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Encyclopedia > Culture of Cornwall

Cornwall, in the United Kingdom, though administratively part of England, has many cultural differences from the culture of England. These cultural differences are central to the Cornish independence movement, which advocates ceremonial independence from England. Motto: Onen hag oll (Cornish: One and all) Geography Status Ceremonial and (smaller) Non-metropolitan county Region South West England Population - Total (2004 est. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK... The culture of ENGLAND is sometimes difficult to separate clearly from the culture of the United Kingdom, so influential has English culture been on the cultures of the British Isles and, on the other hand, given the extent to which other cultures have influenced life in England. ... Cornish nationalism is a movement which seeks independence or greater autonomy for the area of Cornwall which advocates assert is not a county of England as is generally regarded, but a separate nation which has never been formally incorporated into England. ...


Due to its celtic-derived traditions and unusual constitutional status Cornwall is recognised as one of the six modern 'celtic nations' by the Celtic Congress and the Celtic League. Many celtic-derived traditions were dying out in the early 20th century but have recently increased in popularity. The International Celtic Congress is a cultural organisation that seeks to promote the Celtic languagues of the nations of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, Isle of Man. ... The Celtic League is a political and cultural organisation in the modern Celtic nations of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, Cornwall and the Isle of Man, as well as their Celtic languages // Aims The fundamental aim of the Celtic League is to contribute, as an international organisation, to the struggles of...

Contents


Music and festivals

Cornwall has a rich and vibrant folk music tradition which has survived into the present. Cornwall is well known for its unusual folk survivals such as Mummers Plays, the Furry Dance in Helston, and Obby Oss in Padstow. Often short Cornish festivals are called dy goel, feast day in Cornish, this term survives also in the English dialect of Cornwall as 'duggle'. There are two major branches to the tradition of the Mummers Play: Firstly the folk tradition of troupes of mummers performing street theatre and secondly the more formal Christian Mystery Plays. ... The Furry Dance (also known as the Floral Dance or Flora Dance) is one of the oldest customs still practiced in the British Isles. ... Location within the British Isles Helston (Cornish: Hellys or Henlys) is a small town in Cornwall, UK, at the northern end of the Lizard Peninsula. ... A hobby-horse is childs toy horse popular during the days before cars. ... Location within the British Isles. ...


Cornish players are regular participants in inter-Celtic festivals, and Cornwall itself has several lively inter-Celtic festivals such as Perranporth's folk festival. Perranporth is a village on the north coast of Cornwall, England, near to Newquay. ...


Golowan festival in Penzance is part of a much wider tradition of midsummer festivals where bonfires were lit on hilltops on Midsummer's Eve. The tradition of midsummer bonfires continues, albeit to a lesser extent than when fires could be seen on every hilltop, throughout Cornwall. A bagpipe band from Mid Argyll walk along Market Jew Street The Golowan Festival is held in Penzance during June each year. ...


Cornish Celtic music is a relatively large phenomenon given the size of the region. A recent tally found over 100 bands playing mostly or entirely Cornish folk music. Traditional dancing is associated with the music. These dance events are either troyls (a Cornish ceilidh) or Nozow looan, (literally "happy nights", a dance night more similar to a Breton fest noz, and generally appealing to a younger audience). Céilí (Irish reformed spelling), Cèilidh (Scottish reformed spelling), or Céilidh (older spelling in both languages), pronounced in either case, is the traditional Gaelic social dance in Ireland and Scotland. ... Traditional coat of arms This article is about the historical duchy and French province, as well as the cultural area of Brittany. ... The Fest Noz (translation: Festival of the Night) is a Breton traditional festival, similar to a céilí. There is traditional music, dancing and drinking, particularly of chouchen, a traditional drink made from fermenting honey in water. ...


There is a long tradition of processional dance and music in Cornwall. The best known tradition is the Helston Furry, but in reality this is just one such tradition. The term 'furry' is used generally to describe such a dance or associated tune. These bands have been referred to as 'crowders and horners' and generally have a motley mix of instruments with folk instruments such as the fiddle, bagpipe or crowdy crawn mixed up with brass, reed and anything that can be carried.


Kneehigh Theatre is one of the most high profile theatre companies in Cornwall. Their recient production of the Cornish legend Tristan & Yseult has toured thoughout the UK and internationally. Kneehigh Theatre is one of the most high profile Cornish Theatre companies. ... The Film Tristan and Isolde, the legend that grew from the stories of Arthur, was brought to life in the form of a spectacular opera of the same name by Wagner. ...


Historically Cornwall has had close links with Brittany and this is reflected in the music. The Cornish and Breton languages were mutually intelligible in Tudor times and there were many Bretons living in Cornwall before the Prayer Book Rebellion. Myths, saints, dances and tunes are often shared with Brittany. It has been noted that the Breton duchy flag is the exact inverse of the Cornish flag, whether there is a reason for this is unknown. Breton flags are popular in Cornwall and are often seen alongside the Cornish flag on car bumpers and at musical events. This link continues today with Cornish-Breton festivals such as 'aberfest' in Falmouth (aberfal) and the twinning of Cornish and Breton towns. Traditional coat of arms This article is about the historical duchy and French province, as well as the cultural area of Brittany. ... The Prayer Book Rebellion or Western Rebellion occurred in the southwest of England in 1549. ... Traditional coat of arms This article is about the historical duchy and French province, as well as the cultural area of Brittany. ... Saint Pirans Flag is regarded as the national flag of Cornwall and an emblem of the Cornish people. ...


The Cornish Gorseth (or gorsedh) is similar to the Welsh Gorsedd, and indeed was formed by the Welsh gorsedh at the request of Henry Jenner. The Cornish Gorsedh promotes the arts and the Cornish language through competitions at the open gorsedh. A gorsedd (SAMPA /gO:rsED/), occasionally spelled gorseth, plural gorseddau, is a community of bards. ... Henry Jenner ( 1848- 1934) was a Celtic scholar, Cornish cultural activist, and the chief originator of the Cornish language revival. ...


Language

The Cornish language is a celtic language related to Breton and Welsh, the Cornish language was the language of Cornwall before English. The language went into decline following the introduction of the English Prayer Book and by around 1800 had ceased to be used as a community language, (see main article for further discussion.) The Cornish language (in Cornish: Kernowek, Kernewek, Curnoack) is one of the Brythonic group of Celtic languages that includes Welsh, Breton, the extinct Cumbric and perhaps the hypothetical Ivernic. ...


After 1800 researchers began to study the language from remaining isolated speakers and in 1904 Henry Jenner published 'A Handbook in the Cornish Language' signifying the revival proper. Although less than 1% of Cornwall's population speak the language and 'mother tongue' speakers are in their tens rather than hundreds, the language continues to play a significant part in the culture of Cornwall. Henry Jenner ( 1848- 1934) was a Celtic scholar, Cornish cultural activist, and the chief originator of the Cornish language revival. ...


Many events will use Cornish, in short phrases, openings, greetings or names. There is a healthy tradition of music in the language, which can be enjoyed by non speakers. The vast majority of place names in Cornwall are derived from the language, and most people in Cornwall know a few words or phrases like, ironically, 'kernow bys vyken!' ('Cornwall forever!). Many Cornish houses, businesses, children, pets and boats are named in the language, thus it has use as a 'official community language' and any speaker will likely often be asked to provide translations. A sign of this role is that two of Cornwall's five MPs swore their oaths to the Queen in Cornish.


Food

Cornwall is famous for its pasties (a type of pie often containing meat), but saffron buns, Cornish Heavy (Hevva) Cake, Cornish fairings (biscuit), Cornish fudge and Cornish ice cream are also common. A Cornish pasty or Cornish pastie is a type of pie, originating in Cornwall, United Kingdom. ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ... A slice of Russian fudge Fudge is a type of confectionery, usually extremely rich and often flavored. ... Missing image Ice cream is often served on a stick Boxes of ice cream are often found in stores in a display freezer. ...


Cornwall with the South West shares clotted cream and many types of cider. There are also many types of beers brewed in Cornwall including a stout and there is some small scale production of wine. Clotted cream is a treacle-thick yellow cream made by heating and then leaving unhomogenised cows milk in shallow pans, for several hours. ... A pint of Strongbow cider. ... This article is about the drink; for the village in Devon England, see Beer, Devon. ... A pint of stout Stout is a dark beer made using roasted malts or roast barley. ... Wine is an alcoholic beverage produced by the fermentation of grapes and grape juice. ...


Religion

Traditionally, the Cornish have been nonconformists in religion. Celtic Christianity was a feature of Cornwall and many Cornish saints are commemorated in legends, churches and placenames. The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. ... This is a list of saints connected with Cornwall Saint Austell Saint Blaze Saint Breaca Saint Constantine Saint Erc Saint Gerren Geraint of Dumnonia Saint Just Saint Keyne Saint Levan Saint Marwenna Saint Menfre Saint Meriasek Saint Morwenna Saint Ouine Saint Petroc Saint Piran St. ...


In contrast to the Welsh language, the churches failed to produce a translation of the Bible into the local language, and this has been seen by some as a crucial factor in the demise of the language. The Bible was translated into Cornish in 2004. Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... The Bible (tanak/h in hebrew language) (sometimes The Holy Bible, The Book, Good Book, Word of God, The Word, or Scripture), from Greek (τα) βιβλια, (ta) biblia, (the) books, is the classical name for the Hebrew Bible of Judaism or the combination of the Old Testament and New Testament of Christianity...


In the 1540s, the Prayer Book Rebellion caused the deaths of thousands of Cornish people. The Prayer Book Rebellion or Western Rebellion occurred in the southwest of England in 1549. ...


The Methodism of John Wesley also proved to be very popular with the working classes in Cornwall in the 18th century. Methodist chapels became important social centres, with male voice choirs and other church-affiliated groups playing a central role in the social lives of working class Cornishmen. Methodism still plays a large part in the religious life of Cornwall today, although Cornwall has shared in the post-World War II decline in British religious feeling. The Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... John Wesley (June 17, 1703–March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who founded the Methodist movement. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties 17 million military deaths 7 million military deaths {{{notes}}} World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th century conflict that engulfed much of the globe and is accepted as the largest and...


In 2003, a campaign group was formed called Fry an Spyrys (free the spirit in Cornish) [1]. It is dedicated to disestablishing the Church of England in Cornwall and to forming an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion - a Church of Cornwall. Its chairman is Dr Garry Tregidga of the Institute of Cornish Studies. The Anglican Church was disestablished in Wales to form the Church in Wales in 1920 and in Ireland to form the Church of Ireland in 1869. The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Flag of the Church in Wales The Church in Wales (Welsh: Yr Eglwys Yng Nghymru) is a member Church of the Anglican Communion, consisting of six dioceses in Wales. ... The Church of Ireland is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ...


Sports and games

Cornwall has its own unique form of wrestling related to Breton wrestling. Cornish wrestling (or wrasslin as it is sometimes called in Cornish English) is a form of wrestling similar to judo, which has been established in Cornwall (South West Britain) for several centuries. ...


Cornwall's other national sport is hurling, a kind of medieval football played with a silver ball. Hurling is distinct from Irish Hurling. The sport now takes place in St Columb and St Ives only. For the Irish sport of hurling, see Hurling Hurling the silver ball (Cornish: Hurlian) is an old sport found still in some parts of Cornwall, England. ... For the Cornish sport of Hurling, please see Hurling the Silver Ball Hurling is a team sport of Celtic origin, played with sticks and a ball. ... St Columb may refer to: The celtic saint, Columba St Columbs Cathedral, Londonderry St. ... One of these three places is famous for the nursery rhyme and riddle As I Was Going to St Ives though it is not entirely clear which. ...


Rugby has a large following in Cornwall. The county team often drawing very large crowds of supporters, dubbed Trelawny's Army. Football and Cricket are played more, with most villages and towns having clubs, but it is Rugby that captures the imagination and when the Cornish rugby team go to play in the county championships everyone in the county takes big notice of the events. If the side reaches the finals at Twickenham Stadium, home of the English Rugby Union, as many as 50,000 Cornishmen (a tenth of the population) go to see the final. The last success was in 1999, when the county side beat Gloucestershire. Image from a test-match between Ireland and the New Zealand All Blacks. ... Sir Jonathan Trelawney (March 24th 1650, Trelawny, Cornwall - July 19th 1721, Chelsea, Middlesex) was Bishop of Bristol, Exeter and Winchester. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... For the insect, see Cricket (insect). ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in southwest England. ...


Cornwall has produced many fine rugby players who have represented England. Such players as Phil Vickery, Trevor Woodman and Graham Dawe have all represented England, along with Andy Reed who has represented Scotland due to having a Scottish grandparent. Phil Vickery MBE (born 14 March 1976) is an English rugby union footballer who plays prop for Gloucester and England, and was part of the England side that won the 2003 Rugby World Cup. ... He went to Liskeard School in Cornwall. ...


Also, the Cornish rugby team can boast an Olympic silver medal. In 1908, they won the County Championship for the first time, and the prize was to represent England at rugby in the 1908 Olympic Games. They lost to Australia 32-3 in the final, and to this day remain the only county side to represent England at rugby in the Olympics, since rugby is currently no longer an Olympic sport. For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The fifth modern Olympic games, originally scheduled to be held in Rome, were instead held in 1908 in London, England. ...


Due to its large coastline, various maritime sports are popular in Cornwall, notably sailing, surfing and gig rowing. International events are frequently held in Cornwall. Cornwall will host the Inter Celtic Watersports Festival in 2006 and the Isles of Scilly hosts the World Pilot Gig Championships every year. Wooden sailing boat Sailing is the skillful art of controlling the motion of a sailing ship or smaller boat, across a body of water using wind as the source of power. ... Surfing outside Kaneohe Bay, Hawai‘i. ... The colourful lignup of gigs on St. ... This article concerns those peoples who consider themselves, or have been considered by others, to be Celts in modern times. ... Water sport most commonly refers to a sport which is played in the water. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2004 a campaign was started to field a Cornish national team in the 2006 commonwealth games. [2]


Euchre is a popular card game in Cornwall, it is normally a game for four players consisting of two teams. Its origins are unclear but some claim it is a Cornish game. There are several leagues in Cornwall at present. Euchre is a trick-taking card game played in many parts of the world. ... The Klondike Solitaire game that comes with Gnome. ...


Cornish literature

The earliest Cornish literature is in the Cornish language, Cornwall produced a substantial amount of passion plays during the Middle Ages. Many are still extant, and provide valuable information about the Cornish language. These were performed in round 'plen a gwary' outside theatres. A Passion play is a dramatic presentation depicting the suffering and death of Jesus. ... The Cornish language (in Cornish: Kernowek, Kernewek, Curnoack) is one of the Brythonic group of Celtic languages that includes Welsh, Breton, the extinct Cumbric and perhaps the hypothetical Ivernic. ...


There is much tradition folklore in Cornwall, often tales of giants, mermaids or the 'pobel vean' (little poeple.) These are still suprisingly popular today, with many events hosting a 'droll teller' to tell the stories. Such myths and stories have found much publishing success, particularily for children's books.


Writing in the Cornish dialect has generally been overshadowed by the Cornish language. However poems and short stories have been published, often with a typically Cornish humour.


Cornish World is a colour magazine covering all aspects of Cornish life, it has proved popular with the descendants of Cornish emigrants as well as Cornish residents, it is produced in Cornwall. It includes a column in the Cornish language.


Notable Cornish writers include Arthur Quiller-Couch, alias "Q", Jack Clemo, deaf short story writer, and D M Thomas, acclaimed author and poet. Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (November 21, 1863 - May 12, 1944) was a British writer, who published under the pen name of Q. Born in Cornwall, he was educated at Newton Abbot College, at Clifton College, and Trinity College, Oxford and later became a lecturer there. ... Reginald John Clemo (Jack Clemo) (March 11, 1916 - July 25, 1994) was a British poet and writer, strongly associated both with his native Cornwall and his Christian belief. ... Donald Michael Thomas, known as D. M. Thomas (1935-), is an English novelist, poet, and translator. ...


Daphne du Maurier lived in Cornwall and set many of her novels there, including Rebecca, Jamaica Inn, Frenchman's Creek, My Cousin Rachel, and The House on the Strand. She is also noted for writing Vanishing Cornwall. Dame Daphne du Maurier DBE (May 13, 1907 – April 19, 1989) was one of the most successful Cornish novelists of all time. ... Rebecca is a novel by prolific British author Daphne du Maurier, published in 1938 and likely the authors best-known work. ... The Jamaica Inn is a Free House on the borders of Bodmin Moor in Cornwall. ... Frenchmans Creek is a 1942 historical novel by Daphne du Maurier. ... My Cousin Rachel is a 1952 mystery film/romance film directed by Henry Koster and starred Olivia de Havilland, Richard Burton, Audrey Dalton, Ronald Squire, George Dolenz and John Sutton. ...


Charles de Lint, writer of many modern and urban fairy tales, set his novel The Little Country in the village of Mousehole in Cornwall. Charles De Lint (born December 22, 1951) is a Canadian fantasy author and Celtic folk musician. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Mousehole (pron: mowzel) is a fishing village near Newlyn in Cornwall, reputed to have one of the most beautiful harbours in the United Kingdom. ...


Cornwall is featured heavily in the beginning of The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley as the home of Igraine, wife of Gorlois, Duke of Cornwall. The castle at Tintagel has been said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. The Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradleys novel, tells the King Arthur myth from a feminist point of view. ... Marion Eleanor Zimmer Bradley (June 3, 1930 - September 25, 1999) was a prolific author of largely feminist fantasy novels such as The Mists of Avalon and was a steadfast encourager of equality (and quality) in writing. ... Situated on the north Atlantic coast of Cornwall, the village of Tintagel (pronounced with the stress on the second syllable; Cornish: Dintagell) and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with the legends surrounding King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. ...


Cornwall was the setting for the popular series of Poldark books by Winston Graham, and for the television series based on those books. Poldark is a series of historical novels by Winston Graham, and a popular BBC television series of the 1970s based on the books. ... Winston Graham (June 30, 1908-July 10, 2003) was an English novelist, best known for the Poldark series of historical novels. ...


Over Sea, Under Stone and Greenwitch from the series of fantasy novels The Dark Is Rising, by Susan Cooper, are set in Cornwall. Greenwitch, by Susan Cooper The 3rd book in the Dark is Rising Sequence, preceded by The Dark Is Rising, and followed by The Grey King Categories: Substubs ... The Dark is Rising is the name of a five-book series by Susan Cooper, as well as the name of the second of the five books. ... Susan Cooper (born in Burnham, Buckinghamshire, England, UK in May 1935) is a British author. ...


Cornish art

Cornwall has produced and inspired many artists. St. Ives is known for its artists and hosts the Tate Gallery. One of these three places is famous for the nursery rhyme and riddle As I Was Going to St Ives though it is not entirely clear which. ... Tate St Ives is an art gallery in St. ...


Celtic art is found in Cornwall, often in the form of Celtic crosses. Cornwall boasts the highest density of traditional 'celtic crosses' of any nation. In modern times many crosses were erected as war memorials and to celebrate events such as the millennium. Muiredacha Cross. ... A Celtic cross For Celtic Cross, the ambient/dub band see Celtic Cross (band) A Celtic cross combines the cross with a ring surrounding the intersection. ... This memorial in England lists the names of soldiers who died in the First World War. ... A millennium is a period of time, literally equal to one thousand years (from Latin mille, thousand, and annum, year). ...


Cornish film

Numerous films, short and long, have been made in Cornwall. The cornish film industry is well supported by organisations such as war-rag. The celtic film festival allows entries from cornish film makers and will be held in Falmouth in 2006. Also the Goel fylm kernow/cornwall film festival is held once a year and supports cornish film making in either language. Map sources for Falmouth, Cornwall at grid reference SW810325 Falmouth (Cornish: Aberfal) is a seaport on the south coast of Cornwall in the United Kingdom. ...


Goel fylm Kernow hosts workshops, screenings and the "govynn kernewek" compitition in which applicants present their idea for a film in the cornish language and win money, material and knowledge support to make it. Films made due to this award include "kernow's kick ass kung fu kween's ", a kung fu film in cornish


The only feature length film in the Cornish language is 'Hwerow Hweg', filmed alongside an english version, due to several unusual desicions it wasn't as popular as hoped. However there are a great many short films in the language.


However many film-makers working solely in english will refer to themselves as cornish film makers. Their films often make use of cornish themes, landscape and way of life. Certainly the concept of a cornish film industry exists, the term 'Oggywood' has been coined (from oggy meaning pasty and hollywood.) A Cornish pasty or Cornish pastie is a type of pie, originating in Cornwall, United Kingdom. ...


Traditional dress

"Traditional dress" of cornwall includes bal maiden's gear, and fishermans smocks.


Cornish Kilts have become popular,though the accuracy of them is debatable. There are some carvings showing kilts, but the style is not nessesarily the same as the scottish style kilts worn today. Debate has also existed about whether the kilts should use tartan, it has been argued that plain black kilts should be worn. However the most common kilt used is a pleated scottish style with a duchy shield style sporran and made of the cornish national tartan.


The cornish national tartan was designed by E.E Morton Nance using colours traditionaly associated with Cornwall. Fragments of tartan were found in Penwith. Penwith (Cornish: Penwyth) is a local government district in Cornwall, UK. It is the westernmost district in the UK, other than the Isles of Scilly. ...


Cornish studies

The Institute of Cornish Studies, established in 1970, moved to the new Combined Universities in Cornwall Campus at Tremough, Penryn in October of 2004. The institute is a branch of the University of Exeter. The Combined Universities in Cornwall is a centre of higher education located at the site of an abandoned girls convent, in Tremough, Cornwall, England. ... Map sources for Tremough at grid reference SW775345 Tremough is a suburb of Falmouth in Cornwall, England. ... Market Street in 2005, looking south Map sources for Penryn at grid reference SW782345 Penryn (Cornish: Pennrynn, from Pen-ryn meaning promontory) is a town in Cornwall, England on the Penryn river. ... The University of Exeter is the principal University in the English city of Exeter, in Devon. ...


On Cornish history, Philip Payton professor of Exeter University's department of Cornish studies has written Cornwall: A History as well as editing the Cornish studies series.


Mark Stoyle Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History at the University of Southampton asks ‘Are the Cornish English?’in his book West Britons a work on Cornish history exploring the nature of Cornishness in the early modern period. University of Southampton Dolphin logo The University of Southampton is a British university situated in the city of Southampton, on the south-coast of the United Kingdom. ...


John Angarrack of the human rights organisation Cornwall 2000 has produced two books to date. Breaking the Chains and Our Future is History are polemical reexaminations of Cornish history and identity.


A detailed overview of literature is provided by A. M. Kent's 'The Literature of Cornwall'. It covers everything from medieval mystery plays to more recent literary works that draw on the Cornish landscape.


Symbols

Saint Piran's Flag, a white cross on a black background is often seen in Cornwall. The Duchy of Cornwall shield of 15 gold bezants on a black field is also used. Because of these two symbols black,white and gold are considered colours symbolic of cornwall. Saint Pirans Flag is regarded as the national flag of Cornwall and an emblem of the Cornish people. ... The standard of the Duchy of Cornwall. ... Bezants is a medieval name for gold coins. ...


The chough (in Cornish = palores) is also used as a symbol of Cornwall. In cornish poetry the chough is used to symbolise the spirit of cornwall. Also there is a cornish belief that King Arthur lives in the form of a chough. "Chough" was also used as a nickname for Cornish people. Binomial name Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax (Linnaeus, 1758) The Red-billed Chough, or just Chough (pronounced ), Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax is a member of the crow family, Corvidae. ... King Arthur is an important figure in the mythology of Great Britain, where he appears as the ideal of kingship in both war and peace. ...


An anvil is sometimes used to symbolise cornish nationalism, particularily in its more extreme forms. This is a reference to 'Michael An Gof' , 'the smith' a leader of a Cornish rebellion. Michael An Gof (also known as Michael Joseph; An Gof is Cornish for blacksmith) and Thomas Flamank (a Bodmin landowners son and London lawyer) led the Cornish Rebellion of 1497, in which rebels marched on London to protest at King Henry VIIs levying of a tax with which...


Fish, tin and copper together are used as they show the 'traditional' three main industries of Cornwall. Tin has a special place in the Cornish culture, the 'stannary parliment' and 'cornish pennies' are a testament to the former power of the tin industry.Cornish tin is highly prized for jewelery, often of mine engines or celtic designs.


See also

The Cornish language (in Cornish: Kernowek, Kernewek, Curnoack) is one of the Brythonic group of Celtic languages that includes Welsh, Breton, the extinct Cumbric and perhaps the hypothetical Ivernic. ... Cornish nationalism is a movement which seeks greater autonomy for the area of Cornwall which advocates assert is not a county of England as is generally regarded, but a separate nation which has never been formally incorporated into England. ... The Cornish are a celtic ethnic group primarily found in Cornwall. ... Note: This list includes people of Cornish birth, parentage, or longtime residence. ...

External links

  • The Institute of Cornish Studies
  • Real Cornwall Explores the themes of Food & Drink, People & Places, Sports & Games and Arts & Media.
  • An Daras Cornish culture
  • BBC Nations - Cornish history by Dr Mark Stoyle Look for The Cornish: A Neglected Nation?
  • Tyr Gwyr Gweryn an alternative view of Cornish history
  • The Trevithick Society A charitable organisation involved in Industrial Archaeology and the industrial past in Cornwall
  • The London Cornish Association
  • Cornish World Cornwall's biggest independent magazine
  • Cumpas A charitable organisation which aims to protect, research and promote traditional Cornish music
  • Cornwall Rugby Union Home to the Cornish Rugby Football Union

 
 

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