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Encyclopedia > Cypriot Orthodox Church
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Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in Greece, the Balkans, the rest of Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity. ... Image File history File links HY002563. ... Byzantine EmpireGreek name: - Basileia tōn Romaiōn) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire of the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... In Christianity, an Ecumenical Council or general council is a meeting of the bishops of the whole church convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

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Theosis Negative theology - also known as the Via Negativa (Latin for Negative Way) and Apophatic theology - is a theology that attempts to describe God by negation, to speak of God only in terms of what may be said about God and to avoid what may not be said. ... In Christian theology the filioque clause or filioque controversy (filioque meaning and [from] the Son) is a heavily disputed part of the Nicene Creed, that forms a divisive difference between some Christian sects. ... Miaphysitism is the christology of the Oriental Orthodox Churches. ... Monophysitism (from the Greek monos meaning one, alone and physis meaning nature) is the christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human. ... Nestorianism is the Christian doctrine that Jesus existed as two persons, the man Jesus and the divine Son of God, or Logos, rather than as a unified person. ... Panentheism (Greek words: pan=all, en=in and Theos=God; all-in-God) is the view that God is immanent within all Creation or that God is the animating force behind the universe. ... In Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic theology, theosis, meaning divinization (or deification or, to become god), is the call to man to become holy and seek union with God, beginning in this life and later consummated in the resurrection. ...

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The ancient Church of Cyprus is one of the fourteen or fifteen independent ('autocephalous') Eastern Orthodox churches, which are in communion and in doctrinal agreement with one another but not all subject to one patriarch. It is one of the oldest autocephalous churches. The bishop of the capital, Salamis (Constantia), was constituted metropolitan by Emperor Zeno, with the title of archbishop. This article treats the manner in which the Eastern Orthodox Churches are organized, rather than the doctrines, traditions, practices, or other aspects of Eastern Orthodoxy. ... In hierarchical Christian churches, especially Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches, autocephaly is the status of a hierarchical church whose head bishop does not report to any higher-ranking bishop. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a religious organization which claims to be the continuation of the original Christian body, founded by Jesus and his Twelve Apostles. ... Full communion is completeness of that relationship between Christian individuals and groups which is known as communion. ... Salamis was an ancient city-state on the east coast of Cyprus, at the mouth of the river Pedieos, 6 km North of Famagusta. ... In hierarchical Christian churches, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop (then more precisely called Metropolitan archbishop) of a metropolis; that is, the chief city of an old Roman province, ecclesiastical province, or regional capital. ... Zeno on a coin celebrating his victories. ...


The Apostle Paul, accompanied by Barnabas and Mark (Barnabas' nephew), came to Cyprus in 45 AD to spread Christianity. Arriving at Salamis, they travelled across the island to Paphos, where Sergius Paulus was the first Roman official to convert to Christianity. In 50 AD St Barnabas returned to Cyprus accompanied by St Mark and set up his base in Salamis. He is considered to be the first Archbishop of Cyprus. In 57 AD, St Barnabas was stoned to death by the Jews on the outskirts of Salamis, where he was also buried. He thus became one of the first martyrs of Christianity. Paul of Tarsus, also known as Paul the Apostle or Saint Paul (AD 3–14 — 62–69),[1] is widely considered to be central to the early development and spread of Christianity, particularly westward from Jerusalem. ... Barnabas was an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament. ... Mark the Evangelist (Greek: Markos) (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark. ... Events Roman Empire Galba becomes the commander of Legio III Augusta. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, and on his life and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... [edit] Events [edit] By place [edit] Roman Empire Londinium is founded by the Romans, taking over as capital of the local Roman province, from Colchester (approximate date) Roman Emperor Claudius appoints Agrippa II governor of Chalcis. ... For other uses, see number 57. ...


A few of the Bishops who helped spread Christianity on the island were Lazarus, the Bishop of Kition, Herakleidios the Bishop of Tamasos, Avxivios the Bishop of Soloi, and Theodotos the Bishop of Kyrenia. Kyrenia Harbour on a summer night Kyrenia Castle at Night Kyrenia Castle Bellapais Abbey inner court Kyrenia (Greek: Κερύνεια Keryneia; Turkish: Girne) is a town in the break-away Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. ...


Towards the end of the 4th century, Christianity had spread throughout the island. During this time St Epiphanius was Archbishop. His seat was in Salamis, which was renamed Constantia. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Epiphanius (ca 310–20 – 403) was a Church Father, a heresiologist who was a strong defender of orthodoxy, known for tracking down deviant teachings (heresies) wherever they could be traced, during the troubled era in the Christian Church following the Council of Nicaea. ...


This independent position by ancient custom was recognized, against the claims of the Patriarch of Antioch, at the Council of Ephesus (431 CE), and by an edict of the Byzantine emperor Zeno. When the Archbishop of Antioch tried to abolish the Cyprus church's autocephaly, the Cypriot clergy denounced this before the Third Ecumenical Synod, which convened in 434 AD in Ephesos. The Synod ratified the autocephaly of the Church of Cyprus by its 8th canon. In 478 AD, Archbishop Anthemios of Cyprus, following a vision, found the grave of St Barnabas and his remains. On St Barnabas's chest rested a copy of St Mathew's Gospel. The church had sent a cogent argument on its own behalf to the Emperor the alleged body of its reputed founder Barnabas, just then having been most opportunely discovered at Salamis by Archbishop Anthemios. Zeno confirmed the status of the Church of Cyprus and granted its Archbishop the "three privileges": namely to sign his name in cinnabar, an ink made vermilion by the addition of the mineral cinnabar; to wear purple instead of black robes under his vestments; and to hold an imperial sceptre instead of a normal episcopal crosier. Patriarch of Antioch is the traditional title carried by the Bishop of Antioch. ... The Council of Ephesus was held in Ephesus, Asia Minor in 431 under Emperor Theodosius II, grandson of Theodosius the Great. ... Events June - Council of Ephesus: Nestorianism is rejected, the Nicene creed is declared to be complete. ... The Council of Ephesus was held in Ephesus, Asia Minor in 431 under Emperor Theodosius II, grandson of Theodosius the Great. ... Events Aetius a general in the service of emperor Valentinian III holds power in Rome for twenty years. ... Ephesus was one one of the great cities of the Ionian Greeks in Asia Minor, located in Lydia where the Cayster river flows into the Aegean Sea (in modern day Turkey). ... Events First Shinto shrines built in Japan. ... Matthew the Evangelist (מתי Gift of the LORD, Standard Hebrew and Tiberian Hebrew Mattay; Septuagint Greek Μαθθαιος, Matthaios) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Matthew. ... Barnabas was an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament. ... Vermilion, also spelled vermilion, when found naturally-occurring, is an opaque reddish orange pigment, used since antiquity, originally derived from the powdered mineral cinnabar. ... Cinnabar, sometimes written cinnabarite, is a name applied to red mercury(II) sulfide (HgS), or native vermilion, the common ore of mercury. ... The term Purple has always been used in a general sense in English by the average person to describe a wide variety of shades within a range of colors intermediate between blue and red. ... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican Churches. ... A sceptre or scepter is an ornamental staff held by a ruling monarch, a prominent item of kingly regalia. ... Crosiere of arcbishop Heinrich of Finstingen, 1260-1286 A crosier (crozier, pastoral staff) is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican and some Lutheran prelates. ...


Cyprus suffered greatly from Arab invasions in the following centuries, and during the reign of Justinian II the cities of Salamis (Constantia), Kourion and Paphos were sacked. At the advice of the Emperor, the Archbishop fled to the Hellespont along with the survivors, and established the city of Nova Justiniana (Greek: Νέα Ιουστινιανή), named after the Emperor, near the city of Cyzicus. In 692 the Quinisext Council (also called "in Trullo") reconfirmed the status and privileges of the exiled Archbishop and in 698, when the Arabs were driven out of Cyprus, the Archbishop returned but retained the title of "Archbishop of Nova Justiniana and All Cyprus": a custom that, along with the "three privileges", continues to this day. Justinian II, known as Rhinotmetus (the Split-nosed) (669-711) was a Byzantine emperor of the Heraclian Dynasty, reigned from 685 to 695 and again from 704 to 711. ... Salamis may refer to Salamis Island in the Saronic Gulf of the Aegean Sea, near Athens, Greece, where the Battle of Salamis was fought in 480 B.C.. Salamis, Cyprus, an ancient city on the east coast of Cyprus. ... Paphos, usually written Paphos or Paphus in English, (Ancient Greek: ; Modern Greek: Πάφος, Páfos; Latin: Paphus, and for a time, Augusta; Turkish: Baf, formerly Baffa) is a coastal town in the southwest of Cyprus. ... Hellespont (i. ... Cyzicus was an ancient town of Mysia in Asia Minor, situated on the shoreward side of the present peninsula of Kapu-Dagh (Arctonnesus), which is said to have been originally an island in the Sea of Marmara, and to have been artificially connected with the mainland in historic times. ... Events The Quinisext Council (also said in Trullo), held in Constantinople, laid the foundation for the Orthodox Canon Law The Arabs conquer Armenia. ... Both the Fifth Ecumenical Council and the Sixth Ecumenical Council failed to produce disciplinary norms, for which reason the emperor Justinian II convoked an assembly in 692 to meet in Constantinople in the same domed hall where the Sixth Council had been held, called in Trullo (= under the dome). ... Events Tiberius III deposes Leontius and becomes Byzantine Emperor. ...


After the establishment of Kingdom of Cyprus the Catholic kings gradually reduced the number of orthodox bishops from 14 to 4 and forced those away from their towns. The archbishop was moved from Nicosia to the region of Solia, near Morphou, the bishop of Larnaca was moved to the village of Lefkara etc. Each orthodox bishop was under the Catholic bishop of the area. The Catholic church tried on occasion to force the orthodox bishops to make concessions on the differences in doctrine and practices between the two churches, sometimes with threats and sometimes using violence and torture, as in the case of the 13 monks in Kantara. Moreover the properties of many monasteries were confiscated. The persecutions, especially during the Frankish period, did not succeed in uprooting the faith of the Orthodox Greek Cypriots. The Kingdom of Cyprus was a Roman Catholic Crusader kingdom on the island of Cyprus in the late Middle Ages. ... Morphou (in Greek Μόρφου, in Turkish Omorfo (pre 1974) or Güzelyurt post 1974) is a market town in the north-west of Cyprus. ... Larnaca, or Larnaka (also colloquially Skala or Iskele), is a city on the southeast coast of Cyprus. ... Greek Cypriot refers to the Greek-speaking population of Cyprus. ...


The Franks were succeeded by the Venetiand in 1489 without any significant change to the status of the orthodox church. The conquest of Cyprus by the Ottoman Empire in 1571 led to the recognition of the Orthodox church as the only legal Christian church. The church was considered by the Ottomans to be the political leadership of the Christian population (Rum millet) and was responsible for collecting taxes. Because of the different policies of the Ottoman empire towards Muslim and non Muslim citizens, especially regarding taxation, certain Christians converted to Islam. These are known in Cyprus with the name "Linopampakoi". Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Söğüt (1299-1326), Bursa (1326-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul) (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah... Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ... The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Imperial motto El Muzaffer Daima The Ever Victorious (as written in tugra) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital İstanbul ( Constantinople/Asitane/Konstantiniyye ) Sovereigns Sultans of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40 million Area 12+ million km² Establishment 1299 Dissolution October 29... For other uses, including people named Islam, see Islam (disambiguation). ...


Attempts were made subsequently by the patriarchs of Antioch to claim authority over the Cypriot Church, the last as recently as 1600, but in vain. 1597 1598 1599 - 1600 - 1601 1602 1603 |- | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1570s 1580s 1590s - 1600s - 1610s 1620s 1630s |- | align=center | Centuries: 15th century - 16th century - 17th century |} // Events January January 1 - Scotland adopts January 1st as being New Years Day February February 17 - Giordano Bruno burned at the...


Nevertheless, during the Cyprus under the Ottoman period (1571-1878) Cyprus went through hard times. People lived in insecurity and their life and property was constantly at the disposal of the Ottomans. The role of the Church in the preservation of faith, national identity and traditions of orthodox Greek cypriots was particularly important. The churches were not mere places of worship but were transformed to schools and places of ethnic inspiration. Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Söğüt (1299-1326), Bursa (1326-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul) (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah... For publications of this name, see also Nation (disambiguation) A nation is a community of people who live together in an area (or, more broadly, of their descendants who may now be dispersed); and who regard themselves, or are regarded by others, as sharing some common identity, to which certain...


The revolution in Greece in 1821, together with information of a revolutionary movement in Cyprus, resulted in the execution of Archbishop Kyprianos on 9th July 1821 and Bishops Chrysanthos of Paphos, Meletios of Kitium, Lavrentios of Kyrenia, of the Abbot Josef of the Kykkos Monastery and other notables, clergymen and common people. Combatants Greek revolutionaries, United Kingdom, Russia, France Ottoman Empire, Egyptian troops Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis, Alexander Ypsilanti Omer Vryonis, Ibrahim Pasha of Egypt. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1872 archbishop Sofronios of Cyprus partipated in a council in Constantinople which condemned nationalism, triggered by the unilateral declaration of autocephaly by the Bulgarian church. 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix Nationalism is an ideology [1] that holds that a nation is the fundamental unit for human social life, and takes precedence over any other social and political principles. ...


The purchase of Cyprus by the British in 1878 allowed more freedom in religious practices, such as the use of bells in churches (which were forbidden under the Ottomans). Some linopampakoi took advantage of the political change to convert back to christianity. 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


John Hackett published "A history of the Orthodox Church of Cyprus" in 1901. At about the same time the church went through a crisis regarding the succession of the archbishop. The two candidates, Kyrillos II and Kyrillos III had mainly political differences (one was a nationalist whereas the other was a moderate). Sir John Winthrop Hackett (1910 - September, 1997) was a British Army officer and author. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Kyrillos Papadopoulos (greek Κύριλλος Παπαδόπουλος) nicknamed Kyrillatsos (big Kyrillos) was bishop of Larnaca and later Archbishop of Cyprus. ... Kyrillos, nicknamed Kyrilloudin (small Kyrillos to differentiate from Kyrillos II) was the bishop of Kyrenia and later became the archbishop of the Cypriot Orthodox Church. ...


Despite that Church gained more freedom by British, however, the British Administration interfered, in certain cases, using restrictive laws on the management of the Church and other areas of national and cultural activity. This led to the October 1931 riot organised by bishops who were also members of the legislative assembly. As a consequence of this uprise, the Bishops Nikodemos of Kition, and Makarios of Kyrenia were exiled and restrictions were imposed on the election of the Archbishop. As a result the filling of the Archbishop's throne was pending from 1933 (death of Archbishop Kyrillos the 3rd) to 1946, when the Bishop of Paphos Leontios was elected as the new Archbishop. 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


In 1950, Makarios III was elected Archbishop. While still bishop of Kition he had demonstrated strong intellectual and national activity. In 1949 he founded the Seminary «Apostle Varnavas» and in 1950 he organised the referendum on the Union (Enosis) between Cyprus and Greece. While archbishop he was the political leader of the EOKA liberation struggle in the years 1955-1959. The British exiled him to the Seychelles because of his activities. 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Makarios (born Mihalis Christodoulou Mouskos, August 13, 1913—August 3, 1977) was archbishop and primate of the autocephalous Cypriot Orthodox Church (1950-1977) and first President of the Republic of Cyprus (1960-1977). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... The word Ένωσις (enosis) is Greek for union. ... EOKA (Εθνική Οργάνωσις Κυπρίων Αγωνιστών, Ethniki Organosis Kyprion Agoniston (Greek National Organisation of Cypriot Fighters) was a Greek Cypriot nationalist organisation that fought for the expulsion of British troops from the island, for self-determination and for union with Greece in the mid to late 1950s. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1960, Archbishop Makarios III was elected President of the newly established Republic of Cyprus. Disagreements of the other 3 bishops with Makarios lead to the Ecclesiastical coup. Following the dethronement of the Bishops of Paphos, Kitium and Kyrenia for conspiring against Makarios, two new Bishoprics were created: the Bishopric of Limassol which was detached from the Bishopric of Kition, and the Bishopric of Morfou which was detached from the Bishopric of Kyrenia. The Coup d'état of 15 July 1974 forced Archbishop Makarios III to leave the island. He returned in December 1974. 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... The Ecclesiastical coup is the name given to the coup détat staged by three Bishops of the Orthodox Church of Cyprus against President of the Republic of Cyprus, Archbishop Makarios III in March 1972. ... Kyrenia Harbour on a summer night Kyrenia Castle at Night Kyrenia Castle Bellapais Abbey inner court Kyrenia (Greek: Κερύνεια Keryneia; Turkish: Girne) is a town in the break-away Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. ... View of Limassol from the medieval castle museum Limassol (Greek: Λεμεσός, Lemesos; Turkish: Leymosun) is the second-largest city of Cyprus, with a population of 161,000 (2001 census), and the biggest municipality of the island. ... A coup détat (pronounced ), or simply coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government through unconstitutional means by a part of the state establishment — mostly replacing just the high-level figures. ... July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


The coup was followed by the Turkish invasion of 20th July 1974 which affected significantly the Church and its flock: as 35% of Cyprus' territory came under Turkish occupation, hundreds of thousands of orthodox Christians were displaced and those that couldn't or didn't want to leave (20,000 initially) faced oppression. As of May 2001 figures only 421 Greek Cypriots and 155 Maronites remain in North Cyprus. In 1974, a coup detat by Greek Army officers stationed on the Mediterranian island of Cyprus, tried to overthrow the then-President Makarios. ... -1... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܶܐ in Syriac, Mawarinah in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ...


The destruction of Christian monuments was another important consequence. Churches containing Byzantine icons, frescoes and mosaics of incalculable value have been pillaged by antiquities dealers and sold on the black market. One of the most characteristic cases of pillage has been the case of the mosaics of Panayia of Kanakaria of the 6th century AC, which were finally returned to the Church of Cyprus, following a ruling by the Indianapolis Court. In the occupied areas of Cyprus there are 514 churches, chapels and monasteries, many of whom were converted to mosques, museums or abandoned. This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ...


On 3 August 1977, Archbishop Makarios died and was succeeded by Chrysostomos, the current Archbishop. In 1979, the new Statutory Charter of the Church of Cyprus was drawn up and approved replacing the old one of 1914. August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ...


Archbishop Chrysostomos is suffering from Alzheimer's disease and had not been able to carry out his duties on the Mediterranean island for several years. In May 2006, Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I chaired a broader meeting of church elders which called for Chrysostomos' "honorary removal."


Paphos Metropolitan Chrysostomos, 65, was elected new archbishop on November 5, 2006, after a long-running election campaign.


Holy Synod

The Holy Synod of the Autocephalous Church of Cyprus is the highest Church Authority in Cyprus. Its task is to examine and provide solutions on all issues concerning the Church of Cyprus. It consists of his Beatitude the Archbishop of Cyprus as the Head of the Holy Synod, the Bishops of Paphos, Kition, Kyrenia, Limassol and Morphou, the Suffragan Bishops of Salamis, Trimithous and Arsinoe and the Bishop of Kykko Nikiforos, as regular members. Paphos, usually written Paphos or Paphus in English, (Ancient Greek: ; Modern Greek: Πάφος, Páfos; Latin: Paphus, and for a time, Augusta; Turkish: Baf, formerly Baffa) is a coastal town in the southwest of Cyprus. ... Larnaca, or Larnaka, is a city on the southeast coast of Cyprus. ... Kyrenia Harbour on a summer night Kyrenia Castle at Night Kyrenia Castle Bellapais Abbey inner court Kyrenia (Greek: Κερύνεια Keryneia; Turkish: Girne) is a town in the break-away Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus. ... View of Limassol from the medieval castle museum Limassol (Greek: Λεμεσός, Lemesos; Turkish: Leymosun) is the second-largest city of Cyprus, with a population of 161,000 (2001 census), and the biggest municipality of the island. ... Morphou (in Greek Μόρφου, in Turkish Omorfo (pre 1974) or Güzelyurt post 1974) is a market town in the north-west of Cyprus. ...


The Holy Synod meets regularly in the first week after Easter and in the first fortnight of the months of February and September. It meets in ad hoc sessions when it is deemed necessary or when two of its members put forward a request. Easter, also known as Pascha (Greek Πάσχα: Passover), the Feast of the Resurrection, the Sunday of the Resurrection, or Resurrection Day, is the most important religious feast of the Christian liturgical year, observed between late March and late April (early April to early May in Eastern Christianity). ...


See also: List of Archbishops of Cyprus This is a list of Archbishops of the Autocephalous Greek Cypriot Orthodox Church since its foundation with known dates of enthronement: St. ...


Source

  • Official Cypriot Government (About Church of Cyprus)

External links

  • Orthodox Church of Cyprus, official site
  • Orthodox Church of Cyprus, scholarly site
Autocephalous and Autonomous Churches of Eastern Orthodoxy
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The * designates a church whose autocephaly or autonomy is not universally recognized.

 
 

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