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Encyclopedia > Culture of Croatia
Part of the series on
Croatian Culture
Art
Literature
Music
Language
History
Religion
Cuisine
Cinema
Sports

The culture of Croatia has roots in a long history: the Croatian people have been inhabiting the area for thirteen centuries, but there are important remnants of the earlier periods still preserved in the country. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Croatian art describes the visual arts in Croatia from medieval times to the present. ... // (ca. ... The music of Croatia, like the country itself, has three major influences: the influence of the Mediterranean especially present in the coastal areas, of the Balkans especially in the mountainous, continental parts, and of central Europe in the central and northern parts of the country. ... This is the history of Croatia. ... Croatian cuisine is heterogeneous and is therefore known as the cuisine of regions, since every region has its own distinct culinary traditions. ... Culture (Culture from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate,) generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... This is the history of Croatia. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ...

Contents

Ancient Heritage

Ancient monuments from Paleolithic are very poor and it consists out of simple stone and bone objects. Some of the earliest remaining historical features include 100,000 year old bones of a Neandertal man near Krapina (Krapina-Zagorje county). // The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ... Binomial name Homo neanderthalensis King, 1864 The Neanderthal or Neandertal was a species of genus Homo (Homo neanderthalensis) that inhabited Europe and parts of western Asia from about 230,000 to 29,000 years ago (in the Middle Palaeolithic, early Stone Age). ... Krapina is a town in northern Croatia, center of the Krapina-Zagorje county, population 12,950 (2001). ... Coat of arms Krapina-Zagorje county - Krapinsko-zagorska županija is a county in northern Croatia. ...


The most interesting Copper Age or Eneolithic finds are from Vučedol culture. Out of that culture sprung out Bronze Age Vinkovci culture (named after city of Vinkovci) that is recognizable by bronze fibulas that were replacing objects like needles and buttons. Bronze culture of Illyrians, ethnic group with distinct culture and art form started to organize itself in 7th century BC. Numerous monumental sculptures are preserved, as well as walls of citadel Nezakcij near Pula, one of numerous Istrian cities from Iron Age. The Chalcolithic (Greek khalkos + lithos copper stone) period or Copper Age period (also known as the Eneolithic (Aeneolithic)), is a phase in the development of human culture in which the use of early metal tools appeared alongside the use of stone tools. ... The Chalcolithic (Greek khalkos + lithos copper stone) period, also known as the Eneolithic or Copper Age period, is a phase in the development of human culture in which the use of early metal tools appeared alongside the use of stone tools. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... [[Image: Vinkovci (Croatia) |250px|none|]] Coordinates: Country  Croatia County Vukovar-Srijem Government  - Mayor Mladen Karlić (HDZ) Elevation 90 m (295. ... Illyria (disambiguation) Illyrians has come to refer to a broad, ill-defined Indo-European[1] group of peoples who inhabited the western Balkans (Illyria, roughly from northern Epirus to southern Pannonia) and even perhaps parts of Southern Italy in classical times into the Common era, and spoke Illyrian languages. ... This article is about a type of fortification. ... Pula (Latin Colonia Pietas Iulia Pola; Italian Pola (the city has an official Croatian-Italian bilingualism [1]); Istriot Pula, German Polei) is the largest city in Istria, situated at the southern tip of the peninsula, with a population of 62,080 (2006). ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ...

Restitution of Emperor Diocletian Palace in Split, c. 300 AD
Restitution of Emperor Diocletian Palace in Split, c. 300 AD

Greeks from Syracuse in Sicily in 390 BC came to islands of Vis (Issa), Hvar (Pharos) and Korčula (Corcyra Nigra) and there have founded city-states in which they lived quite isolated. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x985, 503 KB) Bird eye of a restitution of Diocletians palace in Split/Spalato by the architect E. Hébrard. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x985, 503 KB) Bird eye of a restitution of Diocletians palace in Split/Spalato by the architect E. Hébrard. ... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (c. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Syracuse (Italian Siracusa, Sicilian Sarausa, Greek , Latin Syracusae) is an Italian city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC - 390s BC - 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 395 BC 394 BC 393 BC 392 BC 391 BC - 390 BC - 389 BC 388 BC 387... Vis can refer to: Vis, a type of Polish handgun, after the Polish word for power in Latin Vis, an island in the Adriatic Vis, town and municipality on the aforementioned island See also: VIS This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Hvar (Croatia) For the acronym, see HVAR. Hvar (Lesina in Italian) is a Croatian island in the Adriatic Sea, located off the Dalmatian coast. ... County Dubrovnik–Neretva Area 279 km² (entire island) Location Mayor Mirko Duhović (SDP) Population 3,232 (town); 16,138 (island) Korčula (Italian Curzola, Latin Corcyra Nigra, Greek Korkyra Melaina, Old-Slavic: Krkar) is an island in the Adriatic Sea, in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county of Croatia. ... A city-state is a region controlled exclusively by a city. ...


While the Greek colonies were flourishing on the island, on the continent the Illyrians were organizing their centers. Their art was greatly influenced by Greek art, and they have even copied some. Illyrians even conquered Greek colonies on Dalmatian islands. Famous was the queen Teuta of Issa (today island of Vis) which waged wars with the Romans. But finally, Rome subdued the Illyrians in first century BC, and after that the history of these parts is a history of Illyrian provinces of Rome and Byzantium. Colonies in antiquity were city-states founded from a mother-city, not from a territory-at-large. ... Queen Teuta of the Illyrians (reigned approximately from 231 BC to 228 BC) (aka Tefta) After the death of Agron (250 BC?-231 BC) who established the first kingdom of Illyria, from which the Albanians are believed to descend, extending from Dalmatia on the north to the Aous (Vjosa river... Vis can refer to: Vis, a type of Polish handgun, after the Polish word for power in Latin Vis, an island in the Adriatic Vis, town and municipality on the aforementioned island See also: VIS This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... (2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century - other centuries) The 1st century BC starts on January 1, 100 BC and ends on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events The Roman... Illyrian Provinces (French Provinces illyriennes) were formed in 1809 when Austria ceded with the Treaty of Schoenbrunn its lands Carinthia, Carniola, Croatia southwest of the river Sava, Gorizia and Trieste to France after the defeat at the Battle of Wagram. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ...


The Romans[1] organized the entire coastal territory by transforming citadels to urban cities. There have been at least thirty urban cities in Istria, Liburnia and Dalmatia with roman citizenship (civitas). The best-preserved nets of roman streets (decumanus/cardo) are those in Epetion (Poreč) and Jader (Zadar). The most entirely preserved roman monuments are in Pola (Pula) including Amphitheater (so called – Arena) from 2nd century. In 3rd century AD the city of Salona was the largest (it had 40 000 inhabitants) and most important city of Dalmatia. Near the city emperor Diocletian, born in Salona, build the Palace (around year 300 AD), which is largest and most important monument of late antique architecture in the World. In the 4th century Salona have became the center of Christianity for entire western Balkans. It hade numerous basilicas and necropolises, and even two saints: Domnius (Duje) and Anastasius (Staš). Istria (Croatian and Slovenian: Istra, Venetian and Italian: Istria), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ... Liburnia (recent Croatian Kvarner, Italian Quarnero) in ancient geography was the land of the Liburnians, a region along the northeastern Adriatic coast in Europe, actual Croatia, whose borders shifted according to the extent of Liburnian dominance at a given time between 11th and 1st century BC. // Liburnia was south of... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... In the history of the Roman empire, civitas (pl. ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... Pula (Latin Colonia Pietas Iulia Pola; Italian Pola (the city has an official Croatian-Italian bilingualism [1]); Istriot Pula, German Polei) is the largest city in Istria, situated at the southern tip of the peninsula, with a population of 62,080 (2006). ... The name amphitheatre (alternatively amphitheater) is given to a public building of the Classical period (being particularly associated with ancient Rome) which was used for spectator sports, games and displays. ... ARENA may refer to either: Nationalist Republican Alliance, a political party in El Salvador. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (c. ... Events Romano-Celtic temple-mausoleum complex is constructed in Lullingstone, and also in Anderida (approximate date). ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... St. ... Saint Duje (also known as Doimus, Domnio, Domnius or Dujam) was a third century bishop of Salona, a Roman city in modern Croatia. ... Look up Anastasius in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


One of few preserved basilicas in western Europe (beside ones in Ravenna) from the time of early Byzantium is Euphrasian Basilica in Poreč from 6th century. Ravenna is a city and comune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ... Byzantium (Greek: Βυζάντιον) was an ancient Greek city, which, according to legend, was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas or Byzantas (Βύζας or Βύζαντας in Greek). ... The Euphrasian Basilica is a minor basilica in Poreč, Croatia. ... Poreč (Italian Parenzo, Latin Parentium), (lat. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...

Pre-Romanesque Church of St. Donatus in Zadar, from the 9th century
Pre-Romanesque Church of St. Donatus in Zadar, from the 9th century

The early middle ages brought the great migration of the Slavs and this period was perhaps a Dark Age in the cultural sense until the successful formation of the Slavic states which coexisted with Italic cities that remained on the coast, each of them were modelled like Venice. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1068x1094, 157 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Croatia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1068x1094, 157 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Croatia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... Human migration denotes any movement of groups of people from one locality to another, rather than of individual wanderers. ... The Dark Ages (or Dark Age) is a metaphor with multiple meanings and connotations. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia, Latin: Venetia) is a city in northern Italy, the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,251 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ...

Croatian Art

Main article: Art of Croatia
Portal of Trogir chatedral by sculptor Radovan, c. 1240
Portal of Trogir chatedral by sculptor Radovan, c. 1240

In the 7th century the Croats, with other Slavs and Avars, came from Northern Europe to the region where they live today[2]. The Croats were open to roman art and culture, and first of all to Christianity. First churches[3] were build as royal sanctuaries, and influences of roman art was strongest in Dalmatia where urbanization was thickest, and there was largest number of monuments. Gradually that influence was neglected and certain simplification, alteration of inherited forms and even creation of original buildings appeared. Croatian art describes the visual arts in Croatia from medieval times to the present. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 449 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (652 × 871 pixel, file size: 313 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo of an portal before restauration I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 449 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (652 × 871 pixel, file size: 313 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo of an portal before restauration I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document... Coat of arms Trogir (Italian Traù, Latin Tragurium, Greek Tragurion, Hungarian Tengerfehérvár) is a historic town and harbour on the Adriatic coast in Split-Dalmatia county, Croatia, with a population of 10,907 (2001) and a total municipality population of 13,322 (2001). ... Radovan was a sculptor and architect who lived in Dalmatia (Croatia) in the 13th century. ... Events Batu Khan and the Golden Horde sack the Ruthenian city of Kyiv Births Pope Benedict XI Deaths April 11 - Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn The Great Prince of Gwynedd Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... The Eurasian Avars were a nomadic people of Eurasia who established a state in the Danube River area of Europe in the early 6th century. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Fresco from the Villa of the Mysteries. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch...


The largest and most complicated central based church from 9th century is St Donatus in Zadar. From those times, with its size and beauty we can only compare the chapel of Charlemagne in Aachen. Altar enclosure and windows of those churches were highly decorated with transparent shallow string-like ornament that is called Croatian pleter (meaning to weed) because the strings were threaded and rethreaded through itself. Sometimes the engravings in early Croatian script – Glagolitic appeared. Soon, the glagolic writings were replaced with Latin on altar boundaries and architraves of old-Croation churches. St. ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... Charlemagne and Pippin the Hunchback. ... Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ornament is frequently used to denote: An element of decoration. ... Tablet inscribed with the Glagolitic alphabet The Glagolitic alphabet or Glagolitsa is the oldest known Slavonic alphabet. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The architrave is the lintel or beam that rests on the capitals of the columns. ...


By joining the Hungarian state in the twelfth century, Croatia lost its independence, but it didn't lose its ties with the south and the west, and instead this ensured the beginning of a new era of Central European cultural influence. Early Romanesque art appeared in Croatia at the beginning of 11th century with strong development of monasteries and reform of the church. In that period many valuable monuments and artefacts alongside Croatian coast were made, like Cathedral of St. Anastasia, Zadar (natively - St. Stošija) in Zadar (13th century). In Croatian Romanesque sculpture we have a transformation of decorative interlace relief (Croatian pleter) to figurative. The best examples of Romanesque sculpture are: wooden doors of Split cathedral done by Andrija Buvina (c.1220) and Stone portal of Trogir cathedral done by artisan Radovan (c. 1240). Early frescoes are numerous and best preserved in Istria. On them we can evidence the mixing of influences of Eastern and Western Europe. The oldest miniatures are from 13th century – Evangelical book from Split and Trogir. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Romanesque St. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Buddhist monastery near Tibet A monastery is the habitation of monks. ... Cathedral of St. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Andrija Buvina was a 13th century Medieval Croatian architect, sculptor, and painter. ... // The world in 1220 Middle Ages in Europe Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Events Mongols first invade Abbasid caliphate - Bukhara and Samarkand taken End of the Kara-Khitan Khanate, destroyed by Genghis Khans Mongolian cavalry Dominican Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope... Radovan was a sculptor and architect who lived in Dalmatia (Croatia) in the 13th century. ... Events Batu Khan and the Golden Horde sack the Ruthenian city of Kyiv Births Pope Benedict XI Deaths April 11 - Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn The Great Prince of Gwynedd Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile... A XIV Century fresco featuring Saint Sebastian Note: Fresco is the NATO reporting name of the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17. ... Istria (Croatian and Slovenian: Istra, Venetian and Italian: Istria), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ... Look up miniature in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Evangelical in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Cathedral of St Stephen in capital of Croatia, Zagreb, interior from 14th century
Cathedral of St Stephen in capital of Croatia, Zagreb, interior from 14th century
The Walls of Dubrovnik, UNESCO Heritage
The Walls of Dubrovnik, UNESCO Heritage

The Gothic art in 14th century was supported by culture of cities councils, preaching orders (like Franciscans), and knightly culture. It was the golden age of free Dalmatian cities that were trading with Croatian feudal nobility in the continent. Largest urban project of those times was complete building of two new towns – Small and Large Ston, and about a kilometre of wall with guard towers between them (14th century). After Hadrian's wall in Scotland, the longest wall in Europe. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 461 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1004 × 1304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 461 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1004 × 1304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Saint Stephen, the first Christian martyr, was one of the first seven deacons chosen by the early church, according to the Acts of the Apostles (vi. ... Location of Zagreb within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia RC diocese 1094 Free royal city 1242 Unified 1850 Government  - Mayor Milan Bandić Area [1]  - City 641. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 300 pixelsFull resolution (400 × 300 pixel, file size: 57 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 300 pixelsFull resolution (400 × 300 pixel, file size: 57 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Look up Gothic, goth, Goth in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... County Dubrovnik–Neretva Population 2,605 Mayor Vedran Antunica Ston on the map of Croatia Ston municipality within Dubrovnik-Neretva county Ston is a small town in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county of Croatia, located at the south of isthmus of the PeljeÅ¡ac (Sabioncello) peninsula. ... // Hadrians Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of Great Britain. ... This article is about the country. ...


Tatars destroyed Romanesque cathedral in Zagreb during their scourge in 1240, but right after their departure Zagreb got the title of a free city from Hungarian king Bela IV. Soon after bishop Timotej began to rebuild the cathedral in new Gothic style. Tatars (Tatar: Tatarlar/Татарлар), sometimes spelled Tartar (more about the name), is a collective name applied to the Turkic speaking people of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. ... Events Batu Khan and the Golden Horde sack the Ruthenian city of Kyiv Births Pope Benedict XI Deaths April 11 - Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn The Great Prince of Gwynedd Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile... B la IV (1206-1270) was the king of Hungary between 1235 and 1270. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about a title...


Zadar was independent Venetian city. The most beautiful examples of gothic humanism in Zadar are reliefs in gilded metal as in Arc of St Simon by artisan from Milan in 1380. Gothic painting is less preserved, and finest works are in Istria as fresco-cycle of Vincent from Kastv in Church of Holy Mary in Škriljinah near Beram, from 1474. From that times are the two of the best and most decorated illuminated liturgies done by monks from Split, – Hvals’ Zbornik (today in Zagreb) and Misal of Bosnian duke Hrvoje Vukčić Hrvatinić (now in Istanbul). For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... Venetian could mean of Venice of the venetia territory of the Republic of Venice of the venet nation the Venetian language The Venetian, a hotel and casino in Las Vegas, Nevada A venetian blind - a horizontally slatted window blind. ... Gilding is the art of spreading gold, either by mechanical or by chemical means, over the surface of a body for the purpose of ornament. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... September 8 - Battle of Kulikovo - Russian forces under Grand Prince Dmitri Donskoi of Moscow resist a large invasion by the Blue Horde, Lithuania and Ryazan, stopping their advance at Kulikovo. ... For building painting, see painter and decorator. ... Fresco by Dionisius representing Saint Nicholas. ... Events December 12 - Upon the death of Henry IV of Castile a civil war ensues between his designated successor Isabella I of Castile and her sister Juana who was supported by her husband, Alfonso V of Portugal. ... Look up Illumination in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may be refer to, or include, an elaborate... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ...

Cathedral of St Jacob in Šibenik from 1555, UNESCO World Heritage
Cathedral of St Jacob in Šibenik from 1555, UNESCO World Heritage
An illuminated page from Juraj Klović's Colonna hours, John Rylands Library, Manchester.
An illuminated page from Juraj Klović's Colonna hours, John Rylands Library, Manchester.

In 15th century, Croatia was divided between three states – northern Croatia was a part of Austrian Empire, Dalmatia was under the rule of Venetian Republic (with exception of Dubrovnik) and Slavonia was under Ottoman occupation. Dalmatia was on the periphery of several influences so religious and public architecture with clear influence of Italian renaissance flourished. Three works out of that period are of European importance, and will contribute to further development of Renaissance: Cathedral of St.Jacob in Šibenik, in 1441 by Juraj Dalmatinac; chapel of Blessed John from Trogir in 1468 by Nikola Firentinac; and Sorkočević’s villa in Lapad near Dubrovnik in 1521. Image File history File links Description: Saint Jacobs cathedral Source: Å ibenik, Croatia Date: 28. ... Image File history File links Description: Saint Jacobs cathedral Source: Å ibenik, Croatia Date: 28. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1576x2150, 388 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Juraj Julije Klović ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1576x2150, 388 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Juraj Julije Klović ... The John Rylands Library (inaugurated October 1899) is a collection of historic books and manuscripts in Manchester, England. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded... The Republic of Venice was a city-state in Venetia in Northeastern Italy, based around the city of Venice. ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ... Look up Ottoman, ottoman in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Italian Renaissance began the opening phase of the Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement in Europe that spanned the period from the end of the 14th century to about 1600, marking the transition between Medieval and Early Modern Europe. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... The front side of the cathedral with the rosetta and the portal The cathedral dome and sculptures The Cathedral of St. ... Å ibenik Å ibenik (German: Sibenning, Italian: Sebenico) is an historic town in Croatia, population 51,553 (2001). ... This page is about the year 1441. ... Giorgio Orsini (circa 1410 - 1473/1475) also nicknamed Georgius Mathaei Dalmaticus (in Latin) was a medieval sculptor and architect. ... August 26 - Baeda Maryam succeeds his father Zara Yaqob as Emperor of Ethiopia. ... Nikola Firentinac (Nicola Fiorentino) was a Renaissance sculptor and master architect. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ...


In northwestern Croatia, the beginning of the wars with the Ottoman Empire caused many problems but in the long term it both reinforced the northern influence (by having the Austrians as the rulers). With permanent danger by Ottomans from east, there was modest influence of renaissance, while fortifications thrived, like fortified city of Karlovac in 1579 and fort of Ratkay family in Veliki Tabor from 16th century. Some of the famous Croatian renaissance artists lived and worked in other countries, like brothers Laurana (natively - Vranjanin, Franjo and Luka), miniaturist Juraj Klović (also known as Giulio Clovio) and famous mannerist painter Andrija Medulić (teacher of El Greco). Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy [[Category:Former monarchies}}|Ottoman Empire, 1299]] Sultans  - 1281–1326... Table of Fortification, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... Karlovac (Croatia) Karlovac municipality within Karlovac county Karlovac Karlovac (German: Karlstadt or Carlstadt, Hungarian: Károlyváros and sometimes in Croatian, Marinograd) is a city and municipality in central Croatia. ... Events January 6 - The Union of Atrecht united the southern Netherlands under the Duke of Parma, governor in the name of king Philip II of Spain. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Laurana Kanan (also known as Lauralanthalasa Kanan), is a fictional character in the Dragonlance fantasy series, written by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, originally published by TSR, Inc. ... Portrait of Juraj Julije Klovic, El Greco Juraj Julije Klović or Giorgio Giulio Clovio (1498–1578), known worldwide as Giulio Clovio, was a Croatian miniaturist painter and by profession a priest. ... Holy Family with St Catherine, 1552, Vienna. ... El Greco (The Greek, 1541 – April 7, 1614) was a painter, sculptor, and architect of the Spanish Renaissance. ...

The church of St Vlaho (St Blasius) in Dubrovnik by night
The church of St Vlaho (St Blasius) in Dubrovnik by night

In 17th and 18th century Croatia was reunited with the parts of country that were occupied by Venetian Republic and Ottoman Empire. The unity attributed to sudden flourishing of Art in every segment. Image File history File linksMetadata Svvlaho_photo. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Svvlaho_photo. ... Saint Blaise can refer to: A saint, see Saint Blaise Many places: In France, the communes of Saint-Blaise, Alpes-Maritimes, in the Alpes-Maritimes département Saint-Blaise, Haute-Savoie, in the Haute-Savoie département Saint-Blaise-du-Buis, in the Isère département Saint-Blaise-la... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Republic of Venice was a city-state in Venetia in Northeastern Italy, based around the city of Venice. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy [[Category:Former monarchies}}|Ottoman Empire, 1299]] Sultans  - 1281–1326...


Large fortifications with radial plan, ditches and numerous towers were built because of constant Ottoman threat. The two largest ones were Osijek and Slavonski Brod. Later they become large cities. Urban planning of Baroque is felt in numerous new towns like Karlovac, Bjelovar, Koprivnica, Virovitica etc. Cities of Dalmatia also got baroque towers and bastions incorporated in their old walls, like the ones in Pula, Šibenik or Hvar. But biggest baroque undertaking happened in Dubrovnik in 17th century after catastrophic earthquake in 1667 when almost entire city was destroyed. Wall painting experienced flourishing in all parts of Croatia, from illusionist frescoes in church of Holy Mary in Samobor, St Catherine in Zagreb to Jesuit church in Dubrovnik. An exchange of artists between Croatia and other parts of Europe happened. The most famous Croatian painter was Federiko Benković who worked almost his entire life in Italy, while an Italian – Francesco Robba, did the best Baroque sculptures in Croatia. A ditch with water can be used for drainage and irrigation. ... Osijek (pronounced: []) is the fourth largest city in Croatia with a population of 114,616 in 2001. ... Slavonski Brod is the sixth largest city in Croatia, with a population of 64,612 in 2001. ... Karlovac (Croatia) Karlovac municipality within Karlovac county Karlovac Karlovac (German: Karlstadt or Carlstadt, Hungarian: Károlyváros and sometimes in Croatian, Marinograd) is a city and municipality in central Croatia. ... The first information you can find about Bjelovar is being one of the youngest cities in Croatia, but that fact doesn’t mean less. ... Koprivnica is a city in northern Croatia with a population of 30,994 (2001), the capital of the Koprivnica-Križevci county. ... Basic facts State: Croatia County: Virovitica-Podravina Coordinates: Elevation: 122 m Area: 178. ... Categories: Stub | Fortification ... Pula (Latin Colonia Pietas Iulia Pola; Italian Pola (the city has an official Croatian-Italian bilingualism [1]); Istriot Pula, German Polei) is the largest city in Istria, situated at the southern tip of the peninsula, with a population of 62,080 (2006). ... Å ibenik Å ibenik (German: Sibenning, Italian: Sebenico) is an historic town in Croatia, population 51,553 (2001). ... Hvar (Croatia) For the acronym, see HVAR. Hvar (Lesina in Italian) is a Croatian island in the Adriatic Sea, located off the Dalmatian coast. ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... // Events January 20 - Poland cedes Kyiv, Smolensk, and eastern Ukraine to Russia in the Treaty of Andrusovo that put a final end to the Deluge, and Poland lost its status as a Central European power. ... Samobor is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia. ... There are five St. ... Location of Zagreb within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia RC diocese 1094 Free royal city 1242 Unified 1850 Government  - Mayor Milan Bandić Area [1]  - City 641. ... Federiko Benković (1667-1753) was a prominent Croatian-Italian late Baroque painter. ...


In Austrian countries on the beginning of 19th century Romantic movement in Croatia was sentimental, gentle and subtle. At the end of 19th century architect Herman Bolle undertook one of the largest projects of European historicism – half-kilometer long neo-renaissance arcade with twenty domes on Zagreb cemetery Mirogoj. At the same time the cities in Croatia got important urban makeover. Pseudo building that emphasizes all three visual arts is former building of Ministry of Prayer and Education (so called "Golden Hall") in Zagreb (H. Bolle, 1895). Vlaho Bukovac brought the spirit of impressionism from Paris, and he strongly influenced the young artists (including the authors of “Golden Hall”). On the Millenium Exhibition in Budapest they were able to set aside all other artistic options in Austro-Hungary. Romantic and romanticism have a number of uses: Titles: Romantic (song) by Karyn White. ... Mirogoj Arcades Mirogoj Cemetery, Zagreb The Mirogoj Cemetery is considered to be one of the most beautiful cemetery parks in Europe and, thanks to its design, numbers among the more noteworthy landmarks in the City of Zagreb. ... Vlaho Bukovac (born Biagio Faggioni) (1855 - 1922) was a Croatian painter. ... Impressionism was a 19th century art movement that began as a loose association of Paris-based artists, who began exhibiting their art publicly in the 1860s. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...


The turbulent twentieth century re-oriented Croatia politically on many occasions and affected it in many other ways, but it couldn't significantly alter its already peculiar position at the crossroads of many different cultures.


Education

Zagreb University building

Croatia has seven universities in seven larger cities: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ...

Each of the universities in Croatia is composed of many independent "faculties" (Croatian fakultet, meaning college or department). Each independent college or department maintains its own administration, professional staff (also known as a "faculty") and campus. The colleges focus on specific areas of learning: Natural Sciences, Philosophy, Law, Engineering, Economy, Architecture, Medicine, and so on. Although a university's colleges or departments are usually located in the same city as the administration of the university, sometimes they are not. For example, Zagreb University's Faculty of Metallurgy is located in the city of Sisak. The University of Zagreb (Croatian SveučiliÅ¡te u Zagrebu, Latin Universitas Studiorum Zagrabiensis) is the oldest Croatian university in continuous operation and also the oldest university in southeastern Europe. ... Location of Zagreb within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia RC diocese 1094 Free royal city 1242 Unified 1850 Government  - Mayor Milan Bandić Area [1]  - City 641. ... The University of Split (Croatian SveučiliÅ¡te u Splitu) is a university located in Split, Croatia. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... The University of Rijeka (Croatian SveučiliÅ¡te u Rijeci) is situated in the city of Rijeka with faculties also located in cities throughout the regions of Primorje, Istria and Lika. ... Rijeka (in local Croatian dialects Rika and Reka; Fiume in Italian and Hungarian. ... The Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek (Croatian ) is a university located in Osijek, Croatia. ... Josip Juraj Strossmayer (also Joseph Georg Strossmayer; February 4, 1815 – May 8, 1905) was a notable bishop, benefactor and a politician from Croatia. ... Osijek (pronounced: []) is the fourth largest city in Croatia with a population of 114,616 in 2001. ... The University of Zadar (Croatian SveučiliÅ¡te u Zadru, Latin Universitas Studiorum Jadertina) is a university located in Zadar, Croatia. ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... The University of Dubrovnik (Croatian SveučiliÅ¡te u Dubrovniku, Latin Universitas Studiorum Ragusina) is a university located in Dubrovnik, Croatia. ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ... Pula (Latin Colonia Pietas Iulia Pola; Italian Pola (the city has an official Croatian-Italian bilingualism [1]); Istriot Pula, German Polei) is the largest city in Istria, situated at the southern tip of the peninsula, with a population of 62,080 (2006). ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Sisak on the map of Croatia Sisak (German: Sissek, Hungarian: Sziszek, Italian: Siscia) is a city in central Croatia. ...


There are also a number of scientific institutes, including the Institute "Ruđer Bošković" in Zagreb that excels in physics, or the Energy Institute "Hrvoje Požar" also in Zagreb. An institute is a permanent organizational body created for a certain purpose. ...


The Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Zagreb is a learned society promoting language, culture, and science from its first conception in 1836. (The juxtaposition of the words typically seen in English as "Arts and Sciences" is deliberate.) The Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts (Latin Academia Scientiarum et Artium Croatica, Croatian Hrvatska akademija znanosti i umjetnosti) is the national academy of Croatia. ...


The Roman Catholic Church was instrumental in the founding of many educational facilities in Croatia. The Church continues to maintain numerous seminaries and theological faculties in the country, as well as the Pontifical Croatian College of St. Jerome for Croatian students in Rome. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... The Roman Catholic Church in Croatia is part of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope and curia in Rome. ... The Pontifical Croatian College of St. ...


People

Statue of King Tomislav by Robert Frangeš Mihanović in Zagreb
Statue of King Tomislav by Robert Frangeš Mihanović in Zagreb

Some of the people Croatians take special pride in include: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 667 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 667 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Frangeš Mihanovićs equestrian statue of King Tomislav in Zagreb Robert Frangeš Mihanović (October 2, 1872 - January 12, 1940) was a Croatian sculptor. ...

This list is far from inclusive: the list of Croatians includes all the people who influenced the Croatian culture and history. Tomislav was the first king of Croatia. ... Ante Starčević (born 1823 in Žitnik- died 1896 in Zagreb) was a Croatian politician in the times of the Kingdom of Hungary. ... Nikola Šubić Zrinski or Miklós Zrínyi, (1508-1566), Croatian and Hungarian hero, member of the Zrinski noble family. ... Marko Marulić (Split, August 18, 1450 - Split, January 5, 1524), Croatian poet, apologist and Christian humanist is generally considered the father of vernacular Croatian literature. ... Marin Držić (1508-1567) is considered the finest Croatian Renaissance playwright and prose writer. ... Faust Vrančić (1551, Šibenik - January 17, 1617, Venice), also known as Faust Verantius, was a humanist, philosopher, historian, lexicographer, and inventor. ... Rudjer Joseph Boscovich (first name also sometimes spelled Roger in English; Italian Ruggero Giuseppe Boscovich; Croatian and Serbian Ruđer Josip Bošković, Руђер Јосип Бошковић) (May 18, 1711 – February 13... Ivan Gundulić (Italian: Giovanni Gondola) (January 9, 1589 - December 8, 1638) is the most celebrated Croatian Baroque poet from Dubrovnik. ... Ban is a title of either Avar or Illyrian origin, the title was used in some states in central and south-eastern Europe between the 7th century and the 20th century. ... Josip Jelačić of Bužim (born 1801 in Petrovaradin, died 1859 in Zagreb; also spelled Jellachich) was the Ban of Croatia between March 23rd, 1848 and May 19, 1859. ... Ivan Meštrović (August 15, 1883 – January 16, 1962) was a Croatian sculptor. ... Nikola Tesla (1856-1943)[1] was a world-renowned Serbian inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer and electrical engineer. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Ivan Blaž Lupis Vukić (Giovanni Biagio Luppis) (1813/1814 – 1875) was a Croatian naval engineer who had invented the first self-propelled torpedo. ... Lavoslav (Leopold) Ružička (September 13, 1887 - September 26, 1976) was a Nobel Prize winner in chemistry, the first one from Croatia. ... Slavoljub Eduard Penkala (April 20, 1871 - February 5, 1922) was an engineer and inventor from Croatia. ... The parliament of Croatia is called Hrvatski Sabor in Croatian - the word sabor means an assembly, a gathering, a congress. ... Stjepan Radić (May 11, 1871 – August 8, 1928) was a Croatian politician and the founder of the Croatian Peasant Party (CPP, Hrvatska Seljačka Stranka) in 1905. ... Ivo Andrić. Ivo Andric; (hr/sr-lat:Ivo Andrić; sr-cyr:Иво Андрић) (October 9, 1892 in Dolac near Travnik (Bosnia and Herzegovina) – March 13, 1975 in Belgrade, then Yugoslavia), a Serbian-Croatian novelist, short story writer, and Nobel Prize... Miroslav Krleža (July 7, 1893 - December 29, 1981) was, arguably, the greatest Croatian writer of the 20th century. ... Franjo Tuđman (May 14, 1922 - December 10, 1999) was the first president of Croatia in the 1990s. ... The following is a list of prominent individuals who are Croatian people. ...


Places

Cathedral of St. Jacob in Šibenik
Cathedral of St. Jacob in Šibenik
Plitvice Lakes, IUCN Category II (National Park)
Plitvice Lakes, IUCN Category II (National Park)

The UNESCO has marked six places in Croatia as World Heritage: Image File history File links Description: Saint Jacobs cathedral Source: Å ibenik, Croatia Date: 28. ... Image File history File links Description: Saint Jacobs cathedral Source: Å ibenik, Croatia Date: 28. ... The front side of the cathedral with the rosetta and the portal The cathedral dome and sculptures The Cathedral of St. ... Å ibenik Å ibenik (German: Sibenning, Italian: Sebenico) is an historic town in Croatia, population 51,553 (2001). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 884 KB) Summary Plitvice lakes, Croatia, May 2003. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 884 KB) Summary Plitvice lakes, Croatia, May 2003. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada A national park is a reserve of land, usually, but not always (see National Parks of England and Wales), declared and owned by a national government, protected from most human development and pollution. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ...

As far as natural beauty goes, Croatia has eight national parks, mostly situated along the Adriatic coast. The Euphrasian Basilica is a minor basilica in Poreč, Croatia. ... Poreč (Italian Parenzo, Latin Parentium), (lat. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Šibenik Šibenik (Italian: Sebenico) is a historic town in Croatia, population 52,654 (2001), located in central Dalmatia where the Krka river flows into the Adriatic Sea. ... Coat of arms Trogir (Italian Traù, Latin Tragurium, Greek Tragurion, Hungarian Tengerfehérvár) is a historic town and harbour on the Adriatic coast in Split-Dalmatia county, Croatia, with a population of 10,907 (2001) and a total municipality population of 13,322 (2001). ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... The perystile viewving towards the entrance of Emperors aquarters Diocletians Palace is a building in Split, Croatia that was built by the emperor Diocletian the 3rd century AD. At the time it was built, there was no such city of Split, and the original town was built around... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (c. ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country Croatia County Dubrovnik-Neretva county Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ... Plitvice lakes The Plitvice Lakes ([plitvi], Croatian: Plitvička Jezera) are a national park in Croatia, situated at , in the Plitvice Lakes municipality, near the border with Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... There are eight national parks in Croatia. ... The Adriatic Sea is an arm of the Mediterranean Sea separating the Apennine peninsula (Italy) from the Balkan peninsula, and the system of the Apennine Mountains from that of the Dinaric Alps and adjacent ranges. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... There are eight national parks in Croatia. ... Brijuni, Brioni or Brioni Islands are a group of twelve small islands in the Northern Adriatic Sea, off the west coast of the Istrian peninsula in Croatia. ... Kornati Islands The Croatian Kornati archipelago (Italian: ) is located in central Dalmatia, south of Zadar. ... Categories: Croatian geography stubs | National parks of Croatia ... Categories: Croatian geography stubs | National parks of Croatia ... Plitvice lakes The Plitvice Lakes ([plitvi], Croatian: Plitvička Jezera) are a national park in Croatia, situated at , in the Plitvice Lakes municipality, near the border with Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Risnjak National Park (Croatian: Nacionalni park Risnjak) is a national park in Croatia. ... Sjeverni Velebit, lit. ...

Cuisine

Main article: Croatian cuisine

Croatian cuisine is heterogeneous, and is therefore known as "the cuisine of regions". Its modern roots date back to proto-Slavic and ancient periods and the differences in the selection of foodstuffs and forms of cooking are most notable between those on the mainland and those in coastal regions. Mainland cuisine is more characterized by the earlier proto-Slavic and the more recent contacts with the more famous gastronomic orders of today - Hungarian, Viennese and Turkish - while the coastal region bears the influences of the Greek, Roman and Illyrian, as well as of the later Mediterranean cuisine - Italian and French. Croatian cuisine is heterogeneous and is therefore known as the cuisine of regions, since every region has its own distinct culinary traditions. ...


A large body of books bears witness to the high level of gastronomic culture in Croatia, which in European terms dealt with food in the distant past, such as the Gazophylacium by Belostenec, a Latin-Kajkavian dictionary dating from 1740 that preceded a similar French dictionary. There is also Beletristic literature by Marulić, Hektorović, Držić and other writers, down to the work written by Ivan Bierling in 1813 containing recipes for the preparation of 554 various dishes (translated from the German original), and which is considered to be the first Croatian cookbook.


Sports

Main article: Sport in Croatia
  • Croatia at the Summer Olympics
  • Croatia at the Winter Olympics
  • Football in Croatia
  • Category:Basketball in Croatia

Since independence Croatia has been a fairly successful sporting country. ... Croatia, after declaring indenpendence from SFR Yugoslavia in 1991. ... Croatia, after declaring indenpendence from SFR Yugoslavia in 1991. ... Football in Croatia, called nogomet, is the most popular team sport. ...

Entertainment

// Sci-fi & horror comics artist Frazer Irving, while originally British, currently lives in Zagreb. ... This is a list of television channels that broadcast in Croatia and/or for a Croatian language audience: // Croatian Radiotelevision (HRT), state-owned public television HTV 1 - nation-wide concession (HRT) HTV 2 - nation-wide concession (HRT) HRT Plus - cable and satellite only, nation-wide concession public television Nova TV...

Architecture

Main article: Architecture of Croatia

Neolithic Bunja house near Å ibenik The architecture of Croatia has roots in a long history: the Croats have been inhabiting the area for thirteen centuries, but there are important remnants of the earlier periods still preserved in the country. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Culture of Croatia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (681 words)
The culture of Croatia has roots in a long history: the Croats have been inhabiting the area for thirteen centuries, but there are important remnants of the earlier periods still preserved in the country.
The early middle ages brought the great migration of the Slavs and this period was perhaps a Dark Age in the cultural sense until the successful formation of the Slavic states which coexisted with Italic cities that remained on the coast, each of them were modelled like Venice.
By joining the Hungarian state in the twelfth century, Croatia lost its independence, but it didn't lose its ties with the south and the west, and instead this ensured the beginning of a new era of Central European cultural influence.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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