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Encyclopedia > Cut and paste
Windows keys for cut and pasting: Control + x (cut), Control + c (copy), Control + v (paste)
Windows keys for cut and pasting: Control + x (cut), Control + c (copy), Control + v (paste)

In human-computer interaction, cut and paste or copy and paste is a user interface paradigm for transferring text, data, files or objects from a source to a destination. Most ubiquitous is the ability to cut and paste sections of plain text. This paradigm is closely associated with graphical user interfaces that use pointing devices. Image File history File linksMetadata Control_cut_copy_paste. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Control_cut_copy_paste. ... Human–computer interaction (HCI) or, alternatively, computer–human interaction (symbolized as Χ χ Chi, the 22nd letter of the Greek alphabet) is the study of interaction between people (users) and computers. ... The user interface is the part of a system exposed to users. ... In Computer Science, data is often distinguished from code, though both are represented in modern computers as binary strings. ... A computer file is a collection of information that is stored in a computer system and can be identified by its full path name. ... In strictly mathematical branches of computer science the term object is used in a purely mathematical sense to refer to any thing. While this interpretation is useful in the discussion of abstract theory, it is not concrete enough to serve as a primitive datatype in the discussion of more concrete... Computer files can be divided into two broad categories: binary and text. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ...


The term cut and paste derives from the traditional practice in manuscript editing in which paragraphs were literally cut from a page with scissors and physically pasted onto another page. This was standard practice as late as the 1960s. Editing scissors with blades long enough to cut an 8-1/2"-wide page were available at stationery stores. The advent of photocopiers made the practice easier and more flexible. 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ...


The cut-and-paste paradigm was widely popularized by Apple in the Lisa (1981) and Macintosh (1984) operating systems and applications. It was mapped to a key combination consisting of a special control key held down while typing the letters X (for cut), C (for copy), and V (for paste). These key combinations were later adopted by Microsoft in Windows. Common User Access (in Windows and OS/2) also uses combinations of the Insert, Del, Shift and Control keys. Some environments allow cutting and pasting with a computer mouse (by drag and drop, for example). Apple Lisa The Apple Lisa was a revolutionary personal computer designed at Apple Computer during the early 1980s. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... A Control key (marked Ctrl) on a modern Windows keyboard In computing, a Control key is a key, which when pressed in conjunction with another key, will perform a special operation. ... The Microsoft Corporation, commonly known as just Microsoft, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual sales of US$44. ... Microsoft Windows is a family of operating systems by Microsoft. ... Common User Access (CUA) is a set of guidelines for the user interface to personal computer operating systems and computer programs, developed by IBM starting in 1987 as part of their Systems Application Architecture. ... The Insert key (often abbreviated to INS) commonly found on keyboards is mostly used to switch between the two main modes of entering text on a computer. ... On full size computer keyboards, the delete key, labelled Del, should, during normal text editing, discard the character at the cursors position, moving all following characters one position back towards the freed place. ... The shift key on a modern Windows keyboard The shift key is a modifier key on a keyboard, used to type capital letters and other alternate upper characters. ... A Control key (marked Ctrl) on a modern Windows keyboard In computing, a Control key is a key, which when pressed in conjunction with another key, will perform a special operation. ... Operating a mechanical 1: Pulling the mouse turns the ball. ... In computer graphical user interfaces, drag-and-drop is the action of (or support for the action of) clicking on a virtual object and dragging it to a different location or onto another virtual object. ...

Contents


Performing cut and pastes

Cut and paste are very frequently performed operations. It is customary to provide several methods for performing them, such as a key combination, a pulldown menu, and a toolbar button. An early toolbar on a Xerox Alto Computer In a graphical user interface on a computer monitor a toolbar is a row, column, or block of onscreen buttons or icons that, when clicked, activate certain functions of the program. ...

  1. The text to be moved is selected by some method, typically by dragging over the text with the pointing device.
  2. A cut operation is performed by key combination, menu, or other means.
  3. The visible effect of the cut is to remove the text immediately from its location.
  4. Conceptually, the text has been moved to a location often called the clipboard. The clipboard is typically invisible. On most systems there is only one location in the clipboard, hence another cut operation overwrites the previously stored information. Multiple clipboard entries are provided by many UNIX text editors and some Windows clipboard manager programs that are available over the Internet.
  5. A location for insertion is selected by some method, typically by clicking at the desired insertion point.
  6. A paste operation is performed which visibly inserts the clipboard text at the insertion point.
  7. The paste operation is nondestructive; the text remains in the clipboard and additional copies can be inserted at other points.

Whereas cut and paste is usually done with a mouse on Windows-like environment, it may also sometimes be done entirely from the keyboard, especially in UNIX text editors, such as Pico or vi. The most common kind of cutting and pasting without a mouse involves the entire current line, but it may also involve text after the cursor until the end of the line and other more sophisticated operations. A clipboard is small, thin board that is typically slightly larger than a pad of standard sheets of paper, with a large (typically metal) clip at the top. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Clipboard manager is a computer program that adds additional functionality to basic clipboard usage. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Notepad is the standard text editor for Microsoft Windows A text editor is a piece of computer software for editing plain text. ... A screenshot of Pico. ... The correct title of this article is vi. ... A typical arrow-like mouse cursor. ...


When cut and paste are provided, a nondestructive operation called copy is usually provided as well; copy places a copy of the selected text in the clipboard without removing it from its original location.


The clipboard is usually not displayed, because the operations of cutting and pasting, while actually independent, are usually performed in quick succession, and the user (usually) needs no assistance in understanding the operation or maintaining mental context.


Copy and paste

Copy-and-paste refers to the popular, simple method of reproducing text or other data from a source to a destination, which is only different from cut and paste in that the original source text or data is not deleted or removed as it is with the latter process. The term text has multiple meanings depending on its context of use: In language, text is a broad term for something that contains words to express something. ... Data is the plural of datum. ...


Copying can be performed on most graphical user interface systems using the key combinations Ctrl+C (used for killing the running process in UNIX and DOS environments) or Ctrl+Ins (the former being more widely supported), or by using some other method, such as a context menu or a toolbar button. Once data have been copied into the area of memory referred to as the clipboard, they can be pasted into a destination using the key combinations Ctrl+V or Shift+Insert, or methods dependent on the system. Macintosh computers use the key combinations Command+C and Command+V. In the X Window System, selecting text copies it to a clipboard, while middle-clicking pastes. This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... A Control key (marked Ctrl) on a modern Windows keyboard In computing, a Control key is a key, which when pressed in conjunction with another key, will perform a special operation. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... An example for a context menu taken from the word processor Microsoft Word. ... An early toolbar on a Xerox Alto Computer In a graphical user interface on a computer monitor a toolbar is a row, column, or block of onscreen buttons or icons that, when clicked, activate certain functions of the program. ... A clipboard is small, thin board that is typically slightly larger than a pad of standard sheets of paper, with a large (typically metal) clip at the top. ... Macintosh, also known as Mac, is a family of personal computers manufactured by Apple Computer, Inc. ... The command key The Command key, known as Apple key in documentation previous to the Apple Macintosh family of computers, is a modifier key present on Apple Macintosh keyboards. ... KDE 3. ...


The popularity of this method stems from its simplicity and the ease with which data can be moved between various applications without resorting to permanent storage. Disk storage is a group of data storage mechanisms for computers; data are transferred to planar surfaces or disks for temporary or permanent storage. ...


Comparison to verb-object paradigm

As of 2005, the cut-and-paste paradigm is so universal as to be taken for granted, and it may be instructive to compare a competing paradigm, popular in some early, highly successful applications that were known for ease of use by the standards of the day. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... I love the Ease of getting into your mothers pants. ...

  1. Initially, no text is selected.
  2. The user initiates the operation by selecting a move command in some manner.
  3. The system displays a prompt such as "Move what?"
  4. The system enters a modal state in which the only actions available to the user are either to select text or cancel the move operation.
  5. The user selects the text in some manner.
  6. The system displays a prompt "To where?"
  7. The system enters a modal state in which the only actions available to the user are either to indicate an insertion point or cancel the move operation.
  8. The user indicates the insertion point and confirms the move operation.
  9. The effects of the move are displayed.

In computer software, a mode is distinct method of operation within a computer program, in which the same user input can produce different results depending of the state of the computer. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cut Copy and Paste Tutorial (471 words)
There are several ways to copy and paste but we will learn the way that I use most often.
The only difference between copy and cut is that when you cut the text is removed and not just copied but can still be pasted.
Select Cut from this menu and the text should be removed or cut from the box.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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