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Encyclopedia > Cynthia McKinney
Cynthia McKinney
Cynthia McKinney

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's 4th district
In office
1993 - 2003, 2005 - 2007
Preceded by John Linder
Denise Majette
Succeeded by Denise Majette,
Hank Johnson

Born March 17, 1955
Atlanta, Georgia
Political party Democratic
Spouse Coy Grandison (divorced)
Religion Roman Catholic

Cynthia Ann McKinney (born March 17, 1955) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. A Democrat, McKinney is a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1993 to 2003, and from 2005 to 2007, representing Georgia's fourth congressional district. McKinney was defeated in the 2006 Democratic primary,[1] losing her Congressional seat for the second time. Image File history File linksMetadata Cynthia_McKinney_Congressional_photo. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Map The Fourth Congressional District of the U.S. State of Georgia was created in 1996 following the Supreme Court decision Miller v. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... John Elmer Linder (born September 9, 1942), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1993, representing the 7th District of Georgia (map). ... Denise Majette Denise L. Majette (born May 18, 1955) is a Democratic U.S. politician from the state of Georgia. ... Denise Majette Denise L. Majette (born May 18, 1955) is a Democratic U.S. politician from the state of Georgia. ... Henry “Hank” Johnson Jr. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in leap years). ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Hotlanta, The Big Peach, The ATL, A-Town Location in Fulton County in the state of Georgia Coordinates: Country United States State Georgia Counties Fulton, Dekalb  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area    - City  132. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in leap years). ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a presidential republic... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A state of the United States is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Map Represented by Cynthia McKinney Categories: | | ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Contents

Early life and political career

McKinney was born in Atlanta, the daughter of Billy McKinney, one of Atlanta's first African-American law enforcement officers and a former Georgia State Representative, and Leola McKinney, a retired nurse. She currently lives in the Atlanta suburb of Stone Mountain. She is a Roman Catholic, one of the few members of that faith to have electoral success in heavily Protestant Georgia[citation needed]. Billy McKinney is a former American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Stone Mountain is a city located in DeKalb County, Georgia. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


She earned a B.A. in International Relations from the University of Southern California, a Masters of Art in Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and she is expected to complete a Ph.D. at University of California, Berkeley. International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs of and relations among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... The University of Southern California (commonly referred to as USC, SC, Southern California, and incorrectly as Southern Cal[1]), located in the University Park neighborhood in Los Angeles, California, USA, was founded in 1880, making it Californias oldest private research university. ... The Cabot Intercultural Center of The Fletcher School at Tufts University The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, also called simply The Fletcher School, is the oldest graduate school of international relations in the United States. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


Her political career began in 1986 when her father, a representative in the Georgia House of Representatives, submitted his daughter's name as a write-in candidate for the Georgia state house. She received about 40 percent of the popular vote despite the fact that she lived in Jamaica at the time with then-husband Coy Grandison (with whom she had a son, Coy McKinney, now age 20). In 1988, McKinney ran for the same seat and won, making the McKinneys the first father and daughter to simultaneously serve in the Georgia state house. The Georgia House of Representatives is the lower house of the General Assembly (the state legislature) of Georgia. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A write-in candidate is a candidate in an election whose name does not appear on the ballot, but for whom voters may vote nonetheless by writing in the persons name. ...


McKinney immediately challenged House rules requiring women to wear dresses by wearing slacks. In 1991, she spoke out against the Persian Gulf War, causing many legislators to walk out in protest at her remarks. See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ...


Service in the U.S. House of Representatives

In the 1992 election, McKinney was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives as the member of Congress from the newly-created 11th District, a 64 percent black-majority district stretching from Atlanta to Savannah. She was the first African-American woman to represent Georgia in the House. She was handily reelected in 1994. The U.S. House election, 1992 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1992 which coincided with the election of Bill Clinton as President. ... Coordinates: County Chatham  - Mayor Otis S. Johnson Area    - City 202. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The U.S. House election, 1994 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1994 which occurred in the middle of President Bill Clintons first term. ...


In 1995 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Miller v. Johnson that the 11th District was an unconstitutional gerrymander because the boundaries were racially discriminatory. McKinney's district was subsequently renumbered the 4th and redrawn to take in almost all of DeKalb County, prompting a response of outrage from McKinney. She asserted that it was a racially-discriminatory ruling, given the fact that the Supreme Court had previously ruled that Texas's 6th District, which is 91 percent white, was constitutional.[2] Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the United... Miller v. ... Constitutionality is the status of a law, procedure, or act being in accordance with the laws or guidelines contained in a constitution. ... Gerrymandering is a controversial form of redistricting in which electoral district or constituency boundaries are manipulated for an electoral advantage. ... The current boundaries of Texas District 6. ...


The new 4th, however, was no less Democratic than the 11th, and McKinney was reelected from this district in 1996, 1998 and 2000 with no substantive opposition. McKinney lost her seat in 2002 after losing the primary election (details below). She regained her seat in 2004, when it was open due to Denise Majette's run for U.S. Senate. In 2006, she was opposed in the Democratic primary by Hank Johnson and John Coyne III. She led the July 18 primary, with Johnson coming in second, but the race continued to an August 8 runoff, because no candidate received 50 percent of the votes cast.[1] McKinney lost the primary election runoff 59 percent to 41 percent to Johnson on August 8, 2006: Hank Johnson 41,178 59% Cynthia McKinney 28,832 41%.[3] The U.S. House election, 1996 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1996 which coincided with the re-election of Bill Clinton as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1998 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1998 which occurred in the middle of President Bill Clintons second term. ... The U.S. House election, 2000 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 2000 which coincided with the election of George W. Bush as President. ... Denise Majette Denise L. Majette (born May 18, 1955) is a Democratic U.S. politician from the state of Georgia. ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ...


Honors and recognition

McKinney has been featured in a full-length motion picture titled American Blackout. On April 14, 2006, she received the key to the city of Sarasota, Florida and was doubly honored when the city named April 8 as "Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney Day" in Sarasota. American Blackout is a documentary film that premiered at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival. ... Freedom of the City is an award made by towns and cities, to esteemed members of its community; such people may then be termed Freemen or Freewomen of the City. ... Cà dZan - a 1925 Sarasota residence that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places Sarasota is a city in the central west coast of Florida, USA. Sarasota Bay and several barrier islands facing the Gulf of Mexico are within its city limits. ...


On June 14, 2000, Rep. McKinney was honored when part of Memorial Drive, a major thoroughfare running through her district, was renamed "Cynthia McKinney Parkway," but the naming has come under scrutiny since her primary defeat in 2006. Memorial Drive leads from south Atlanta to Stone Mountain. Her father had previously been honored when a portion of Interstate 285 in Atlanta was dedicated as "Billy McKinney Parkway." Stone Mountain Close up of the carving Stone Mountain is a granite dome located in Stone Mountain, Georgia, a suburb of Atlanta. ...


2002 Primary defeat

In 2002, McKinney was defeated in the Democratic primary by DeKalb County judge Denise Majette.[4] It was stunning by itself that Majette, who had never run in a partisan contest before, was able to unseat the seemingly entrenched McKinney. However, Majette won by an overwhelming margin, garnering 58% of the vote to McKinney's 42%. A primary election is an election in which voters in a jurisdiction select candidates for a subsequent election (nominating primary). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Denise Majette Denise L. Majette (born May 18, 1955) is a Democratic U.S. politician from the state of Georgia. ...


McKinney protested the result in court, claiming that thousands of Republicans, knowing they had no realistic chance of defeating her in November, had participated in the Democratic primary to vote against McKinney in revenge for her anti-Bush administration views and allegations of possible voter fraud in Florida in the 2000 Presidential Election. Like 20 other states, Georgia operates an open primary: voters do not claim a political party when they register to vote, and may participate in whichever party's primary election they choose. Thus, relying on the Supreme Court's decision in California Democratic Party v. Jones, which had held that California's blanket primary violated the First Amendment (despite the fact that the Court explicitly differentiated - albeit in dicta - the blanket primary from the open primary in Jones), on McKinney's behalf, five voters claimed that the open primary system was unconstitutional, operating in violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, the associational right protected by the First Amendment, and various statutory rights protected by §2 of the Voting Rights Act.[2] The Republican Party is a one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Democratic Party. ... An Open Primary is a type of direct primary open to voters regardless of their party affiliation. ... // Political scientists have developed concepts of different ideal types of political parties in order to better compare them with each other. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- California Democratic Party v. ... In United States politics, the blanket primary was a system used for selecting party candidates in a primary election. ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... The words inscribed above the entrance to the U.S. Supreme Court are: Equal justice under law The Equal Protection Clause, part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, provides that no state shall… deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. ... The Fourteenth Amendment may refer to the: Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution - contains the due process and equal protection clauses. ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... The National Voting Rights Act of 1965 ()[1] outlawed the requirement that would-be voters in the United States take literacy tests to qualify to register to vote, and it provided for federal registration of voters in areas that had less than 50% of eligible minority voters registered. ...


The district court dismissed the case, noting that the plaintiffs had presented no evidence in support of the Equal Protection and VRA claims, and lacked standing to bring the First Amendment claim. It interpreted the Supreme Court's Jones ruling to hold that the right to association involved in a dispute over a primary - and thus, standing to sue - belongs to a political party, not an individual voter. On appeal, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals upheld this result (Osburn v. Cox, 369 F.3d 1283 (2004)) in May 2004, noting that not only were the plaintiffs' claims meritless, but the remedy they requested would likely be unconstitutional under the Supreme Court's decision in Tashjian v. Republican Party of Connecticut. On October 18, 2004, the Supreme Court brought an end to the litigation, denying certiorari without comment (Osburn v. Georgia, 04-217) (cert denied, 541 U.S. __).[3] 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 18 is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This law-related article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Other factors in her defeat were her controversial statements regarding 9/11,[5] her reported support of Palestinian causes and her condemnation of human rights abuses against Palestians by Israel.[citation needed] Indeed, many pro-Israel lobbying groups donated money to Majette during the primary.[citation needed] On the night before the primary election, McKinney's father stated on Atlanta television that "Jews have bought everyone ... J-E-W-S" in the election, presumably referring to AIPAC involvement in orchestrating the "erase Cynthia" campaign.[6] The 9/11 Truth Movement is a collection of individuals, researchers and groups who question the governmental, mainstream scientific and media accounts of the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... U.S. President George W. Bush addresses AIPAC members in Washington on May 18, 2004. ...


Between terms

McKinney wrote in CounterPunch on September 13, 2002 that Judge Joe Brown told the Congressional Black Caucus unequivocally that the "murder rifle" was not the weapon that killed Dr. Martin Luther King.[7] Counterpunch can refer to: In traditional typography, a counterpunch is a type of punch used to create the negative space in or around a character. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Joe Brown Joe Brown, (b. ... The Congressional Black Caucus is an organization representing African American members of the Congress of the United States. ... The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr, Ph. ...


McKinney traveled widely as a public speaker during her term out of office.

Cynthia McKinney in 2006
Cynthia McKinney in 2006

Throughout 2003 and 2004, McKinney toured America and much of Europe speaking of her defeat, her opposition to the Iraq War, and the Bush administration. In a January 2004 issue of Jet magazine, McKinney said that the "white, rich Democratic boys club wanted her to stay in the back of the bus." Image File history File links CynthiaMcKinneycrop2006. ... Image File history File links CynthiaMcKinneycrop2006. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


On September 9, 2004, McKinney participated as a Commissioner in the The Citizens' Commission on 9-11. On October 26, 2004, she was among 100 prominent Americans and 40 family members of those killed on 9/11 who signed the 9/11 Truth Movement statement, calling for new investigations of what they perceived as unexplained aspects of the 9/11 events.[8] September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rep. ... The 9/11 Truth Movement is a collection of individuals, researchers and groups who question the governmental, mainstream scientific and media accounts of the September 11, 2001 attacks. ...


Speculation suggested that she was considering a run as the Green Party's nominee for the 2004 presidential election. However, she had made no secret of her desire to win back her old congressional seat, and turned down the Green Party nomination. In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... Presidential election results map. ...


2004 return to Congress

Majette declined to run for reelection to the House, opting instead to become a candidate to replace retiring Senator Zell Miller, a conservative Democrat. McKinney instantly became the favorite in the Democratic primary. Since it was taken for granted that whoever won the Democratic primary would be the district's next congressman, McKinney's opponents focused on clearing the field for a single candidate who could force her into a runoff election. They apparently hoped in the interim to drive up McKinney's negatives enough to make it easier to defeat her in the runoff. Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... Zell Bryan Miller (born February 24, 1932) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... Runoff voting is a voting system used in single-seat elections. ...


However, her opponents' efforts were unsuccessful, and five candidates entered the Democratic primary. As a result of the fragmented primary opposition, McKinney won just enough votes to avoid a runoff. This all but assured her return to Congress after a two-year absence. However, in a break from traditional practice, the House Democratic Caucus did not restore her seniority. If her seniority had been restored, McKinney would have been a senior Democrat as ranking member of the International Relations Committee. Instead, that post went to Tom Lantos of California. The House Democratic Caucus, nominates and elects the Democratic Party leadership in the United States House of Representatives. ... Tom Lantos Thomas Peter Lantos (born February 1, 1928 as Lantos Tamás Péter) has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1981, representing Californias 12th congressional district, located just south of San Francisco. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


McKinney hosted the first delegation of Afro-Latinos from Central and South America and worked with the World Bank and the U.S. State Department to recognize Afro-Latinos. She stood with Aboriginals against Australian mining companies; and with the U'wa people of Colombia in their fight to save their sacred land from oil rigs. Indigenous Australians or Aborigines[1][2] are the first human inhabitants of the Australian continent and its nearby islands. ... The Uwa people (also known as the Tunebo people) are an indigenous people living in the cloudforests of northeast Colombia. ...


9/11 commission and government secrecy issues

Initially, McKinney kept a low profile upon her return to Congress. However, on July 22, 2005, the first anniversary of the release of the 9/11 Commission Report, McKinney held a well-attended congressional briefing on Capitol Hill to address outstanding issues regarding the September 11, 2001, attacks.[9] The day-long briefing featured family members of victims, scholars, former intelligence officers and others who critiqued the 9/11 Commission account of 9/11 and its recommendations. The four morning panels purported to address flaws, omissions, and the lack of historical and political analysis in the commission's report. Three afternoon panels critiqued the commission's recommendations in the areas of foreign and domestic policy, and intelligence reform. An Atlanta Journal-Constitution editorial maintained that the purpose of the event was to discuss whether or not the Bush administration was involved in the 9/11 attacks, expressing surprise that McKinney was once again taking on the issue which was widely believed to have been the one that cost her House seat. The Journal-Constitution refused to publish McKinney's reply.[10] July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The cover of the final 9/11 report, which can be purchased in bookstores across the United States and around the world The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks, including preparedness for and the immediate response... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ...


McKinney's interest in 9/11 relates specifically to what she expresses as her opposition to excessive government secrecy. She has submitted to Congress two versions of the same bill, the "MLK Records Act" (one in 2003, the other in 2005,) which, if signed into law, would release all currently sealed files concerning the 1968 assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr..[11] These records were sealed in 1978 and are not due to be declassified until the year 2028. Likewise, the 9/11 Commission has sealed all the notes and transcripts of some 2,000 interviews, all the forensic evidence, and both classified and non-classified documents used in compiling its final report until January, 2009. Documents relating to the death of rapper Tupac Shakur, which McKinney has taken an active interest in, would be released under another bill introduced by Rep. McKinney. In a statement, McKinney explained her reason for the bill: "The public has the right to know because he was a well-known figure. There is intense public interest in the life and death of Tupac Shakur." Critics assert she is merely pandering to her power base. Others point out that legislation demanding release of records is a more direct route than the tedious process and limited scope of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Tupac Amaru Shakur (June 16, 1971 – September 13, 1996), also known by his stage names 2Pac, Makaveli, or simply as Pac, was an American artist renowned for his rap music, movie roles, poetry, and his social activism. ... Nearly sixty countries around the world have implemented some form of freedom of information legislation, which sets rules on governmental secrecy. ...


On March 24, 2005, she held a talk with Rumsfeld and others regarding 9/11 and other issues.[12]


Hurricane Katrina

McKinney has been an advocate for victims of Hurricane Katrina and a critic of the government's response. Over 100,000 evacuees from New Orleans and Mississippi relocated to the Atlanta area, and many have now settled there. Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Representative McKinney was the only member of Congress to participate in a march across the Crescent City Connection Bridge on November 7, 2005 to protest what had happened on that bridge in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. During the Katrina crisis, evacuees were turned away by the Gretna Police when they attempted to cross the Crescent City Connection Bridge between New Orleans and Gretna, Louisiana. [4] Seeking justice for the affected survivors, McKinney introduced a bill [5], on November 2, 2005, that would temporarily deny federal assistance to the City of Gretna Police Department, the Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office, and the Crescent City Connection Division Police Department, in the state of Louisiana. The bill was referred to the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security, but was not acted on. However, in August 2006, a grand jury began an investigation of the incident [6]. New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... The city of Gretna is the parish seat of Jefferson Parish, in the US state of Louisiana. ...


Despite the Democratic Party leadership's call for a boycott, McKinney was an active participant in the Select Bipartisan Committee to Investigate the Preparation for and Response to Hurricane Katrina.[13] She sat as a guest along with only a few other Democrats. In questioning Department of Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, McKinney referred to a news story in which the owners of a nursing home were charged with negligent homicide for abandoning 34 clients who died in the flood waters. McKinney asked Chertoff: "Mr. Secretary, if the nursing home owners are arrested for negligent homicide, why shouldn't you also be arrested for negligent homicide?"[14] Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Michael Chertoff (born November 28, 1953) is the current United States Secretary of Homeland Security. ...


The Congressional Black Caucus' Omnibus Bill (HR 4197) was introduced on November 2, 2005 to provide a comprehensive response to the Gulf Coast residents affected by Hurricane Katrina. The second title of the bill was submitted by McKinney, seeking Comprehensive Environmental Sampling and Toxicity Assessment Plan, or CESTAP, to minimize harm to Gulf Coast residents from the toxic releases into the environment caused by the hurricane.[15] Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ...


At the request of McKinney's efforts, the Select Bipartisan Committee to Investigate the Preparation for and Response to Hurricane Katrina, chaired by Thomas M. Davis held a previously unscheduled hearing titled "Voices Inside the Storm" on December 6, 2005. Thomas M. Tom Davis III (born January 5, 1949 in Minot, North Dakota) is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the Eleventh Congressional District of Virginia (map) in Northern Virginia. ...


More recently, Rep. McKinney along with Rep. Barbara Lee (CA), produced a "Katrina Legislative Summary," a chart summarizing House and Senate bills on Hurricane Katrina. On June 13, 2006, McKinney pointed out on the House Floor that only a dozen of the 176 Katrina bills identified on the chart had passed into law, leaving 163 bills stalled in committee. Barbara Lee Barbara Lee (born July 16, 1946), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1998, representing the 9th District of California (map). ...


Anti-war and human rights efforts

Until 2000, McKinney served on the House International Relations Committee, where she was the highest-ranking Democrat on the Human Rights Subcommittee. McKinney felt that it was important that US policy reflect a deep respect for human rights, so she worked on legislation to stop conventional weapons transfers to governments which are undemocratic or fail to respect human rights. Her legislation to end the mining of coltan in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo was mentioned in the United Nations Security Council's "Special Report on Ituri," January 2002-December 2003. Coltan is the colloquial African name for (columbite-tantalite), a metallic ore comprising Niobium and Tantalum. ... The United Nations Security Council (UNSC) is the organ of the United Nations charged with maintaining peace and security among nations. ...


On November 18, 2005, McKinney was one of only three House members (out of 406) to vote for H.R. 571, introduced by House Armed Services Committee chairman Duncan Hunter, Chairman of the Armed Services Committee, on which McKinney sat. Hunter, a Republican, offered this resolution calling for an immediate withdrawal of U.S. forces in Iraq in place of John Murtha's H.J.Res. 73, which called for redeployment "at the earliest possible date." In her prepared statement, McKinney accused the Republicans of "trying to set a trap for the Democrats. A 'no' vote for this Resolution will obscure the fact that there is strong support for withdrawal of US forces from Iraq ... In voting for this bill, let me be perfectly clear that I am not saying the United States should exit Iraq without a plan. I agree with Mr. Murtha that security and stability in Iraq should be pursued through diplomacy. I simply want to vote 'yes' to an orderly withdrawal from Iraq." The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services, commonly known as the House Armed Services Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. ... Duncan Lee Hunter (born May 31, 1948), American politician, has been a Republican member of the House of Representatives since 1981 from Californias 52nd congressional district in northern and eastern San Diego. ... John Patrick “Jack” Murtha, Jr. ...


Sponsored legislation

At the end of the 2006 legislative session, McKinney introduced largely symbolic legislation for articles of impeachment against President Bush. In the bill, she accused Bush of misleading Congress on the war in Iraq and violating privacy laws with his domestic spying program. McKinney had long maintained that Bush was illegitimately elected and had lied about 9/11 in order for him to allow his friends to personally profit from the attack.Breitbart News Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... President Bush can refer to: George H. W. Bush (born 1924), the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993) and father of George W. Bush George W. Bush (born 1946), the 43rd President of the United States (2001–) and son of George H. W. Bush Category: ... The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ...


The Capitol Police incident

On the morning of March 29, 2006, McKinney entered the Longworth House Office Building's southeast entrance and proceeded past the security checkpoint, walking around the metal detector. Members of Congress have identifying lapel pins and are not required to pass through metal detectors. The officers present failed to recognize her as a Member of Congress because she was not wearing the appropriate lapel pin.[16] She proceeded westward down the ground floor hallway, and about halfway down the hallway was grabbed by United States Capitol Police officer Paul McKenna, who states that he had been calling after her "Ma'am, Ma'am!" Two days later, Office McKenna filed a police report claiming that McKinney had struck "hist chest with a closed fist." March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Longworth House Office Building The Longworth House Office Building (LHOB) is one of three office buildings used by the United States House of Representatives. ...


In the midst of a media frenzy, McKinney made an [apology http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/04/06/mckinney/] on the floor of the House of Representatives on April 6, 2006, neither admitting to nor denying the charge, stating only that: "There should not have been any physical contact in this incident."


Though not indicted for criminal charges or subjected to disciplinary action by the House, the president of the Fraternal Order of Police has advocated the filing of a civil suit by Officer McKenna.[17] The Fraternal Order of Police is a fraternal organization for sworn police officers. ...


For more on this incident, go to: March 29, 2006 Capitol Hill Police Incident. On March 29, 2005, in a hallway of the Longworth House Office Building, Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney of Georgia was stopped by a Capitol Hill Police Officer who did not recognize he as a Member of Congress. ...


Other controversies

Cynthia McKinney has been involved in controversies before. In the wake of the March 29 incident with the Capitol Police officer, Rep. McKinney was still very much "in the news" and her office invited the media to attend one of her monthly "District Days," where she spends one full day meeting with constituents to discuss issues of concern. At her April 23, 2006, "District Days" event, Rep. McKinney was being interviewed by WGCL's Renee Starzyk, who rather than asking questions about District Days as McKinney would have liked, repeatedly questioned her about the March 29 scuffle with a Capitol Police officer. Frustrated, McKinney stood up, and forgot she was still wearing the microphone. Her off screen comments were captured on tape. She was heard saying, "Oh, crap, now you know what ... they lied to Coz and Coz is a fool."[18] She was referring to one of her aides, Coz Carson. McKinney realized the embarrassing mistake and returned on screen with the microphone, this time with instructions on what parts of the interview CBS 46 was allowed to use, "anything that is captured by your audio ... that is captured while I'm not seated in this chair is off the record and is not permissible to be used ... is that understood?"[19] Her comments were immediately aired on CBS and eventually across the nation: CNN video Link to video: McKinney Caught On-Air Blasting Aide.


In a 2002 interview on Pacifica Radio McKinney questioned the Bush administration's possible prior knowledge of the September 11, 2001 attacks:[20] Pacifica Radio Network. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...

We know there were numerous warnings of the events to come on September 11 ... Those engaged in unusual stock trades immediately before September 11 knew enough to make millions of dollars from United and American airlines, certain insurance and brokerage firms' stocks. What did the Administration know, and when did it know it about the events of September 11? Who else knew and why did they not warn the innocent people of New York who were needlessly murdered?

– "Flashpoints" with Dennis Bernstein, KFPA Pacifica Radio

These remarks provoked criticism, and many Democrats distanced themselves from McKinney's statements. On April 12, 2002, McKinney issued a statement saying that "I am not aware of any evidence showing that President Bush or members of his administration have personally profited from the attacks of 9-11. A complete investigation might reveal this to be the case." April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


In a controversial remark, McKinney said that on September 13, 2002, Judge Joe Brown had stated unequivocally that the purported murder rifle was not the weapon that killed Dr. Martin Luther King.[21] September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Joe Brown Joe Brown, (b. ...


On October 12, 2001 (approximately the one-month anniversary of the September 11 attacks), McKinney sent a letter to Saudi Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal that was highly critical of the way Israel responds to terrorist attacks, and was not critical of the terrorist attacks upon Israel. [7] McKinney further suggested that the money that the prince donated for 9/11 relief that had been rejected by Rudolph Giuliani be redirected toward charities chosen by McKinney. McKinney's supporters say the letter was appropriate; her critics describe it as "fawning" and "disgraceful." HRH Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal bin Abdul Aziz Al-Saud, (born, March 7, 1955) (Arabic: الوليد بن طلال بن عبد العزيز آل سعود) commonly known as Prince Al-Waleed, is a member of the Saudi Royal Family, an entrepreneur and international investor. ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III, KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ...


During the 2000 presidential campaign, McKinney wrote that "Al Gore's Negro tolerance level has never been too high. I've never known him to have more than one black person around him at any given time." The Gore campaign pointed out, however, that his campaign manager was black.[22] Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... // Negro means black in Spanish and Portuguese (Latin: niger = black). It is an ethnic term applied to people of African origin; some people consider it either archaic or a slur (see also nigger) except for its inclusion in the names of some organizations founded when the term had currency, e. ...


2006 primary and primary runoff

McKinney finished first in the July 18, 2006 Democratic primary, edging DeKalb County Commissioner Hank Johnson 47.1% to 44.4%, with a third candidate receiving 8.5%.[23] However, since McKinney failed to get at least 50% of the vote, she and Johnson were forced into a run-off. McKinney had been heavily favored to win, so her narrow margin surprised observers. Johnson picked up support because he seemed to have a real possibility of winning. The Georgia 4th congressional district election, 2006 is an election for the United States House of Representatives. ... Henry “Hank” Johnson Jr. ...


In the runoff of August 8, 2006, although there were about 8,000 more voters than in the primary, McKinney received about the same number of votes as in July. Johnson won with 41,178 votes (59%) to McKinney's 28,832 (41%).[24] According to CNN, during her concession speech, McKinney barely mentioned her opponent but praised the leaders of Cuba and Venezuela [taken to be Fidel Castro and Hugo Chávez], took aim at the efficacy of electronic voting machines and offered several swipes at the media.[25] Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías (IPA: ) (born July 28, 1954) is the current President of Venezuela. ...


McKinney's 2002 campaign and statements had been characterized by some as anti-Semitic,[26][27][28][29][30] and controversy erupted again when one of her "supporters" blamed "Jews" for her defeat.[31] McKinney maintains that she opposes anti-Semitism and responded to the controversy with this statement:

"The people who made those remarks were not associated with my campaign in any formal way, and I want to make clear from this hour that any informal ties between me and my campaign and anyone holding or espousing such views are cut and renounced."

McKinney added, "Anyone who makes blanket denunciations of Jews or "the Jew" is certainly not a supporter of mine, not a staff member, not a consultant to, nor is welcome to be a volunteer in my campaign," despite a similar statement by her father in the past.[32]


2008 Green Party speculation

Once again, Cynthia McKinney is being mentioned among Green Party circles as a potential candidate in 2008. Green Party members attempted to recruit McKinney both in 2000 and 2004. In 2000, she was widely mentioned as a possible running mate (in the VP slot) for Ralph Nader; in 2004 attempts were made to convince McKinney to run on the Green Party ballot line for president. While there had been a great deal of excitement amongst party members concerning a possible McKinney run in those prior elections, the congresswoman had little to do with the party outside of Green Party loyalists working on her Democratic congressional campaigns. This changed drastically following her defeat in the 2006 election. McKinney recently attended the California Green Party strategy retreat in Sonoma, California where she was the keynote speaker [8] Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934), is an American attorney and political activist. ...


References

  1. ^ "Democrat U.S. House District 4", WSBTV Action News 2 Atlanta, 2006-08-08. Retrieved on 2006-08-08. (in English)
  2. ^ Jim Lehrer. "The NewsHour, Politics of Race.", PBS, 9 December 1996.
  3. ^ "Democrat U.S. House District 4", WSBTV Action News 2 Atlanta, 2006-08-08. Retrieved on 2006-08-08. (in English)
  4. ^ "Barr, McKinney lose in Georgia primaries", CNN.
  5. ^ "Lessons from Rep. Cynthia McKinney's defeat, by Michael Barone", U.S. News and World Report., 29 August 2002.
  6. ^ "Lessons from Rep. Cynthia McKinney's defeat, by Michael Barone", U.S. News and World Report., 29 August 2002.
  7. ^ http://www.counterpunch.org/mckinney0918.html
  8. ^ http://www.911truth.org/article.php?story=20041026093059633
  9. ^ "Press Release", Office of Rep. Cynthia McKinney, 22 July 2005.
  10. ^ Cynthia McKinney. "The 9/11 Commission Report One Year Later: A Citizens' Response – Did They Get it Right?", NOWAR/PAIX., 9 August 2005.
  11. ^ "Martin Luther King, Jr., Records Collection Act of 2005", Government Printing Office, 23 May 2005.
  12. ^ http://www.prisonplanet.com/video/McKinney2.rm
  13. ^ "A Failure of Initiative: The Final Report of the Select Bipartisan Committee to Investigate the Preparation for and Response to Hurricane Katrina", U.S. House of Representatives, 15 February 2006.
  14. ^ "McKinney Roils Panel", Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 20 October 2005.
  15. ^ "Hurricane Katrina Recovery, Reclamation, Restoration, Reconstruction and Reunion Act of 2005", Government Printing Office, 2 November 2005.
  16. ^ "Rep. McKinney Punches Cop", WXIA-TV ATLANTA, 30 March 2006.
  17. ^ "Officer Considers Lawsuit Against McKinney", WSBTV ATLANTA.
  18. ^ "Station catches McKinney bad-mouthing staffer", The Associated Press.
  19. ^ "McKinney Caught On-Air Blasting Aide", CBS.
  20. ^ "Interview with Dennis Bernstein. Flashpoints", Pacifica Radio. KPFA, Berkeley, California., 25 March 2002.
  21. ^ "Goodbye to All That, by Cynthia McKinney", CounterPunch., 12 September 2002.
  22. ^ Chris Suellentrop. "Cynthia McKinney - The rep who cries racism", Slate.com, 19 April 2002.
  23. ^ "Georgia Election Results: Official Results of the July 18, 2006 Primary Election", Georgia Secretary of State, 2006-07-16. Retrieved on 2006-08-08. (in English)
  24. ^ "Democrat U.S. House District 4", WSBTV Action News 2 Atlanta, 2006-08-08. Retrieved on 2006-08-08. (in English)
  25. ^ http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/08/09/congress.mckinney/
  26. ^ "She also, as The New York Times said in reporting her victory, had made 'a series of other incendiary, often racial comments.' This is The New York Times' delicate way of alluding to the stridently anti-Semitic character of McKinney's 2002 campaign, in which 'Jews' were repeatedly blamed for her faltering in the polls and for her eventual defeat." Alexander, Edward. The Democratic Party's anti-Semitism problem, The Seattle Times, August 9, 2004.
  27. ^ "McKinney ended up losing the Democratic primary in 2002 to Denise Majette. Majette rode to victory largely on the negative publicity that flowed McKinney's way both when the 'Bush KNEW' accusation made national news and when her anti-Semitic and pro-Islamist beliefs were exposed." Preston, Bryan. The Female Michael Moore, National Review Online, July 27, 2004.
  28. ^ "...in the past McKinney has been accused of making anti-Semitic comments during interviews and speeches." Leibowitz, Rebecca. Defeating Anti-Israeli and Anti-Semitic Activity on Campus - A Case Study: Rutgers University, Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, Jewish Political Studies Review 17:1-2 (Spring 2005).
  29. ^ " Representative Cynthia McKinney (D-Georgia) and her supporters have had a long history of anti-Semitic statements." Lasky, Ed. The Europeanization of the Democratic Party, The American Thinker, October 24, 2006.
  30. ^ "A year later, Representative Cynthia McKinney, a black Georgian Democrat, ran an anti-Semitic campaign against her Jewish opponent." Heineman, Kenneth J. God Is a Conservative: Religion, Politics, and Morality in Contemporary America, New York University Press, p. 234. ISBN 0-8147-3554-1
  31. ^ http://www.adl.org/PresRele/ASUS_12/4869_12.htm
  32. ^ http://www.cynthiaforcongress.com/blog.php?id=50

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... Jim Lehrer James Charles Lehrer (born May 19, 1934) is the news anchor for The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer on PBS. // Lehrer was born in Wichita, Kansas and attended middle school in Beaumont, Texas. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) provides printed (and now electronic) copies of documents produced by and for all federal agencies, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and EPA. Court... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) provides printed (and now electronic) copies of documents produced by and for all federal agencies, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and EPA. Court... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ... Pacifica Radio Network. ... Counterpunch can refer to: In traditional typography, a counterpunch is a type of punch used to create the negative space in or around a character. ... Categories: Magazines stubs | Microsoft subsidiaries | Websites | The Washington Post ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... The Seattle Times is the leading daily newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley Jr. ...

External links

  • Congressmember Cynthia Mckinney Under Fire: A Discussion with Georgia's First African-American Congresswoman - August 12, 2002
  • Progressive Georgia Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney Loses Controversial Primary - August 21, 2002
  • Former U.S. Rep. Cynthia Mckinney Speaks Out On the Unseen Costs of War - April 16, 2003
  • Fmr. Rep. Cynthia McKinney Seeking to Win Back Georgia Seat - July 19, 2004
  • New Orleans Evacuees and Activists Testify at Explosive House Hearing on the Role of Race and Class in Government's Response to Hurricane Katrina - December 9, 2005
  • H.R. 2297 H.R. 2297: To establish the Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area, and for other purposes
  • H. R. 2554 To provide for the expeditious disclosure of records relevant to the life and assassination of Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King, Jr. (pdf version) - May 23, 2005
  • H. R. 4139: To minimize harm to populations impacted by the release of environmental contaminants, hazardous materials or infectious materials in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita by providing for a Comprehensive Environmental Sampling and Toxicity Assessment Plan (CESTAP) to assess and monitor air, water, soil and human populations, and for other purposes. (pdf version) - October 25, 2005
  • H CON 274 (pdf version) Reaffirming the continued importance and applicability of the Posse Comitatus Act - October 25, 2005
  • H. R. 4210: To provide for the expeditious disclosure of records relevant to the life and death of Tupac Amaru Shakur. (pdf version) - November 2, 2005
  • HR 4209 To temporarily deny Federal assistance to the City of Gretna Police Department, the Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office, and the Crescent City Connection Division Police Department in the State of Louisiana for their maltreatment of individuals seeking aid during the Hurricane Katrina crisis, and for other purposes - November 2, 2005
  • McKinney roils hurricane panel - Atlanta Journal Constitution, October 20, 2005
  • McKinney: Republicans seek to silence dissent on Iraq war - Final Call, November 18, 2005
  • Nuclear Plants Safe? Claim is Unsound - Atlanta Journal Constitution, November 24, 2005
  • Congresswoman Not Suing 'Atlanta Journal-Constitution' for Libel
  • Johnson is candidate of common sense
  • Voters can see through McKinney
  • Oil Empire page of Rep. McKinney speeches
  • Cynthia McKinney Accuses Capitol Police of Racial Profiling
  • Capitol police chief faults McKinney for escalating incident (CNN)
  • "The Last Plantation", an interview with four African American Police Officers
Preceded by
District created
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's 11th congressional district

19931997
Succeeded by
John Linder
Preceded by
John Linder
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's 4th congressional district

1997-2003
Succeeded by
Denise Majette
Preceded by
Denise Majette
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's 4th congressional district

20052007
Succeeded by
Hank Johnson

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cynthia McKinney - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2237 words)
Cynthia McKinney's political career began in 1986 when her father, state representative Billy McKinney, submitted her name as a write-in candidate for a state house district.
McKinney angrily responded to the ruling by asserting that it was a racially discriminatory ruling given the fact that the Supreme Court had previously ruled that Texas' 6th district, which is 91 percent white, was constitutional.
McKinney protested the result in court, claiming that Republicans in the mostly-Democratic district had participated in the Democratic primary to vote against McKinney in revenge for her anti-Bush administration views and implied voter fraud.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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