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Encyclopedia > Cultural views of suicide
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Various human cultures may have views on suicide not directly or solely linked to religious views of suicide. Image File history File links Wiki_letter_w. ... There are a variety of religious views of suicide. ...

Suicide
Types of suicide
Teenage suicide
Euthanasia
Murder-suicide
Suicide bombing
Ritual suicide
Cult suicide
Mass suicide
Suicide pact
Internet suicide
Copycat suicide
Forced suicide
Suicide-by-cop
History and Methodology
History of suicide
Famous suicides
Parasuicide (threats of suicide)
Suicide methods
Suicide note
Suicide watch
Views on suicide
Cultural
Legal
Medical
Philosophical
Religious
(Religious and Philosophical)
Right to die
Resources for dealing with suicidal thoughts
Crisis hotline
Suicide prevention
Crisis hotlines by country
Medical views of suicide
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Contents

Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life. ... Teenage suicide is an act where a teenager feels it necessary to kill themselves, suicide. ... A euthanasia machine. ... A murder suicide is an act in which an individual kills one or more other persons immediately before, or while killing himself. ... A suicide attack is an attack in which the attacker or attackers intend and expect to die (see suicide). ... Ritual suicide is the act of suicide motivated by a religious, spiritual, or traditional ritual. ... Cult suicide is that phenomenon by which some religious groups, in this context often referred to as cults, have led to their membership committing suicide. ... Mass suicide occurs when a number of people kill themselves together or for the same reason and is usually connected to a real or perceived persecution. ... A suicide pact describes the suicides of two or more individuals in an agreed-upon plan. ... An Internet suicide is a suicide pact made between individuals who meet on the Internet. ... A copycat suicide is defined as a duplication or copycat of another suicide that the person attempting suicide knows about either from local knowledge or due to accounts or depictions of the original suicide on television and in other media. ... Forced suicide is a method of execution where the victim is given the choice of commiting suicide, or facing an alternative they perceive as worse - like suffering torture, or having friends or family members killed. ... Suicide-by-cop is a suicide method in which someone deliberately acts in a threatening way towards a law enforcement officer, with the main goal of provoking a lethal response (e. ... Suicide has been part of the history of the world - people of all walks of life had committed suicide over the years. ... A list of people who have committed suicide. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of intentionally ending ones own life. ... This is a list of a number of common suicide methods that are used by people who wish to commit suicide. ... Kurt Cobains alleged suicide note. ... Suicide watch is the act of a prison officer making sure that a prisoner does not commit suicide because they show intentions of doing so. ... This page concerns suicide. ... Modern medical views on suicide consider suicide to be a mental health issue. ... There are a variety of philosophical views of suicide. ... There are a variety of religious views of suicide. ... Suicide, as a central feature of human life, has long fascinated human society. ... For the 1987 film, see Right to Die (film) The term right to die (also: Dying with Dignity) refers to various issues around the death of an individual when that person could continue to live with the aid of life support or in a diminished or enfeebled capacity. ... Wikipedia contains a list of crisis hotlines by country. ... Various suicide prevention strategies have been used: Promoting mental resilience through optimism and connectedness. ... List of crisis hotlines by country USA - 1-800-784-2433 (1-800-SUICIDE) National Hopeline Network USA - 1-800-273-8255 (1-800-273-TALK) National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Links http://www. ... Modern medical views on suicide consider suicide to be a mental health issue. ...


East Asian Views

China

Chinese culture has historically taken an ambivalent view on suicide. It has been commonly mentioned throughout Chinese history and frequently tolerated, if not explicitly sanctioned. It is frequently used as a means of escaping tragedy and shame, an especially strong pressure given the collective aspects of traditional Chinese culture. Ritual suicide has historically been relatively common, particularly as a form of political protest. This is the current collaboration of the week! Please help improve it to featured article standard. ... Ritual suicide is the act of suicide motivated by a religious, spiritual, or traditional ritual. ...


Nonetheless, many moral systems dominant in traditional China prohibited or looked disfavorably upon suicide, including Buddhism and Confucianism. (See also Chinese bioethics) However, even in these cases, exceptions were often made. Buddhism (Pāli Buddhadhamma or Sanskrit Buddhadharma) is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, who lived in the 5th century BCE. Buddhism spread throughout the ancient Indian sub-continent in the five centuries following his death, and propagated into Central, Southeast, and... Shrine of Confucius in Thian Hock Keng in Singapore. ...


Suicide has been closely tied with gender in Chinese culture, both historically and today. There are countless examples of females committing suicide in pre-modern Chinese history, usually as a result of oppression or misfortune, such as family members (particularly husbands and mothers-in-law) looking upon them in condemnation, or when women fell into shame. In the latter cases, it was viewed as an honorable way to escape shame – especially because the repercussions of shame typically fell not merely on the individual, but to an immense degree upon the individual's extended family.


Suicide was also glamorised by popular stories among the people, in which lovers unable to be together in life because of various reasons, were joined together in death. An example is that of the Butterfly Lovers, and also Pan Yu-Ann and Su Qi in "A Dream of Red Mansions", one of the four great works of Chinese literature. In these stories, death by suicide was the only way that they could be together.


During the Cultural Revolution in China (1966-1976), numerous publicly-known figures, especially intellectuals and writers, are reported to have commited suicide, typically to escape persecution, typically at the hands of the Red Guards. Some, or perhaps many, of these reported suicides are suspected by many observers to have, in fact, not been voluntary but instead the result of mistreatment. Some reported suicides include famed writer Lao She, among the best-known 20th century Chinese writers, and journality Fan Changjiang. A poster during the Cultural Revolution. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... Red Guards refer to socialist or communist militia formed to instigate, support, or defend communist revolutions. ... Lao She (老舍, Pinyin: LÇŽo ShÄ›), (February 3, 1899 - August 24 ?, 1966) was a noted Chinese writer. ... Fan Changjiang (Trad. ...


Today, suicide among females in China is at an extraordinarily high rate, reckoned to be the highest in the world. This typically occurs among poorly educated rural women. Because of the difficulties in transportation in the rural environment, women who attempt suicide are frequently successful in ending their lives because they cannot be brought to medical care early enough to be treated successfully. Some researchers, such as Canadian physician Michael Phillips have called to light this tragic phenomenon, and authorities in China are gradually awakening to the problem. Physician examining a child A physician is a person who practices medicine. ... Michael Phillips is a prominent Canadian psychiatrist known for his work in mental illness and suicide prevention. ...


India

Like contemporary Asian cultures China and Japan, Indian culture has historically taken an ambivalent view on suicide. It has been commonly mentioned throughout Indian history and frequently tolerated. Ritual suicide has historically been relatively common, particularly as a form of political protest, warrior code or as a religious/philosophical undertaking. Many notable Indian rishis, kings and other figures have died through suicide for these reasons. In Hinduism, a Rishi () is a sage and/or seer who heard (cf. ...


The religions of India, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism, have traditioanlly opposed suicide, except in extraordinary circumstances. Hindu, Jain and Buddhist monks would sometimes practice sallekhana, where starvation was used as a form of suicide that prevented rash decisions, and so was used with full consideration, perhaps as a way of ending one's life in their final years, or as a form of extreame protest, as during the Indian Independence movement, when various freedom fighters, such as Mahatma Gandhi would declare 'fast unto death'. Occasionally self-immolation was also practiced for similar reasons - perticularily by Hindu monks who would enter their own funeral pyre at the end of their lives as a form of devotion/renoucement, and Buddhist monks for similar reasons. Hinduism (Sanskrit/Hindi —, hindi , and ) is a religion originating in the Indian subcontinent, based on the Vedas, and among the oldest religious traditions still practiced today. ... Buddhism (Pāli Buddhadhamma or Sanskrit Buddhadharma) is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, who lived in the 5th century BCE. Buddhism spread throughout the ancient Indian sub-continent in the five centuries following his death, and propagated into Central, Southeast, and... Pre-Kushana Ayagapatta from Mathura Jainism (pronounced in English as //), traditionally known as Jain Dharma (जैन धर्म), is a religion and philosophy originating in the prehistory of South Asia. ... The Golden Temple is a sacred shrine for Sikhs Sikhism (Punjabi: , ), is a panentheistic religion based on the teachings of ten Gurus who lived in northern India during the 16th and 17th centuries. ... Sallekhana (also called Santharo, Prayopavesha Samadhi, or Samnyasa-marana) is a Hindu or Jainist practise of voluntary death through fasting - akin to suicide. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Devanagari: मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी; Gujarati: મોહનદાસ કરમચંદ ગાંધી; October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) was a prominent civil rights leader during the Indian independence movement. ... Thích Quảng Ðức pictured during his self-immolation. ...


Like other East Asian cultures, 'death before dishonour' was a tenet of warrior classes or kshatriya, and thus military or martial suicide was permitted when defeat was deemed inevitable, such as in the case of Rajput warriors, who would ride out to meet death when a siege was inevitably doomed, whilst their womanfolk would immolate themselves to avoid capture, molestation and rape by dishonourable enemies such as the Arab, Central Asian and Persian raiders of medieval times. This practice was known as jauhar. There are numerous examples of Indian warrior classes such as Gurkhas, Sardars and Rajputs giving their lives to further a battle or - many of these warriors gained renown even amongst the British - many Indians during World War 2 allegedly astonished even Japanese troops with their willingness to die for honour, and launch kamikaze like attacks. Kshatriya is the title of the Hindu military order. ... Rajputs (anonymous, c. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب ) are a large and heterogeneous ethnic group found throughout the Middle East and North Africa, originating in the Arabian Peninsula of southwest Asia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Jauhar (sometimes spelt jowhar) was originally the voluntary death on a funeral pyre of the queens and royal womenfolk of defeated Rajput castles in order to avoid capture and consequent molestation. ... Gurkha Soldiers (1896) Wives and children of Gurkha Soldiers (1896) Gurkha (or Gorkha) are a people from Nepal who take their name from the former city-state of Gorkha, which went on to found the Kingdom of Nepal later on. ... The word Sardar (, IPA ) originally came from Afghanistan (from the Pashto language of Indo-Iranian language family), where it means a commander. ... A Rajput (possibly from Sanskrit rāja-putra, son of a king) is a member of a prominent caste who live throughout northern and central India, primarily in the northwestern state of Rajasthan. ...


In some parts of India, an extreame interpretation of select ancient philosophical texts led to the practice of sati, where a woman would immolate herself to join her husband upon his death, and theoretically vis a vis. In practice this was abused, with women often being forced to commit suicide in this manner by the local rural communities to prevent the burden of a widow on resources. Sati may refer to any of the following: The Hindu Goddess Sati, daughter of Daksha and wife of Shiva A social practise in some parts of India in past centuries, often spelt Suttee The Buddhist Sati; see mindfulness. ...


Japan

Similarly to China and India, Japanese culture takes a view that, in comparison to European and American cultures, is relatively tolerant of suicide. However, recent events in Japan and some of the highest rates of suicide in the world among younger people have forced the Japanese government to take a more critical view of suicide as a "problem". As in China, suicide is traditionally viewed as a means of maintaining one's honor, perhaps more so - a ritual self-disembowelling known as Seppuku was in common use in Feudal Japan, and while this tradition largely faded out with the demise of the Samurai and the introduction of a western-style society, many young Japanese people of today still perceive suicide as an acceptable means to avoid bringing shame or dishonor upon their family. Seppuku with ritual attire and second (staged) General Akashi Gidayu preparing to commit Seppuku after losing a battle for his master in 1582. ...


It is a common misconception that the act of kamikaze also belongs to Japanese culture. However, it was a tactic devised during the Second World War by the Japanese air force and was used neither prior to nor after the war. The term "Kamikaze" has no such connotation in Japanese, instead meaning "godly wind", which originated after not one, but two storms protected Japan from invasion by destroying the invading fleets of Genghis Khan from Mongolia in the 13th Century. A kamikaze (just left of center near the top border), a Mitsubishi Zero in this case, about to hit the USS Missouri. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cultural views of suicide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (847 words)
In the latter cases, it was viewed as an honorable way to escape shame – especially because the repercussions of shame typically fell not merely on the individual, but to an immense degree upon the individual's extended family.
Suicide was also glamorised by popular stories among the people, in which lovers unable to be together in life because of various reasons, were joined together in death.
During the Cultural Revolution in China (1966-1976), numerous publicly-known figures, especially intellectuals and writers, are reported to have commited suicide, typically to escape persecution, typically at the hands of the Red Guards.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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