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Encyclopedia > Cumberland Lodge

Built 1650 in Windsor Great Park, south of Royal Lodge, Cumberland Lodge was called Byfield House till 1670. It was later renamed New Lodge, at times was also known as Windsor Lodge or Ranger Lodge. // Events June 23 - Claimant King Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland arrives in Scotland, the only of the three Kingdoms that has accepted him as ruler. ... The Long Walk to Windsor Castle Windsor Great Park is a large Crown Estate of 19 km2 south of the town of Windsor to the west of London in the United Kingdom. ... Royal Lodge was the residence of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in Windsor Great Park from 1952 until her death in 2002. ... 1670 was a common year beginning on a Saturday in countries using the Julian calendar and a Wednesday in countries using the Gregorian calendar. ...


Cumberland Lodge was built originally in the middle of the seventeenth century by John Byfield, a Captain in Cromwell’s army. Taken over by Charles II, for much of its subsequent history it has been the official residence of the Ranger of The Great Park — a Crown appointment always held by someone close to the Sovereign. Among those who have lived at the Lodge were the first resident Ranger, Baptist May; Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough 1702-1744; John Spencer 1744-1746; and William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland (son of George II) 1746-1765, his son Henry Duke of Cumberland 1765-1790, the Duchess of Cumberland 1790-1803, and the Duke of Sussex 1830-1843. The non-royal Duke of Marlborough lived there to 1822. Cromwell is the name of the following places: Cromwell, New Zealand Cromwell, Connecticut, United States of America Cromwell, Indiana, United States of America Cromwell, Iowa, United States of America Cromwell, Minnesota, United States of America Cromwell Township, Minnesota, United States of America Cromwell Township, Pennsylvania, United States of America People... The name Charles II is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings: Charles the Fat (also known as Charles II of France and Charles III of the Holy Roman Empire) Charles II of England Charles II of Naples Charles II of Navarre Charles II of Romania Charles II... In general, a ranger is a keeper, guardian, or soldier that ranges over a region to protect the area or enforce law. ... The adjective sovereign is used to refer to a state of sovereignty. ... Sarah Churchill, née Jennings, Duchess of Marlborough (May 29, 1660 - October 18, 1744), rose to be one of the most influential women in British history, largely as a result of her close friendship with Queen Anne. ... Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births May 19 - Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, queen of George III of Great Britain (d. ... John Spencer can refer to different people: John Spencer is an American actor in series such as L.A. Law and The West Wing. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births May 19 - Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, queen of George III of Great Britain (d. ... Events January 8 - Bonnie Prince Charlie occupies Stirling April 16 - Battle of Culloden brings an end to the Jacobite Risings October 22 - The College of New Jersey is founded (it becomes Princeton University in 1896) October 28 - An earthquake demolishes Lima and Callao, in Peru Catharine de Ricci (born 1522... Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland (April 15, 1721–October 31, 1765), a younger son of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline, was a noted military leader. ... Several notable men were named George II. These include: George II of Great Britain (October 30, 1683–October 25, 1760) George II of Greece (July 19, 1890–April 1, 1947) George II of Württemberg-Mömpelgard (1626–1699) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Events January 8 - Bonnie Prince Charlie occupies Stirling April 16 - Battle of Culloden brings an end to the Jacobite Risings October 22 - The College of New Jersey is founded (it becomes Princeton University in 1896) October 28 - An earthquake demolishes Lima and Callao, in Peru Catharine de Ricci (born 1522... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Duke of Cumberland is a peerage title that was conferred upon junior members of the British royal family. ... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Duke of Sussex is a peerage title conferred upon Prince Augustus Frederick (1773-1843), sixth son of King George III. He was created Duke of Sussex and Earl of Inverness (in the Peerage of Great Britain), and Baron Arklow (in the Peerage of Ireland) on 25 November 1801. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The coat of arms of the Dukes of Marlborough The Dukedom of Marlborough (pronounced Maulbruh) is an hereditary title of British nobility in the Peerage of England. ... 1822 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1872, the Lodge became the home of Queen Victoria’s favourite daughter, Princess Helena, and her husband Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein. After Princess Christian’s death in 1923, it was granted to Lord FitzAlan of Derwent, the last Viceroy of Ireland, who lived there until 1947. During 1936 Cumberland Lodge was used for key meetings between the King’s Private Secretary and the Prime Minster, Stanley Baldwin, which eventually led to the abdication of King Edward VIII. 1872 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Helena can refer to: Saint Helena (Island in the Atlantic Ocean) Helena, mother of Constantine the Great (also known as Helena of Constantinople, a Saint in the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Christianity) Helena is one of the most renowned songs by the emo rock band My Chemical Romance. ... Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenberg (22 January 1831 - 28 October 1917) was a minor German prince who became a member of the British Royal Family through his marriage to Princess Helena (25 May 1846 - 9 June 1923), the third daughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and... 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (also known as the Viceroy or in the Middle Ages as the Lord Deputy) was the head of Englands (pre-1707) or Britains (post 1707) administration in Ireland. ... 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1936 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... See Private Secretary to the Sovereign. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (August 3, 1867 - December 14, 1947) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on three separate occasions. ... Abdication (from the Latin abdicatio, disowning, renouncing, from ab, from, and dicare, to declare, to proclaim as not belonging to one), the act whereby a person in office renounces and gives up the same before the expiry of the time for which it is held. ... King Edward VIII King of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, King of Ireland Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VIII, (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David), later His Royal Highness The Duke of Windsor (23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was the second British monarch of the House...


In 1947 King George VI granted the use of the lodge of the St Katharine’s Foundation — now known as the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Foundation of St Catharine’s. 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George) (December 14, 1895 - February 6, 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from December 11, 1936 to February 6, 1952. ...


This is a Christian educational trust which was the product of the imagination and insight of Miss Amy Buller. Drawing on her experiences in Germany between the two world wars, she believed that the rise of Nazism had been significantly aided by the great German universities not teaching students to use their critical judgement on the world around them and not providing an environment where the great issues of the day could be openly discussed. The term National Socialism has been used in self-description by a number of different political groups and ideologies, some of which have no connection with the Nazis; see National socialism (disambiguation). ...


Amy Buller thus conceived the idea of a residential centre where students could come with their teachers and, in a relaxed atmosphere, consider important ethical and social issues outside the normal confines of their degree courses. She gained the active support of the King and Queen. To recognise the prime role played by their Majesties in establishing the Trust, its name was changed in 1968 to the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Foundation of St Catharine’s. 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ...


The building is used for short residential courses by groups of students, primarily from universities, who come here to examine, in the context of Christian philosophy, the fundamental assumptions underlying political, economic and scientific activities. The late Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother was Patron of the Foundation, and the late Princess Margaret was its Visitor. Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon in her later years as Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother The Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Windsor L.G., L.T., C.I., G.C.V.O., G.B.E., C.C., née Bowes-Lyon) (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was the Queen... Generally, patronage is the act of supporting or favoring some person, group, or institution. ... HRH The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret (Margaret Rose Armstrong-Jones, née Windsor; (August 21, 1930—February 9, 2002) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest daughter of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, and sister of the current British... A Visitor, in United Kingdom law and history, is an overseer of an autonomous ecclesiastical or eleemosynary institution (i. ...


Cumberland Lodge is not open to the general public.


 
 

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