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Encyclopedia > Curate

From the Latin curatus (compare Curator), a curate is a person who is invested with the care, or cure (cura), of souls of a parish. In this sense, it means a parish priest. However, it has come to mean an assistant priest or deacon. It has been suggested that History of the Latin language be merged into this article or section. ... A curator of a cultural heritage institution (e. ... In some denominations of Christianity, the cure of souls (Latin cura animarum) is the exercise by a priest of his or her office. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... Roman Catholic priests in traditional clerical clothing. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ...


Originally, a bishop would entrust a priest with the 'cure of souls' (pastoral ministry) of a parish. When, in medieval Europe, this included the legal freehold of church land in the parish, the parish priest was the perpetual curate (curatus perpetuus). Occasionally, a bishop might appoint a temporary or assistant curate (curatus temporalis). This was particularly the case when the perpetual curate was absent or needed assistance. A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... In some denominations of Christianity, the cure of souls (Latin cura animarum) is the exercise by a priest of his or her office. ... Freehold is a term used in real estate or real property law, land held in fee simple, as opposed to leasehold, which is land which is leased. ... Parish Priest may refer to A parishs assigned clergyman A biography of Fr. ...


As the church became more embedded into the fabric of feudal Europe, various other titles often supplanted 'curate' for the senior parish priest. 'Rector' was the usual substitute name, but, particularly in England and Wales, 'vicar' became more common. The British Parliament passed an act in 1868 that authorized all perpetual curates to use the title 'vicar'. In the Anglican Communion and English-speaking Roman Catholic churches, 'curate' has come to mean an assistant parish priest. Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages None official English de facto Capital None official London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom, England and Wales and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... In the broadest sense, a vicar (from the Latin vicarius) is anyone acting as a substitute or agent for a superior (compare vicarious). In this sense, the title is comparable to lieutenant. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


The Book of Common Prayer (1662) of the Church of England refers to the clergy as bishops and curates in the text of prayer of intercession for Holy Communion. Church of England curates are officially assistant curates. 1979 ECUSABCP The Book of Common Prayer is foundational prayer book of the Church of England and also the name for similar books used in other churches in the Anglican Communion. ... Events February 1 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ...


In French, curé refers to the senior parish priest, and likewise the Italian curato and Spanish cura.


In the charismatic and/or evangelical part of the Anglican church, the role of the curate is usually perceived a little differently. Curates in charismatic and/or evangelical churches tend to be seen as an assistant leader to the overall leader, often in a larger team of pastoral leaders. Many of the larger charismatic/evangelical churches have sizeable staff teams with a number of pastoral leaders, some who are ordained and others who are not. The Charismatic Movement is a movement that began with the adoption of certain Pentecostal beliefs—specifically what are known as the bibilical charisms of Christianity: speaking in tongues, prophesying, etc. ... The term evangelical has several distinct meanings: In its original sense, it means belonging or related to the Gospel (Greek: euangelion - good news) of the New Testament. ...


External links

  • THE END A collaboratively curated group exhibition of new work by graduating artists

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Curate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (361 words)
From the Latin curatus (compare Curator), a curate is a person who is invested with the care, or cure (cura), of souls of a parish.
In the charismatic and/or evangelical part of the Anglican church, the role of the curate is usually perceived a little differently.
Curates in charismatic and/or evangelical churches tend to be seen as an assistant leader to the overall leader, often in a larger team of pastoral leaders.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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