasting Company ( oftenly known as ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... Saturday morning cartoon is the colloquial term for the animated television programming which was typically scheduled on Saturday mornings on the major American television networks from the 1960s to the 1990s. ...

The New Gods #1 (March 1971) featuring Orion. Cover art by Jack Kirby & Don Heck.
The New Gods #1 (March 1971) featuring Orion. Cover art by Jack Kirby & Don Heck.

In 1967, Batman artist Infantino became DC's editorial director. With the growing popularity of upstart rival Marvel Comics threatening to topple DC from its longtime number-one industry position, he attempted to infuse the company with new titles and characters, and recruited major talents such as Steve Ditko and promising newcomers such as Neal Adams. He also replaced some existing editors with such artist-editors as Joe Kubert and Dick Giordano. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x606, 90 KB)Cover to New Gods #1, February-March, 1971. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x606, 90 KB)Cover to New Gods #1, February-March, 1971. ... The New Gods are a fictional race created by Jack Kirby for DC Comics. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds of others stretching... Don Heck (January 2, 1929-1995) was a comic book artist best known for co-creating the character Iron Man, and for his long run penciling The Avengers in the 1960s. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (born July 20, 1932) is an American comic book artist and editor best known for introducing Charlton Comics Action Heroes stable of superheroes, and serving as editor of then industry-leader DC Comics. ...


The new editors recruited youthful new creators in an effort to capture a market that had grown from primarily children to now includee older teens and even college students. Some new talent, such as Dennis O'Neil, who worked on Green Lantern and Batman, became industry lights. Nevertheless, the period was plagued by short-lived series that started out strong but petered out rapidly. Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ...


In 1969, National Comics merged with Warner Bros/7 Arts. The following year, Jack Kirby defected from Marvel to create a handful of thematically linked series he called collectively The Fourth World, introducing in his comics New Gods, Mister Miracle, and The Forever People such enduring characters and concepts as archvillain Darkseid and the otherdimensional realm Apokolips. While sales did not meet management's expectations, Kirby's conceptions would become integral to the DC Multiverse. Kirby went on to create the series Kamandi, about a teenaged boy in a post-apocalyptic world of militaristic talking animals, when directed by the publisher to come up with something resembling Planet of the Apes.[citation needed] Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds of others stretching... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The New Gods are a fictional race published by DC Comics, as well as the title for four series of comics about those characters. ... Mister Miracle is a DC Comics superhero created by Jack Kirby, originally as part of The Fourth World series of titles. ... The Forever People is a comic book property created by Jack Kirby as part of the Fourth World set of DC Comics titles. ... Darkseid (pronounced dark-side) is a fictional alien supervillain published by DC Comics. ... In the DC Comics fictional shared Universe, Apokolips was the planet ruled by Darkseid, established in Jack Kirbys Fourth World series. ... The Earths of the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each one. ... A legion of intelligent tigers force Kamandi to fight an intelligent gorilla. ... It has been suggested that Post-holocaust be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the book. ...


1970s and 1980s

Green Lantern vol. 2, #76 (April 1970). Cover art by Neal Adams.
Green Lantern vol. 2, #76 (April 1970). Cover art by Neal Adams.

Jenette Kahn, a former children's magazine publisher, replaced Infantino in January 1976. DC had been attempting to compete with the now-surging Marvel by dramatically increasing its output, a move the company called the "DC Explosion". This included series featuring such new characters as Firestorm and Shade, the Changing Man, and several non-superhero titles. Afterward, however, corporate partner Warner dramatically cut back on these largely unsuccessful titles, firing many staffers in what industry watchers dubbed "the DC Implosion". Cover of Green Lantern #76 This work is copyrighted. ... Cover of Green Lantern #76 This work is copyrighted. ... Jenette Kahn is an American comic book editor and executive. ... Firestorm is a DC Comics superhero. ... Shade, the Changing Man is a fictional comic book character created by Steve Ditko for DC Comics in 1977. ... The DC Implosion is the informal yet established name by which fans and other observers refer to the dramatic number of sudden cancellations among DC Comics publications in 1978. ...


Seeking new ways to boost market share, the new management of publisher Kahn, vice-president Paul Levitz, and managing editor Giordano addressed the issue of talent instability. To that end — and following the example of Atlas/Seaboard Comics and such independent companies as Eclipse Comics — DC began to offer royalties in place of the industry-standard work-for-hire agreement in which creators worked for a flat fee and signed away all rights. In addition, emulating the era's new television form, the miniseries, DC created the industry concept of comic book limited series that allowed flexible arrangements for storylines. Paul Levitz (born 21 October 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. ... Atlas/Seaboard is the term that comic book historians and collectors use to refer to the short-lived line of comics published as Atlas Comics by Seaboard Periodicals, to differentiate it from Atlas Comics, the former name of Marvel Comics. ... Eclipse Comics was an American comic book publisher, one of several influential indendent publishers during the 1980s. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A work for hire is an exception to the general rule that the person who creates a work is the author of that work. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ...


These policy changes paid off with the success of the ongoing series The New Teen Titans, by writer Marv Wolfman and artist George Pérez, two popular talents with a history of success. Their superhero-team comic, which was superficially similar to Marvel's ensemble series X-Men, earned significant sales in part due to the stability of the creative team, who kept with the title for years. In addition, Wolfman and Pérez took advantage of the limited-series option to create a spin-off title, Tales of the New Teen Titans, to present origin stories of their original characters without having to break the narrative flow of the main series or oblige them to double their work load with another ongoing title. The Teen Titans, also known as “The New Teen Titans”, “New Titans”, or “The Titans”, a DC Comics superhero team. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ...

The New Teen Titans #1 (Nov. 1980). Cover art by George Perez & Dick Giordano.

This successful revitalization of a minor title led the editorship to seek the same for DC's entire line. The result was the limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths, which gave the company an opportunity to dismiss some of the "baggage" of its history, and revise major characters such as Superman and Wonder Woman. teen titans File links The following pages link to this file: DC Comics Teen Titans George Pérez ... teen titans File links The following pages link to this file: DC Comics Teen Titans George Pérez ... George Pérez (born June 9, 1954 in The Bronx, New York) is a Puerto Rican-American illustrator and writer of comic books. ... Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (born July 20, 1932) is an American comic book artist and editor best known for introducing Charlton Comics Action Heroes stable of superheroes, and serving as editor of then industry-leader DC Comics. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


Meanwhile, British writer Alan Moore had re-energized the minor horror series Saga of the Swamp Thing, and his acclaimed work sparked the comic-book equivalent of rock music's British Invasion. Numerous British writers, including Neil Gaiman and Grant Morrison, began freelancing for the company. The resulting influx of sophisticated horror and dark fantasy material led not only to DC abandoning the Comics Code for particular titles scripted by those talents, but also to establishing in 1993 the Vertigo mature-readers imprint. Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... The British Invasion of American comics is a term used to describe the influx in the late 1980s of British comics creators, especially writers. ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... The seal of the Comics Code Authority, which appears on the covers of approved comic books. ... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ...


Acclaimed limited series such as Batman: The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller and Watchmen by Moore and artist Dave Gibbons also drew attention to changes at DC. This new creative freedom and the attendant publicity allowed DC to challenge Marvel's industry lead. The premiere issue of the series Spoiler warning: The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ... Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957) is an American writer, artist and film director best known for his film noir-style comic book stories. ... For the 2008 film based on the comic book, see Watchmen (film). ... Dave Gibbons (born April 14, 1949) is a British writer and artist of comics. ...


Conversely, the mid-1980s also saw the end of many long-running DC war comics, including venerable series that had been in print since the 1960s. These titles, all with over 100 issues, included Sgt. Rock, G.I. Combat, The Unknown Soldier, and Weird War Tales. War comics are a genre of comics that gained popularity in English-speaking countries following the Second World War. ... One of Joe Kuberts evocative covers for Sgt. ... Cover of issue #168 of G.I. Combat is a long-running comic book series published first by Quality Comics and later by National Periodical Publications or NCC, which was the primary company of those that evolved to become DC Comics. ... Unknown Soldier #250 (April 1981) with the title character in center. ... Weird War Tales was a comic book title published by DC Comics which ran from September 1971 to June 1983, numbering 124 issues. ...


In 1989, DC began publishing its DC Archive Editions of hardcover collections of early, rare comics. Rick Keene handled the restoration on many of the Archive books with color restoration by DC's long-time resident colorist, Bob LeRose. DC Archive Editions, edited by Dale Crain for DC Comics, collect early, sometimes rare, comic books published by DC and other publishers into a permanent hardcover series. ... Robert K. Bob LeRose (June 3, 1921, Brooklyn, New York City, New York - August 30, 2006, Elmont, New York) was an American advertising artist and a comic book colorist for DC Comics, who provided the color for hundreds of stories featuring Batman, Superman, and other major characters. ...


1990s

The Death of Superman: Superman #75 (Jan. 1993). Cover art by Dan Jurgens.
The Death of Superman: Superman #75 (Jan. 1993). Cover art by Dan Jurgens.

The comics industry experienced a brief boom in the early 1990s, thanks to a combination of speculative purchasing of the books as collectibles and several storylines which gained attention from the mainstream media. DC's extended storylines in which Superman was killed and Batman was crippled, resulted in dramatically increased sales, but the increases were as temporary as the substitutes, and sales dropped off as industry sales went into a major slump. The cover of Superman #75, deemed fair use. ... The cover of Superman #75, deemed fair use. ... Superman #75 (Jan. ... Dan Jurgens is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... Superman #75 (Jan. ...


DC's Piranha Press and other imprints in the 1990s were introduced to facilitate diversification and specialized marketing of its product line. They increased the use of nontraditional contractual arrangements, including creator-owned work and licensing material from other companies. DC also increased publication of trade paperbacks, including both collections of serial comics and original graphic novels. Piranha Press, an imprint of DC Comics from 1989 to 1993, was a response by DC to the growing interest in alternative comics. ... In comics, a trade paperback (TPB) specifically refers to the periodic collections, published in book format, of stories published in comic books, usually capturing one story arc in the series. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ...


DC entered into a publishing agreement with Milestone Media that gave DC a line of comics featuring a culturally and racially diverse range of superhero characters; although the Milestone line ceased publication after a few short years, it yielded the popular animated series Static Shock. Paradox Press was established to publish material the large-format Big Book of... series, and such crime fiction as the graphic novel Road to Perdition. DC purchased Wildstorm Comics, maintaining it as a separate imprint with its own style and audience. Likewise, DC added the Wildstorm imprint America's Best Comics, created by Alan Moore and including the series Tom Strong and Promethea. Milestone Medias character Static Animated version of Static Milestone Media is a company best known for creating the Milestone comics imprint (that was published through DC Comics) and the Static Shock cartoon series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Paradox Press is a division of DC Comics. ... Road to Perdition is a graphic novel written by Max Allan Collins and illustrated by Richard Piers Rayner that was made into a motion picture of the same name in 2002. ... WildStorm Productions, or simply WildStorm or Wildstorm, is a publishing imprint and studio of American comic book publisher DC Comics. ... Alex Ross cover to Americas Best Comics 64 Page Giant, featuring all of the characters created by Alan Moore for the imprint. ... Tom Strong was a bi-monthly comic book created by writer Alan Moore and artist Chris Sprouse published by Americas Best Comics, an imprint of DC Comics Wildstorm division. ... Promethea is a comic book series created by Alan Moore and J.H. Williams III with Mick Gray, published by Americas Best Comics/Wildstorm. ...


2000s

Infinite Crisis #1 (Oct. 2005). Variant-cover art by George Pérez.
Infinite Crisis #1 (Oct. 2005). Variant-cover art by George Pérez.

In March 2003, DC acquired publishing and merchandising rights to the long-running fantasy series Elfquest, previously self-published by creators Wendy and Richard Pini under the Warp Graphics banner. The following year, DC established the CMX imprint to reprint translated manga, and temporarily acquired the North American publishing rights to graphic novels from European publishers 2000 AD and Humanoids. It also rebranded its younger-audience titles with the mascot Johnny DC. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x630, 484 KB)Cover to Infinite Crisis #1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x630, 484 KB)Cover to Infinite Crisis #1. ... New Teen Titans #1. ... Elfquest #5, 1979. ... Wendy and Richard Pini are the husband-and-wife team responsible for creating the well-known ElfQuest series of comics, graphic novels and prose works. ... WaRP Graphics, later Warp Graphics, was an alternative comics publisher which was most well known for being the original publisher of the Elfquest comic books. ... CMX is a division of Wildstorm Productions, an imprint of DC Comics which in turn is owned by Time-Warner. ... This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ... Cover of the first issue of 2000 AD, 26 February 1977. ... Humanoids Publishing (in French Humanoïdes Associés) is a comics publisher specialising in science fiction titles. ... Johnny DC was a character that appeared in various Silver Age DC Comics advertisments, and was used to promote DCs line of comics. ...


Starting in 2004, DC began laying groundwork for a sequel to Crisis on Infinite Earths, promising substantial changes to the DC Universe. In 2005, the company published several limited series establishing increasing conflicts among DC's heroes, with events climaxing in the limited series Infinite Crisis. Afterward, DC's ongoing series jumped one year forward in their story continuity, with DC publishing a weekly series, 52, that would gradually fill in the gap. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ...


Also in 2005, DC launched an "All-Star" line, featuring some of DC's best-known characters in stories that eschewed the long and convoluted continuity of the DC Universe. All-Star Batman & Robin the Boy Wonder launched in July 2005, with All-Star Superman beginning in November 2005 and All-Star Wonder Woman soon to follow. Warner Bros. released Batman Begins on June 15, 2005. Batman Begins is a 2005 superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Batman. ...


In 2006, affiliate CMX began publishing the webcomic Megatokyo' in print form, and Warner Bros. released the film Superman Returns on June 28, 2006. Megatokyo is a webcomic created by Fred Gallagher and Rodney Caston, debuting on August 14, 2000,[1] and then written and illustrated solely by Gallagher as of July 17, 2002. ... Superman Returns is a 2006 superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Superman. ...


2007 saw the completion of their year long weekly series 52, which saw extensive critical success. A new weekly series, Countdown, began the week after 52's conclusion. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... Countdown is a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 9, 2007, directly following the conclusion of the 52-issue 52. ...


Logo history

DC logos.

DC's first logo appeared on the March 1940 issues of its titles. The letters "DC" stood for Detective Comics, the name of Batman's flagship title. The small logo, with no background, read simply, "A DC Publication". This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The November 1941 DC titles introduced an updated logo. This version was almost twice the size of the previous, and was the first version with a white background. The name "Superman" was added to "A DC Publication", effectively acknowledging both Superman (the company's most popular character) and Batman. This logo was the first to occupy the top-left corner of the cover, where the logo has usually resided since. The company now referred to itself in its advertising as "Superman-DC".


In November 1949, the logo was modified to incorporate the company's formal name, National Comics Publications. This logo would also serve as the round body of Johnny DC, DC's mascot in the 1960s. Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ...


In October 1970, the circular logo was briefly retired in favor of a simple "DC" in a rectangle with the name of the title, or the star of the book; the logo on many issues of Action Comics, for example, read "DC Superman". An image of the lead character either appeared above or below the rectangle. For books that did not have a single star, such as anthologies like House of Mystery or team series such as Justice League of America, the title and "DC" appeared in a stylized logo, such as a bat for House of Mystery. This use of characters as logos helped to establish the likenesses as trademarks, and was similar to Marvel's contemporaneous use of characters as part of its cover branding. An anthology, literally a garland or collection of flowers, is a collection of literary works, originally of poems. ... House of Mystery was a horror anthology comic book series published by DC Comics from 1951 to 1983. ... “Chiroptera” redirects here. ... For other senses of this word, see Trademark (disambiguation). ...


DC's "100 Page Super-Spectacular" titles and later 100-page and "Giant" issues published from 1972 to 1974 featured a logo that was exclusive to these editions, the letters "DC" in a simple sans-serif typeface, in a circle. A variant had the letters in a square. In typography, serifs are the small features at the end of strokes within letters. ... For the origin and evolution of fonts, see History of western typography. ...


The July 1972 DC titles featured a new circular logo. The letters "DC" were rendered in a block-like typeface that would remain through later logo revisions until 2005. The title of the book usually appeared inside the circle, either above or below the letters.


In December 1973, this logo was modified with the addition of the words "The Line of DC Super-Stars" and the star motif that would continue in later logos. This logo was placed in the top center of the cover from August 1975 to October 1976.


When Jenette Kahn became DC's publisher in late 1976, she commissioned graphic designer Milton Glaser to design a new logo. Popularly referred to as the "DC bullet", this logo premiered on the February 1977 titles. Although it varied in size and color and was at times cropped by the edges of the cover, or briefly rotated 45 degrees, it remained essentially unchanged for nearly three decades. “Publisher” redirects here. ... Milton Glaser, 2003 I Love New York campaign by Milton Glaser. ...

1987 test logo.
1987 test logo.

In July 1987, DC released variant editions of Justice League #3 and The Fury of Firestorm #61 with a new DC logo. It featured a picture of Superman in a circle surrounded by the words "SUPERMAN COMICS." These variant covers were released to newsstands in certain markets as a marketing test. [6] Image File history File links Dc_variantlogo. ... Image File history File links Dc_variantlogo. ...


On May 8, 2005, a new logo was unveiled, debuting on DC titles starting in June 2005 with DC Special: The Return of Donna Troy #1 and the rest of the titles the following week. In addition to comics, it was designed for DC properties in other media, such as the movies Batman Begins and Superman Returns and the TV series Smallville and Justice League Unlimited, as well as for collectibles and other merchandise. The logo was designed by Josh Beatman of Brainchild Studios[citation needed] and DC executive Richard Bruning.[citation needed] is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Donna Troy is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. ... Batman Begins is a 2005 superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Batman. ... Superman Returns is a 2006 superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Superman. ... Smallville is an American television series set in the fictional town of Smallville, Kansas. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) is the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... A collectible (or collectable) is typically a manufactured item designed for people to collect. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ...


Imprints

Promotional art for Gotham Knights #20 cover featuring Batman and Superman, by Brian Bolland.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (666x792, 81 KB)Promotional cover art for Gotham Knights #20 by Brian Bolland. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (666x792, 81 KB)Promotional cover art for Gotham Knights #20 by Brian Bolland. ... Bollands cover to Hellstorm: Prince Of Lies #16. ... DC Comics All Star imprint All Star is an imprint of ongoing comic book titles published by DC Comics that began in 2005. ... Amalgam Comics was a metafictional American comic book publisher, and part of a collaboration between Marvel Comics and DC Comics, in which the two comic book publishers merged their characters to create new ones (e. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... DC Archive Editions, edited by Dale Crain for DC Comics, collect early, sometimes rare, comic books published by DC and other publishers into a permanent hardcover series. ... DC Focus was a short-lived imprint of DC Comics. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Helix was a short-lived imprint of DC Comics, with a science-fiction theme, launched in 1996 and last used in 1998. ... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ... Impact Comics was an imprint of DC Comics that was aimed at younger audiences. ... Archie Comics is an American comic book publisher known for its many series featuring the fictional teenage Archie Andrews, Betty Cooper, Veronica Lodge, Reggie Mantle and Forsythe Jughead Jones characters created by Bob Montana. ... Johnny DC was a character that appeared in various Silver Age DC Comics advertisments, and was used to promote DCs line of comics. ... Mad is an American humor magazine founded by editor Harvey Kurtzman and publisher William Gaines in 1952. ... Milestone Medias character Static Animated version of Static Milestone Media is a company best known for creating the Milestone comics imprint (that was published through DC Comics) and the Static Shock cartoon series. ... Minx is an imprint of DC Comics that publishes graphic novels aimed at teenage girls. ... Paradox Press is a division of DC Comics. ... Piranha Press, an imprint of DC Comics from 1989 to 1993, was a response by DC to the growing interest in alternative comics. ... Paradox Press is a division of DC Comics. ... Tangent Comics was a DC Comics imprint created in 1997-1998, developed from ideas created by Dan Jurgens. ... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ... WildStorm Productions, or simply WildStorm or Wildstorm, is a publishing imprint and studio of American comic book publisher DC Comics. ... Alex Ross cover to Americas Best Comics 64 Page Giant, featuring all of the characters created by Alan Moore for the imprint. ... Cliffhanger was an imprint of Wildstorm, publishing creator-owned comic books. ... Wildstorm started publishing comics in 1992. ... CMX is a division of Wildstorm Productions, an imprint of DC Comics which in turn is owned by Time-Warner. ... Homage Comics is a comic book publishing imprint, a subdivision of Wildstorm. ... Wildstorm started publishing comics in 1992. ... Wildstorm Wildstorm Productions, or simply WildStorm, is an American publisher of comic books. ... Wildstorm started publishing comics in 1992. ... Wildstorm Wildstorm Productions, or simply WildStorm, is an American publisher of comic books. ... William Erwin Eisner (March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) was an acclaimed American comics writer, artist and entrepreneur. ... Zuda Comics is DC Comics webcomic division. ...

Acquired companies and studios

The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ... Big C logo, used from Sept. ... Whiz Comics #2, the first appearance of Captain Marvel, the companys most popular character. ... Mad is an American humor magazine founded by editor Harvey Kurtzman and publisher William Gaines in 1952. ... Crack Comics #1 (May, 1940), featuring the Clock, previously introduced as the first masked comic book superhero. ... WildStorm Productions, or simply WildStorm or Wildstorm, is a publishing imprint and studio of American comic book publisher DC Comics. ... William Erwin Eisner (March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) was an acclaimed American comics writer, artist and entrepreneur. ...

See also

DC Direct[1] is the exclusive collectibles division of DC Comics, the Time Warner subsidiary that publishes comic books and licenses characters such as Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, Flash, Batman, Batgirl and Hawkgirl. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... The DC Universe Timeline is a timeline of the major events in the fictional DC Universe. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... This is a list of characters owned or published primarily by DC Comics. ... Below is a list of television series based on properties of DC Comics. ... This is a list of video games based on DC Comics: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Below is a list of feature films based on DC characters and properties. ... During its 75 years of publication, DC Comics has produced many noteworthy stories set in its fictional DC Universe. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dc_comics#Origins. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Brad Meltzer Becomes First Writer to Top New York Times Bestseller List and Diamond Comic Distributors Top 100 Sales Chart Simultaneously. TimeWarner (2006-09-15). Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  2. ^ Mayo, John (2007-06-04). Sales Estimates for April, 2007 Books. Comics Book Resources. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  3. ^ Benton, Mike. The Comic Book in America: An Illustrated History (Taylor Publishing: Dallas, Texas, 1989), pp. 178-181, reprinted at website Religious Affiliation of Comics Book Characters: "The Significant Seven: History's Most Influential Super-heroes" [sic]
  4. ^ Jones, Gerard. Men of Tomorrow: Geeks, Gangsters, and the Birth of the Comic Book (Basic Books, 2004; trade paperback ISBN 0-465-03657-0, p. 223
  5. ^ The lapsed "Captain Marvel" trademark had been seized by Marvel Comics in 1967, disallowing the DC comic itself to be called that. While Captain Marvel did not recapture his old popularity, a Saturday morning live action TV adaptation was popular and the character would gain a noted place in the DC Universe.
  6. ^ Silver Bullet Comic Books: It's BobRo the Answer Man (column; no date): "Conspiracy? Icons? And More?" by Bob Rozakis
  7. ^ http://dccomics.com/graphic_novels/

Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up sic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Gerard Jones is an American writer, born July 10, 1957 in Cut Bank, Montana, raised in Los Gatos and Gilroy, California. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Jackson Bostwick as Captain Marvel in the Shazam! television show. ...

References

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The DC Comics Encyclopedia at CrazyFish.net (668 words)
Comment: Using the encyclopedia format to look at the myriad characters created over the course of DC Comics history is a clever and fun idea.
In reality the DC Comics Encyclopedia is a great resource, I recently recieved it as a gift and I love it.
Featuring some of DC's most creative artists and heroes and villains from the world famous to lesser known one-offs, this thrilling, one-of-a-kind guide has comic book history exploding off every page.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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