FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Cutlass" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Cutlass
French naval cutlass of the 19th Century
Enlarge
French naval cutlass of the 19th Century

A cutlass is a short, thick saber or slashing sword, with a straight or slightly curved blade sharpened on the cutting edge, and a hilt often featuring a solid cupped or basket-shaped guard. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2426x1050, 112 KB) Sabre dabordage de la Marine française, XIXe siècle. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2426x1050, 112 KB) Sabre dabordage de la Marine française, XIXe siècle. ... The Saber (spanish/portuguese: knowledge) currency is an educational sectoral currency in Brazil that is handed out by the ministry of education. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A blade is the flat part of a tool or weapon that normally has a cutting edge and/or pointed end typically made of a metal, such as steel used to cut, stab, slice, throw, thrust, or strike. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ... See also: Hilt (band) and Peter Hilt Hilt of Szczerbiec The hilt of a sword is its handle, consisting of a guard, grip and pommel. ...

Contents

Etymology

The word cutlass, recorded in English since 1594, is probably derived from the Italian coltellaccio (pejorative form of coltello, 'knife'), the name of a short, broad-bladed sabre popular in Italy during the 16th century, via the French coutelas, or coutelace, a form of coutel, modern couteau, a knife, from Latin cultellus, diminutive of culter, a ploughshare, or cutting instrument. A soldier armed with it can be called coutillier. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Two variations appear in English: curtelace, where the r represents probably the l of the original Latin word, or is a further variant of the second variation; and curtelaxe, often spelled as two words, curtal axe, where the prefix curtal is confused with various English words derived from the Latin curtus such as curtan, curtal and curtail, which all mean shortened; the word thus wrongly derived was supposed to refer to some non-existent form of battle-axe. In every case the weapon to which these various forms apply is a broad cutting or slashing sword.


History and use

Cutlasses aboard the frigate Grand Turk

Best known as the sailor's weapon of choice, the naval side arm, likely because it was also robust enough to hack through heavy ropes, canvas, and wood. It was also short enough to use in relatively close quarters, such as during boarding actions, in the rigging, or below decks. Another advantage to the cutlass was its simplicity of use. The cutlass required less training than the rapier or small sword, and was more effective as a combat weapon than the full-sized sword. The cutlasses portrayed in films about pirates are usually historically incorrect, often 19th-century weapons that substitute for the backsword and falchion that were actually available to pirates in prior centuries. Download high resolution version (960x1280, 456 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (960x1280, 456 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Grand Turk, at anchor in Oostende, Belgium The Grand Turk is a three-masted 6th rate frigate, well known as the from the TV series Hornblower (and also as the French ship Papillon). ... A sailor is a member of the crew of a ship or boat. ... A side arm is a small personal weapon that is typically worn on the body in a holster in such a way to permit immediate access and use. ... Silver damascened rapier guard, between 1580 and 1600. ... The Smallsword is a sword intermediate in historical period between the rapier and the classical e, ancestor to the modern sporting e. ... This article is about sea pirates. ... 19th century French Navy officer sabre Greek Makhaira Chinese Dao Backsword is a denomination of any type of sword with only one edge, with the back of the sword often being the thickest part of the blade. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


It was also used on land, particularly by cavalrymen such as the Mamelukes, since its curved blade made it useful for slashing combat. In time of peace the Ottoman state supplied no arms, and the janissaries on service in the capital were armed only with clubs; they were forbidden to carry any arm save a cutlass, the only exception being at the frontier-posts. An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for... The Janissaries (or janizaries; in Turkish: Yeniçeri, meaning New Troops) comprised infantry units that formed the Ottoman sultans household troops and bodyguard. ...


A cutlass is as often an agricultural implement and tool, as a weapon (cf. machete, to which the same comment applies), being used commonly in rain forest and sugar cane areas, such as the Caribbean and Central America. Woodsmen and soldiers in the 17th and 18th centuries used a similar short and broad backsword called hanger. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A rainforest is a forested biome with high annual rainfall. ... Species Ref: ITIS 42058 as of 2004-05-05 Sugarcane is one of six species of a tall tropical southeast Asian grass (Family Poaceae) having stout fibrous jointed stalks whose sap at one time was the primary source of sugar. ... World map depicting Caribbean : West Indies redirects here. ... Map of Central America Central America is the central geographic region of the Americas. ... 19th century French Navy officer sabre Greek Makhaira Chinese Dao Backsword is a denomination of any type of sword with only one edge, with the back of the sword often being the thickest part of the blade. ...


According to pirate myth, the cutlass was invented by the Caribbean buccaneers, and was originally a long knife made for cutting meat. As a historical fact, however, this remains dubious. It has been noted that the hey-day of corsairs and pirates was well over before the widespread use of the cutlass. Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Buccaneer is a term that was used in the later 17th century in the Caribbean Islands. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


The last use of a cutlass in a boarding action by the British Royal Navy is recorded as being as late as 1941. The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ...


The cutlass remained an official weapon in the U.S. Navy stores until 1949, though seldom used in training after the early 1930s. The last new model of cutlass adopted by the U.S.Navy was the Model 1917. A cutlass is still carried by the RCPO of recruit divisions at U.S. Navy Recruit Training Command. USN redirects here. ...


The musket was loaded at the barrel and was apox. 1.7m long.


See also

The US Marine Corps OKC-3S Bayonet A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife- or dagger-shaped weapon designed to fit on or over the muzzle of a rifle barrel or similar weapon. ...

Sources and references

(incomplete)

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclop√¶dia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • Etymology OnLine

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cutlass - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (488 words)
A cutlass is a short, thick saber or slashing sword, with a straight or slightly curved blade sharpened on the cutting edge, and a hilt often featuring a solid cupped or basket-shaped guard.
The cutlasses portrayed in films about pirates are usually historically incorrect, often 19th-century weapons that substitute for the backsword and falchion that were actually available to pirates in prior centuries.
The last use of a cutlass in a boarding action by the British Royal Navy is recorded as being as late as 1941.
Cutlass (468 words)
Cutlass cruised on the east coast until 8 January 1940 when she cleared for the Canal Zone.
Except for 3 months of operations in Delaware Bay, Cutlass remained in the Caribbean, based at Cristobal, C.Z. From 23 August to 2 October 1947 she made a cruise down the coast of South America, around Cape Horn, visited Valparaiso, Chile, and returned to the east coast of South America through the Straits of Magellan.
Cutlass left the Canal Zone 6 January 1948 for local operations at Key West, then entered Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in March for overhaul and modernization.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m