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Encyclopedia > Cyperus papyrus
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Papyrus sedge
Cyperus papyrus
Cyperus papyrus
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Liliopsida
Order: Cyperales
Family: Cyperaceae
Genus: Cyperus
Species: C. papyrus
Binomial name
Cyperus papyrus
L.

Papyrus sedge, also known as Bulrush or Paper reed (Cyperus papyrus) is a monocot belonging to the sedge family Cyperaceae. It is a herbaceous perennial native to Africa. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 246 KB) Name Cyperus papyrus Family Cyperaceae Image no. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Divisions Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Hepatophyta - liverworts Anthocerophyta - hornworts Bryophyta - mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) Lycopodiophyta - clubmosses Equisetophyta - horsetails Pteridophyta - true ferns Psilotophyta - whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta - adderstongues Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta - seed ferns Pinophyta - conifers Cycadophyta - cycads Ginkgophyta - ginkgo Gnetophyta - gnetae Magnoliophyta - flowering plants Adiantum pedatum (a fern... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants (also angiosperms or Magnoliophyta) are one of the major groups of modern plants, comprising those that produce seeds in specialized reproductive organs called flowers, where the ovulary or carpel is enclosed. ... Orders Base Monocots: Acorus Alismatales Asparagales Dioscoreales Liliales Pandanales Family Petrosaviaceae Commelinids: Arecales Commelinales Poales Zingiberales Family Dasypogonaceae Monocotyledons or monocots are a group of flowering plants usually ranked as a class and once called the Monocotyledoneae. ... Cyperales is an order comprising monocot flowering plants of a single family, the Cyperaceae, known as sedges. ... Genera See text The family Cyperaceae, or the Sedge family, is a taxon of monocot flowering plants that superficially resemble grasses or rushes. ... Species About 600 species, including: Cyperus albostriatus - Dwarf Umbrella-sedge Cyperus alternifolius - Umbrella Papyrus Cyperus congestus - Dense Flatsedge Cyperus eragrostis - Tall Flatsedge Cyperus esculentus - Chufa Cyperus fuscus - Brown Galingale Cyperus longus - Galingale Cyperus papyrus - Papyrus Cyperus prolifer - Dwarf Papyrus Cyperus is a large genus of about 600 species of sedges... In biology, binomial nomenclature is a standard convention used for naming species. ... A painting of Carolus Linnaeus Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné (   listen?), and who wrote under the Latinized name Carolus Linnaeus (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of taxonomy. ... Orders Base Monocots: Acorus Alismatales Asparagales Dioscoreales Liliales Pandanales Family Petrosaviaceae Commelinids: Arecales Commelinales Poales Zingiberales Family Dasypogonaceae Monocotyledons or monocots are a group of flowering plants usually ranked as a class and once called the Monocotyledoneae. ... Genera See text The family Cyperaceae, or the Sedge family, is a taxon of monocot flowering plants that superficially resemble grasses or rushes. ... Genera See text The family Cyperaceae, or the Sedge family, is a taxon of monocot flowering plants that superficially resemble grasses or rushes. ... A herb (pronounced urb in American English and hurb in most varieties of Commonwealth English) is a plant grown for culinary, medicinal, or in some cases even spiritual value. ... A Red Valerian, a perennial plant. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous after Asia. ...


This tall, robust, leafless aquatic can grow 4-5 m high. It features a grass-like clump of triangular green stems that rise up from thick, woody rhizomes. Each stem is topped by a dense cluster of thin, bright green, thread-like rays around 10-30 cm in length. This cluster resembles a feather duster when the plant is young. Greenish-brown flower clusters appear at the ends of the rays. The flowers give way to brown, nut-like fruits. Ginger rhizome In botany, a rhizome is a usually-underground, horizontal stem of a plant that often sends out roots and shoots from its nodes. ... Wildflowers A flower is the reproductive organ of those plants classified as angiosperms (flowering plants; Division Magnoliophyta). ... Fruit stall in Barcelona, Spain. ...


The younger parts of the rhizome are covered by red-brown, papery, triangular scales, which also cover the base of the culms and represent reduced leaves. It is therefore untrue to call this plant "leafless".


Papyrus is estimated to range from subtropical to tropical desert to wet forests, tolerating annual temperatures of 20-30°C and pH of 6.0 - 8.5. Papyrus flowers in late summer, and prefers full sun to partly-shady conditions. Like most tropical plants, it is sensitive to frost.


The papyrus sedges form vast stands in swamps, shallow lakes, and along stream banks throughout the wetter parts of Africa, but has become rare in the Nile Delta. In deeper waters it is the chief constituent of the floating, tangled masses of vegetation known as sudd. It also occurs also in Madagascar, and some Mediterranean regions such as Sicily and the Levant. The Nile Delta is the delta formed in Northern Egypt where the River Nile spreads out and drains into the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 sq. ... The Levant or Sham (Arabic root word related to the term Semite) is an approximate historical geographical term referring to a large area in Southwest Asia south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea in the west, and the north Arabian Desert and Mesopotamia to the east. ...


The 'feather-duster' flowering heads make ideal nesting sites for many social species of birds. As in most sedges, pollination is effected by wind, not insects, and the mature fruits after release are distributed by water. Orders Many - see section below. ... Pollination is an important step in the reproduction of seed plants: the transfer of pollen grains (male gametes) to the plant carpel, the structure that contains the ovule (female gamete). ... Classes & Orders Subclass: Apterygota Orders Archaeognatha (Bristletails) Thysanura (Silverfish) Monura - extinct Subclass: Pterygota Orders Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Diaphanopteroidea - extinct Palaeodictyoptera - extinct Megasecoptera - extinct Archodonata - extinct Infraclass: Neoptera Orders Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Dermaptera (earwigs) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (walking sticks) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera...


Today, papyrus is mainly cultivated as an aquatic ornamental plant. A dwarf relative of this plant, designated as C. nanus or C. profiler, typically grows to only 1 m tall. An ornamental is a plant variety that is grown for its beauty (in its end use), rather than commercial or other value. ...


Papyrus in history

See also the main article Papyrus.
Papyrus plant (Cyperus papyrus) at Kew Gardens, London
Papyrus plant (Cyperus papyrus) at Kew Gardens, London

Ancient Egyptians used the plant for many purposes, most famously for making papyrus paper. Its name in Greek and in English is widely believed to have come from Egyptian, but this is likely a folk etymology. Cyperus papyrus is now used mainly for decoration, as it is nearly extinct in its native habitat in the Nile Delta, where in ancient times it was widely cultivated. Theophrastus' "History of Plants" (Book iv. 10) states that it grew in Syria; and, according to Pliny's Natural History, it was also a native plant of the Niger River and the Euphrates. Blank papyrus. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1712x2288, 564 KB) Papyrus plant (Cyperus papyrus) at Kew Gardens, London, England. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1712x2288, 564 KB) Papyrus plant (Cyperus papyrus) at Kew Gardens, London, England. ... Hathor The history of Egypt is the longest continuous history, as a unified state, of any country in the world. ... Blank papyrus. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Folk etymology (or popular etymology) is a linguistic term for a category of false etymology which has grown up in popular lore as opposed to one which arose in scholarly usage. ... In biology and ecology, extinction is the ceasing of existence of a species or group of taxons. ... Theophrastus, the successor of Aristotle in the Peripatetic school, a native of Eresus in Lesbos, was born c. ... Á Gaius Plinius Secundus, (23–79) better known as Pliny the Elder, was an ancient author and Natural philosopher of some importance who wrote Naturalis Historia. ... Naturalis Historia Pliny the Elders Natural History is an encyclopedia written by Pliny the Elder. ... Map of Niger river. ... Length 2,800 km Elevation of the source 4,500 m Average discharge 818 m³/s Area watershed 765,831 km² Origin  Eastern Turkey Mouth  Shatt al Arab Basin countries Turkey Syria Iraq Boat on the Shatt-al-Arab The Euphrates (the traditional Greek name for the river, which is...


Aside from papyrus, several other members of the genus Cyperus may actually have been involved in the multiple uses Egyptians found for the plant. Its flowering heads were linked to make garlands for the gods in gratitude. The pith of young shoots was eaten both cooked and raw. Its woody root made bowls and other utensils and was burned for fuel. From the stems were made reed boats (seen in bas-reliefs of the Fourth Dynasty showing men cutting papyrus to build a boat; similar boats are still made in the southern Sudan), sails, mats, cloth, cordage, and sandals. Theophrastus states that King Antigonus made the rigging of his fleet of papyrus, an old practice illustrated by the ship's cable, wherewith the doors were fastened when Odysseus slew the suitors in his hall (Odyssey xxi. 390). Species About 600 species, including: Cyperus albostriatus - Dwarf Umbrella-sedge Cyperus alternifolius - Umbrella Papyrus Cyperus congestus - Dense Flatsedge Cyperus eragrostis - Tall Flatsedge Cyperus esculentus - Chufa Cyperus fuscus - Brown Galingale Cyperus longus - Galingale Cyperus papyrus - Papyrus Cyperus prolifer - Dwarf Papyrus Cyperus is a large genus of about 600 species of sedges... Bas relief is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal. ... The Odyssey (Greek Ὀδυσσεία) is the second of the two great Greek epic poems ascribed to Homer, the first of which is the Iliad. ...


External links

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Cyperus papyrus

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Cyperus papyrus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (572 words)
Papyrus sedge, also known as Bulrush or Paper reed (Cyperus papyrus) is a monocot belonging to the sedge family Cyperaceae.
Papyrus is estimated to range from subtropical to tropical desert to wet forests, tolerating annual temperatures of 20-30°C and pH of 6.0 - 8.5.
Cyperus papyrus is now used mainly for decoration, as it is nearly extinct in its native habitat in the Nile Delta, where in ancient times it was widely cultivated.
Papyrus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1039 words)
Papyrus is an early form of paper made from the pith of the papyrus plant, Cyperus papyrus, a wetland sedge that grows to 5 meters (15 ft) in height and was once abundant in the Nile Delta of Egypt.
Papyrus is first known to have been used in Ancient Egypt (at least as far back as the First dynasty), but it was also widely used throughout the Mediterranean region, as well as inland parts of Europe and south-west Asia.
Papyrus was used as late as the 1100s in the Byzantine Empire, but there are no known surviving examples.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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