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Encyclopedia > Cy Coleman

Cy Coleman (June 14, 1929 - November 18, 2004) was an American composer, songwriter, and jazz pianist. June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... Jazz is an original American musical art form that originated around the start of the 20th century in New Orleans, rooted in African American musical styles blended with Western music technique and theory. ... Pianist Claudio Arrau, Carnegie Hall, 1954. ...


He was born Seymour Kaufman on June 14, 1929, in New York City to Eastern European Jewish parents, and was raised in the Bronx. His mother was an apartment landlady and father a carpenter. He was a child prodigy who gave piano recitals at Steinway Hall, Town Hall, and Carnegie Hall between the ages of six and nine. Before beginning his fabled Broadway career, he led the Cy Coleman Trio, which made many recordings and was a much-in-demand club attraction. June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi,AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ... A child prodigy, or simply prodigy, is someone who is a master of one or more skills or arts at an early age. ... City Hall is a 1996 film directed by Harold Becker. ... Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 7th Avenue, occupying the east stretch of 7th Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ...


Despite the early classical and jazz success, he decided to build a career in popular music. His first collaborator was Joseph Allen McCarthy (together they have written and composed a song called The Riviera), but his most successful early partnership, albeit a turbulent one, was with Carolyn Leigh. The pair wrote many pop hits, including Witchcraft and The Best Is Yet To Come. Joseph McCarthy was an American songwriter and composer who worked on a number of Hollywood productions spanning a period of 50 years from 1926 to 1976. ... The Riviera is a song written and composed by Cy Coleman and Joseph McCarthy, Jr. ... Carolyn Leigh (born August 21, 1926 New York, NY, died November 19, 1981 New York, NY) was a lyricist and composer for Broadway and movies. ...


One of his instrumentals, "Playboy's Theme," became the signature music of the regular TV shows and specials presented by Playboy magazine, and remains synonymous with the magazine and its creator, Hugh Hefner. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Coleman's winning streak as a Broadway composer began when the team collaborated on Wildcat (1960), which marked the Broadway debut of comedienne Lucille Ball. The score included the hit tune "Hey Look Me Over". When Ball was unable to cope with the rigors of eight performances a week, she left the cast, and the show soon folded. Up next for the two was Little Me, with a book by Neil Simon based on the novel by Patrick Dennis (Auntie Mame). The show introduced Real Live Girl and I've Got Your Number, which became popular standards. Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... The term wildcat or wild cat may refer to several concepts: Wild Cat is a species of cat. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 – April 26, 1989) was an iconic American actress, comedian and star of the landmark sitcom I Love Lucy, a four time Emmy Award winner (awarded 1953, 1956, 1967, 1968) and charter member of the Television Hall of Fame. ... Little Me was the parody confessional self-indulgent autobiography of Belle Poitrine (Pretty Bosom), subtitled The Intimate Memoirs of the Great Star of Stage, Screen and Television, by Patrick Dennis, who had achieved a great success with Auntie Mame. ... Marvin Neil Simon (born July 4, 1927 in The Bronx, New York City), is an American playwright and screenwriter. ... Patrick Dennis (1921 – 1976) was an American author. ... Broadway poster Auntie Mame is a 1955 novel by Patrick Dennis that chronicles his madcap adventures growing up as the ward of his deceased fathers eccentric sister. ...


In 1964, Coleman met Dorothy Fields at a party, and when he asked if she would like to collaborate with him, she is reported to have answered, "Thank God somebody asked". Fields was revitalised by working with the much younger Coleman, and by the contemporary nature of their first project, which was to become Sweet Charity, again with a book by Simon, and starring Gwen Verdon. The show was a major success and Coleman found working with Fields much easier than with Leigh. The partnership was to work on two more shows – an aborted project about Eleanor Roosevelt, and Seesaw which reached Broadway in 1973 after a troubled out-of-town tour. Despite mixed reviews, the show enjoyed a healthy run. The partnership was cut short by Fields' death in 1974. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Dorothy Fields was immortalised on a USPS postage stamp. ... Sweet Charity, based on Federico Fellinis screenplay for Nights of Cabiria, is a 1966 musical show directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse. ... Gwen Evelyn Verdon (January 13, 1925 in Culver City, California – October 18, 2000 in Woodstock, Vermont) was an acclaimed Tony Award winning American dancer and actress. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her stature as First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945 to promote her husbands (Franklin D. Roosevelts) New Deal, as well as Civil Rights. ... Seesaw is a musical comedy based on William Gibsons play, Two for the Seesaw which ran on Broadway in the late 1950s. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


Coleman remained prolific in the late 1970s. He collaborated on I Love My Wife (1977) with Michael Stewart, On The Twentieth Century (1978) with Betty Comden and Adolph Green, and Home Again, Home Again with Barbara Fried, although the latter never reached Broadway. For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Michael Stewart may refer to: Michael Stewart, Baron Stewart of Fulham, a British Cabinet Minister; Michael Stewart (playwright), a playwright and librettist; Michael Stewart (basketball), an NBA basketball player; Michael Stewart (footballer), an association football player. ... On the Twentieth Century, was a Broadway musical with book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, and music by Cy Coleman, directed by Hal Prince. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Comden and Green was the writing duo of Betty Comden and Adolph Green. ... Adolph Green (December 2, 1914 - October 23, 2002) was an American lyricist and playwright, who penned most of his songs, plays, and movies with Betty Comden. ...

Poster for City of Angels
Poster for City of Angels

In 1980, Coleman served as producer and composer for the circus-themed Barnum, which introduced theatergoers to Jim Dale and Glenn Close. Later in the decade, he collaborated on Welcome to the Club (1988) with A.E. Hotchner and City of Angels (1989) with David Zippel. In the latter, inspired by the hard-boiled detective film noir of the 1930s and '40s, he returned to his jazz roots, and the show was a huge critical and commercial success. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Barnum is a theatre musical with music by Cy Coleman, lyrics by Michael Stewart and book by Mark Bramble. ... Jim Dale MBE (born James Smith on August 15, 1935) is a British singer, songwriter, and actor. ... Glenn Close (born March 19, 1947) is a five time Academy Award-nominated American film and stage actress. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The City of Angels Broadway Playbill, courtesy of broadwayman. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ...


The 1990s brought more new Coleman musicals to Broadway: The Will Rogers Follies (1991), again with Comden and Green, The Life (1997), a gritty look at pimps, prostitutes, and assorted other lowlife in the big city, with Ira Gasman, and a revised production of Little Me. Coleman's film scores include Father Goose, The Art of Love, Garbo Talks and Family Business. In addition, he wrote Shirley MacLaine's memorable television specials, If My Friends Could See Me Now and Gypsy in My Soul. 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shirley MacLaine (born Shirley MacLean Beaty April 24, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning American actress, well-known not only for her acting, but for her devotion to her belief in reincarnation. ...


Coleman was on the ASCAP Board of Directors for many years and also served as their Vice Chairman Writer. The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) is an organization known as a collecting society that protects intellectual property, ensuring that music which is broadcast, commercially recorded, or otherwise used for profit, pays a fee to compensate the creators of that music. ...


He died of cardiac arrest on November 18, 2004 at the age of 75. He is survived by his wife, Shelby Coleman and their daughter, Lily Cye Coleman (born in 2000). To the very end, he was part of the Broadway scene - just prior to passing away, he had attended the premiere of Michael Frayn's new play Democracy. One final musical with a Coleman score played in Los Angeles in 2004 under the title Like Jazz, presumably as a Broadway tryout. November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Frayn (born 8 September 1933) is an English playwright and novelist. ...


Awards and nominations

  • 1997 Tony Award Best Book of a Musical The Life (nominee)
  • 1997 Tony Award Best Musical The Life (nominee)
  • 1997 Tony Award Best Original Musical Score The Life (nominee)
  • 1991 Tony Award Best Musical The Will Rogers Follies (winner)
  • 1991 Tony Award Best Original Score The Will Rogers Follies (winner)
  • 1990 Tony Award Best Original Score City of Angels (winner)
  • 1980 Tony Award Best Musical Barnum (nominee)
  • 1980 Tony Award Best Original Score Barnum (nominee)
  • 1978 Tony Award Best Original Score On the Twentieth Century (winner)
  • 1977 Tony Award Best Original Score I Love My Wife (nominee)
  • 1974 Tony Award Best Original Score Seesaw (nominee)
  • 1966 Tony Award Best Composer and Lyricist Sweet Charity (nominee)
  • 1966 Tony Award Best Musical Sweet Charity (nominee)
  • 1963 Tony Award Best Composer and Lyricist Little Me (nominee)
  • 1963 Tony Award Best Musical Little Me (nominee)

He also won three Emmy Awards and two Grammy Awards, was elected to the Songwriter's Hall of Fame, and was the recipient of the Songwriter's Hall of Fame Johnny Mercer Award and The ASCAP Foundation Richard Rodgers Award for Lifetime Achievement in the American Musical Theater. What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... An Emmy Award. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Johnny Mercer John Herndon Johnny Mercer (November 18, 1909 – June 25, 1976) is regarded as one of Americas greatest songwriters. ... An autographed photo of Richard Rodgers Richard Charles Rodgers (June 28, 1902 – December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. He wrote more than 900 published songs, and forty Broadway musicals. ...


External links

  • Find-A-Grave profile for Cy Coleman

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cy Coleman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (912 words)
Cy Coleman (June 14, 1929 - November 18, 2004) was an American composer, songwriter, and jazz pianist.
In 1964, Coleman met Dorothy Fields at a party, and when he asked if she would like to collaborate with him, she is reported to have answered, "Thank God somebody asked".
Coleman was on the ASCAP Board of Directors for many years and also served as their Vice Chairman Writer.
92nd Street Y Gala Honors Cy Coleman (1640 words)
Coleman was also a 92nd Street Y parent, with a daughter enrolled in a variety of 92nd Street Y programs for children.
Cy Coleman was a composer, pianist, orchestrator, arranger, and producer known for versatility and pure love of music.
Cy Coleman was represented on Broadway as producer as well as a composer; he co-produced the triple Tony Award winning musical, Barnum, starring Jim Dale.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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