FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Curly Lambeau

Earl Louis "Curly" Lambeau (April 9, 1898 - June 1, 1965) was the founder, a player and the first coach of the Green Bay Packers professional football team.


Lambeau and George Calhoun formed the Packers in 1919 while Lambeau was working as a shipping clerk at the Indian Packing Company. The success of the team quickly led to it joining the National Football League in 1921.


Lambeau coached the Packers as an NFL team from 1921 to 1949. He also played for the Packers from 1921 to 1929. During his tenure as head coach he led the Packers to six championships (1929, 1930, 1931, 1936, 1939, 1944). Lambeau's regular season record as head coach of the Packers was 209-104-21 (.626 winning percentage) with a playoff record of 3-2.


After Lambeau's career with the Packers came to an end in early 1950, he went on to coach the Chicago Cardinals for the 1950 season and most of the 1951 season. His record with the Cardinals was 7-15 (.318 winning percentage). After leaving the Cardinals, Lambeau went on to coach the last two years of his career with the Washington Redskins for the 1952 and 1953 seasons. His record in Washington was 10-13-1 (.417 winning percentage).


Lambeau finished his 33 year coaching career with an overall record of 229-134-22 (.595 winning percentage). He was a member of the 1963 inaugural class of inductees to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.


Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wisconsin is named after him. The new City Stadium which was built in 1957 was renamed to Lambeau Field in September 1965 following Lambeau's death that June.


External link

  • Pro Football Hall of Fame (http://www.profootballhof.com/hof/member.jsp?player_id=117)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Packers.com » Team » Coaches » Earl Lambeau (1728 words)
Lambeau led the Packers to six world championships as head coach and is one of just five coaches in NFL history to record 200 wins (others are Don Shula, George Halas, Tom Landry and Chuck Noll).
Lambeau had been an outstanding athlete at Green Bay East High School and after enrolling at the University of Notre Dame and making varsity as a freshman under Knute Rockne, Lambeau was back in Green Bay by in 1919 after severe tonsillitis forced him to miss the spring semester.
The winningest coach in team history, Curly Lambeau's impressive 212-106-21 (.656) overall record doesn't even include the 1919 or 1920 seasons in which the Packers went a combined 19-2-1, outscoring their opponents 792-36, prior to joining what is now the NFL in 1921.
Curly Lambeau: Information from Answers.com (499 words)
Earl Louis "Curly" Lambeau (April 9, 1898 - June 1, 1965) was the founder, a player, and the first coach of the Green Bay Packers professional football team.
Lambeau's regular season record as head coach of the Packers was 209-104-21 (.626 winning percentage) with a playoff record of 3-2.
After Lambeau's career with the Packers came to an end in early 1950, he went on to coach the Chicago Cardinals for the 1950 season and most of the 1951 season.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m