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Encyclopedia > Cyprus
Κυπριακή Δημοκρατία (Greek)
Kypriakī́ Dīmokratía
Kıbrıs Cumhuriyeti (Turkish)
Republic of Cyprus
Flag of Cyprus
Flag Coat of arms
AnthemὝμνος εἰς τὴν Ἐλευθερίαν
Ymnos is tin Eleftherian
Hymn to Liberty1
Location of  Cyprus  (dark green)

– on the European continent  (light green & dark grey)
– in the European Union  (light green) Cyprus is an island in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cyprus. ... Cyprus coat of arms This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Flag ratio: 3:5 The flag of Cyprus was adopted on August 16, 1960. ... Coat of Arms of Cyprus The coat of arms of Cyprus depicts a dove carrying an olive branch (a well-known symbol of peace) over “1960”, the year of Cypriot independence from British rule. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: All verses in Greek The Hymn to Liberty (Ύμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν Ímnos is tin Eleftherían) is a poem written by Dionýsios Solomós in 1823 that consists of 158 stanzas, set to music by Nikolaos Mantzaros. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...

Capital
(and largest city)
Nicosia (Lefkosia, Lefkosa)
35°08′N, 33°28′E
Official languages Greek,Turkish
Demonym Cypriot
Government Presidential republic
 -  President Dimitris Christofias
Independence from the UK 
 -  Date 1 October 1960 
EU accession 1 May 2004
Area
 -  Total 9,251 km² (167th)
3,572 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) negligible
Population
 -  2007 census 788,457 
 -  Density 85/km² (85th)
221/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2007 IMF estimate
 -  Total $36.533 billion (91st)
 -  Per capita $46,865 (7th)
GDP (nominal) 2007 IMF estimate
 -  Total $21.303 billion (87th)
 -  Per capita $27,327 (28th)
Gini (2005) 29 (low
HDI (2007) 0.903 (high) (28th)
Currency Euro (EUR)
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 -  Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Internet TLD .cy3
Calling code +357
1 Also the national anthem of Greece.
2 Before 2008: Cypriot pound
3 The .eu domain is also used, shared with other European Union member states.

Cyprus (Greek: Κύπρος, Kýpros; Turkish: Kıbrıs), officially the Republic of Cyprus (Greek: Κυπριακή Δημοκρατία, Kypriakī́ Dīmokratía; Turkish: Kıbrıs Cumhuriyeti) is a Eurasian island country situated in the eastern Mediterranean south of Turkey, west of the Levant, north of Egypt, and eastsoutheast of Greece. Not to be confused with capitol. ... Motto none Anthem (transliteration) Hymn to Freedom 1 Location of Cyprus (orange) within the European Union (camel). ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Republics with presidential systems are shown in blue A presidential system, or a congressional system, is a system of government of a republic where the executive branch is elected separately from the legislative. ... The President of Cyprus is the countrys head of state. ... Dimitris Christofias (Greek: Δημήτρης Χριστόφιας) is a chubby Cypriot politician who is the General Secretary of AKEL and the President of the House of Representatives (Cypriot Parliament). ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Austria Poland Belgium Bulgaria Cyprus Czech   Rep. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... IMF redirects here. ... The international dollar is a hypothetical unit of currency that has the same purchasing power that the U.S. dollar has in the United States at a given point in time. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... IMF redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... World map of GDP (Nominal and PPP). ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of countries by 2006 GDP (nominal) per capita (IMF, October 2007). ... Graphical representation of the Gini coefficient The Gini coefficient is a measure of inequality of income distribution or inequality of wealth distribution. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... This talks about the countries in the Human Development Index, for information on the Human Development Index, please Click Here World map indicating Human Development Index (2007) (Colour-blind compliant map) For red-green color vision problems. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+3 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .cy is the country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Cyprus. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... Cyprus adopted a closed telephone numbering plan on 1st December 2001. ... ISO 4217 Code CYP User(s) Cyprus (except in the self-proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus), Akrotiri and Dhekelia Inflation 2. ... For other uses, see Eurasia (disambiguation). ... Island countries in the world An island country is a country that is wholly confined to an island or island group, and has no territory on the mainland of a continent. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... The Levant The Levant (IPA: ) is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ...


Cyprus is the third-largest island and one of the most popular tourist destinations in the Mediterranean, attracting over 2.4 million tourists per year.[1] A former British colony, it gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1960 and became a Commonwealth republic in 1961. The Republic of Cyprus is a developed country and has been a member of the European Union since 1 May 2004. It adopted the euro on 1 January 2008. For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... The Commonwealth republics, shown in pink A Commonwealth republic is any one of the 31 sovereign states of the Commonwealth of Nations that have a republican form of government. ... World map indicating Human Development Index (as of 2004). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1974, following a period of violence between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots and an attempted Greek Cypriot coup d'état aimed at annexing the island to Greece[2] and sponsored by the Greek military junta of 1967-1974, Turkey invaded and occupied one-third of the island. This led to the displacement of thousands of Cypriots and the establishment of a separate Turkish Cypriot political entity in the north. This event and its resulting political situation is a matter of ongoing dispute. Combatants Greek Cypriots Aided by Hellenic Republic Turkish Cypriots Aided by Republic of Turkey Strength 30,000[1] 5,000[2] Cyprus Intercommunal violence refers to periods of inter-ethnic conflict between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots on the island of Cyprus from 1963 to 1974. ... Greek Cypriot refers to the ethnic Greek population of Cyprus. ... Turkish Cypriots are those inhabitants of Cyprus who are ethnically Turkish[1], as opposed to those who are of Greek (the Greek Cypriots) or other ethnicities. ... Coup redirects here. ... The Greek military junta of 1967-1974, alternatively The Regime of the Colonels (Greek: ), or in Greece The Junta (Greek: ) and The Seven Years (Greek: ) are terms used to refer to a series of right-wing military governments that ruled Greece from 1967 to 1974. ... Combatants  Turkey  Cyprus  Greece On the 20th of July 1974, Turkey launched a military invasion by air, land and sea against Cyprus purportedly to restore constitutional order following an Athens orchestrated coup by the Cypriot National Guard against the President of Cyprus, Makarios III. Though Turkey had consistently refused to... Cypriot Refugees Page It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Civilian casualties and displacements during the Cyprus conflict. ... Anthem Ä°stiklâl Marşı(Turkish) Independence March Capital Nicosia Official languages Turkish Government Representative democratic republic1  -  President Mehmet Ali Talat  -  Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer Sovereignty from Cyprus   -  Proclaimed November 15, 1983   -  Recognition By Turkey   -  Independence from Cyprus   -  Declared November 15, 1983  Area  -  Total 3,355 km² (not ranked) 1... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Republic of Cyprus, the internationally recognized state, claimed sovereignty over 97% of the island of Cyprus and all surrounding waters, with the United Kingdom controlling the remaining three percent. The island is de facto partitioned into four main parts. The Republic of Cyprus exercises full effective control over approximately 59% of the island, the self-proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) controls over approximately 36% of the island, and the remaining approximately 5% of the land mass is split evenly between British-controlled Sovereign Base Areas and the UN-controlled Green Line.[3] For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... “Sovereign” redirects here. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Anthem: Ä°stiklâl Marşı(Turkish) Independence March Capital Nicosia (LefkoÅŸa in Turkish) Official languages Turkish Government Representative democratic republic1  -  President Mehmet Ali Talat  -  Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer Independence from Cyprus   -  Proclaimed November 15, 1983   -  Recognition By Turkey only  Area  -  Total 3,355 km² (167th ranked together with Cyprus...

Contents

The list of unrecognized countries enumerates those geo-political entities which lack general diplomatic recognition, but wish to be recognized as sovereign states. ... Anthem: Ä°stiklâl Marşı(Turkish) Independence March Capital Nicosia (LefkoÅŸa in Turkish) Official languages Turkish Government Representative democratic republic1  -  President Mehmet Ali Talat  -  Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer Independence from Cyprus   -  Proclaimed November 15, 1983   -  Recognition By Turkey only  Area  -  Total 3,355 km² (167th ranked together with Cyprus... Diplomatic recognition is a political act by which one state acknowledges an act or status of another state or government, thereby according it legitimacy and expressing its intent to bring into force the domestic and international legal consequences of recognition. ... UN redirects here. ... UN Buffer Zone in Cyprus The United Nations Buffer Zone in Cyprus is a 300 km (187 mile) separation barrier along the 1974 Green Line (or ceasefire line) de facto dividing the Republic of Cyprus into north and south regions. ... A street cut by the Green Line in Nicosia The term Green Line is often used to refer to the line of demarcation that divides the Cypriot capital of Nicosia into the southern Greek Cypriot region, the controlled area by Republic of Cyprus and the northern Turkish Cypriot region, which... The UK Sovereign Base Areas are those British military base areas located in countries formerly ruled by the United Kingdom which were retained by it and not handed over when those countries attained independence. ... Anthem God Save the Queen Akrotiri and Dhekelia (Occupied Areas) Sovereign Base Areas indicated in pink. ...

Etymology

The name 'Cyprus' has a somewhat uncertain etymology. One suggestion is that it comes from the Greek word for the Mediterranean cypress tree (Cupressus sempervirens), κυπάρισσος (kypárissos), or even from the Greek name of the henna plant (Lawsonia alba), κύπρος (kýpros). Another school suggests that it stems from the Eteocypriot word for copper. Georges Dossin, for example, suggests that it has roots in the Sumerian word for copper (zubar) or for bronze (kubar), from the large deposits of copper ore found on the island. Through overseas trade the island has given its name to the Classical Latin word for the metal through the phrase aes Cyprium, "metal of Cyprus", later shortened to Cuprum.[6] Cyprus is also called "the island of Aphrodite" ,[7] since the Greek goddess Aphrodite, of beauty and love, was born in Cyprus. The most common theory is that it came from their word for copper, Kypros, because the island had rich deposits of copper. Etymologies redirects here. ... Species See text. ... Binomial name Cupressus sempervirens L. Cupressus sempervirens, the Mediterranean Cypress, is a species of cypress native to the eastern Mediterranean region, in northeast Libya, southeast Greece (Crete, Rhodes), southern Turkey, Cyprus, western Syria, Lebanon and western Jordan, and also a disjunct population in Iran. ... For other uses, see Henna (disambiguation). ... Henna (Lawsonia inermis, syn. ... Eteocypriot was a pre-Indo-European language spoken in Iron Age Cyprus. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... Sumerian ( native tongue) was the language of ancient Sumer, spoken in Southern Mesopotamia from at least the 4th millennium BCE. It was gradually replaced by Akkadian as a spoken language in the beginning of the 2nd millenium BCE, but continued to be used as a sacred, ceremonial, literary and scientific... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... This article is about the metal alloy. ... Classical Latin is the language used by the principal exponents of that language in what is usually regarded as classical Latin literature. ... For the 1934 film, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ...


History

Main article: History of Cyprus
Temple to Apollon Ilatis outside the city of Limassol.
Temple to Apollon Ilatis outside the city of Limassol.
Salamis, Cyprus, outside the city of Amochostos.
Salamis, Cyprus, outside the city of Amochostos.

Cyprus is the mythical birthplace of Aphrodite, Adonis and home to King Cinyras, Teucer and Pygmalion.[8] The earliest confirmed site of human activity is Aetokremnos, situated on the south coast, indicating that hunter-gatherers were active on the island from around 10,000 BC, with settled, village communities dating from 8200 BC. Important remains from this early-Neolithic period can be found at Shillourokambos, Kastros, and Khirokitia, where decorated pottery and figurines of stone quite distinct from the cultures of the surrounding mainland survive. The Mycenaean Greeks first reached Cyprus around 1600 BC, with settlements dating from this period scattered all over the island. Another wave of Greek settlement is believed to have taken place in the period 1100-1050 BC, with the island's predominantly Greek character dating from this period. Several Phoenician colonies were founded in the 8th century BC, like Kart-Hadasht ('New Town'), near present day Larnaca and Salamis This article is about the History of Cyprus. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... Gymnasium at Salamis, photo by User:Jeandunston File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Gymnasium at Salamis, photo by User:Jeandunston File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Salamis was an ancient city-state on the east coast of Cyprus, at the mouth of the river Pedieos, 6 km North of Famagusta. ... Famagusta or Gazimağusa is a city on the east coast of Cyprus. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses of the name Adonis, see Adonis (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, King Cinyras of Cyprus was a son of Apollo and husband of Metharme. ... In Greek mythology Teucer, also Teucrus or Teucris from Greek Τεύκρος, was the son of King Telamon of Salamis and his second wife Hesione, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy. ... Étienne Maurice Falconet: Pygmalion & Galatee (1763) Pygmalion is a legendary figure found in Ovids Metamorphoses. ... Aetokremnos is a rock shelter near Limassol on the southern coast of Cyprus. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Shillourokambos is an aceramic Neolithic site (PPN B) near Parekklisha, 6 km east of Limassol in southern Cyprus. ... For a community in the western Peloponnese in Greece, see Kastro Kastros is an early Neolithic settlement in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. ... Choirokoitia is an archaeological site on the island of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea, dating from the Neolithic age. ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ...


Cyprus was conquered by Assyria in 709 BC, before a brief spell under Egyptian rule and eventually Persian rule in 545 BC. Cypriots, led by Onesilos, joined their fellow-Greeks in the Ionian cities during the unsuccessful Ionian Revolt in 499 BC against the Achaemenid Empire. The island was brought under permanent Greek rule by Alexander the Great and the Ptolemies of Egypt following his death. Full Hellenization took place during the Ptolemaic period, which ended when Cyprus was annexed by Roman Republic in 58 BC. Cyprus was one of the first stops in apostle Paul's missionary journey. In 395 AD it became part of the Byzantine Empire,[9] which lost it temporarily to the Arabs in 643 AD before reclaiming it in 966 AD. This article concerns the ancient Mesopotamian kingdom. ... Onesilus or Onesilos (Greek: Ονήσιλος)(?- 497 BCE) was the brother of king Gorgos (Gorgus) of the city of Salamis on the island of Cyprus. ... Location of Ionia Ionia (Greek Ιωνία; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was an ancient region of southwestern coastal Anatolia (in present-day Turkey, the region nearest İzmir,) on the Aegean Sea. ... The Ionian Revolts were triggered by the actions of Aristagoras, the tyrant of the Ionian city of Miletus at the end of the 6th century BC and the beginning of the 5th century BC. They constituted the first major conflict between Greece and Persia. ... Founder of empires: Cyrus, The Great is still revered in modern Iran as he was in all the successor Persian Empires. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Ptolemy, one of Alexander the Greats generals, was appointed satrap of Egypt after Alexanders death in 323 BC. In 305 BC he declared himself King Ptolemy I, later known as Soter (saviour). ... Hellenization (or Hellenisation) is a term used to describe a cultural change in which something non-Greek becomes Greek (Hellenistic civilization). ... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... St. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... Byzantine redirects here. ...

The Centaur floor mosaic in Paphos.
The Centaur floor mosaic in Paphos.

Richard I of England captured the island in 1191 during the Third Crusade, using it as a major supply base that was relatively safe from the Saracens. A year later Guy of Lusignan purchased the island from the Templars to compensate the loss of his kingdom. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the mythological creatures. ... This article is about a decorative art. ... District Paphos Government  - Mayor Savvas Vergas Population (2001)  - City 47,300 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England and ruler of the Angevin Empire from 6 July 1189 until his death. ... The Third Crusade (1189–1192), also known as the Kings Crusade, was an attempt by European leaders to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin. ... For the rugby club Saracens see Saracens (rugby club) The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ... Imaginary portrait of Guy of Lusignan by François-Edouard Picot, c. ... For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ...


The Republic of Venice seized control of the island in 1489 after the abdication of Queen Caterina Cornaro, the widow of James II, the last Lusignan king of Cyprus. Using it as an important commercial hub, Venetians soon fortified Nicosia, the capital and most important city, with its famous Venetian Walls. Throughout Venetian rule, the Ottoman Empire frequently raided Cyprus. In 1539 the Ottomans destroyed Limassol. Fearing the worst, the Venetians fortified Famagusta, Nicosia, and Kyrenia. Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Caterina Cornaro (1454 - 1510) was Queen of Cyprus from 1474 - 1489. ... The Lusignan family originated in Poitou in western France, and in the late 12th century came to rule the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Kingdom of Cyprus. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital İstanbul ( Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 12+ million km² Establishment 1299 Dissolution October 29, 1923... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... Magusa redirects here. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Kourion Theatre outside the city of Limassol.
Kourion Theatre outside the city of Limassol.

In 1570, a full scale invasion under Piyale Pasha with 60,000 troops brought the island under Ottoman control, despite stiff resistance by the inhabitants of Nicosia and Famagusta. The Ottomans applied the millet system and allowed religious authorities to govern their own non-Muslim minorities, but at the same time invested the Orthodox Church as a mediator between Christian Cypriots and the authorities granting it not only religious but political and economic powers. Heavy taxation led to rebellions - between 1572 and 1668, around twenty-eight bloody uprisings took place - forcing the Sultan to intervene. The first large-scale census of the Ottoman Empire in 1831, counting only men, showed 14,983 Muslims and 29,190 Christians.[10] By 1872, the population of the island had risen to 144,000 comprising 44,000 Muslims and 100,000 Christians.[11] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kourion (Greek: Κούριον), also Curias (Pliny v. ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... Piyale Pasha (circa 1515-1578), also known as Piale Pasha in the West or Pialí Bajá in Spain (Turkish: Piyale PaÅŸa), was an Ottoman-Turkish admiral between 1553 and 1567 and a high ranking Ottoman Vizier after 1568. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... Magusa redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The term Cucumber may refer to: The Eastern Orthodox Church: the Eastern Christian churches of Byzantine tradition that adhere to the seven Ecumenical Councils. ... The Ottoman Dynasty (or the Imperial House of Osman) ruled the Ottoman Empire from 1281 to 1923, beginning with Osman I (not counting his father, ErtuÄŸrul), though the dynasty was not proclaimed until 1383 when Murad I declared himself sultan. ...

Administration (but not sovereignty) of the island was ceded to the British Empire in 1878, in the aftermath of the Russo-Turkish War (1877–1878). The island would serve Britain as a key military base in its its colonial routes. By 1906, when the Famagusta harbour was completed, Cyprus was a strategic naval outpost overlooking the Suez Canal, the crucial main route to India, then Britain's most important colony. Following World War 1 and the Ottoman alliance with the Central powers, the United Kingdom annexed the island. In 1923, under the Treaty of Lausanne, the nascent Turkish republic relinquished any claim to Cyprus, and in 1925 it was declared a British Crown Colony. Many Greek Cypriots, fought in the British Army during both world wars, under the impression that Cyprus would eventually be united with Greece. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... kykkos Monastry ,Outside View with the adorable Orthodox icons hand painted on the walls. ... Troodos is the biggest mountain range of Cyprus, located in the center of the island. ... Map of Cyprus showing Nicosia district. ... The Cyprus Convention of June 4, 1878 was an agreement reached between the United Kingdom and the Ottoman Empire which granted control of Cyprus to Great Britain in exchange for their support of the Ottomans in the Russian-Turkish war. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... Combatants  Russian Empire Romania Serbia Bulgaria Montenegro  Ottoman Empire Commanders Mikhail Skobelev Mikhail Loris-Melikov Ivan Lazarev Carol I of Romania Ahmed Muhtar Pasha Russia preparing to release the Balkan dogs of war, while Britain warns him to take care. ... For other uses, see Suez (disambiguation). ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Red: Central Powers at their zenith. ... Borders as shaped by the treaty The Treaty of Lausanne (July 24, 1923) was a peace treaty signed in Lausanne that settled the Anatolian part of the partitioning of the Ottoman Empire by annulment of the Treaty of Sèvres signed by the Ottoman Empire as the consequences of the... This article is about the Republic of Turkey. ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ...


In January 1950 the Orthodox Church organized a referendum boycotted by the Turkish Cypriot community with over 90% voting in favour of union with Greece. Restricted autonomy under a constitution was proposed by the British administration but eventually rejected. In 1955 the EOKA organisation was founded, seeking independence and union with Greece through armed struggle. At the same time the TMT, calling for Taksim, was established by the Turkish Cypriots as a counterweight .[12] Turmoil on the island was met with force by the British who started openly favouring Turks in police and administration as part of a divide-and-conquer policy. Nevertheless, Cyprus attained independence in 1960 after an agreement in Zürich and London between the United Kingdom, Greece and Turkey. Britain retained two Sovereign Base Areas in Akrotiri and Dhekelia while government posts and public offices were allocated by ethnic quotas giving the minority Turks a permanent veto, 30% in parliament and administration, and granting the 3 mother-states guarantor rights. EOKA (Εθνική Οργάνωσις Κυπρίων Αγωνιστών, Ethniki Organosis Kyprion Agoniston (Greek for National Organisation of Cypriot Fighters)) was a Greek Cypriot nationalist organisation that fought for the expulsion of British troops from the island, for self-determination and for union with Greece in the mid to late 1950s. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The UK Sovereign Base Areas are those British military base areas located in countries formerly ruled by the United Kingdom which were retained by it and not handed over when those countries attained independence. ... Anthem God Save the Queen Akrotiri and Dhekelia (Occupied Areas) Sovereign Base Areas indicated in pink. ...

Part of Limassol.
Part of Limassol.

Shortly afterward, inter-communal violence broke out, partially sponsored by both "motherlands"[13] - with Turkish Cypriots shortly afterwards withdrawn in enclaves and Greek Cypriot leader Archbishop Makarios III calling for constitutional changes as a means to ease tensions. In 1974 the US-backed Greek junta - in power since 1967 - partly in a move to draw attention away from internal turmoil and partly unsatisfied with Makarios' policy in Cyprus, attempted a coup on July 13 to replace him with Nikos Sampson and declare union with Greece. Seven days later, Turkey launched an invasion of Cyprus allegedly to reinstate the constitution. This resulted in bloody conflict, partition of the island and mass ethnic cleansing. The overwhelming Turkish land, naval and air superiority against the island's weak defences led to 37% of the land being brought under Turkish control. 170,000 Greek Cypriots were evicted from their homes in the north with 50,000 Turks following the opposite path. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... The Turkish Cypriot enclaves are an important and often overlooked aspect of modern Cypriot History and the Cyprus_dispute. ... Makarios III (Greek: Μακάριος Γ`; born Mihalis Christodoulou Mouskos (Greek: Μιχαήλ Χριστοδούλου Μούσκος), August 13, 1913 – August 3, 1977) was the archbishop and primate of the autocephalous Cypriot Orthodox Church (1950-1977) and first President of the Republic of Cyprus (1960-1977). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Greek military junta of 1967-1974, alternatively The Regime of the Colonels (Greek: ), or in Greece The Junta (Greek: ) and The Seven Years (Greek: ) are terms used to refer to a series of right-wing military governments that ruled Greece from 1967 to 1974. ... Nikos Sampson (Greek: Νίκος Σαμψών; December 16, 1935 – May 9, 2001) was the de facto dictator of Cyprus installed by the coup détat that overthrew President Makarios in 1974. ... Combatants  Turkey  Cyprus  Greece On the 20th of July 1974, Turkey launched a military invasion by air, land and sea against Cyprus purportedly to restore constitutional order following an Athens orchestrated coup by the Cypriot National Guard against the President of Cyprus, Makarios III. Though Turkey had consistently refused to...


In 1983 Turkish Cypriots unilaterally proclaimed independence, which was only recognized by Turkey. Anthem Ä°stiklâl Marşı(Turkish) Independence March Capital Nicosia Official languages Turkish Government Representative democratic republic1  -  President Mehmet Ali Talat  -  Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer Sovereignty from Cyprus   -  Proclaimed November 15, 1983   -  Recognition By Turkey   -  Independence from Cyprus   -  Declared November 15, 1983  Area  -  Total 3,355 km² (not ranked) 1...


As of today, there are 1,534 Greek Cypriots [14] and 502 Turkish Cypriots [15] missing as a result of the invasion. The events of the summer of 1974 dominate the politics on the island, as well as Greco-Turkish relations. Around 100,000 settlers from Turkey are believed to be living in the north in violation of the Geneva Convention and various UN resolutions. Following the invasion and the capture of its northern territory by Turkish troops, the Republic of Cyprus announced that all of its ports of entry in the north are closed, as they are not under its effective control. Euphemistically Turkey refers to this event as an "embargo". This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Relations between Greece and Turkey have been marked by alternating periods of mutual hostility and reconciliation ever since Greece won its independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1832. ... The Geneva Conventions consist of treaties formulated in Geneva, Switzerland that set the standards for international law for humanitarian concerns. ... A euphemism is a word or phrase used in place of a term that originally could not be spoken aloud (see taboo) or, by extension, terms which they consider to be disagreeable or offensive. ...

Part of Nicosia.
Part of Nicosia.

Since de facto but not de jure partition of the Republic, the north and south have followed separate paths. The Republic of Cyprus is a constitutional democracy that has reached great levels of prosperity, with a booming economy and good infrastructure. It is part of the UN, the European Union and several other organisations by whom it is recognized as the sole legitimate government of the whole island. The area of the Republic of Cyprus not under its effective control, the north, is over-dependent on help from Turkey. The last major effort to settle the Cyprus dispute, was the Annan Plan. On 10 March 2003, this most recent phase of talks collapsed in The Hague, Netherlands, when 30 year strong Turkish Cypriot leader Denktaş told the Secretary-General he would not put the Annan Plan to referendum. "The plan was unacceptable for us. This was not a plan we would ask our people to vote for," Mr Denktaş said. The UN plan had undergone several revisions in an attempt to win support. It was the Turkish Cypriot side which refused to even talk further, and which was blamed for the failure of the peace process .[16] Later in its 5th [17] revision the plan gained the support of the Turkish Cypriots but lost support of the Greek Cypriots. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... UN redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Annan Plan was a United Nations proposal to bring about the reunification of the divided island nation of Cyprus as the United Cyprus Republic. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hague redirects here. ... Rauf DenktaÅŸ Rauf Raif DenktaÅŸ (in English often spelled Rauf Denktash) (born January 27, 1924) is the founder of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, a de facto state which is only recognized by Turkey. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural referendums or referenda), ballot question, or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The two major communities of the de facto divided island nation of Cyprus held a referendum on settleing the Cyprus dispute on 24 April 2004. ...


In July 2006 the island served as a safe haven for people fleeing Lebanon due to the conflict between Israel and Hezbollah.[18] For other uses, see Hezbollah (disambiguation). ...


In March 2008, the Republic of Cyprus demolished a wall that for decades had stood at the boundary between the Greek Cypriot controlled side and the UN buffer zone.[19] The wall had cut across Ledra Street in the heart of Nicosia and was seen as a strong symbol of the island's 32-year division. On April 3, 2008, Ledra Street was reopened in the presence of Greek and Turkish Cypriot officials.[20] is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Geography

Kyrenia Mountain Range.
Kyrenia Mountain Range.
Topography of Cyprus.

The third largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily and Sardinia), Cyprus is situated in the eastern Mediterranean, just south of the Anatolian peninsula (or Asia Minor) of the Asian mainland; thus, it is often included in the Middle East (see also Western Asia and Near East). Turkey is 75 kilometres (47 mi) north; other neighbouring countries include Syria and Lebanon to the east, Israel to the southeast, Egypt to the south, and Greece to the westnorthwest. Map of Cyprus Cyprus is an island in the Mediterranean Sea, the third biggest in Meditteranean Sea, situated in the Middle East, south of Turkey. ... The municipalities in Cyprus Map of Cyprus. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 218 KB) Summary Girne Daglari (Kyrenia Mountain Range), North Cyprus. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 218 KB) Summary Girne Daglari (Kyrenia Mountain Range), North Cyprus. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1363x865, 885 KB) Description, Source Description: Topography of Cyprus, created with GMT 4. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1363x865, 885 KB) Description, Source Description: Topography of Cyprus, created with GMT 4. ... For discussion of land surfaces themselves, see Terrain. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Sardinia (pronounced ; Italian: ; Sardinian: or ) is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily). ... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...  Southwest Asia in most contexts. ... Inhabitants of the Near East, late nineteenth century. ...


However, historically, politically and culturally Cyprus is closely aligned with Europe – the Greek Cypriots with Greece and the Turkish Cypriots with Turkey. Historically, Cyprus has been at the crossroads between Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa, with lengthy periods of mainly Greek and intermittent Anatolian, Levantine, and British influences. Though these influences may cause some to consider Cyprus as a transcontinental island, such a term is properly applied only to nations whose boundaries straddle more than one continent e.g. Turkey, Russia and Egypt. A crossroads (the word rarely appears in singular) is a road junction, where two or more roads meet (there are three or more arms). ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... The Levant The Levant (IPA: ) is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ... A transcontinental nation is a country belonging to more than one continent. ...


The central plain, the Mesaoria, is bordered by the Kyrenia and Pentadactylos mountains to the north and the Troödos mountain range to the south and west. There are also scattered, but significant, plains along the southern coast. The island's highest point is at the summit of Mount Olympus 1,952 metres (6,404 ft), in the heart of the Troödos range. The Mesaoria is a broad, sweeping plain which makes up the center of the island of Cyprus. ... The Pentadactylos mountains comprise the western half of the Kyrenia mountain range, a long, narrow chain which runs 160 km (100 mi) along the northern coast of Cyprus. ... Troodos is the biggest mountain range of Cyprus, located in the center of the island. ... The highest point of the Troodos Mountains (1952 m). ...


The major cities in Cyprus are the capital Nicosia (Lefkosia in Greek, Lefkoşa in Turkish), Limassol (Lemesos in Greek), Larnaca, Paphos, Famagusta (Gazimağusa or Mağusa in Turkish, Ammochostos in Greek), and Kyrenia (Girne in Turkish, Kerynia in Greek). District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... District Larnaka  - Mayor Andreas Moyseos Population (2001)  - City 72,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... District Paphos Government  - Mayor Savvas Vergas Population (2001)  - City 47,300 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... Magusa redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Climate

The climate is temperate and Mediterranean with dry summers and variably rainy winters. Summer temperatures range from warm at higher elevations in the Troödos mountains to hot in the lowlands. Winter temperatures are mild at lower elevations, where snow rarely occurs, but are significantly colder in the mountains with sufficient snow for seasonal ski facilities. Dust storms are frequent throughout the year.  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is one that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin, which includes over half of the area with this climate type world-wide. ...


Government

The Presidential Palace (Residence) in Nicosia.
The Presidential Palace (Residence) in Nicosia.

Cyprus is a Presidential republic. The head of state and the government is the President, who is elected by the universal suffrage for a five-year term. Executive power is exercised by the government. Federal legislative power is vested in both the government and the House of Representatives. The Judiciary is independent of the executive and the legislature. This entry is about politics of Cyprus, especially the island of Cyprus and the Republic of Cyprus. ... Cyprus has historically followed a non-aligned foreign policy, although it increasingly identifies with the West in its cultural affinities and trade patterns, and maintains close relations with Greece. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x708, 97 KB) The Presidential Palace (Residence) in Nicosia I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x708, 97 KB) The Presidential Palace (Residence) in Nicosia I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... Republics with presidential systems are shown in blue A presidential system, or a congressional system, is a system of government of a republic where the executive branch is elected separately from the legislative. ...


The 1960 Constitution provided for a presidential system of government with independent executive, legislative, and judicial branches, as well as a complex system of checks and balances, including a weighted power-sharing ratio designed to protect the interests of the Turkish Cypriots. The executive, was headed by a Greek Cypriot president and a Turkish Cypriot vice president elected by their respective communities for five-year terms and each possessing a right of veto over certain types of legislation and executive decisions. Legislate power rested on the House of Representatives, also elected on the basis of separate voters' rolls. Since 1964, following clashes between the two communities, the Turkish Cypriot seats in the House remain vacant.


After an invasion of the island by Turkey in 1974, Cyprus was divided, de facto, into the Greek Cypriot controlled southern two-thirds of the island and the Turkish-occupied northern third. The Turkish Cypriots subsequently declared independence in 1983 as the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus but have not been recognized by any country in the world, except Turkey. In 1985, the TRNC adopted a constitution and held its first elections. All foreign governments (except Turkey), as well as the United Nations, recognise the sovereignty of the Republic of Cyprus over the whole island of Cyprus. The Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus(TRNC) {NOTE: the name is not accepted by UN} , in Turkish Kuzey Kıbrıs Türk Cumhuriyeti, is a self-proclaimed state occupying the northern third of the island of Cyprus in the eastern Mediterranean. ... The Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus(TRNC) {NOTE: the name is not accepted by UN} , in Turkish Kuzey Kıbrıs Türk Cumhuriyeti, is a self-proclaimed state occupying the northern third of the island of Cyprus in the eastern Mediterranean. ...


The House of Representatives currently has 59 members elected for a five year term, 56 members by proportional representation and 3 observer members representing the Maronite, Latin and Armenian minorities. 24 seats are allocated to the Turkish community but remain vacant since 1964. The political environment is dominated by the communist AKEL, the liberal conservative Democratic Rally, the centrist[21] Democratic Party, the social-democratic EDEK and the centrist EURO.KO. Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܐܶ; in Syriac, Mâruniyya مارونية in Arabic) are members of an Eastern Catholic Church in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The Progressive Party of Working People (AKEL) (Greek: Ανορθωτικό Κόμμα Εργαζόμενου Λαού) is a communist party in Cyprus. ... The Democratic Rally (Greek: Δημοκρατικός Συναγερμός), or DISY, is a conservative political party in Cyprus, led by Nikos Anastasiadhis. ... The Democratic Party (Greek: Dimokratikon Komma) is a liberal political party in Cyprus, founded in 1976 by Spyros Kyprianou. ... The Movement for Social Democracy (Greek: Kinima Sosialdimokraton) is a social-democratic political party in Cyprus. ... The European Party (Evropaiko Komma, Ευρωπαϊκό Κόμμα) is a political party in Cyprus founded in 2005, largely out of the New Horizons party. ...


On 17 February 2008, Dimitris Christofias of the AKEL was elected President of Cyprus, thus marking his party's first electoral victory without being part of a wider coalition, making Cyprus one of only two countries in the world to have a democratically elected communist government (the other being Moldova), and is the only European Union member state currently under communist leadership. Christofias took over government from Tassos Papadopoulos of Democratic Party, who had been in office since February 2003. is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Dimitris Christofias (Greek: Δημήτρης Χριστόφιας) is a chubby Cypriot politician who is the General Secretary of AKEL and the President of the House of Representatives (Cypriot Parliament). ... The Progressive Party of Working People (AKEL) (Greek: Ανορθωτικό Κόμμα Εργαζόμενου Λαού) is a communist party in Cyprus. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Tassos Nikolaou Papadopoulos (Greek: Τάσσος Νικολάου Παπαδόπουλος; born January 7, 1934) has been the president of the Republic of Cyprus since 2003. ... The Democratic Party (Greek: Dimokratikon Komma) is a liberal political party in Cyprus, founded in 1976 by Spyros Kyprianou. ...


Districts

The Republic of Cyprus is divided into six districts:[22] Nicosia, Famagusta, Kyrenia, Larnaca, Limassol and Paphos. The districts (επαρχίες) are the subnational subdivisions of Cyprus. ... The municipalities in Cyprus Map of Cyprus. ...

Map of Cyprus Districts Greek name Turkish name
Famagusta    Αμμόχωστος (Ammochostos)    Gazimağusa/Mağusa   
Kyrenia Κερύvεια (Keryneia) Girne
Larnaca Λάρνακα (Larnaka) Larnaka/İskele
Limassol Λεμεσός (Lemesos) Limasol/Leymosun
Nicosia Λευκωσία (Lefkosia) Lefkoşa
Paphos Πάφος (Pafos) Baf

Image File history File links Map of the districts of Cyprus Source: Made by User:Golbez. ... Famagusta District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. ... Kyrenia District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. ... Larnaca District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. ... Limassol District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. ... Nicosia District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. ... Paphos District is one of the six districts of Cyprus. ...

Exclaves and enclaves

Cyprus has four exclaves, all in territory that belongs to the British Sovereign Base Area of Dhekelia. The first two are the villages of Ormidhia and Xylotymvou. Additionally there is the Dhekelia Power Station, which is divided by a British road into two parts. The northern part is an enclave, like the two villages, whereas the southern part is located by the sea and therefore not an enclave, although it has no territorial waters of its own.[23] Pyrgos is officially comprised of two villages, the larger Kato Pyrgos (Greek: Κατω Πυργος) and the smaller Pano Pyrgos (Πανω Πυργος). Together they have around 3000 inhabitants. ... D is Bs exclave, but is not an enclave. ... Anthem God Save the Queen Akrotiri and Dhekelia (Occupied Areas) Sovereign Base Areas indicated in pink. ... Ormidhia is a village in Larnaca District in south-eastern Cyprus. ... Xylotymvou is a village in Larnaca District in south-eastern Cyprus. ...


The UN buffer zone separating the territory controlled by the Turkish Cypriot administration from the rest of Cyprus runs up against Dhekelia and picks up again from its east side, off Ayios Nikolaos (connected to the rest of Dhekelia by a thin land corridor). In that sense, the buffer zone turns the southeast corner of the island, the Paralimni area, into a de facto, though not de jure, exclave. Ayios Nikolaos, in the Dhekelia British sovereign base in Cyprus, is a listening station of the spying network ECHELON. The Joint Service Signal Unit (JSSU), formerly 9th Signal Regiment, is based at Ayios Nikolaos providing both the UK Armed Forces and the United Nations Forces with electronic warfare support and... Paralimni (Greek: ) is a town situated in the South East of Cyprus, a little way inland, within the Famagusta District. ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Human rights

The constant focus on the division of the island can sometimes mask other human rights issues. Prostitution is rife in both the government-controlled and the Turkish-occupied regions, and the island as a whole has been criticised[24] for its role in the sex trade as one of the main routes of human trafficking from Eastern Europe.[25] The regime in the North has been the focus of occasional freedom of speech criticisms[26] regarding heavy-handed treatment of newspaper editors. Domestic violence legislation in the Republic remains largely unimplemented,[27] and it has not yet been passed into law in the North. Reports on the mistreatment of domestic staff, mostly immigrant workers from developing countries, are sometimes reported in the Greek Cypriot press.[28] For other uses, see Human trafficking (disambiguation). ... This article is about the general concept. ... Domestic disturbance redirects here. ...


Military

Main article: Military of Cyprus

The Cypriot National Guard is the main military institution of the Republic of Cyprus. It is a combined arms force, with land, air and naval elements. The Military of Cyprus comprises the Cypriot National Guard, a combined arms force with land, naval and air elements. ... The Cypriot National Guard (Greek Εθνική Φρουρά) , aka the Greek Cypriot National Guard,is the combined arms military force of the Republic of Cyprus. ... Combined arms is an approach to warfare which seeks to integrate different arms of a military to achieve mutually complementary effects. ...


The land forces of the Cypriot National Guard comprise the following units:

  • First Infantry Division (Ιη Μεραρχία ΠΖ)
  • Second Infantry Division (ΙΙα Μεραρχία ΠΖ)
  • Fourth Infantry Brigade (ΙVη Ταξιαρχία ΠΖ)
  • Twentieth Armored Brigade (ΧΧη ΤΘ Ταξιαρχία)
  • Third Support Brigade (ΙΙΙη Ταξιαρχία ΥΠ)
  • Eighth Support Brigade (VIIIη Ταξιαρχία ΥΠ)

The air force includes the 449th Helicopter Gunship Squadron (449 ΜΑΕ) - operating SA-342L and Bell 206 and the 450th Helicopter Gunship Squadron (450 ME/P) - operating Mi-35P, BN-2B and PC-9. Current Senior officers include Supreme Commander, Cypriot National Guard: Lt. Gen. Konstantinos Bisbikas, Deputy Commander, Cypriot National Guard: Lt. Gen. Savvas Argyrou and Chief of Staff, Cypriot National Guard: Maj. Gen. Gregory Stamoulis. The Gazelle is a helicopter developed as part of an Anglo-French venture between the Westland and A rospatiale companies in 1968. ... The Bell Helicopter Model 206 JetRanger is a two-bladed main rotor, turbine powered helicopter with a conventional, two-bladed tail rotor. ... The Mil Mi-24 is a large combat helicopter gunship and low-capacity troop transport operated from 1976 by the Soviet Air Force, its successors, and over thirty other nations. ... The Britten-Norman Islander (also known as the BN-2) is a light utility aircraft manufactured by Britten-Norman of the United Kingdom. ... The Pilatus PC-9 is a single-engine, low-wing tandem-seat turboprop training aircraft manufactured by Pilatus Aircraft of Switzerland. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Cyprus
The Yiorkeion building, Ministry of Health, Nicosia
The Yiorkeion building, Ministry of Health, Nicosia

The Cypriot economy is prosperous and has diversified in recent years.[29] Its per-capita GDP (adjusted for purchasing power) is slightly lower than that of France, Germany, Italy and the UK, but slightly higher than the European Union average. Cyprus has been sought as a base for several offshore businesses for its highly developed infrastructure. Economic policy of the Cyprus government has focused on meeting the criteria for admission to the European Union. Adoption of the euro as a national currency is required of all new countries joining the European Union, and the Cypriot government adopted the currency on 1 January 2008.[29] Economy - overview: Economic affairs in Cyprus are dominated by the division of the country into the southern (Greek) area controlled by the Cyprus Government and the northern Turkish Cypriot-administered area. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 706 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 849 pixel, file size: 190 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 706 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 849 pixel, file size: 190 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Oil has recently been discovered in the seabed between Cyprus and Egypt, and talks are underway between Lebanon and Egypt to reach an agreement regarding the exploration of these resources.[30] The seabed separating Lebanon and Cyprus is believed to hold significant quantities of crude oil and natural gas.[30] Synthetic motor oil being poured. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ...


The economy of the Turkish-occupied area is dominated by the services sector, including the public sector, trade, tourism and education, with smaller agriculture and light manufacturing sectors. The economy operates on a free-market basis, although it continues to be handicapped by the political isolation of Turkish Cypriots, the lack of private and governmental investment, high freight costs, and shortages of skilled labor. Despite these constraints, the economy turned in an impressive performance in 2003 and 2004, with growth rates of 9.6% and 11.4%. The average income in the area is $5,000 per capita, and the Turkish government has pledged to increase this to $12,000 through investment and aid.[31] Growth has been buoyed by the relative stability of the Turkish new lira and by a boom in the education and construction sectors. TRY banknotes and coins The Turkish new lira is the current currency of Turkey and of the de facto state Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. ...


Demographics

Population Growth.
Population Growth.
Population structure.
Population structure.

According to the last census carried out by the Republic in 1960, Greek Cypriots comprise 77% of the island's population, Turkish Cypriots 18%, while the remaining 5% are of other ethnicities. However, after the Turkish invasion of 1974, about 150,000 Turks from Anatolia were transferred or decided to settle in the north. This has changed the actual demographic structure of the island. Northern Cyprus now claims 265,100 inhabitants,[32] closer to 30% of the population of the island. The TRNC has granted citizenship to these immigrants: however, as the TRNC is not recognised by the Republic or the international community (with the exception of Turkey), its power to create new citizens is not recognised and the newcomers retain Turkish passports. The result of this situation is that percentage population estimates vary widely. Motto none Anthem (transliteration) Hymn to Freedom 1 Location of Cyprus (orange) within the European Union (camel). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 554 pixelsFull resolution (902 × 625 pixel, file size: 34 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 554 pixelsFull resolution (902 × 625 pixel, file size: 34 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Greek Cypriot refers to the ethnic Greek population of Cyprus. ... Turkish Cypriots are those inhabitants of Cyprus who are ethnically Turkish[1], as opposed to those who are of Greek (the Greek Cypriots) or other ethnicities. ...


In the years since the census data were gathered in 2000, Cyprus has also seen a large influx of guest workers from countries such as Thailand, the Philippines and Sri Lanka, as well as major increases in the numbers of permanent British residents. The island is also home to a significant Armenian minority, as well as a large refugee population consisting of people mainly from Serbia, Palestine and Lebanon. There is also a Kurdish minority present in Cyprus. A foreign worker (cf expatriate), is a person who works in a country other than the one of which he or she is a citizen. ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... A 2003 satellite image of the region. ... Languages Kurdish Religions Predominantly Sunni Muslim also some Shia, Yazidism, Yarsan, Judaism, Christianity Related ethnic groups other Iranian peoples (Talysh Baluch Gilak Bakhtiari Persians) The Kurds are an ethnic group who consider themselves to be indigenous to a region often referred to as Kurdistan, an area which includes adjacent parts...


Since the country joined the European Union, a significant Polish population has also grown up, joining sizeable communities from Russia and Ukraine (mostly Pontic Greeks, immigrating after the fall of the Eastern Bloc), Bulgaria, Romania and Eastern European states. The term Pontic Greeks, Pontian Greeks, Pontians or Greeks of Pontus (Greek: or , Turkish: ) can refer to Greeks specifically from the area of Pontus in the region of the former Empire of Trebizond on the Black Sea coast of Eastern Turkey, or in other cases more generally all Greeks from... A map of the Eastern Bloc 1948-1989. ...


There is also a significant and thriving Cypriot Diaspora in other countries, with the United States, the United Kingdom, Greece and Australia hosting the majority of migrants who fled the Turkish invasion in 1974.


Religion

Main article: Religion in Cyprus
Agios Lazaros Church in Larnaca.
Agios Lazaros Church in Larnaca.

Most Greek Cypriots, and thus the majority of the population of Cyprus, are members of the Cypriot Orthodox Church, whereas most Turkish Cypriots are Muslim. According to Eurobarometer 2005 ,[33] Cyprus is one of the most religious countries in Europe, along with Malta, Romania, Greece and Poland. In addition to the Orthodox Christian and Muslim communities, there are also small Bahá'í, Jewish, Protestant, Roman Catholic, Maronite (Eastern Rites Catholic) and Armenian Apostolic communities in Cyprus. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... District Larnaka  - Mayor Andreas Moyseos Population (2001)  - City 72,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... The ancient Church of Cyprus is one of the fourteen or fifteen independent (autocephalous) Eastern Orthodox churches, which are in communion and in doctrinal agreement with one another but not all subject to one patriarch. ... Predominant religious heritages in Europe  Roman Catholicism  Orthodox Christianity  Protestantism  Sunni Islam  Shia Islam  Judaism Religion in Europe has a rich and diverse religious history, and its various faiths have been a major influence on European art, culture, philosophy and law. ... This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... // Cyprus is the large island located in the east Mediterranean Sea. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Religions Christianity Scriptures Bible Languages Vernacular: Lebanese Arabic, Cypriot Maronite Arabic Liturgical: Syriac Maronites (Arabic: ‎, transliteration: , Syriac: ܡܪܘܢܝܐ, Latin: Ecclesia Maronitarum) are members of one of the Eastern Catholic Churches, with a heritage reaching back to Maron in the early 5th century. ... Official standard of Karekin II Catholicos of Armenia The Armenian Apostolic Church (Armenian: Õ€Õ¡Õµ Ô±Õ¼Õ¡Ö„Õ¥Õ¬Õ¡Õ¯Õ¡Õ¶ Եկեղեցի, Hay Arakelagan Yegeghetzi), sometimes called the Armenian Orthodox Church or the Gregorian Church, is the worlds oldest national church[1] [2] and one of the most ancient Christian communities [3]. // Baptism of Tiridates III. The earliest...


Education

Cyprus has a well-developed system of primary and secondary education offering both public and private education. The high quality of instruction can be attributed to a large extent to the above-average competence of the teachers. State schools are generally seen as equivalent in quality of education to private-sector institutions. However, the value of a state high-school diploma is limited by the fact that the grades obtained account for only around 25% of the final grade for each topic, with the remaining 75% assigned by the teacher during the semester, in a minimally transparent way. Greek (List of universities in Greece) and Cypriot universities (University of Cyprus) ignore high school grades almost entirely for admissions purposes. While a high-school diploma is mandatory for university attendance, admissions are decided almost exclusively on the basis of scores at centrally administered university entrance examinations that all university candidates are required to take. The majority of Cypriots receive their higher education at Greek, British, Turkish, other European and North American universities. Private colleges and state-supported universities have been developed by both the Turkish and Greek communities. A listing of universities in Greece. ...


Culture

Art

Notable artists include Rhea Bailey, Mihail Kkasialos, Theodoulos Gregoriou, Helene Black, George Skoteinos,Kalopedis family, Nicos Nicolaides, Stass Paraskos, Arestís Stasí, Telemachos Kanthos, Adamantios Diamantis and Konstantia Sofokleous Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Kourion (Greek: Κούριον), also Curias (Pliny v. ... Helene Black is a Cypriot artist working with various media. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... NICOS NICOLAIDES THE CYPRIOT: HIS LIFE AND WORKS Nicos Nicolaides (in Greek:Νίκος Νικολαϊδης) was born the son of poor parents in Nicosia,Cyprus on the April 3, 1884. ... Stass Paraskos (1933—) is one of the leading artists of Cyprus, although much of his life was spent teaching and working in England. ... Konstantia Sofokleous, Greek: Κωνσταντία Σοφοκλέους (born 1974) is a Cypriot artist. ...


Music

Main article: Music of Cyprus

The traditional folk music of Cyprus has many common elements with Greek mainland and island folk music, including dances like the sousta, syrtos, zeibekikos, tatsia, and the kartsilamas. The instruments commonly associated with Cyprus folk music are the lute ("laouto"), violin ("fkiolin"), accordion and the Cyprus flute ("pithkiavlin"). There is also a form of musical poetry known as "chattista", which is often performed at traditional feasts and celebrations. Composers associated with traditional music in Cyprus include Marios Tokas, Solon Michaelides, Savvas Salides, and Doros Georgiades. Pop music in Cyprus is generally influenced by the Greek pop music "Laïka" scene, with several artists such as Anna Vissi and Evridiki earning widespread popularity. Cypriot rock and "entechno" rock music is often associated with artists such as Michalis Hatzigiannis and Alkinoos Ioannidis. Metal also has a following in Cyprus, represented by bands such as Winter's Verge, Blynd and Armageddon Rev. 16:16. History (Timeline and Samples) Genres: Classical music -Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Rock Regional styles Aegean Islands - Arcadia - Argos - Athens - Crete - Cyclades - Dodecanese Islands - Epirus - Ionian Islands - Lesbos - Macedonia - Peloponnesos - Thessaloniki - Thessaly - Thrace - Cyprus The music of Cyprus includes a variety of classical, folk and popular genres. ... Sousta(χασαποσερβικο in Greece) is the name of a folk dance in Cyprus and Crete which is similar to Hasapiko (χασαπικο) which is danced in Greece and generally in the Balkans. ... Syrtos(Συρτός,Sirto,Syrto,Sirtos) is the name of a group of Greek folk dances of ancient origin. ... A renaissance-era lute. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... Marios Tokas is a Cypriot (born in Limassol) composer of traditional music. ... This article is about the Greek music-culture. ... Anna Vissi (Greek: Άννα Βίσση; born December 20, 1957) is a Cypriot-Greek singer, famous mainly in Greece, and her home country Cyprus, with success in the United States as well. ... Evridiki Theokleous (Greek: , born 25 February 1968), known professionally as simply Evridiki, is a Cypriot rock, pop, and modern laika singer. ... // Michalis Hatzigiannis (Μιχάλης Χατζηγιάννης) was born in Nicosia, Cyprus in November 5th 1979, although his parents originate from Keryneia, from where they fled following the Turkish invasion of Cyprus in 1974. ... Alkinoos Ioannides, is a Greek Cypriot composer and singer born in Nicosia on 19 September 1969. ...


Literature

Literary production of the antiquity includes the Cypria, an epic poem probably composed in the later seventh century BC and attributed to Stasinus. The Cypria is one of the very first specimens of Greek and European poetry.[34] The Cypriot Zeno of Citium was the founder of the Stoic philosophy. Epic poetry, notably the "acritic songs", flourished during Middle Ages. Two chronicles, one written by Leontios Machairas and the other by Voustronios, refer to the period under French domination (15th century). Poèmes d'amour written in medieval Greek Cypriot date back from 16th century. Some of them are actual translations of poems written by Petrarch, Bembo, Ariosto and G. Sannazzaro.[35] Modern literary figures from Cyprus include the poet and writer Kostas Montis, poet Kyriakos Charalambides, poet Michalis Pasardis, writer Nicos Nicolaides, Stylianos Atteshlis, Altheides and also Demetris Th. Gotsis. Dimitris Lipertis and Vasilis Michaelides are folk poets who wrote poems mainly in the Cypriot-Greek dialect. The majority of the play Othello by William Shakespeare is set on the island of Cyprus. Cyprus also figures in religious literature, most notably in Acts of the Apostles, according to which the Apostles Barnabas and Paul preached on the island. The Cypria is one of the lost sections of the eight volume cycle that told the full story of the Trojan War. ... Stasinus, of Cyprus, according to some ancient authorities the author of the Cypria (in 11 books), one of the poems belonging to the epic cycle. ... The Cypria is one of the lost sections of the eight volume cycle that told the full story of the Trojan War. ... Zeno of Citium Zeno of Citium (The Stoic) (sometime called Zeno Apathea) (333 BC-264 BC) was a Hellenistic philosopher from Citium, Cyprus. ... From the c. ... Bembo was a Monotype “recutting” (in effect a revival and reworking) of type used by Aldus Manutius. ... Ludovico Ariosto (September 8, 1474 _ July 6, 1533) was a Ferrarese poet, author of the epic poem Orlando furioso (1516), Orlando Enraged. He was born at Reggio, in Hungary in 1518, and wished Aniosto to accompany him. ... Jacopo Sannazaro (1458 - April 27, 1530), the Neapolitan poet, humanist and epigrammist, wrote easily in Latin, in Italian and Napuletano, but is best remembered for his humanist classic Arcadia a masterwork that illustrated the possibilities of poetical prose in Italian and instituted the themes of Arcadia in European literature: see... Kyriakos Charalambides was born on January 31, 1940 in Akhna, in the Famagusta District of Cyprus. ... NICOS NICOLAIDES THE CYPRIOT: HIS LIFE AND WORKS Nicos Nicolaides (in Greek:Νίκος Νικολαϊδης) was born the son of poor parents in Nicosia,Cyprus on the April 3, 1884. ... Stylianos Atteshlis (Daskalos), was a mystic from Strovolos, Cyprus. ... Altheides (1193–1262) was a Cypriot philosopher, primarily known from sayings attributed to him in the works of others. ... Demetris Th. ... Dimitris Theophani Lipertis, was born in Larnaca, in 1866 (exact date disputed – either 22 Sep, or 26 Oct). ... Vasilis Michaelides (Greek: Βασίλης Μιχαηλίδης) was born in Cyprus in 1849. ... For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For the literature genre, see Acts of the Apostles (genre). ...


Cuisine

Main article: Cuisine of Cyprus

Halloumi, (a cheese made from a mixture of goat's and sheep's milk) originates from Cyprus, and is commonly served sliced and grilled as an appetizer. Seafood dishes of Cyprus include calamari (squid), octopus in red wine, (red mullet), and sea bass. Cucumber and tomato are used widely in Cypriot cuisine. Other common vegetable preparations include potatoes in olive oil and parsley, pickled cauliflower and beets, kolokasi (taro) and asparagus. Meat dishes marinated in dried coriander seeds and wine, and eventually dried and smoked, such as lounza, charcoal-grilled lamb (souvla), sheftalia (minced meat wrapped in mesentery), as well as cracked wheat (pourgouri) are some of the traditional delicacies of the island. Cypriot cuisine is the cuisine of the Cypriot people who live on the island of Cyprus located in the north-eastern Mediterranean Sea. ... Country of origin Cyprus Region, town islandwide Source of milk Goats or Sheep Pasteurised Traditionally no, but commercially yes Texture semi-soft Aging time Not aged Certification No Halloumi (Greek: χαλλούμι, Turkish: Hellim), is a cheese indigenous to Cyprus. ... For other uses, see Octopus (disambiguation). ... For the Popeye character, see Olive Oyl. ... This article is about the herb. ... Cauliflower within Brassica oleracea, in the family Brassicaceae. ... A beet (called beetroot in the United Kingdom and its former colonies, as well as table beet, garden beet, blood turnip or red beet) is a plant of the genus Beta of which both the leaves and root are edible. ... This article is about the plant. ...


Sports

Governing bodies of sport in Cyprus include the Cyprus Automobile Association, Cyprus Badminton Federation[9]]], Cyprus Basketball Federation, Cyprus Cricket Association, Cyprus Football Association, Cyprus Rugby Federation and the Cyprus Volleyball Federation. Marcos Baghdatis is one of the most successful tennis players in international stage. He reached the Wimbledon semi-final in 2006. Also Kyriakos Ioannou a Cypriot high jumper born in Limassol achieved a jump of 2.35 m at the 11th IAAF World Championships in Athletics held in Osaka, Japan, in 2007 winning the bronze medal The Cyprus Automobile Association (CAA) is a non-profit organization governed by an elected council. ... The Cyprus Basketball Federation (Greek: ΚΟΚ-Κυπριακή Ομοσπονδία Καλαθόσφαιρας) is the governing body for basketball on the island and is a division of the Cyprus Sport Organisation (ΚΟΑ-Κυπριακός Οργανισμός Αθλητισμού). It was established in 1966 and became a full member of FIBA in 1974. ... The Cyprus Cricket Association is the governing body of cricket in Cyprus. ... The Cyprus football assosiation (CFA) (Greek: Κυπριακή Ομοσπονδία Ποδοσφαίρου, ΚΟΠ) is the governing body of football in Cyprus. ... The Cyprus Rugby Federation the governing body for rugby union in Cyprus. ... Cyprus Volleyball Federation (Kypriaki Omospondia Petosfairisis = Greek: Kυπριακή Oμοσπονδία Πετοσφαίρισης) Cyprus Volleyball Federation Logo Volleyball first made its appearance in Cyprus in the 1920s and was first included as a competitive event in the 1928 Pancyprian Games. ... Marcos Baghdatis (Greek: Μάρκος Παγδατής, pronounced ) born 17 June 1985, Limassol, Cyprus) is a Cypriot professional tennis player. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as Wimbledon, is the oldest major championship in tennis and is widely considered to be the most prestigious. ...


The island has a keen football culture. Notable football teams include AC Omonia, APOEL, Anorthosis Famagusta FC and AEL Limassol. Stadiums or sports venues in Cyprus include the GSP Stadium(the largest and home venue of the Cypriot national football team), Makario Stadium, Neo GSZ Stadium, Antonis Papadopoulos Stadium and Tsirion Stadium. The Cyprus Rally is also on the World Rally Championship sporting agenda. Athletic Club Omonia Nicosia (Greek: ) is a Cypriot football club, which plays in the capital, Nicosia. ... Anorthosis Famagusta FC (Greek: Ανόρθωση Αμμοχώστου = Anorthosi Ammochostou) is a Cypriot football and volleyball club which was originally based in Famagusta, but is now based temporarily in Larnaca. ... AEL Limassol (Greek:ΑΕΛ;Αθλητική Ένωση Λεμεσού;Athletic Union of Limassol) is a Cypriot multisport club based in Limassol, Cyprus. ... The Pancyprian Gymnastic Association Stadium (GSP Stadium) (Greek: Στάδιο Γυμναστικός Σύλλογος Παγκύπρια) is a football stadium in Nicosia, Cyprus. ... Makario Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Nicosia, Cyprus. ... Neo GSZ Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Larnaca, Cyprus. ... Antonis Papadopoulos Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Larnaca, Cyprus. ... Tsirion Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Limassol, Cyprus. ... The Cyprus Rally was the sixth rally on the World Rally Championship schedule for 2005. ... WRC is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: World Rally Championship, a series of automobile rally races and World Rally Car, the class of cars involved in them Will Rice College, a residential college of Rice University Western Reserve College, a prep school in Hudson, Ohio...


Media

Southern Cyprus: Newspapers include the Cyprus Mail, the Cyprus Observer, Famagusta Gazette, Cyprus Today, Cyprus Weekly, Financial Mirror, Haravgi, Makhi, Phileleftheros, Politis (Cyprus), and Simerini. TV channels include ANT1 Cyprus, Alfa TV, CNC Plus TV, Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation, Lumiere TV, Middle East Television, Mega Channel Cyprus and Sigma TV. Cyprus Mail is a Cypriot English-language newspaper. ... The Cyprus Observer is a Turkish owned weekly newspaper which includes news from both the north and south of Cyprus, as well the UK, and the rest of the world. ... CYPRUS TODAY is the major English-Language newspaper in the Northern Cyprus. ... The Cyprus Weekly is the top-selling English-language publication in Cyprus, with a circulation exceeding 17,000. ... The Financial Mirror is the top-selling daily business newspaper in Cyprus. ... Haravgi is a Greek language newspaper published in Cyprus since 1956. ... Makhi (Greek: Μάχη, meaning Battle or Struggle) is a Greek-language Cypriot daily newspaper with close affiliation to radical right and nationalist ideas. ... Phileleftheros is the largest newspaper, by circulation, in Cyprus[1]. Established in 1951, it is also the oldest Greek paper (that is in current circulation) on the island. ... Politis (Greek: Πολίτης, meaning Citizen) is a daily Greek-language newspaper published in Cyprus. ... Simerini is a Greek language newspaper published in Cyprus since 1976. ... ANT-1 TV Cyprus (pronounced Antenna) is a free to air terrestrial TV channel established in 1993. ... Alfa TV is a Cypriot terrestrial pay tv channel. ... CNC (Cyprus New Channel) Plus TV is the island’s sixth free-to-air television channel launched on July 28, 2006. ... The Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation (Ραδιοφωνικό Ίδρυμα Κύπρου) or CyBC (ΡΙΚ) is Cyprus public broadcasting service, transmitting island-wide on four radio and two television channels. ... Lumiere TV (LTV) is a premium television service available in Cyprus, that broadcasts blockbuster movies and hit series. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sigma TV is a commercial network in Cyprus that first hit the air on April 3, 1995. ...


Northern Cyprus: Newspapers include--Daily:

  • Cyprus Gazette(English name) also known as Kibris Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • Cypriot Newspaper(English name) also known as Kibrisli Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • Africa Gazette(English name) also known as Afrika Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • Volkan Newspaper(English name) also known as Volkan Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • News & Gossip Paper(English name) also known as Haber Havadis Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • Union Newspaper(English name) also known as Birlik Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • NewOrder Gazette(English name) also known as Yeniduzen Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • Star Cyprus Newspaper(English name) also known as Star Kibris Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • Public's Voice Newspaper(English name) also known as Halkin Sesi Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • Motherland Gazette(English name) also known as Vatan Gazetesi(Turkish name)

Weekly:

  • Cyprus Observer(English name) also known as Kibris Gozlemeci Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • Cyprus Today(English name) also known as Kibris Bugun Gazetesi(Turkish name)
  • Newperiod(English name) also known as Yenicag (Turkish name)

The Cyprus Observer is a Turkish owned weekly newspaper which includes news from both the north and south of Cyprus, as well the UK, and the rest of the world. ... CYPRUS TODAY is the major English-Language newspaper in the Northern Cyprus. ...

Infrastructure

Transportation

Main article: Transport in Cyprus
Nicosia's Airport remains closed since the Turkish invasion of the island in 1974.
Aerial view of the promenade in Limassol

Since the last railway was dismantled in 1950, the remaining modes of transport are by road, sea, and air. Of the 10,663 km (6,626 mi) of roads in the Greek Cypriot area as of 1998, 6,249 km (3,883 mi) were paved, and 4,414 km (2,743 mi) were unpaved. As of 1996 the Turkish Cypriot area had a similar ratio of paved to unpaved, with approximately 1,370 km (850 mi) of paved road and 980 km (610 mi) unpaved. Cyprus is one of only four EU nations in which vehicles drive on the left-hand side of the road, a remnant of British colonization. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The abandoned central terminal An abandoned Trident airliner on the tarmac Nicosia International Airport (IATA: NIC) is an abandoned airport. ... In 1974, a coup detat by Greek Army officers stationed on the Mediterranian island of Cyprus, tried to overthrow the then-President Makarios. ... Image File history File links Limassol-Seafront'.jpg‎ I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Limassol-Seafront'.jpg‎ I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ...  drive on right drive on left Driving on either the left or the right side of the road reduces the incidence of vehicles being involved in head-on collisions with each other. ...


Motorways A motorway (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, and some Commonwealth nations) is both a type of road and a classification. ...

Main article: Roads and Motorways in Cyprus
Number of licensed vehicles [36]
Vehicle Category 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Private vehicles 270,348 277,554 291,645 324,212 344,953
Taxis 1,641 1,559 1,696 1,770 1,845
Rental cars 8,080 8,509 9,160 9,652 8,336
Buses 3,003 2,997 3,275 3,199 3,217
Light trucks (lighter than 40 tonnes) 107,060 106,610 107,527 105,017 105,327
Heavy trucks (over 40 tonnes) 10,882 11,182 12,119 12,808 13,028
Motorcycles (2 wheels) 12,956 14,983 16,009 16,802 16,836
Motorcycles (3 wheels) 42 41 43 55 558
Scooters 28,987 25,252 25,464 24,539 22,987
TOTAL 442,999 448,687 466,938 498,054 517,087

In 1999, Cyprus had six heliports and two international airports: Larnaca International Airport and Paphos International Airport. Nicosia International Airport has been closed since 1974. Cyprus Motorway logo Cyprus has one of the most developed and modern road networks in Europe. ... Image:A1 highway. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... The A2 motorway branches off the A1 at Nisou and connects to the A3. ... District Larnaka  - Mayor Andreas Moyseos Population (2001)  - City 72,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... The A3 motorway (Greek: δρόμος Διεθνούς Αερολιμένα Λάρνακας - Αγίας Νάπας) is a modern Motorway linking Larnaca International Airport, the largest airport in Cyprus, and Agia Napa, a very popular clubbing paradise. ... District Larnaka  - Mayor Andreas Moyseos Population (2001)  - City 72,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... A beautiful beach of Agia Napa Ayia Napa (Greek: Αγία Νάπα; Turkish: Aya Napa; today officially transliterated into English as Agia Napa) is a resort at the far eastern end of the south coast of the island of Cyprus. ... The A5 links the A1 motorway (at the level of Kofinou village) with the A3 near Larnaca. ... District Larnaka  - Mayor Andreas Moyseos Population (2001)  - City 72,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... The A6 highway (locally referred to as the Limassol - Paphos highway, Greek: νέος δρόμος Λεμεσού - Πάφου) marked the ending of an ambitious government project to link all the main cities on the island with modern 4 lane, high speed, highways. ... Pafos, usually written Paphos in English, (Greek: Πάφος, Páfos; Turkish: Baf) is a coastal town in the south-west of Cyprus. ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... A9 is an under construction Motorway which is planed to connect the capital Nicosia with Troodos mountains. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... Astromeritis (Greek: Αστρομερίτης) is a large village in the Nicosia District of Cyprus. ... North America Vehicle size classes in use in North America categorise automobiles by their relative lengths and volumes. ... |}Larnaca International Airport (Greek: ) (IATA: LCA, ICAO: LCLK) is an international airport located near Larnaca, Cyprus. ... Paphos International Airport (Greek: ) (IATA: PFO, ICAO: LCPH) is located 10 miles (16 km) from the city of Paphos, Cyprus. ... The abandoned central terminal An abandoned Trident airliner on the tarmac Nicosia International Airport (IATA: NIC) is an abandoned airport. ...


Public transport in Cyprus is limited to privately run bus services (except in Nicosia), taxis, and 'shared' taxi services (referred to locally as service taxis). Per capita private car ownership is the 5th highest in the world. In 2006 extensive plans were announced to improve and expand bus services and restructure public transport throughout Cyprus, with the financial backing of the European Union Development Bank. The main harbours of the island are Limassol harbour and Larnaca harbour, which service cargo, passenger, and cruise ships. District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... A harbor (or harbour) or haven is a place where ships may shelter from the weather or are stored. ... Although a title held by Famagusta Port for centuries, Limassol Port has now become the principal seaport in Cyprus. ... District Larnaka  - Mayor Andreas Moyseos Population (2001)  - City 72,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ...


Health care

Urban hospitals include:

District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... The decision for erecting a purpose built general hospital in Nicosia was taken during the British colonial administration of Cyprus in 1936. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... District Limassol Government  - Mayor Andreas Christou Population (2004)  - City 201. ... District Larnaka  - Mayor Andreas Moyseos Population (2001)  - City 72,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... District Larnaka  - Mayor Andreas Moyseos Population (2001)  - City 72,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... District Paphos Government  - Mayor Savvas Vergas Population (2001)  - City 47,300 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ...

Telecommunications

Cyta, the state-owned telecommunications company, manages most Telecommunications and Internet connections on the island. However, following the recent liberalization of the sector, a few private telecommunications companies have emerged including MTN, Cablenet, TelePassport, OTEnet Telecom and PrimeTel. // Cyta, the state-owned telecommunications company manages most Telecommunications and Internet connections on the island. ... This article is about the Cypriot Telecommunication Authority. ... Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... In general, liberalization refers to a relaxation of previous government restrictions, usually in areas of social or economic policy. ... MTN Group is a South Africa-based multinational mobile telecommunications company, operating in many African and Middle Eastern countries. ... Cablenet is a privately-owned telecommunications carrier which operates a national Hybrid Fibre Coaxial network and a cutting-edge national intra-city fiber backbone. ...


International membership

The island nation Cyprus is member of: Australia Group,CN, CE, CFSP, EBRD, EIB, EU, FAO, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC, ICCt, ITUC, IDA, IFAD, IFC, IHO,ILO, IMF, IMO, Interpol, IOC, IOM, IPU, ITU, MIGA, NAM, NSG, OPCW, OSCE, PCA, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNHCR, UNIDO, UPU, WCL, WCO, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WToO, WTO[10] [11] An island nation is a country that is wholly confined to an island or islands. ... Australia Group is an informal group of countries established in 1985 (after the use of chemical weapons by Iraq in 1984) to help reduce the spread of chemical and biological weapons by monitoring and controlling the spread of technologies required to produce them. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... Anthem Ode to Joy (orchestral)  ten founding members joined subsequently observer at the Parliamentary Assembly observer at the Committee of Ministers  official candidate Seat Strasbourg, France Membership 47 European states 5 observers (Council) 3 observers (Assembly) Leaders  -  Secretary General Terry Davis  -  President of the Parliamentary Assembly Rene van der Linden... The Common Foreign and Security Policy or CFSP was established as the second of the three pillars of the European Union in the Maastricht treaty of 1992, and further defined and broadened in the Amsterdam Treaty of 1997. ... The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) was founded in 1991 to promote private and entrepreneurial initiatives in the countries of central and eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). ... The European Investment Bank (the Banque Européenne dInvestissement) is the European Unions financing institution and was established under the Treaty of Rome (1957) to provide loan finance for capital investment furthering European Union policy objectives, in particular regional development, Trans-European Networks of transport, telecommunications and energy... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ... Possible meanings: Faro Airport (Portugal) Federation of Astrobiology Organizations Financial Aid Office Food and Agriculture Organization This page expands a three-character combination which might be any or all of: an abbreviation, an acronym, an initialism, a word in English, or a word in another language. ... IAEA The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, in Romance languages: BIRD), better known as the World Bank, is an international organization whose original mission was to finance the reconstruction of nations devastated by WWII. Now, its mission has expanded to fight poverty by means of financing states. ... The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), an agency of the United Nations, develops the principles and techniques of international air navigation and fosters the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safe and orderly growth. ... The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) is an international organization that works to promote and support global trade and globalization. ... The official logo of the ICC The International Criminal Court (ICC or ICCt)[1] was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression, although it cannot currently exercise jurisdiction over the crime of aggression. ... The International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) is the worlds largest trade union federation. ... The International Development Association (IDA) created on September 24, 1960, is the part of the World Bank that helps the world’s poorest countries. ... The International Fund for Agricultural Development is an agency of the United Nations. ... The International Finance Corporation (IFC) promotes sustainable private sector investment in developing countries as a way to reduce poverty and improve peoples lives. ... The International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) is an intergovernmental international organization established in 1921. ... The International Labour Organization (ILO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that deals with labour issues. ... The flag of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the international organization entrusted with overseeing the global financial system by monitoring foreign exchange rates and balance of payments, as well as offering technical and financial assistance when asked. ... Although there had been significant developments in meteorology in the 18th century, Matthew Fontaine Maury, of the US Navy, was instrumental in convening the first true International Meteorological Organization held in Brussels, Belgium on August 23, 1853. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alternative meanings at IOC (disambiguation) The International Olympic Committee is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin in 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece, and organize this sports event every four years. ... The International Organization for Migration is an intergovernmental organization. ... The Inter-Parliamentary Union is an international organization established in 1889 by William Randal Cremer (United Kingdom) and Frédéric Passy (France). ... This article is about the location. ... The Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) is a member of the World Bank group. ... Member states of the Non-Aligned Movement (2005). ... The Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) is a multinational body concerned with reducing nuclear proliferation by controlling the export and re-transfer of materials that may be applicable to nuclear weapon development and by improving safeguards and protection on existing materials. ... The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) is an agency of the United Nations. ... The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is an international organization for security. ... The Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA), also known as the Hague Tribunal is an international organization based in The Hague in the Netherlands. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) was established in 1964 as a permanent intergovernmental body, UNCTAD is the principal organ of the United Nations General Assembly dealing with trade, investment and development issues. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) (established December 14, 1950) protects and supports refugees at the request of a government or the United Nations and assists in their return or resettlement. ... United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) is an agency of the United Nations with the mission of helping countries pursue sustainable industrial development, it is a specialist in industrial affairs. ... The Universal Postal Union (UPU) is a international organization that coordinates postal policies between member nations, and hence the world-wide postal system. ... The World Confederation of Labour (WCL) was founded in 1920 under the name of the International Federation of Christian Trade Unions as a confederation of unions associated with the Christian Democratic parties of Europe. ... World Customs Organization (WCO) is an intergovernmental organization that helps member states communicate and cooperate on customs issues. ... The World Federation of Trade Unions (WFTU) was established in the wake of the Second World War to bring together trade unions across the world in a single international organization, much like the United Nations. ... Look up who in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is one of the specialized agencies of the United Nations, and has as its core objectives the promotion of creative intellectual activity and the facilitation of the transfer of technology related to intellectual property to the developing countries in order to accelerate economic, social... The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is an intergovernmental organization with a membership of 187 Member States and Territories. ... The World Tourism Organization (WTO) is a UN agency dealing with questions relating to tourism. ... For other uses of the initials WTO, see WTO (disambiguation). ...


International rankings

Organization Survey Ranking
State of World Liberty Project State of World Liberty Index[37] 9 out of 159
United Nations Development Programme Human Development Index 2006[38]
Human Development Index 2004[39]
Human Development Index 2000[39]
29 out of 177
29 out of 177
29 out of 177
The Economist Worldwide Quality-of-life Index, 2005[40] 23 out of 111
University of Leicester Satisfaction with Life Index[41] 49 out of 178
Heritage Foundation/Wall Street Journal Index of Economic Freedom[42] 20 out of 157
Reporters Without Borders Worldwide Press Freedom Index 2006[43]
Worldwide Press Freedom Index 2005[44]
30 out of 168
25(tied) out of 168
Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index 2006[45]
Corruption Perceptions Index 2005[46]
Corruption Perceptions Index 2004[47]
37 out of 163
37 out of 158
36 out of 145
World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Report[48] 46 out of 125
International Monetary Fund GDP per capita[49] 31 out of 180
Yale University/Columbia University Environmental Sustainability Index 2005[50] not ranked
Nationmaster Labor strikes[51] not ranked
A.T. Kearney / Foreign Policy Globalization Index 2006 [52]
Globalization Index 2005 [53]
Globalization Index 2004 [54]

not ranked

The State of World Liberty Index is a ranking of countries according to the degree of economic and personal freedoms which their citizens enjoy; each country is given a score between 0 and 100. ... The United Nations Development Programe (UNDP), the United Nations global development network, is the largest multilateral source of development assistance in the world. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... University of Leicester seen from Victoria Park - Left to right: the Department of Engineering, the Attenborough tower, the Charles Wilson building. ... Green = Happiest > Blue > Purple > Orange > Red = Least Happy; Grey = Data not available The Satisfaction with Life Index was created by Adrian White, an Analytic Social Psychologist at the University of Leicester. ... The Heritage Foundation is one of the most prominent conservative think tanks in the United States. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... Map of Economic Freedom released by the Heritage Foundation. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, Spanish: Reporteros Sin Fronteras, or RSF) is a French origin international non-governmental organization that advocates freedom of the press, founded by its current general-secretary, Robert Menard. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, Spanish: Reporteros Sin Fronteras, or RSF) is a French origin international non-governmental organization that advocates freedom of the press, founded by its current general-secretary, Robert Menard. ... Transparency International (TI) is an international organisation addressing corruption, including, but not limited to, political corruption. ... Overview of the index of perception of corruption, 2006 Since 1995, Transparency International has published an annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI)[1] ordering the countries of the world according to the degree to which corruption is perceived to exist among public officials and politicians.[2] The organization defines corruption as... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... World map of the 2006-2007 Global Competitiveness Index. ... IMF redirects here. ... Gross Domestic Product (GDP), a calculation method in national accounting (see Measures of national income and output) is defined as the total value of final goods and services produced within a countrys borders in a year, regardless of ownership. ... Yale redirects here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Environmental Sustainability Index (ESI) is a composite index tracking 21 elements of environmental sustainability covering natural resource endowments, past and present pollution levels, environmental management efforts, contributions to protection of the global commons, and a societys capacity to improve its environmental performance over time. ... Nationmaster is the name for a website created by Rapid Intelligence an Australian Web tech company. ... A.T. Kearney is an international management consulting firm, dating its origins back to the early days of the management consulting profession. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ...

See also

Image File history File links Flag_of_Cyprus. ... The following is a list of Cypriots notable enough to have their own article. ... Greek ( IPA: or simply IPA: — Hellenic) has a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single natural language in the Indo-European language family. ... Greek Cypriot refers to the ethnic Greek population of Cyprus. ... Turkish ( IPA ) is a language spoken by 65–73 million people worldwide, making it the most commonly spoken of the Turkic languages. ... Turkish Cypriots are those inhabitants of Cyprus who are ethnically Turkish[1], as opposed to those who are of Greek (the Greek Cypriots) or other ethnicities. ... Gibrizlija, Gibrizlidja, or Kibrislica, is a Turkic language widely spoken in Cyprus. ... This article is about the History of Cyprus. ... This is a timeline of Cypriot history. ... The Prehistoric Period is the oldest part of Cypriot history. ... This article treats the history of Cyprus in Classical Antiquity, from the 8th century BC to the Middle Ages. ... The Medieval history of Cyprus starts with the division of the Roman Empire into an Eastern and Western half. ... The Kingdom of Cyprus was a Roman Catholic Crusader kingdom on the island of Cyprus in the late Middle Ages. ... In 1570, the Turks first occupied Cyprus, and Lala Mustafa Pasha became the first Turkish Governor of Cyprus, challenging the claims of Venice. ... In 1878 as the result of the Cyprus Convention, the United Kingdom took over the government of Cyprus as a protectorate from the Ottoman Empire. ... Combatants  Turkey  Cyprus  Greece On the 20th of July 1974, Turkey launched a military invasion by air, land and sea against Cyprus purportedly to restore constitutional order following an Athens orchestrated coup by the Cypriot National Guard against the President of Cyprus, Makarios III. Though Turkey had consistently refused to... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Cyprus Police are a part of the Ministry of Justice and Public Order and are the police force in the Republic of Cyprus. ... This entry is about politics of Cyprus, especially the island of Cyprus and the Republic of Cyprus. ... Type Unicameral Houses Βουλή των Αντιπροσώπων; Temsilciler Meclisi President Demetris Christofias, AKEL since 2006 Members 59 (56 + 3 observers) Political groups (as of elections) AKEL, DISY, DIKO, EDEK, Evroko, Green Party, Meeting place Web site www. ... The President of Cyprus is the head of state and the head of government of the Republic of Cyprus. ... Elections in Cyprus gives information on election and election results in Cyprus. ... Political parties in Cyprus lists political parties in this country. ... Cyprus has historically followed a non-aligned foreign policy, although it increasingly identifies with the West in its cultural affinities and trade patterns, and maintains close relations with Greece. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Anthem: Ä°stiklâl Marşı(Turkish) Independence March Capital Nicosia (LefkoÅŸa in Turkish) Official languages Turkish Government Representative democratic republic1  -  President Mehmet Ali Talat  -  Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer Independence from Cyprus   -  Proclaimed November 15, 1983   -  Recognition By Turkey only  Area  -  Total 3,355 km² (167th ranked together with Cyprus... Motto none Anthem (transliteration) Hymn to Freedom 1 Location of Cyprus (orange) within the European Union (camel). ... The districts (επαρχίες) are the subnational subdivisions of Cyprus. ... This is a list of banks operating in Cyprus. ... The Central Bank of Cyprus (Greek: Kεντρικη Τραπεζα της Κυπρου, Turkish: Kıbrıs Merkez Bankasi) is the central bank of the Republic of Cyprus, located in Nicosia. ... Cyprus has been a member of the European Union since 1 May 2004, and is a member of the Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union but has not completed the third stage of the EMU and therefore still uses its own currency, the Cyprus pound. ... The Bank of Cyprus Public Company Ltd was founded in 1899 and is the holding company of the Bank of Cyprus Group. ... Tourism occupies a dominant position in the economy of Cyprus. ... The Military of Cyprus comprises the Cypriot National Guard, a combined arms force with land, naval and air elements. ... The Cypriot National Guard (Greek Εθνική Φρουρά) , aka the Greek Cypriot National Guard,is the combined arms military force of the Republic of Cyprus. ... Motto none Anthem (transliteration) Hymn to Freedom 1 Location of Cyprus (orange) within the European Union (camel). ... This is a list of cities in Cyprus. ... Cypriot cuisine is the cuisine of the Cypriot people who live on the island of Cyprus located in the north-eastern Mediterranean Sea. ... History (Timeline and Samples) Genres: Classical music -Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Rock Regional styles Aegean Islands - Arcadia - Argos - Athens - Crete - Cyclades - Dodecanese Islands - Epirus - Ionian Islands - Lesbos - Macedonia - Peloponnesos - Thessaloniki - Thessaly - Thrace - Cyprus The music of Cyprus includes a variety of classical, folk and popular genres. ... Holidays in Cyprus: 1st January - New Years Day 6th January - Epiphany Variable - Green Monday 25th March - Greek Independence Day 1st April - Greek Cypriot National Day Variable - Good Friday Variable - Easter Monday Variable - Easter Tuesday 1st May - Labour Day Variable - Holy Spirit 15th August - Dormition of the Theotokos(Assumption Day... Flag ratio: 3:5 The flag of Cyprus was adopted on August 16, 1960. ... Coat of Arms of Cyprus The coat of arms of Cyprus depicts a dove carrying an olive branch (a well-known symbol of peace) over “1960”, the year of Cypriot independence from British rule. ... The Hymn to Freedom (Ύμνος εις την Ελευθερίαν, Imnos is tin Eleftherian) is a poem written by Dionýsios Solomós in 1823 that consists of 158 stanzas. ...

References

  1. ^ Invest in Cyprus website - figures do not include tourism to the occupied North [1]
  2. ^ BBC News website [2]
  3. ^ See relevant reference articles for areas
  4. ^ according to the United Nations Security Council, see Resolution 550 and 541
  5. ^ According to Article 1 and Annex A of the Treaty of Establishment of the Republic of Cyprus - see [3]
  6. ^ [Fisher, Fred H. Cyprus: Our New Colony And What We Know About It. London: George Routledge and Sons 1878 pg 13-14.]
  7. ^ Les îles des Princes, banlieue maritime d'Istanboul: guide touristique - Page 136 by Ernest Mamboury
  8. ^ Encyclopedia of Freemasonry Part 1 and Its Kindred Sciences Comprising the Whole Range of Arts … - Page 25
  9. ^ The World Book Encyclopedia - Page 1207 by World Book
  10. ^ "Memalik-i Mahrusa-i Sahanede 1247 senesinde mevcut olan nufus defteri", Istanbul University library, ms.kat d-8 no:8867.
  11. ^ Osmanli Nufusu 1830–1914 by Kemal Karpat, ISBN 975-333-169-X and Die Völker des Osmanischen by Ritter zur Helle von Samo.
  12. ^ Caesar V. Mavratsas, Politics, Social Memory, and Identity in Greek Cyprus since 1974, cyprus-conflict.net, <http://www.cyprus-conflict.net/www.cyprus-conflict.net/mavratsas.html>. Retrieved on 13 October 2007 
  13. ^ The Cyprus Conflict; The Main Narrative, continued, cyprus-conflict.net, <http://www.cyprus-conflict.net/www.cyprus-conflict.net/narrative-main-2.html#The%20%crisis%20%of%20%1963>. Retrieved on 13 October 2007 
  14. ^ Over 100 missing identified so far, Cyprus Mail, <http://www.cyprus-mail.com/news/main.php?id=34064&cat_id=1>. Retrieved on 13 October 2007 
  15. ^ Missing cause to get cash injection, Cyprus Mail, <http://www.cyprus-mail.com/news/main.php?id=30795&cat_id=1>. Retrieved on 13 October 2007 
  16. ^ [4]
  17. ^ [5]
  18. ^ Xinhua. "About 11,500 people flee Lebanon to Cyprus", People's Daily Online, 2006-07-21. 
  19. ^ Greek Cypriots dismantle barrier, BBC News, <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/6433045.stm>. Retrieved on 7 March 2008 
  20. ^ Ledra Street crossing opens in Cyprus. Associated Press article published on International Herald Tribune Website, 3 April 2008
  21. ^ http://www.diko.org.cy/DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid=24
  22. ^ EUROPA - The EU at a glance - Maps - Cyprus
  23. ^ [6]
  24. ^ Jean Christou, US report raps Cyprus over battle on flesh trade, cyprus-mail.com, <http://www.cyprus-mail.com/news/main.php?id=26259&cat_id=1>. Retrieved on 13 October 2007 
  25. ^ Jacqueline Theodoulou, A shame on our society, cyprus-mail.com, <http://www.cyprus-mail.com/news/main.php?id=24784&cat_id=9>. Retrieved on 13 October 2007 
  26. ^ IPI deeply concerned over criminal defamation charges brought against daily newspaper in Northern Cyprus, international Press Institute, 9 January 2007, <http://www.freemedia.at/cms/ipi/statements_detail.html?ctxid=CH0055&docid=CMS1168350896599>. Retrieved on 13 October 2007 
  27. ^ Cyprus Human Rights Practices, 1995: Discrimination Based on Race, Sex, Religion, Disability, Language, or Social Status, Hellenic Resources network, <http://www.hri.org/docs/USSD-Rights/95/Cyprus95.html#Section5>. Retrieved on 13 October 2007 
  28. ^ US Report on Human Rights in Cyprus (sectiond 6c & 6e)
  29. ^ a b Cyprus Economy. Republic of Cyprus. www.cyprus.gov.cy. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  30. ^ a b "Turkey warns Lebanon, Egypt against oil exploration deal with Cyprus", AP/International Herald Tribune, www.iht.com, 2007-01-30. Retrieved on 2007-05-04. 
  31. ^ Abdullah Gul, quoted in the Turkish Daily News 14 April 2007 [7].
  32. ^ Population of Northern Cyprus: 178 thousand, The Observer (Cyprus), 2007-02-16, <http://www.observercyprus.com/observer/NewsDetails.aspx?id=1180>. Retrieved on 13 October 2007 
  33. ^ http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/ebs/ebs_225_report_en.pdf Social values, Science and technology. Eurobarometer 2005. TNS Opinion & Social
  34. ^ "An indication that at least the main contents of the Cypria were known around 650 BCE is provided by the representation of the Judgment of Paris on the Chigi vase" (Burkert 1992:103). On the proto-Corinthian ewer of ca. 640 BCE known as the Chigi "vase", Paris is identified as Alexandros, as he was apparently called in Cypria.
  35. ^ Th. Siapkaras- Pitsillidés, Le Pétrarchisme en Cypre. Poèmes d' amour en dialecte Chypriote d' après un manuscript du XVIe siècle, Athènes 1975 (2ème édition)
  36. ^ Public Works Department official statistics [8]
  37. ^ The 2006 State of World Liberty Index. www.stateofworldliberty.org. Retrieved on 2007-12-07.
  38. ^ Human Development Report 2006. United Nations Development Program. hdr.undp.org (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  39. ^ a b Cyprus: Human Development Index Trends. United Nations Development Program. hdr.undp.org. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  40. ^ Worldwide Quality of Life - 2005. The Economist. www.economist.com (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  41. ^ A Global Projection of Subjective Well-being. www.le.ac.uk. Retrieved on 2007-12-07.
  42. ^ Index of Economic Freedom. Heritage Foundation & The WSJ. www.heritage.org (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  43. ^ North Korea, Turkmenistan, Eritrea the worst violators of press freedom. Reporters Without Borders. www.rsf.org (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  44. ^ North Korea, Eritrea and Turkmenistan are the world's “black holes” for news. Reporters without Borders. www.ref.org (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  45. ^ CPI Table. Transparency International. www.transparency.org (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  46. ^ Transparency International's Annual Report 2005. Transparency International. www.transparency.org (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  47. ^ Transparency International's Annual Report 2004 (2004). Retrieved on 2006-04-28.
  48. ^ Global Competitiveness Report 2006-2007. World Economic Forum. www.weforum.org (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  49. ^ Gross domestic product per capita, current prices. International Monetary Fund. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  50. ^ Environmental Sustainability Index. Yale and Columbia University. www.yale.edu (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  51. ^ Labor Statistics: Strikes by Country. Nation Master. www.nationmaster.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  52. ^ A.T. Kearney/Foreign Policy Globalization Index 2006. A.T. Kearney/FOREIGN POLICY. www.atkearney.com (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  53. ^ A.T. Kearney/Foreign Policy Magazine Globalization Index 2005. A.T. Kearney/FOREIGN POLICY. www.atkearney.com (2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  54. ^ A.T. Kearney/Foreign Policy Magazine Globalization Index 2004. A.T. Kearney/FOREIGN POLICY. www.atkearney.com (2004). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.

Logo of Peoples Daily The Peoples Daily (Chinese: ; pinyin: Rénmín Rìbào) is the official newspaper of the Communist Party of China, published worldwide with a circulation of 3 to 4 million. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: spelling redirect If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Country Studies are works published by the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress ( USA), freely available for use by researchers. ... The U.S. Constitution, adopted in 1789 by a constitutional convention, sets down the basic framework of American government in its seven articles. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The World Factbook (ISSN 1553-8133; also known as the CIA World Factbook)[2] is an annual publication of the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with almanac-style information about the countries of the world. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Further reading

  • Hitchens, Christopher (1997). Hostage to History: Cyprus from the Ottomans to Kissinger. Verso. ISBN 1-85984-189-9. 
  • Brewin, Christopher (2000). European Union and Cyprus. Eothen Press. ISBN 0-906719-24-0. 
  • Dods, Clement (ed.) (1999). Cyprus: The Need for New Perspectives. The Eothen Press. ISBN 0-906719-23-2. 
  • Durrell, Lawrence (1957). Bitter Lemons. Faber and Faber. ISBN 0-571201-55-5. 
  • Gibbons, Harry Scott (1997). The Genocide Files. Charles Bravos Publishers. ISBN 0-9514464-2-8. 
  • Hannay, David (2005). Cyprus: The Search for a Solution. I.B. Tauris. ISBN 1-85043-665-7. 
  • Ker-Lindsay, James (2005). EU Accession and UN Peacemaking in Cyprus. Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 1-4039-9690-3. 
  • Mirbagheri, Farid (1989). Cyprus and International Peacemaking. Hurst. ISBN 1-85065-354-2. 
  • Nicolet, Claude (2001). United States Policy Towards Cyprus, 1954-1974. Bibliopolis. ISBN 3-933925-20-7. 
  • Oberling, Pierre (1982). The Road to Bellapais. Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-88033-000-7. 
  • O'Malley, Brendan and Ian Craig (1999). The Cyprus Conspiracy. I.B. Tauris. ISBN 1-86064-737-5. 
  • Palley, Claire (2005). An International Relations Debacle: The UN Secretary-General's Mission of Good Offices in Cyprus, 1999-2004. Hart Publishing. ISBN 1-84113-578-X. 
  • Papadakis, Yiannis (2005). Echoes from the Dead Zone: Across the Cyprus Divide. I.B. Tauris. ISBN 1-85043-428-X. 
  • Plumer, Aytug (2003 isbn= 975-6912-18-9). Cyprus, 1963-64: The Fateful Years. Cyrep (Lefkosa). 
  • Richmond, Oliver (1998). Mediating in Cyprus. Frank Cass. ISBN 0-7146-4431-5. 
  • Richmond, Oliver and James Ker-Lindsay (eds.) (2001). The Work of the UN in Cyprus: Promoting Peace and Development. Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-91271-3. 
  • Tocci, Nathalie (2004). EU Accession Dynamics and Conflict Resolution: Catalysing Peace or Consolidating Partition in Cyprus?. Ashgate. ISBN 0-7546-4310-7. 
  • Anastasiou, Harry (2006). Broken Olive Branch: Nationalism Ethnic Conflict and the Quest for Peace in Cyprus. Author House. ISBN 1-4259-4360-8. 

I.B. Tauris is a publishing house based in London and specializing in non-fiction. ... I.B. Tauris is a publishing house based in London and specializing in non-fiction. ... I.B. Tauris is a publishing house based in London and specializing in non-fiction. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cyprus
  • Wikimedia Atlas of Cyprus
  • Cyprus travel guide from Wikitravel

Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...

Government

  • Cyprus Trade Centres Worldwide
  • Cyprus High Commission Trade Centre - London
  • Cypriot Diaspora Project
  • Republic of Cyprus - Greek Language
  • Republic of Cyprus - English Language
  • Constitution of the Republic of Cyprus
  • Press and Information Office
  • Central Bank of Cyprus

General information

  • Several maps of Cyprus, including ethnic population distribution before and after partition.
  • CIA World Factbook - Cyprus
  • US State Department - Cyprus includes Background Notes, Country Study and major reports
  • "The Cyprus Conflict" An extensive educational web site dedicated to the Cyprus Conflict
  • Open Directory Project - Cyprus directory category
  • News and information about both parts of Cyprus
  • The UN in Cyprus
  • Free Cyprus GPS maps
  • Bibliography on the Jews of Cyprus (Chiefly in Hebrew and English)

Official publications

  • The British government's Foreign Affairs Committee report on Cyprus.
  • Letter by the President of the Republic, Mr Tassos Papadopoulos, to the U.N. Secretary-General, Mr Kofi Annan, dated June 7, which circulated as an official document of the U.N. Security Council
  • Legal Issues arising from certain population transfers and displacements on the territory of the Republic of Cyprus in the period since 20 July 1974
  • Address to Cypriots by President Papadopoulos (FULL TEXT)
  • The Republic of Cyprus Press and Information Office, Aspects of the Cyprus Problem
  • Noitiki Antistasis, [12] Non-affiliated news website focusing mainly on the effect of globalization and foreign interests on the Cyprus problem
  • 1st Report of the European Commission of Human Rights; Turkey's intervention in Cyprus and aftermath (20 July 1974 - 18 May 1976)
  • 2nd Report of the European Commission of Human Rights; Turkey's intervention in Cyprus and aftermath (19 May 1976 to 10 February 1983)
  • European Court of Human Rights Case of Cyprus v. Turkey (Application no. 25781/94)

St. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ... Seleucia (Greek: Σέλεύχεια) – also transliterated as Seleuceia, Seleukeia, or Seleukheia – may refer to many cities of the Seleucid Empire (Syria): Seleucia on the Tigris (first capital of the Seleucid Empire; currently in Iraq) Seleucia (Sittacene) – in antiquity, across the Tigris from the above city, currently in Iraq Seleucia above Zeugma – on... Salamis was an ancient city-state on the east coast of Cyprus, at the mouth of the river Pedieos, 6 km North of Famagusta. ... District Paphos Government  - Mayor Savvas Vergas Population (2001)  - City 47,300 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... Perga was the capital of Pamphylia, on the coast of Asia Minor. ... Antioch is a city in the Turkish Lake District, which is at the crossroads of the Mediterranean, Aegean and Central Anatolian regions. ... Konya (Ottoman Turkish: ; also Koniah, Konieh, Konia, and Qunia; historically also known as Iconium (Latin), Greek: Ikónion) is a city in Turkey, on the central plateau of Anatolia. ... Derbe is an ancient city in todays Turkey. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is mostly about the Antalya City; for the province, see Antalya Province. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cyprus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5660 words)
Cyprus (Greek: Κύπρος, Kýpros; Turkish: Kıbrıs), officially the Republic of Cyprus (Greek: Κυπριακή Δημοκρατία, Kypriakí Dimokratía; Turkish: Kıbrıs Cumhuriyeti), is a Eurasian island nation in the eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea south of the Anatolian peninsula (Asia Minor) or modern-day Turkey.
Cyprus became part of the Byzantine Empire after the partitioning of the Roman Empire in AD 395, and remained so for almost 800 years, though with brief period of Arab domination and influence.
Cyprus was placed under British control on 4 June 1878 as a result of the Cyprus Convention, which granted control of the island to Britain in return for British support of the Ottoman Empire in the Russian-Turkish War.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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