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A curse is the effective action of some power, distinguished solely by the quality of adversity that it brings. A curse may also be said to result from a spell or prayer, imprecation or execration, or other imposition by magic or witchcraft, asking that a god, natural force, or spirit bring misfortune to someone. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Look up curse, cursing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Adversity is defined as a state of misfortune or affliction, or it may be used to describe a calamitous event. ... The spell is a magical act intended to cause an effect on reality using supernatural means of liturgical or ritual nature. ... Mary Magdalene in prayer. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... “Witch” redirects here. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The forms of curses found in various cultures comprise a significant proportion of the study of both folk religion and folklore. Folk religion consists of beliefs, superstitions and rituals transmitted from generation to generation of a specific culture. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

Philosophy and religion

Belief in curses is found in many cultures and is mentioned in the scriptures of many religions. Many if not most established religions forbid such practices outright, but others, citing the long history of scriptural curses, utilize them only in defense against evil that struck at them first. All religions offer forms of blessings of homes and objects and people, with the intent of removing curses. Typically, then, a curse is only a category or type of something much larger, namely the entirety of any given culture's religio-magical paradigm.


Some people believe curses to be strictly psychological in effect and/or superstitious in nature; these people generally hold rationalist opposing viewpoints to the opinion that curses are actual and real. Such viewpoints usually hold that a curse will only have as much power as the subject gives it; lack of belief, in this case, equals lack of power. Psychology (ancient Greek: psyche = soul and logos = word) is the study of mind, thought, and behaviour. ... For other uses, see Superstition (disambiguation). ... This article is not about continental rationalism. ...


Folk use

The deliberate levying of curses is often part of the practice of magic, taking place at the boundary between organized religion and folkloric customs. The curse makes effective part in the Hindu culture (The Fakir has the bless and curse power). Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... A fakir or faqir (Arabic: فقیر poor) is a Sufi, especially one who performs feats of endurance or apparent magic. ...


Special names for specific types of curses can be found in various cultures:

  • African American voodoo presents us with the jinx/haitians and crossed conditions, as well as a form of foot track magic, whereby cursed objects are laid in the paths of victims and activated when walked over.
  • Middle Eastern and Mediterranean culture is the source of the belief in the evil eye, which may be the result of envy but, more rarely, is said to be the result of a deliberate curse.
  • German people, including the Pennsylvania Dutch speak in terms of hexing (from the German word for witchcraft), and a common hex in days past was that laid by a stable-witch who caused milk cows to go dry and horses to go lame.

An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Voodoo (Vodou, Vodoun, Vudu, or Vudun in Benin, Togo, southeastern Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Senegal; also Vodou in Haiti) is a name attributed to a traditionally uten West African spiritual system of faith and ritual practices. ... The traditional Middle East and the G8s Greater Middle East Political & transportation map of the traditional Middle East today The Middle East is a historical and political region of Africa-Eurasia with no clear definition. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... John Phillip, The Evil Eye (1859), a self-portrait depicting the artist sketching a Spanish gypsy who thinks she is being given the evil eye The evil eye a folklore belief that the envy elicited by the good luck of fortunate people may result in their misfortune, whether it is... The Pennsylvania Dutch (perhaps more strictly Pennsylvania Deitsch or Pennsylvanian German) are the descendants of German immigrants who came to Pennsylvania prior to 1800. ...

Ancient Greek and Roman curses

Greek and Roman curses were somewhat formal and official. Called katadesmoi by the Greeks and tabulae defixiones by the Romans, they were written on lead tablets or other materials, generally invoked the aid of a spirit (a deity, a demon, or one of the dead) to accomplish their aim, and were placed in some place considered effective for their activation, such as in a tomb, cemetery, or sacred spring or well. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... A Curse tablet or binding spell (defixio in Latin, κατάδεσμος katadesmos in Greek) is a type of curse found throughout the Graeco-Roman world, in which someone would ask the gods to do harm to others. ... The English word spirit comes from the Latin spiritus (breath). // The English word spirit comes from the Latin spiritus, meaning breath (compare spiritus asper), but also soul, courage, vigor, ultimately from a PIE root *(s)peis- (to blow). In the Vulgate, the Latin word translates Greek (πνευμα), pneuma (Hebrew (רוח) ruah), as... “Fiend” redirects here. ...


In the text of katadesmoi and defixiones, the petitioner uttered a prayer or formula that the enemy would suffer injury in some specific way, along with the reason therefore, such as theft or loss of respect.


The Romans, Etruscans, and Greeks in Italy all practiced this custom. They buried the curses so well that today we have a body of curse inscriptions to tell us how they did it. The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ...


Celtic curses

In the Celtic world there were also many different forms of curses. Some of the most well known from Ireland are Curse stones, Egg curses, New Year curses and Milk curses. This article is about the European people. ... In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ... The New Year is an event that happens when a culture celebrates the end of one year and the beginning of the next year. ... A glass of cows milk. ...


Curse stones generally involved particle stones with the power to curse. One example involved turning a stone three times and saying the name of the person you wanted to curse.


Egg curses are a fertility curse. If you buried/hid eggs on someone else's land it was believed you could steal their land's fertility and therefore their luck. There are also some well documented methods believed to break these curses. Fertility is the natural capability of giving life. ... This article is about fortune. ...


New year curses are like egg curses. If you took something from someone on the new year you took their luck for the year. People used to not clean their house or throw out water for this reason. In Munster you can see a similar form in the may bush and the stealing of may bushes. Stealing back the item or bush is believed to return the luck. Statistics Area: 24,607. ... Theft (also known as stealing) is, in general, the wrongful taking of someone elses property without that persons willful consent. ...


Milk curses were curses put on a household where the milk from others cows went to yours.


Curses in the Bible

The first curse in the Bible is put on the serpent by God (Genesis 3:14). As a result of Adam and Eve disobeying God, the ground is also cursed: "in toil you shall eat of it all the days of your life." (3:17) For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ...


In the New Testament Paul sees curses as central to the meaning of Jesus's crucifixion. In Galatians 3:13 he says: "Christ redeems us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us...". He refers to Deuteronomy: " anyone who is hung on a tree is under God's curse." (21:23) This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... The Epistle to the Galatians is a book of the New Testament. ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ...


Some passages in the Tanakh treat curses as being effective techniques; they see a curse as an objective reality with real power. However, most sections of the Bible conceive a curse to be merely a wish, to be fulfilled by God only when just and deserved. 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible is a term that refers to the common portions of the Jewish canon and the Christian canons. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...


According to the Book of Proverbs, an undeserved curse has no effect (Proverbs 26:2), but may fall back upon the head of him who utters it (Genesis 12:3; Sirach 21:27), or may be turned by God into a blessing, as in the case of Balaam (Deuteronomy 23:5). The Book of Proverbs is one of the books of the Ketuvim of the Tanakh and of the Writings of the Old Testament. ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... The Wisdom of Ben Sirach, (or The Wisdom of Joshua Ben Sirach or merely Sirach), called Ecclesiasticus by Christians, is a book written circa 180 BCE in Hebrew. ... Balaam (Hebrew בִּלְעָם, Standard Hebrew Bilʻam, Tiberian Hebrew Bilʻām; could mean glutton or foreigner, but this etymology is uncertain), is a prophet in the Bible, his story occurring in the Book of Numbers. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The declaration of punishments (Gen. 3:14, 17; 4:11), the utterance of threats (Jeremiah 11:3, 17:5; Malachi i. 14), and the proclamation of laws (Deut. 11:26-28, 27:15 et seq.) received added solemnity and force when conditioned by a curse. For other uses, see Jeremiah (disambiguation). ... For the Northern Irish singer songwriter, see Malachi Cush. ...


In the Bible, cursing is generally characteristic of the godless (Ps. 10:7), but may serve as a weapon in the mouth of the wronged, the oppressed, and those who are zealous for God and righteousness (Judges 9:57; Prov. 11:26, 30:10). Judges may refer to the Book of Judges in the Bible more than one judge. ...


A righteous curse, especially when uttered by persons in authority, was believed to be unfailing in its effect (Gen. 9:25, 27:12; II Kings 2:24; Ecclus. Sirach 3:11). One who had received exemplary punishment at the hands of God was frequently held up, in cursing, as a terrifying object-lesson (Jer. 23: 22), and such a person was said to be, or to have become, a curse (II Kings 22:19; Jer. 24:9, 25: 18; Zechariah 8:13). An elaborate trial by ordeal for a woman suspected by her husband of adultery is set forth in Numbers 5:11-30; this involved drinking a "bitter water that brings a curse"; if the woman were guilty, she would suffer miscarriage and infertility. The Books of Kings (also known as [The Book of] Kings in Hebrew: Sefer Melachim מלכים) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ... The Wisdom of Ben Sirach, (or The Wisdom of Joshua Ben Sirach or merely Sirach), called Ecclesiasticus by Christians, is a book written circa 180 BCE in Hebrew. ... The Book of Zechariah is a book of the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh attributed to the prophet Zechariah. ... Trial by ordeal is a judicial practice by which the guilt or innocence of the accused is determined by subjecting them to a painful task. ... This article is about the act of adultery. ... The Book of Numbers is the fourth of the books of the Pentateuch, called in the Hebrew ba-midbar במדבר, i. ... Miscarriage or spontaneous abortion is the natural or spontaneous end of a pregnancy at a stage where the embryo or the fetus is incapable of surviving, generally defined in humans at a gestation of prior to 20 weeks. ... Infertility primarily refers to the biological inability of a man or a woman to contribute to conception. ...


It is especially forbidden to curse God (Exodus 22:28), parents (Ex. 21:17; Leviticus 20:9; Prov. 20:20, 30: 11), the authorities (Ex. 22:28; Eccl. 10:20), and the helpless deaf (Lev. 19:14). This article is about the second book in the Torah. ... Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ...


Curses in Rabbinic literature

A number of sections of the Talmud show a belief in the power of curses (Berachot 19a, 56a.) In some cases, a curse is described as related to the nature of a prayer (Ta'an. 23b); an undeserved curse is described as ineffective (Makkot 11a) and falls back upon the head of him who utters it (Sanhedrin 49a). The Talmud (Hebrew: תַּלְמוּד) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs and history. ...


Not only is a curse uttered by a scholar unfailing in its effect, even if undeserved (Mak. 11a), but one should not regard lightly even the curse uttered by an ignorant man (Meg. 15a).


The Biblical prohibitions of cursing are legally elaborated, and extended to self-cursing (Shebu. 35a). A woman that curses her husband's parents in his presence is divorced and loses her dowry (Ket. 72a).


Cursing may be permissible when prompted by religious motives. For instance, a curse is uttered against those who mislead the people by calculating, on the basis of Biblical passages, when the Messiah will come (Sanhedrin 97b). Cursed are those who are guilty of actions which, though not forbidden, are considered reprehensible. Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ...


According to legend, some rabbinic scholars cursed sometimes not only with their mouths, but also with an angry, fixed look. The consequence of such a look was either immediate death or poverty (Sotah 46b, and parallel passages). (See Evil eye) John Phillip, The Evil Eye (1859), a self-portrait depicting the artist sketching a Spanish gypsy who thinks she is being given the evil eye The evil eye a folklore belief that the envy elicited by the good luck of fortunate people may result in their misfortune, whether it is...


Curses in the Qur'an

Main article: Curses in Islam

In Islam, one can pray for God to curse someone. ...

Cursed places

Certain landmarks or locales are said to be cursed. Various lakes, rivers and mountains have been called cursed, as has the Sargasso Sea. However even when there is a tradition of a place "taking someone" every number of years it is not always considered cursed. For example, someone is said to drown in Lough Gur in Limerick, Ireland every 7 years but the lake is not considered "cursed" by the locals. The alleged Bermuda Triangle effect is believed by some to be some form of curse (and by others to be some unexplained natural phenomena). An image of the distribution and size of eel larvae shows the approximate location of the Sargasso Sea. ... The north end of Lough Gur reaches up to a maintained lawn at the visitor area at the lake. ... This article is about the city in Ireland. ... NASA image of the western Atlantic, showing the popular borders of the Bermuda Triangle. ...


Babinda's Boulders is a place known for its Devil's Pool, a group of waterholes known to be dangerous to young male travellers, but never claiming the lives of locals or females. Babinda township is near Cairns on the mid north coast of Queensland, Australia. [1] There is some dispute about the dangers, that the geography of the place is naturally risky with the rocks and fast moving currents – yet an Aboriginal legend exists giving it the context of an historic curse. Devils Pool near Babinda in Far North Queensland is known in Aboriginal legend as a cursed place. ... Babinda is a small town of approximately 1300 residents located 60km south of Cairns and 1645km north of Brisbane in the Australian state of Queensland. ... Cairns is a regional city located in far north Queensland, Australia. ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd...


Curse to the United States presidency

Tecumseh's curse was reputed to cause the deaths in office of Presidents of the United States elected in years divisible by 20, beginning in 1840. This alleged curse appears to have fallen dormant, since Ronald Reagan, (elected in 1980) survived an assassination attempt. The term Tecumsehs curse or zero-year curse is sometimes used to describe a chain of events that began with the death of United States President William Henry Harrison from pneumonia. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


Sports-related curses

Main article: Sports-related curses

A number of curses are used to explain the failures or misfortunes of specific sports teams, players, or even cities. For example: A sports-related curse is the effective action of some power or evil, that is used to explain the failures or misfortunes of specific sports teams, players, or even cities. ...

  • The Curse of the Billy Goat is used to explain the failures of the Chicago Cubs baseball team, who have not won a World Series championship since 1908, and a National League pennant since 1945.
  • There was the Curse of the Bambino, on the Boston Red Sox major league baseball team, who had not won a World Series since 1918 until the 2004 World Series, when the Sox defeated the St. Louis Cardinals, 4 games to 0.
  • The "Krukow Kurse" is used to explain the San Francisco Giants' failure to ever win the World Series. It is attributed to Mike Krukow (a former pitcher for the Giants and a current broadcaster for the team) based upon his yearly pre-season predictions that the Giants "have a chance" to win the World Series. Once Krukow stops making such predictions- says the legend- the Giants will, in fact, win the World Series.
  • Players who appear on the covers of either the Sports Illustrated magazine or the Madden NFL video game have tended to, coincidentally, suffer setbacks or injuries, immediately after appearing on either cover.
  • Some think that the NHL's St. Louis Blues, Toronto Maple Leafs, and the Los Angeles Kings are cursed. Each team has not won a Stanley Cup championship, since 1967. For the Blues and Kings, 1967 was the season that each team joined the NHL, also implying that each team has never won the Stanley Cup.
  • There was the Curse of 1940, which was placed on the New York Rangers for 54 years. But that curse was broken in the 1994 Stanley Cup Finals, with a 4 games to 3 victory against the Vancouver Canucks.
  • There was an alleged curse placed on the Los Angeles Lakers, whenever they played the Boston Celtics in the NBA Finals, especially at the old Boston Garden. Los Angeles lost to Boston 6 times in the Finals in the 1960s ('62, '63, '65, '66, '68, '69), and in the 1984 NBA Finals. In several matchups, infamous incidents have seemed to have favored the Celtics, and in series-clinching wins for Boston, legendary coach Red Auerbach was said to have pulled his famous "victory cigar," and puffed it in front of the Lakers' bench. But the "leprechaun jinx" ended, with the Lakers' 4 games to 2 victory over the Celtics, in the 1985 NBA Finals. The Lakers' celebration was at Boston Garden, which would be the only time in the garden's history that a team other than the Celtics won the NBA championship in that building.
  • There are alleged curses on the cities of Buffalo, Cleveland, Houston, Philadelphia, San Diego, and Seattle; which are believed to have a major league sports championship curse, meaning that any major league franchise that settles in that city are unable to win a sports championship, even if they have powerful and talented teams, thus causing much heartbreak to their fans, and much joy to rivals. Houston did however managed to win back to back championships in the NBA in 1994 and 1995, thus the curse for Houston may have been broken.
  • The "Madden Curse", explaining the seemingly poor performance by any pro football player after appearing on the cover of the video game Madden NFL

... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Babe Ruth -- The Bambino The Curse of the Bambino was a superstition cited, often jokingly, as a reason for the failure of the Boston Red Sox baseball team to win the World Series after they sold Babe Ruth, sometimes called The Bambino, to the New York Yankees. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Dates October 23, 2004–October 27, 2004 MVP Manny Ramírez (Boston) Television network Fox Announcers Joe Buck and Tim McCarver Umpires Ed Montague (Crew Chief), Dale Scott, Brian Gorman, Chuck Meriwether, Gerry Davis, Charlie Reliford The 2004 World Series represented the 100th time two modern Major League Baseball teams... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Michael Edward (Mike) Krukow (born January 21, 1952 in Long Beach, California) is a former starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other meanings of the word giant, see Giant (disambiguation) Giants are humanoid creatures of prodigious size and strength, a type of legendary monster that appear in the tales of many different races and cultures. ... Note: broadcasting is also the old term for hand sowing. ... In an organised sports league, a season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session. ... For other meanings of the word giant, see Giant (disambiguation) Giants are humanoid creatures of prodigious size and strength, a type of legendary monster that appear in the tales of many different races and cultures. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of the word giant, see Giant (disambiguation) Giants are humanoid creatures of prodigious size and strength, a type of legendary monster that appear in the tales of many different races and cultures. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Madden NFL is an American football video game series developed by Electronic Arts Tiburon for EA Sports. ... “Computer and video games” redirects here. ... The St. ... For other uses, see Toronto Maple Leafs (disambiguation). ... The Los Angeles Kings are a professional ice hockey team based in Los Angeles, California, USA. They are members of the Pacific Division of the Western Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The Stanley Cup The Stanley Cup (French: ) is the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL), the major professional ice hockey league in Canada and the United States. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... The Curse of 1940 is a superstitious explanation for why the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League didnt win the leagues championship trophy, the Stanley Cup, from 1940 to 1994. ... The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Vancouver Canucks are a professional ice hockey team based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Logo of the NBA Finals. ... The Boston Garden was a famous arena built in 1928 in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The 1984 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1983-1984 NBA season. ... Arnold Jacob Red Auerbach (September 20, 1917 – October 28, 2006) was a highly successful and influential basketball coach of the BAA Washington Nationals, the NBA Tri-Cities Blackhawks and the NBA Boston Celtics. ... The 1985 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1984-85 NBA season. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... “Houston” redirects here. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... “San Diego” redirects here. ... “Seattle” redirects here. ... The Madden Curse, also known as the Madden Cover Jinx, is a myth involving the video game series Madden NFL, stating that the season a player appears on the cover, that player will be cursed with either an injury or poor performance. ... Madden NFL is an American football video game series developed by Electronic Arts Tiburon for EA Sports. ...

The Curse of 27

The Curse of 27 is the belief that 27 is an unlucky number due to the number of famous musicians who have died at the age. Robert Johnson, Jim Morrison, Brian Jones, Mary Catherine Ingram, Jimi Hendrix, Ron "Pigpen" McKernan, Janis Joplin and Kurt Cobain are all believed to have been affected by the curse of 27. This is also known as the 27 Club. Robert Leroy Johnson (May 8, 1911 – August 16, 1938) is among the most famous Delta Blues musicians and arguably the most influential. ... For other persons named James or Jim Morrison, see James Morrison. ... For other persons named Brian Jones, see Brian Jones (disambiguation). ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... This page is about a musician. ... Janis Lyn Joplin (Born January 19, 1943- October 4, 1970 was an influential singer, songwriter, and music arranger. ... Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967, Aberdeen, – c. ... The 27 Club, also occasionally known as the Forever 27 Club, is a popular culture name for a group of influential rock and blues musicians who all died at the age of 27, sometimes under mysterious circumstances. ...


Cursed objects

Cursed objects are generally supposed to have been stolen from their rightful owners or looted from a sanctuary. The Hope Diamond is supposed to bear such a curse, and bring misfortune to its owner. The stories behind why these items are cursed vary, but they usually are said to bring bad luck or to manifest unusual phenomena related to their presence. The idea has broad pop-culture appeal, from eponymous object in the 1902 horror short story "The Monkey's Paw" to the "Lament Configuration" puzzle box in the modern Hellraiser movie series. Similarly, an attempt may be made to place a new curse onto an otherwise neutral object which can then be used as a cursed object to purportedly bring a curse to a person or place. This is similar to the practice of recording a spoken curse onto a media such as a cassette tape or recordable CD which is then left at the area to be cursed. Hope diamond Weight 45. ... An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, who has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Monkeys Paw is a horror short story by author W. W. Jacobs. ... Puzzle boxes (also alled trick boxes) have a long tradition. ... For other topics with similar names, see Hellraiser (disambiguation). ... For the meaning of cassette in genetics, see cassette (genetics). ... A CD-R (Compact Disc-Recordable) is a thin (1. ...


Egyptian curses and mummies

Limestone donation-stele from Mendes, 3rd Intermediate Period, Dynasty XXII. The inscription celebrates a donation of land to an Egyptian temple, and places a curse on anyone who would misuse or appropriate the land.
Limestone donation-stele from Mendes, 3rd Intermediate Period, Dynasty XXII. The inscription celebrates a donation of land to an Egyptian temple, and places a curse on anyone who would misuse or appropriate the land.

There is a broad popular belief in curses being associated with the violation of the tombs of mummified corpses, or of the mummies themselves. The idea became so widespread as to become a pop-culture mainstay, especially in horror films (though originally the curse was invisible, a series of mysterious deaths, rather than the walking-dead mummies of later fiction). The "Curse of the Pharaohs" is supposed to have haunted the archaeologists who excavated the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun, whereby an imprecation was supposedly pronounced from the grave by the ancient Egyptian priests, on anyone who violated its precincts. Similar dubious suspicions have surrounded the excavation and examination of the (natural, not embalmed) Alpine mummy, "Ötzi the Iceman". While such curses are generally considered to have been popularized and sensationalized by British journalists of the 19th century, ancient Egyptians were in fact known to place curse inscriptions on markers protecting temple or tomb goods or property. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 391 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1650 × 2530 pixel, file size: 589 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 391 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1650 × 2530 pixel, file size: 589 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Ancient Egyptian funerary stele Suenos Stone in Forres Scotland A stele (or stela) is a stone or wooden slab, generally taller than it is wide, erected for funerary or commemorative purposes, most usually decorated with the names and titles of the deceased or living—inscribed, carved in relief (bas... For information about the Portuguese language surname Mendes, see the article Mendez. ... The Third Intermediate Period refers to the time in Ancient Egypt from the death of Pharaoh Rameses XI in 1070 BC to the foundation of the Twenty-Sixth Dynasty by Psamtik I, following the expulsion of the Nubian rulers of the Twenty-Fifth Dynasty. ... Known rulers, in the History of Egypt, for the Twenty-Second Dynasty. ... A mummy is a corpse whose skin and dried flesh have been preserved by either intentional or accidental exposure to chemicals, extreme cold, very low humidity, or airlessness. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... The Curse of the Pharaohs refers to the belief that any person who disturbs the mummy of an Ancient Egyptian pharaoh is placed under a curse whereby they will shortly die. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... Nebkheperure Lord of the forms of Re Nomen Tutankhaten Living Image of the Aten Tutankhamun Hekaiunushema Living Image of Amun, ruler of Upper Heliopolis Horus name Kanakht Tutmesut The strong bull, pleasing of birth Nebty name Neferhepusegerehtawy One of perfect laws, who pacifies the two lands[1] Wer-Ah-Amun... Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... The Ötztal Alps (Ger. ... “Ötzi” redirects here. ...


Fraudulent curses

[original research?] Some people claiming to be gifted in magic or witchcraft set up business to exploit fears, in order to profit from the superstitious and gullible. This has been a very large part of the mythos (and bad reputation) of the modern day Roma people (Gypsies), as well as Voodoo and Santeria practitioners, who among other things peddle both in curses and cures for curses. In most respects these schemes are not particularly distinguishable from other dubious claims of supernatural power, such as those of palm readers, the Psychic Friends Network, tarot card readers or crystal therapists. “Witch” redirects here. ... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Roma (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ... Voodoo (Vodou, Vodoun, Vudu, or Vudun in Benin, Togo, southeastern Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Senegal; also Vodou in Haiti) is a name attributed to a traditionally uten West African spiritual system of faith and ritual practices. ... Lukumí or Regla de Ocha, most widely known as Santeria, is a set of related religious systems that fuse Catholic beliefs with traditional Yorùbá beliefs. ... Chiromancy or cheiromancy,(Greek cheir, “hand”; manteia, “divination”), art of characterization and foretelling the future through the study of the palm also known as palmistry or palm-reading consists of the practice (or pseudoscience) of evaluating a persons character or future life by reading the... The Psychic Friends Network was a telephone psychic service in the 1990s. ... This article is about the general history, iconography, and uses of tarot cards. ... A charmstone is a mineral specimen which certain prehistoric, historic or contemporary peoples invest with healing, mystical or paranormal powers. ...


See also

A book curse was the most widely-employed and effective method of discouraging the thievery of manuscripts during the medieval period. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The motif of harmful sensation refers to the physical or mental damage that a person suffers merely by experiencing what should normally be a benign sensation. ... // In its original application, nocebo had a very specific meaning in the medical domains of pharmacology, and nosology, and aetiology. ... A sports-related curse is the effective action of some power or evil, that is used to explain the failures or misfortunes of specific sports teams, players, or even cities. ... Cover of the June 16, 1959 edition of New York Post, reporting the death of George Reeves The Superman curse refers to a series of misfortunes that have plagued creative people involved in adaptations of Superman in various mediums, particularly actors who have played the role of Superman on film... The term Tecumsehs curse or zero-year curse is sometimes used to describe a chain of events that began with the death of United States President William Henry Harrison from pneumonia. ... A blank videotape such as this was the carrier for the Ring Virus curse. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.abc.net.au/message/tv/ms/s1381165.htm
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Curse
  • Curse tablets and Binding Spells from the Ancient World by John G. Gager ISBN 0-19-506226-4
  • Maledicta: The International Journal of Verbal Aggression ISSN US 0363-3659

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Maledicta (ISSN US 0363-3659) is a scholarly journal dedicated to the study of offensive and negatively-valued words and expressions. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Curse - definition of Curse in Encyclopedia (863 words)
In a broader sense, 'curse' is a loose synonym for blasphemy or profanity.
Sometimes, the curse was allegedly laid with a purpose; such a curse is supposed to have haunted the archaeologists who excavated the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamen; a curse was supposedly pronounced on anyone who violated its precincts by the ancient Egyptian priests.
Tecumseh's curse was reputed to cause the deaths in office of Presidents of the United States elected in years divisible by 20, beginning in 1840 (this alleged curse appears to have fallen dormant in 1980, as President Ronald Reagan, elected that year, failed to die in office).
Curse of the Bambino - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2082 words)
The Curse of the Bambino (1920 – 2004) was an urban myth or scapegoat cited as a reason for the failure of the Boston Red Sox baseball team to win the World Series for 86 years after they sold Babe Ruth, sometimes called The Bambino, to the New York Yankees.
The curse was "reversed" in 2004 as the Red Sox came back from an 0-3 hole to beat the Yankees in the 2004 American League Championship Series and then went on to beat the St.
A "Curse" Born of Hate, a skeptical history of the curse lore, written by Glenn Stout during the 2004 playoffs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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