FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Cyclops" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Cyclops
This page is about the mythical creature. For other uses, see Cyclops (disambiguation).
Polyphemus the Cyclops.

In Greek mythology a Cyclops (pronounced IPA: [ˈsaɪkloʊps]), or Kyklops (Greek Κύκλωψ), is a member of a primordial race of giants, each with a single round eye in the middle of its forehead. The plural is Cyclopes (prounounced IPA: [ˈsaɪkloʊpɪs]) or Kyklopes (Greek Κύκλωπες). The name means "round-" or "wheel-eyed". Cyclops has several meanings. ... Image File history File links Polyphemus. ... Image File history File links Polyphemus. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Jack the Giant-Killer by Arthur Rackham. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ...


Hesiod describes one group of cyclopes and Homer describes another. In Hesiod's Theogony, Zeus releases three Cyclopes, the sons of Uranus and Gaia, from the dark pit of Tartarus. They provide Zeus's thunderbolt, Hades' helmet of invisibility, and Poseidon's trident, and the gods use these weapons to defeat the titans. In a famous passages of Homer's Odyssey, the hero Odysseus encounters the Cyclops Polyphemus, the son of Poseidon and a nereid (Thoosa), who lives with his fellow Cyclopes in a distant country. The connection between the two groups has been debated in antiquity and by modern scholars.[1] Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... Theogony (Greek: Θεογονία, theogonia = the birth of God(s)) is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins and genealogies of the gods of the ancient Greeks, composed circa 700 BC. The title of the work comes from the Greek words for god and seed. // Hesiods Theogony is a large-scale... Uranus is the Latinized form of Ouranos (), the Greek word for sky. ... For other uses, see Gaia. ... In classic Greek mythology, below Heaven, Earth, and Pontus is Tartarus, or Tartaros (Greek Τάρταρος, deep place). ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia)) is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ... For the collection of short stories by Michael Shea, see Polyphemus (book). ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... In Greek mythology, Thoosa was a Nereid, and one of Poseidons paramours. ...

Contents

Hesiod's Cyclops

The Cyclops, a 1914 painting by Odilon Redon.
The Cyclops, a 1914 painting by Odilon Redon.

In the Theogony, the Cyclopes—Arges,[2] Brontes, and Steropes —were the sons of Uranus (Sky) and Gaia (Earth). Like their brothers, the Hecatonchires ("hundred-handed ones"), they were primordial sons of Sky and Earth. They were giants with a single eye in the middle of their forehead and a foul disposition. According to Hesiod, they were strong, stubborn, and "abrupt of emotion". Collectively they eventually became synonyms for brute strength and power, and their name was invoked in connection with massive masonry and especially well-crafted weapons. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (814x1033, 242 KB)Photograph of The Cyclops, 1914, by Odilon Redon in the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (814x1033, 242 KB)Photograph of The Cyclops, 1914, by Odilon Redon in the public domain. ... Self portrait, 1880, Musée dOrsay. ... Theogony (Greek: Θεογονία, theogonia = the birth of God(s)) is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins and genealogies of the gods of the ancient Greeks, composed circa 700 BC. The title of the work comes from the Greek words for god and seed. // Hesiods Theogony is a large-scale... In Greek mythology, one of the first generation of Cyclopes, Arges (brightener) was a giant with one eye. ... For the Greek mythological figure Brontes, see Cyclops. ... In Greek mythology, Steropes (flasher) was one of the first generation of Cyclopes (one-eyed giants). ... For other uses, see Uranus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gaia. ... The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheires, were three gargantuan figures of Greek mythology. ... Jack the Giant-Killer by Arthur Rackham. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived...


Uranus, fearing their strength, locked them in Tartarus. Cronus, another son of Uranus and Gaia, later freed the Cyclopes, along with the Hecatonchires, after he had overthrown Uranus. But Cronus then placed them back in Tartarus, where they remained, guarded by the she-dragon Campe, until freed by Zeus. They fashioned thunderbolts for Zeus to use as weapons, and helped him overthrow Cronus and the other Titans. The thunderbolts, which became Zeus' main weapons, were forged by all three Cyclopes: Arges added brightness, Brontes added thunder, and Steropes added lightning. In classic Greek mythology, below Heaven, Earth, and Pontus is Tartarus, or Tartaros (Greek Τάρταρος, deep place). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A female monster in Greek mythology, Campe (crooked) guarded the Hecatonchires and Cyclopes in Tartarus after Cronus imprisoned them there; she was killed by Zeus when he rescued his uncles for help in the Titanomachy. ... In Greek mythology, the Titanomachy, or War of the Titans (Greek: Τιτανομαχία), was the eleven-year series of battles fought between the two races of deities long before the existence of mankind: the Titans, fighting from Mount Othrys, and the Olympians, who would come to reign on Mount Olympus. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ...


These Cyclopes also created Poseidon's trident, Artemis' bow and arrow of moonlight, Apollo's bow and arrow of sun rays, and the helmet of darkness that Hades gave to Perseus on his quest to kill Medusa. According to a hymn of Callimachus,[3] they were Hephaestus' helpers at the forge. The Cyclopes were said to have built the "cyclopean" fortifications at Tiryns and Mycenae in the Peloponnese. The noises proceeding from the heart of volcanoes were attributed to their operations. Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... Moonlight has several meanings: Moonlight is the light that is perceived as coming from the moon. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... For the constellation, see Perseus (constellation); for the Macedonian king, see Perseus of Macedon Perseus with the Head of Medusa Perseus was the son of Danae, the only child of Acrisius king of Argos. ... A relatively modern image of Medusa painted by Arnold Böcklin In Greek mythology, Medusa (Μεδουσα Queen), was a monstrous female character whose gaze could turn people to stone. ... Callimachus (Greek: ; ca. ... This image is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Plan of Tiryns excavations Tiryns (in ancient Greek Τίρυνς and in modern Τίρυνθα) is a Mycenaean archeological site in the Greek nomos of Argolis in the Peloponnese peninsula, some kilometres north of Nauplion. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ...


Apollo slew the Cyclopes in revenge when Zeus killed his son, Asclepius, with a Cyclopes-forged thunderbolt. For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ...


Homer's Cyclopes

The Cyclopes were huge one-eyed monsters that resided on an island with the same name. Commonly, the term "Cyclops" refers to a particular son of Poseidon and Thoosa named Polyphemus who was a Cyclops. Another member of this group of Cyclopes was Telemus, a seer. Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... In Greek mythology, Thoosa was a Nereid, and one of Poseidons paramours. ... For the collection of short stories by Michael Shea, see Polyphemus (book). ... In Greek mythology, Telemus (or Telemos) was a prophet, and the son of Eurymus. ...


Polyphemus

In Book 9 of Homer's Odyssey, a scouting party led by Odysseus lands on the Island of the Cyclopes and discovers a large cave. They enter into the cave and feast on food they find there. This cave is the home of Polyphemus, who soon returns. Odysseus and his crew attempt to befriend him in the cave, but he traps them instead. He proceeds to eat several crew members, but Odysseus devises a cunning plan for escape. For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia)) is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ... For the collection of short stories by Michael Shea, see Polyphemus (book). ...


To make Polyphemus unwary, Odysseus gives him a skin of very strong, unwatered wine. When Polyphemus asks for Odysseus' name, he tells him that it is 'Outis', Greek for 'no man' or 'nobody'. Once the giant falls asleep drunk, Odysseus and his men take the spit from the fire and drive it through Polyphemus' only eye. Polyphemus' cries of help are answered by the others of his race; however, they turn away from aiding him when they hear that "Nobody" is the cause of his woes. For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ...


In the morning, Odysseus ties his men and himself to the undersides of Polyphemus' sheep. When the Cyclops lets the sheep out to graze, the men are carried out. Since Polyphemus has been blinded, he doesn't see the men, but feels the tops of his sheep to make sure the men aren't riding them. As he sailed away, Odysseus shouts "Cyclops, when your father asks who took your eye, tell him that it was Odysseus, Sacker of Cities, Destroyer of Troy, son of Laertes, and King of Ithaca," which proves to be a catastrophic example of hubris. Now knowing his attacker's name, Polyphemus asks his father Poseidon to prevent Odysseus from returning home to Ithaca, or to at least deprive him of his ship and crew. Hubris or hybris (Greek ), according to its modern usage, is exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride), often resulting in fatal retribution. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... For other places or objects named Ithaca, see Ithaca (disambiguation). ...


This tale from the Odyssey is more humorously told in the only surviving satyr play, entitled Cyclops by Euripides. Papposilenus playing the crotals, theatrical type of the satyr play, Louvre Satyr plays were an ancient Greek form of tragicomedy, similar to the modern-day burlesque style. ... The Cyclops is an Ancient Greek satyr play by Euripides, the only complete satyr play that has survived. ... A statue of Euripides. ...


The Sicilian Greek poet Theocritus wrote two poems circa 275 BC concerning Polyphemus' desire for Galatea, a sea nymph. When Galatea instead was with Acis, a Sicilian mortal, a jealous Polyphemus killed him with a boulder. Galatea turned Acis' blood into a river of the same name in Sicily. Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Theocritus (Greek Θεόκριτος), the creator of ancient Greek bucolic poetry, flourished in the 3rd century BC. Little is known of him beyond what can be inferred from his writings. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC Years: 280 BC 279 BC 278 BC 277 BC 276 BC - 275 BC - 274 BC 273 BC... Galatea (she who is milk-white) was the name of two figures in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... For other uses, see ACIS (disambiguation). ...


Origins

Walter Burkert among others suggests[4] that the archaic groups or societies of lesser gods mirror real cult associations: "it may be surmised that smith guilds lie behind Cabeiri, Idaian Dactyloi, Telchines, and Cyclopes." Given their penchant for blacksmithing, many scholars believe the legend of the Cyclopes' single eye arose from an actual practice of blacksmiths wearing an eyepatch over one eye to prevent flying sparks from blinding them in both eyes. The Cyclopes seen in Homer's Odyssey are of a different type from those in the Theogony; they were most likely much later additions to the pantheon and have no connection to blacksmithing. It is possible that legends associated with Polyphemus did not make him a Cyclops before Homer's Odyssey; Polyphemus may have been some sort of local daemon or monster originally. Walter Burkert (born Neuendettelsau (Bavaria), February 2, 1931), the most eminent living scholar of Greek myth and cult, is an emeritus professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland who has also taught in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Cabeiri in Greek mythology, were a group of minor deities, of whose character and worship nothing certain is known. ... Dactyl may mean: A dactyl, a creature in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Telchines were the original inhabitants of the island of Rhodes, and were known in Crete and Cyprus. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia)) is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ... The term Daemon has several meanings: Daemon (mythology) - see also Demon Daemon (computer software), a background process Dæmon (His Dark Materials) in the Philip Pullman trilogy of novels His Dark Materials Daemon (Warhammer) Daemon (Warcraft) Daemon Sadi (SaDiablo) is a character in the Black Jewels Trilogy by Anne Bishop. ...


Another possible origin for the Cyclops legend is that prehistoric dwarf elephant skulls - about twice the size of a human skull - were found by the Greeks on Crete and Sicily. Due to the large central nasal cavity (for the trunk) in the skull, it might have been believed that this was a large, single, eye-socket. The smaller, actual, eye-sockets are on the sides and, being very shallow, hardly noticeable as such. Given the paucity of experience that the locals likely had with living elephants, they were unlikely to recognize the skull for what it actually was.[5] Dwarf elephants are prehistoric members of the order Proboscidea, that, through the process of allopatric speciation, evolved to a fraction of the size of their modern relatives. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Genera and Species Loxodonta Loxodonta cyclotis Loxodonta africana Elephas Elephas maximus Elephas antiquus † Elephas beyeri † Elephas celebensis † Elephas cypriotes † Elephas ekorensis † Elephas falconeri † Elephas iolensis † Elephas planifrons † Elephas platycephalus † Elephas recki † Stegodon † Mammuthus † Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea...


Whilst it is commonly accepted that cyclopes have only one eye, the description of Polyphemus by Homer does not match this. There is a vase showing Odysseus blinding the cyclops with a two-pronged fork: this suggests that it might originally have had two eyes. [6]


Veratrum album, or white hellebore, an herbal medicine described by Hippocrates before 400 B.C.,[7] contains the alkaloids cyclopamine and jervine, which are teratogens capable of causing cyclopia (holoprosencephaly). Students of Teratology have raised the possibility of a link between this developmental deformity and the myth sharing its name.[8]. Binomial name Veratrum album L. Veratrum album, commonly known as the False Helleborine (but also known as White Hellebore, European White Hellebore, White Veratrum; syn. ... White Hellebore may refer to: Veratrum album Veratrum viride Category: ... For other uses, see Hippocrates (disambiguation). ... Cyclopamine (11-deoxojervine) is naturally-occurring chemical that belongs to the group of steroidal jerveratrum alkaloids. ... Jervine is a steroidal alkaloid, C27H39NO3, derived from the Veratrum plant genus. ... Teratogenesis is a medical term from the Greek, literally meaning monster making. ... Cyclopia, a medical disorder characterized by the fusion of the orbits into a single cavity containing one eye. ... Teratology (from the Greek teras (genitive teratos), meaning monster, and logos meaning study) is the medical study of teratogenesis or grossly deformed individuals. ...


"Cyclopean" walls

Main article: Cyclopean masonry.

After the "Dark Age", when Hellenes looked with awe at the vast dressed blocks, known as Cyclopean structures that had been used in Mycenaean masonry, at sites like Mycenae and Tiryns or on Cyprus, they concluded that only the Cyclopes had the combination of skill and strength to build in such a monumental manner. Cyclopean masonry is a type of stonework found in Mycenaean architecture, built with huge limestone boulders, roughly fitted together with minimal clearance between adjacent stones and no use of mortar. ... Cyclopean structures (Greek: Κυκλώπειες κατασκευές) were constructed during the prehistoric times, using a unique technique: huge stones as the building elements, minimal clearance between adjacent stones and no use of mortar. ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... Plan of Tiryns excavations Tiryns (in ancient Greek Τίρυνς and in modern Τίρυνθα) is a Mycenaean archeological site in the Greek nomos of Argolis in the Peloponnese peninsula, some kilometres north of Nauplion. ...


See also

  • Cyclopean vision, the ability to see with two eyes information that is hidden from each eye alone.
  • Cyclopia, a birth defect that results in a single enlarged eye and other facial abnormalities.

Stereopsis (from stereo meaning solidity, and opsis meaning vision or sight) is the process in visual perception leading to perception of stereoscopic depth. ... Cyclopia, a medical disorder characterized by the fusion of the orbits into a single cavity containing one eye. ...

In popular culture

  • In the fantasy film The Seventh Voyage on Sinbad, a colony of cyclopes inhabit the island of Colosa. They feature prominatly, and are one of the major antagonists. One is blinded and tricked off a cliff, while a second fights a dragon to the death. The cyclopes were created by special effects genious Ray Harryhausen.
  • Based upon the Cyclops concept: In the Masters of the Universe toy franchise, a second wave figure is called Tri-Klops. The figure has a helmet with three large eyes on, one of which faces forwards. The helmet can be rotated for the other eyes to face forwards in turn, and each eye is said to have a different ability. Although standard sized as opposed to being a giant, Tri-Klops is sometimes displayed to have advanced strength. The character also appears in the Filmation cartoon series, although is one of the lesser used characters, only appearing in a handful of episodes.
  • In the second series of the original Garbage Pail Kids sticker sets, card 44a is of a giant one-eyed baby named 'Sy Clops'. His "alias" card (cards which give different names but otherwise use the same artwork), 44b, is called 'One-Eyed Jack'. The sticker also was adapted for a number of spin-off and overseas releases.
  • The loosely Greek myth-based television series Hercules: The Legendary Journeys, and its spin-off series Xena: Warrior Princess, occasionally feature Cyclops characters. One of the most notable instances is in the second regular episode of Hercules, "Eye of the Beholder", where Hercules must stop a Cyclops who is being manipulated into terrorizing a village. "Sins of the Past", the first episode of Xena, also features a Cyclops, whom Xena blinded in a previous (unseen) encounter. In these series, the Cyclops are portrayed as having a standard sized eye, just above where their regular eyes would be, and have protruding foreheads.
  • In the animated series Futurama, the character of Leela has one large eye instead of two normal eyes. At the beginning of the series, she believes she is the last member of an unknown alien race; later on she learns that she was actually born to mutants who live in the sewers.
  • In the popular Playstation game God of War II, Cyclopi are common enemies, ressembling large troll-like creatures, with very little evidence of intelligence, being easily manipulated and summoned by more advanced enemies. they attack with clubs and bats made from damaged tree trunks. Those found in the Swamp can be Blinded and can have their single eye torn out, the player must collect 20 of these eyes to unlock a secret gift.

Ray Harryhausen, with creations from Clash of the Titans. ... Clash of the titans: He-Man and Skeletor face off on the cover of a vintage MOTU graphic novel. ... Tri-Klops is a character from both Mattels toyline He-Man and the Masters of the Universe and the Filmation animated series of the same name. ... The first Filmation logo. ... He-Man and the Masters of the Universe is an American animated television series produced by Filmation based on Mattels successful toy line Masters of the Universe. ... Garbage Pail Kids is a series of humorous trading cards produced by the Topps Company, originally released in 1985 and designed to parody the Cabbage Patch Kids dolls created by Xavier Roberts, which were immensely popular at the time. ... Hercules: The Legendary Journeys was a television series produced from 1995 to 1999, very loosely based on the tales of the classical culture hero Hercules. ... Xena. ... // Hercules agrees to aid a town terrorized by a Cyclops, but soon learns that the creatures actions may not be entirely unjustified. ... This article is about the television series. ... Turanga Leela (often referred to simply as Leela) (born A.D. 2975) is the primary female character in the animated television series Futurama. ...

Notes

  1. ^ As Robert Mondi says: "Why is there such a discrepancy between the nature of the Homeric Cyclopes and the nature of those found in Hesiod's Theogony? Ancient commentators were so exercised by this problem that they supposed there to be more than one type of Cyclops, and we must agree that, on the surface at least, these two groups could hardly have less in common." (R. Mondi, 1983. "The Homeric Cyclopes: Folktale, Tradition, and Theme," Transactions of the American Philological Association 113 (1983), pp. 17-18.)
  2. ^ Arges was elsewhere called Acmonides (Ovid, Fasti iv. 288), or Pyraemon (Virgil, Aeneid viii. 425).
  3. ^ To Artemis, 46f. See also Virgil's Georgics 4.173 and Aeneid 8.416ff.
  4. ^ Greek Religion,III.3.2
  5. ^ Meet the original Cyclops. Retrieved 18 May 2007.
  6. ^ Vase of Odysseus blinding Polyphemus with a two-pronged fork. Retrieved 18 May 2007.
  7. ^ 1911 Encyclopedia Brittanica, citing Codronchius (Comm.... de elleb., 1610), Castellus (De helleb. epist., 1622), Horace (Sat. ii. 3.80-83, Ep. ad Pis. 300)..
  8. ^ Mutants; On the Form, Varieties and Errors of the Human Body, Armand Marie Leroi,2005,Chapter 3,p.68

For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... Ovids Fasti is a long, unfinished Latin poem by the Roman poet Ovid. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities (1898)
  • Perseus Encyclopedia: Cyclopes
  • Theoi.com: Cyclopes

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Further reading

  • Robert Mondi, "The Homeric Cyclopes: Folktale, Tradition, and Theme" Transactions of the American Philological Association 113 Vol. 113 (1983), pp. 17-38.

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Internet Classics Archive | The Cyclops by Euripides (4620 words)
O horned one, to the fold-keeper of the Cyclops, the country-ranging shepherd.
O Cyclops, by thy sire Poseidon, by mighty Triton and Nereus, by Calypso and the daughters of Nereus, by the sacred billows and all the race of fishes!
Ope wide the portal of thy gaping throat, Cyclops; for strangers' limbs, both boiled and grilled, are ready from off the coals for the to gnaw and tear and mince up small, reclining in thy shaggy goat-skin coat.
Review: Kyocera Cyclops calling and messaging phone - infoSync World (579 words)
The Kyocera Cyclops embraces a fun and youthful style, sporting a pearly white shell with a metallic red stripe down the middle.
The Cyclops does include AIM instant messaging and VAM (Virgin Mobile Audio Messaging), which allows you to record voice memos and send them off to your buddies as if they were text messages.
However, unless your buddies also happen to have a VAM-enabled phone (just the Cyclops for now, although word on the street is that the Kyocera Switch_Back will soon be VAM compatible as well), you're stuck with conventional text messaging.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m