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Encyclopedia > Cyrano de Bergerac (play)
Cyrano de Bergerac


Cover of a 1990 French-language edition of Cyrano de Bergerac Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Written by Edmond Rostand
Characters Cyrano de Bergerac
Roxane
Christian
Date of premiere 1897
Country of origin Flag of FranceFrance
Original language French
Genre Romance
Setting France, 1640

Cyrano de Bergerac is a play written in 1897 by Edmond Rostand based on the life of the real Cyrano de Bergerac. The first four acts are set in 1640, while the fifth is set in 1655. An immediate triumph upon its release, the play is one of the most popular in the French language and has been filmed several times and even made into an opera. Statue dedicated to Edmond Rostand in Cambo-les-Bains Edmond Eugène Alexis Rostand (April 1, 1868 - December 2, 1918) was a French poet and dramatist. ... Bust of Cyrano. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... As a literary genre, romance or chivalric romance refers to a style of heroic prose and verse narrative current in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. ... Events December 1 - Portugal regains its independence from Spain and João IV of Portugal becomes king. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Statue dedicated to Edmond Rostand in Cambo-les-Bains Edmond Eugène Alexis Rostand (April 1, 1868 - December 2, 1918) was a French poet and dramatist. ... Bust of Cyrano. ... Events December 1 - Portugal regains its independence from Spain and João IV of Portugal becomes king. ... Events March 25 - Saturns largest moon, Titan, is discovered by Christian Huygens. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... There are several film adaptations of Cyrano de Bergerac: Cyrano de Bergerac (1990 film) -- Gérard Depardieu Cyrano de Bergerac (1950 film) -- José Ferrer Cyrano de Bergerac (1945 film) -- Claude Dauphin Cyrano de Bergerac (1925 film) -- Pierre Magnier Cyrano de Bergerac (just one scene) (1900 film) -- Benoît-Constant Coquelin...


The entire play is written in verse, in rhyming couplets of 12 syllables per line. (It is very close to the Alexandrine format, but the verses sometimes lack a caesura.) It is also meticulously researched, down to the names of the members of the Académie Française and the dames précieuses glimpsed before the performance in the first scene. An alexandrine is a line of poetic meter. ... A caesura, in poetry, is an audible pause that breaks up a line of verse. ... The Académie française In the French educational system an académie LAcadémie française, or the French Academy, is the pre-eminent French learned body on matters pertaining to the French language. ... The literary style called préciosité (preciousness) arose from the lively conversations and playful word games of les précieuses, the witty and educated intellectual ladies who frequented the salon of the marquise de Rambouillet; her Chambre bleue (the blue bedroom of her hôtel particulier) offered a Parisian refuge...


The original Cyrano was Constant Coquelin, who played it over 400 times at Porte-Saint-Martin[1] and later toured North America in the role. Richard Mansfield was the first actor to play Cyrano in the United States in an English translation. The longest-running Broadway production ran 232 performances in 1923 and starred Walter Hampden. He passed the torch to José Ferrer, who won a Tony Award for playing Cyrano in a 1946 Broadway staging, the highlight of which was a special performance in which Ferrer played the title role for the first four acts and Hampden assumed it for the fifth. Other notable English-speaking Cyranos were Ralph Richardson, DeVeren Bookwalter, Derek Jacobi, Richard Chamberlain, and Christopher Plummer, who played the part in Rostand's original play and won a Tony Award for the 1973 musical adaptation. Kevin Kline is slated to play the role in a Broadway production that is scheduled to open November 1st, 2007, with Jennifer Garner playing Roxane and Daniel Sunjata as Christian. Benoît-Constant Coquelin. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Mansfield was well known as Dr. Jekyll and Mr. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Walter Hampden is the artist name of Walter Hampden Dougherty (born June 30, 1879 in Brooklyn; died June 11, 1955 in Los Angeles) was a U.S. actor and theatre manager. ... José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintron, known as José Ferrer (January 8, 1912-January 26, 1992), was an actor and director, born in Santurce, Puerto Rico. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Sir Ralph David Richardson (19 December 1902 – 10 October 1983) was an English actor, one of a group of theatrical knights of the mid-20th century who, though more closely associated with the stage, did their best to make the transition to film. ... DeVeren Bookwalter (September 8, 1939 in Brookville, Pennsylvania - July 23, 1987 in New York, New York) was a theatre actor and director who became the first person to win three Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards for his production, direction and performance in Cyrano de Bergerac at the Globe Playhouse... Sir Derek George Jacobi, CBE (IPA: ) (born 22 October 1938) is an English actor and director, knighted in 1994 for his services to the theatre. ... Richard Chamberlain, right, as John Blackthorne, and John Rhys-Davies, left, as the Portuguese Pilot Vasco Rodrigues in the Shogun television miniseries. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Cyrano is a musical with a book and lyrics by Anthony Burgess and music by Michael J. Lewis. ... Kevin Delaney Kline (born October 24, 1947) is an Academy Award- and Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor. ... Jennifer Anne Garner [1] (born April 17, 1972) is a Golden Globe Award- and SAG Award-winning and Emmy Award-nominated American film and television actress, and producer. ... Daniel Sunjata in the 2004 film Brother to Brother Daniel Sunjata Condon (b. ...


The play has been translated and performed many times, and is responsible for introducing the word "panache" into the English language. Panache means style or flair. Panaché is the French name for Shandy. ...


Plot summary

Hercules Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac, a Cadet (nobleman serving as a soldier) in the French Army, is a brash, strong-willed man of many talents. In addition to being an incredible duelist, he is a remarkable poet and is also shown to be a musician. However, he has an extremely large nose, which is a target for his own self-doubt. This doubt prevents him from expressing his love for his cousin, the beautiful Roxane, as he believes that his ugliness forbids him to "dream of being loved by even an ugly woman." A cadet is a future officer in the military. ... A duel is a formalized type of combat. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ...


At the same time as he is debating whether or not he should propose his love to her, she comes to see him. In a moment of great dramatic irony, she tells him that she believes she loves Christian de Neuvillette, a young cadet in the same regiment as Cyrano. Although disheartened by this chain of events, Cyrano agrees to protect Christian at Roxane's request. “Ironic” redirects here. ...


When Cyrano confronts Christian, he sees that Christian too loves Roxane, but is intimidated by Roxane's intelligence and has no wit or intelligence of his own, even though he's a "handsome devil". Desperate to express his love for Roxane, even if it is unrequited, Cyrano offers to provide Christian with the type of dashing verse that he is associated with. In Act II, Scene ii of the 2003 Signet Classic edition, Christian states that "I need eloquence, and I have none!" to which Cyrano replies "I'll lend you mine! Lend me your conquering physical charm, and together we'll form a romantic hero!"


The two arrange love letters and memorize speeches to attempt to woo Roxane. Christian decides that he does not need Cyrano's help anymore, but humiliates himself in front of Roxane, and begs Cyrano to help him again. This culminates in the famous scene where Roxane, on top of a balcony, believes she is speaking to Christian, below on the ground, but is actually speaking to Cyrano pretending to be Christian. After winning back Roxane's love through Cyrano's poetry, Christian is married to Roxane.


Their brilliant plan, however, is blocked by Antoine de Guiche. De Guiche, the officer in charge of Cyrano and Christian's regiment, dislikes Cyrano and delights in ordering the Cadets to the siege upon Arras, a historical event that was a part of the war against Spain that was occurring that year in Flanders. Though Roxane attempts to keep de Guiche from sending the army away through subterfuge (and uses de Guiche's order to secure her secret marriage to Christian), she fails. Arras (Dutch: ) is a town and commune in northern France, préfecture (capital) of the Pas-de-Calais département. ...


In a military encampment plagued by famine, Cyrano becomes obsessed with writing love letters to Roxane and crediting them to Christian. De Guiche, who is shown to be ridiculed by the soldiers he commands, orders the regiment on a suicide mission. However, Roxane, taken by the love letters, arrives with provisions. Roxane tells Christian that she loves him just for his soul, and would love him even if he were ugly. Hearing this, Christian tries to get the resistant Cyrano to tell Roxane about the entire scheme. However, the battle starts and Christian dies before Cyrano can properly inform her. Cyrano's pride and sense of honor preclude him from telling Roxane about the secret of the man who just died. The cadets charge in a mostly fruitless attack, bringing Act IV and the portion of the play set in 1640 to a close.


The play resumes in 1655, 15 years after the events in Arras. Cyrano has become poor because his pride prevents him from receiving aid. His brash manner, however, has continued to earn him enemies. He visits Roxane, who still mourns for Christian, every Saturday at the cloister where she now lives. Cyrano is stricken on the head by firewood thrown from an open window while walking down the street. It is suspected that the incident was set up by someone that Cyrano had insulted in the past. After being treated by a doctor "acting out of charity", Cyrano gets up out of his bed and leaves to go keep his weekly appointment with Roxane. He asks to read Christian's last letter (which Cyrano, of course, actually wrote), and Roxane gives it to him. It is a moving farewell that Christian supposedly wrote in case of his death in battle. As Cyrano reads it aloud, Roxane remembers hearing the same voice speaking words of love to her long ago and notices that he is reading in the dark. She turns and sees that Cyrano is reciting the letter from memory, and realizes that not only did he write all of Christian's letters, but that she has actually always loved Cyrano, and he her. Two of Cyrano's best friends, Le Bret and Ragueneau, enter, concerned for Cyrano's health, and tell Roxane that Cyrano has "killed himself" by going to visit her. It is then that Cyrano is forced to admit that he is dying from his wound. Roxane now declares that she loves him and begs him not to die. But Cyrano grows delirious, stands up, and imagines that he is fighting a duel with Death himself, saying that it is better to fight in vain. Declaring that the only thing that cannot be taken away from him is his "panache" (i.e., honor; the word also means "a feathered headgear"), he dies in Roxane's arms. Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A cloister (from latin claustrum) is a part of cathedral, monastic and abbey architecture. ... Panache means style or flair. Panaché is the French name for Shandy. ...


Movies and other adaptations

Rostand's play has been the subject of several films, including a 1900 silent movie starring Constant Coquelin, who originally created the role, which was accompanied by a sound-on-cylinder recording of Coquelin's voice reciting one of Cyrano's speeches[2]. A 1925 film version starring Pierre Magnier was notable for its laborious hand coloring using the Pathécolor stencil process, in which groundstone glass is cut with a pantograph in the shape of an object to conform with what is on the 35mm print. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Shortcut: WP:WIN Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia and, as a means to that end, also an online community. ... There are several film adaptations of Cyrano de Bergerac: Cyrano de Bergerac (1990 film) -- Gérard Depardieu Cyrano de Bergerac (1950 film) -- José Ferrer Cyrano de Bergerac (1945 film) -- Claude Dauphin Cyrano de Bergerac (1925 film) -- Pierre Magnier Cyrano de Bergerac (just one scene) (1900 film) -- Benoît-Constant Coquelin... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... This article is about the comedy film. ... Benoît-Constant Coquelin. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first English-language adaptation to be televised was made in 1938 by the BBC and starred Leslie Banks in one of the earliest live television broadcasts. Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Leslie Banks (June 9, 1890 – 21 April 1952) was a British theatre and film actor, director and producer. ...


The most famous film versions may be the 1950 film starring José Ferrer (for which he won an Academy Award), and the 1990 French-language version, made in color, and starring Gérard Depardieu (who was nominated for the same award). Ferrer also played the part in Abel Gance's Cyrano et d'Artagnan (1964) and a cartoon version of the play for an ABC Afterschool Special in 1974. There is a disambiguation page at Cyrano de Bergerac (movie). ... José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintrón (January 8, 1909 – January 26, 1992), was an Academy Award-winning Puerto Rican actor and film director, born in the Santurce district of San Juan, Puerto Rico. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Cyrano de Bergerac is a 1990 French language film based on the 1897 play of the same name by Edmond Rostand. ... Gérard Xavier Marcel Depardieu, CQ (born 27 December 1948,  ) is an Academy Award-nominated French actor. ... José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintrón (January 8, 1909 – January 26, 1992), was an Academy Award-winning Puerto Rican actor and film director, born in the Santurce district of San Juan, Puerto Rico. ... Abel Gance (October 25, 1889 - November 10, 1981) was a world-renowned French film director, producer, writer, actor and editor. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...


There is also a relatively unknown French-language black-and-white film version made in 1945, starring Claude Dauphin. Posters and film stills give the impression that the set designs and costumes of the 1950 José Ferrer film may have been modeled on those in the 1945 movie. [1] Claude Dauphin (born December 17, 1953 in Lachine, Quebec) is a lawyer and politician in the province of Quebec, Canada. ... A film still, sometimes called a publicity still, is a photograph taken on the set of a movie or television program during production and used for promotional purposes. ...


A comedic Hollywood reinterpretation, Roxanne, starring Steve Martin as a Cyrano-esque fire captain in a modern small town, and Daryl Hannah as Roxane, was released in 1987. ... Roxanne is a film released in 1987, starring Steve Martin and Darryl Hannah. ... For the football player of the same name see Steve Martin (football player). ... Daryl Christine Hannah (born December 3, 1960) is an American film actress. ...


Aru kengo no shogai (literally, "Life of an Expert Swordsman"), is an 1959 samurai film by Hideyo Amamoto based on Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac. The movie airs on American TV stations as "Samurai Saga". Eisei Amamoto (January 2, 1926–March 23, 2003) is a Japanese actor who has appeared in many movies, perhaps best known for his roles in various Godzilla films and tokusatsu series. ...


An opera in French, Cyrano de Bergerac, whose libretto by Henri Cain is based on Rostand's words, was composed by the Italian Franco Alfano and was revived by the Metropolitan Opera with Plácido Domingo in the title role. This article is about Opera, the art form. ... Cyrano de Bergerac is a four act opera composed by Franco Alfano, first performed in Rome on 22 January 1936. ... Henri Cain (1859 - 21 November 1937) was a French dramatist and opera librettist. ... Franco Alfano (March 8, 1875 – October 27, 1954) was an Italian composer and pianist best known for completing Puccinis unfinished opera Turandot in 1926. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... Plácido Domingo José Plácido Domingo Embil KBE (born January 21, 1941)[1] better known as Plácido Domingo, is a world-renowned operatic tenor. ...


Victor Herbert wrote an unsuccessful operetta adaptation of the play in 1899. It was one of Herbert's few failures. Victor Herbert Victor August Herbert (February 1, 1859–May 26, 1924) was a popular composer of light opera, and an accomplished cellist and conductor. ... Operetta is a genre of light opera, light in terms both of music and subject matter. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Walter Damrosch wrote another operatic adaptation of Cyrano de Bergerac, which premiered in 1913 at the Metropolitan Opera. Walter Johannes Damrosch (born in Breslau, Prussia, January 30, 1862; died in New York City, December 22, 1950) was an American symphony conductor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ...


In 1964, The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo presented a cartoon adaptation of Cyrano. Mr. ...


In 1973, a musical adaptation by Anthony Burgess, called Cyrano and starring Christopher Plummer, appeared in Boston and then on Broadway. Twenty years later, a Dutch musical stage adaptation was translated into English and produced on Broadway as Cyrano: The Musical. Both the 1973 and 1993 versions were critical and commercial failures. Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ...


Burgess wrote a new translation and adaptation of Cyrano in 1970, which had its world premiere at the Tyrone Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis. Paul Hecht was Cyrano. Also in the cast were Len Cariou as Christian, and Roberta Maxwell as Roxanna. A later production was the Royal Shakespeare Company's acclaimed 1983 stage production. Paul Hecht (b. ... Len Cariou (born September 30, 1939 in Saint Boniface, Manitoba) is a Canadian actor. ... Roberta Maxwell (born 1942 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian actress. ... Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon The Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) is a British theatre company. ...


On the PBS show Wishbone, it was the story featured in the episode "Cyranose". Wishbone was a television show that aired from 1995 to 1998, featuring a Jack Russell terrier of that name. ...


The teen movie Whatever It Takes, was loosely based on it. Whatever It Takes is a 2000 teen comedy starring Marla Sokoloff, Shane West, Jodi Lyn OKeefe, and James Franco. ...


A pornographic adaptation titled Cyrano, directed by Paul Norman, was released in 1991.


Frank Langella created a chamber piece simply titled Cyrano. Frank A. Langella, Jr. ...


The 1996 film The Truth About Cats & Dogs has a plot reminiscent of this play. The Truth About Cats & Dogs is a 1996 American film, a romantic comedy starring Uma Thurman, Janeane Garofalo, Ben Chaplin, and Jamie Foxx. ...


In the French anime show Code Lyoko the Lyoko gang acts out part of this play at the beginning and end of the episode, Temporary Insanity. Code Lyoko is a French animated television series featuring both conventional animation and CGI animation. ... An outside view of Lyoko. ... Temporary Insanity is the sixtieth episode of Code Lyoko. ...


The Brazilian book "A Marca de Uma Lagrima" tells the story of a girl, Isabel, who writes love letters to her cousin, Cristiano, in the name of her best friend Rosana.


The Bollywood movie "Padosan" (1968) is loosely based on this play. Padosan (Hindi: पड़ोसन, Urdu: پڑوسن) is a 1968 Indian Hindi film. ...


In the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode The Nth Degree, Dr. Crusher directs a version of this play with Lt. Barclay performing the lead role. The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Nth Degree is a Star Trek: The Next Generation episode. ... Doctor Beverly Crusher, played by actress Gates McFadden, was a character on the Star Trek: The Next Generation TV show and subsequent films. ... Lieutenant Reginald Endicott Barclay III is a recurring character in the Star Trek fictional universe, created by Sally Caves and played by Dwight Schultz. ...


The Blues Traveler song "Sweet Pain" is about this play.


In an installment of "Monsterpiece Theater" on the children's show Sesame Street, there is a character named "Cyranose", who substitutes a sword with, appropriately, his exaggeratedly long nose. He has a very hot temper and goes ballistic, swinging his nose in blind rage, everytime someone says the word "nose", as he automatically believes they are ridiculing him. Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ...


The song "Sloppy Love Jingle Pt. 1" by the band Gym Class Heroes references Cyrano. Gym Class Heroes is a hip hop band from Geneva, New York. ...


David Bintley created a ballet Cyrano for the Birmingham Royal Ballet. The world premiere was February 7, 2007. Banner advertising the Birmingham Royal Ballet at the Hippodrome The Birmingham Royal Ballet (BRB) is one of the UKs foremost ballet companies, based at the Birmingham Hippodrome theatre in Birmingham, where it enjoys custom-buit facilities such as the Jerwood Centre for the Prevention and Treatment of Dance Injuries... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


A new translation of the play by Ranjit Bolt opens at Bristol Old Vic in May 2007 The Coopers Hall (right) became the theatre foyer in the 1970s. ...


In the Roseanne episode titled "Communicable Theater" Jackie plays Roxanne when going through a phase of appreciation to fine arts.


The song "Cyrano de Berger's Back" by X is based on the play. For other bands named X, see X (band). ...


Michigan Opera Theatre will present Cyrano, a world premiere opera by composer David DiChiera, and director/librettist Bernard Uzan, Oct. 13 - 28, 2007 at the Detroit Opera House. Cyrano is a coproduction with the Philadelphia Opera and Florida Grand Opera.A live broadcast on the 28th from radio station WRCJ-FM will present the world premiere. The Detroit Opera House, opened on January 22, 1922 as the Capitol Theater, is the current venue for all Michigan Opera Theatre productions. ... The Opera Company of Philadelphia is an opera company in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... WRCJ-FM is a classical/jazz radio station in Detroit Michigan. ...


Sound & Fury, a Los Angeles-based comedy trio will present their parody of the play, called "Cyranose!" in L.A. at Café-Club Fais Do-Do in September 2007.


External links

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Cyrano de Bergerac

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cyrano de Bergerac (1145 words)
Cyrano was severely wounded twice, once at a fight with a Gascon Guard, and the second time at the siege of Arras in 1640.
In the 1650s Cyrano de Bergerac published two plays, LA MORT D'AGRIPPINE (1654), which was suspected of blasphemy, and LE PÉDANT JOUÉ (1654), from which Molière borrowed heavily for his play The Cheats of Chapin.
Cyrano is escorted on the Moon by the Demon of Socrates, who says: "If there is something you men cannot understand, you either imagine that it is spiritual or that it does not exists.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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