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Encyclopedia > Cult following

A cult following is a group of fans devoted to a specific area of pop culture. Cult followings most often develop around television shows, films, and books. Some comic books, video games, musicians and writers also gain cult followings. Non-media items may also have what could be considered cult followings, for example the soft drink Tab. Cult typically refers to a cohesive social group devoted to beliefs or practices that the surrounding culture considers outside the mainstream, with a notably positive or negative popular perception. ... A cult of personality or personality cult arises when a countrys leader uses mass media to create a larger-than-life public image through unquestioning flattery and praise. ... In traditional usage, the cult of a religion, quite apart from its sacred writings (scriptures), its theology or myths, or the personal faith of its believers, is the totality of external religious practice and observance, the neglect of which is the definition of impiety. ... There are many meanings for the word cult: A practice within a religion; see cult (religion). ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... For more information on fans of football (soccer), see Football (soccer) culture. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... Cult television, like cult figures, cult film and cult radio, attracts a band of aficionados or appreciators, known as a cult following, devoted to a specific television series or fictional universe. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... Stub for New Cult Fiction Page Cult fiction is not cult following! Someone had placed a redirect page here. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A soft drink is a drink that contains no alcohol. ... Tab, (also spelled TaB), is a diet cola. ...


Cult followings are often dedicated enough that many people of similar interest are familiar with one another due to convention gatherings, concerts, message boards, Internet chat rooms, word of mouth, or shops featuring related items.


These dedicated followings are usually relatively small and pertain to items that don't have broad mainstream appeal. Look up mainstream in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


"Cult following" is also used to describe the more obsessive fans of established mainstream performers. For example, many persons have been interested in Michael Jackson's music or in Disney films, but some fans take their interest to extreme levels, hoarding vast amounts of collectibles. Some such "cult fans" occasionally veer into obsessive-compulsive behaviors or stalking; however, cult followings do not necessitate that individuals partake in such activities. And in such cases like (for example) The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, Led Zeppelin, U2, Prince and Pink Floyd. Even though these bands and artists have millions of fans, and are practically a household name, there are certain intensely devoted fans who know about every song on every album as opposed to just the songs that receive airplay; or these fans will buy imports and other rare items pertaining to the bands; or these fans were into the bands before they became mainstream. The Grateful Dead are the epitome of a cult band; their fans are called Deadheads. Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... Old logo from 1985-2006 Walt Disney Pictures refers to several different entities associated with The Walt Disney Company: Walt Disney Pictures, the film banner, was established as a designation in 1983, prior to which Disney films since the death of Walt Disney were released under the name of the... Hoarding is the storing of food or other goods. ... OCD redirects here. ... Stalking means criminally following or similarly harassing a person over an extended period. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Jerry Garcia later in life The Grateful Dead was an American rock band, which was formed in 1965 in San Francisco from the remnants of another band, Mother McCrees Uptown Jug Champions. ... Dead Heads are fans of the band The Grateful Dead. ...


Cult followings establish their own canons and cherish the notion of cult classics, which are individual items with cult followings. Cult followings are usually generated through a film or television show having targeted a particular genre, such as fantasy, sci-fi, comedy or horror, but other types of films or TV series can produce a cult following as well. Canon, in the context of a fictional universe, comprises those novels, stories, films, etc. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... Horror can mean several things: Horror (emotion) Horror fiction Horror film This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


While cult followings are unquestionably more prevalent in pop culture, examples of this phenomenon exist in serious culture as well, especially among certain sub-segments of the public, such as homosexuals and other cultural minorities. Thus we find cults of certain writers, such as Yukio Mishima, J.K. Rowling, H. P. Lovecraft, J.D. Salinger, Simone de Beauvoir and perhaps most famously, J.R.R. Tolkien; composers like Erik Satie or Edgard Varèse; or performers, like Maria Callas or Magda Olivero. Yukio Mishima ) was the public name of Kimitake Hiraoka , January 14, 1925–November 25, 1970), a Japanese author and playwright, famous for both his highly notable nihilistic post-war writings and the circumstances of his ritual suicide by seppuku. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: roll-ing; her former students used to joke with her name calling her the Rolling Stone), is a British fiction writer. ... This article is about the author. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) is an American author best known for The Catcher in the Rye, a classic coming-of-age story that has enjoyed enduring popularity since its publication in 1951. ... La Beauvoir redirects here; also see: Beauvoir (disambiguation). ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... Selfportrait of Erik Satie. ... Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (December 22, 1883 – November 6, 1965) was a French-born composer. ... Maria Callas in a casual moment, 1960s Maria Callas (Greek: Μαρία Κάλλας) (December 2, 1923 – September 16, 1977) was an American born, Greek dramatic coloratura soprano and perhaps the best-known opera singer of the post-World War II period. ... Magda Olivero (b. ...

Contents

Cult band

A cult band is a term often used to describe a rock and roll band with a dedicated base of fans whose appreciation of the band goes beyond merely enjoying their music. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ...


Cult bands often have a unique conception or musical style which has led to their cult status. It is this uniqueness which sets the band apart from others and which fans find attractive. This also has prevented some cult bands from achieving wider success, as some cult bands are known for experimentation or musical styles outside of mainstream tastes. Often, cult bands are no longer performing and recording, but continue to have a following. Indeed, the following today can be larger than when the band was still together.


Specific musical styles may also have a cult following of the entire subgenre, including ambient music, comedy rock, experimental music, intelligent dance music, hardcore punk, heavy metal, jam rock, japanoise, math rock, nintendocore, noise music, noise rock, outsider music, progressive rock, psychedelic music, ska, surf music and theme music. A genre is any of the traditional divisions of art forms from a single field of activity into various kinds according to criteria particular to that form. ... Ambient music refers to a kind of music that envelops the listener without drawing attention to itself [1] // The term ambient music was first coined by Brian Eno in the mid-1970s to refer to music that can be either actively listened to with attention or as easily ignored, depending... Comedy rock is a term used to describe rock music that mixes the music with general comedy. ... For experimental rock music, see experimental rock. ... Intelligent dance music (commonly IDM) is a genre of electronic music derived from dance music of the 1980s and early 1990s which puts an emphasis on novel processing and sequencing. ... Hardcore punk, now commonly known as hardcore, is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in North America in the late 1970s. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Jam rock is used to describe any variety of a rock band which includes notable improvisational passages within tunes or instrumental rocking out as a key element to musical performance. ... Japanoise is the label applied to the prolific and influential noise music scene in Japan, primarily in the 1980s and 1990s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nintendocore (or NEScore) is a subgenre of music inspired by metalcore music and the instruments which accompany 8-bit video game soundtracks[1], most notably those on the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)[2]. It is characterized by sounding similar to 8-bit video game music/chiptunes, often combined with other... Noise music is music composed of non-traditional musical elements, and lacks the structure associated with Western Music. ... Lightning Bolt Live at the Southgate House 2005. ... Outsider music is music performed either by social outsiders, who have no or few associates in the mainstream music business, or by musicians who choose to live and work in seclusion, often due to compromising behavioral or psychological conditions. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Psychedelia in music (or also psychedelic music, less formally) is a term that refers to a broad set of popular music styles, genres and scenes, that may include psychedelic rock, psychedelic folk, psychedelic pop, psychedelic soul, psychedelic ambient, psychedelic trance, psychedelic techno, and others. ... This article is about the genre. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture, particularly Orange County and other areas of Southern California. ... The theme music of a radio or television program is a piece that is written specifically for that show and usually played during the title sequence and/or end credits. ...


Cult fiction

Cult fiction is a term used to denote literature that has attracted a cult following. For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ...


Literature that tends to attract a cult following include banned books, transgressive fiction, controversial books, erotic literature and genre fiction. For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... Many societies have banned certain books. ... Transgressional fiction or transgressive fiction is a genre of literature that focuses on characters who feel confined by the norms and expectations of society and who use unusual and/or illicit ways to break free of those confines. ... This literature-related list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Erotic literature is a literary genre that either takes the form of erotica written to arouse the reader, or to give instruction in sexual technique. ... Genre fiction is a term for fictional works (novels, short stories) written with the intent of fitting into a specific literary genre in order to appeal to the fans of that genre. ...


There are three main categories of cult fiction.

  • Books that attract a cult following after being published in a different medium - e.g. TV; Film. Examples include Red Dwarf and Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.
  • Books that expand or 'spin-off' from another medium. Examples include the Doctor Who novels and toys..
  • Books that attract a cult following in their own right. These appear to arise less frequently than cult followings in other media.

Closely related are writers that may attract a cult following. Examples may include Kurt Vonnegut, Jane Austen, and Tom Robbins. TV redirects here. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... This article is about the British sitcom. ... The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy was first and foremost a 1978 radio comedy series written by Douglas Adams. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... This article is about the television series. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... 1870 engraving of Jane Austen, based on a portrait commissioned by her nephew for his 1870 Memoir of Jane Austen Jane Austen (16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist whose works include Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, Northanger Abbey, and Persuasion. ... Tom Robbins at a reading of Wild Ducks Flying Backward in San Francisco on September 24, 2005 Thomas Eugene Robbins (born July 22, 1936 in Blowing Rock, North Carolina) is an American author. ...


Cult figure

A cult figure or cult icon is a person who attracts the attention of a small band of aficionados. Some cult figures are well-known to the general public (Christopher Walken, Chuck Norris, Samuel L. Jackson, Christian Bale, Edward Norton, John Bunnell) while others are mostly obscure outside of a subculture (Bruce Campbell, Ed Wood Jr., Valérie Allain[1], Vanessa Duriès). The notoriety of cult figures may be contrasted with that of pop icons. Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... Carlos Ray Chuck Norris (born on 10 March 1940) is an American martial artist, action star, Hollywood actor, and recently, an internet phenomenon, who is best known for playing Cordell Walker on Walker, Texas Ranger. ... Samuel Jackson redirects here. ... Christian Charles Philip Bale (also known professionally as Christian Morgan Bale; born 30 January 1974) is an acclaimed British[2][3] Actor who is known for his roles in the films Newsies, American Psycho, Shaft, Equilibrium, The Machinist, Batman Begins, and The Prestige, among others. ... Ed Norton redirects here. ... John Bunnell appearing in Bad Santa John Edwin Bunnell (born 25 May 1944 in Pendleton, Oregon) is a former Sheriff of Multnomah County, Oregon. ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ... For the former baseball player of the same name, see Bruce Campbell (baseball). ... Edward D. Wood, Jr. ... Valérie Allain (born April 3, 1966) is a French actress. ... Vanessa Duriès Vanessa Duriès (a. ... For the British television series, see Pop Idol. ...


In most of the cases, the work of a cult figure is unusual or exists outside current trends in his or her field. Thus, his or her appeal is limited to only a small group.


Although most cult figures are artists and entertainers who are genuinely recognized for their talent, others gain a following mostly for strange behavior (Wesley Willis, Ellen Feiss) or particularly memorable 15 minutes of fame (William Hung, Clara Peller, Darva Conger). Wesley Willis (May 31, 1963 – August 21, 2003) was a musician and artist from Chicago. ... Ellen Feiss The image above is believed to be a replaceable fair use image. ... 15 minutes of fame (or famous for 15 minutes) is an expression coined by the American artist Andy Warhol. ... This article is about the American musician. ... The picture sleeve of a Wheres the Beef single, recorded by Coyote McCloud and Clara Peller, based on her legendary advertisement Clara Peller (August 4, 1902 – August 11, 1987), was an American who, as a senior citizen, starred in the legendary Wheres the beef? advertisement for Wendys... Darva Conger on the cover of the August 2000 issue of Playboy magazine. ...


Who is a cult figure?

The term cult figure is difficult to define and different people may or may not qualify as cult figures by different standards.


The term usually refers to someone who is admired by a small group of fans and not by the general public or at least not for the same reasons he or she is admired by the general public. For example, Christopher Walken and Crispin Glover are both known for their acting abilities to the general public, but to their cult followings Walken is better known for his recognizable mannerisms and Glover for his strange behavior and distinctive poetry. Actor Bruce Campbell, best known for his starring roles in the Evil Dead movies, a notable cult film series, has become a major cult figure, especially in Sci-Fi circles. Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... For the Scarling. ... Acting is the work of an actor or actress, which is a person in theatre, television, film, or any other storytelling medium who tells the story by portraying a character and, usually, speaking or singing the written text or play. ... For the former baseball player of the same name, see Bruce Campbell (baseball). ... For other uses, see The Evil Dead (disambiguation). ... Sci-fi is an abbreviation for science fiction. ...


The term usually does not refer to a person who is both a widely celebrated figure in culture at large and the object of the acute interest of many dedicated fans, such as Neil Young, Richey James Edwards, Buckethead, Johnny Cash, Syd Barrett, Marilyn Monroe, or George Lucas. The term also usually does not refer to a widely significant figure who is particularly important to a subculture, such as Judy Garland, Cher,Diana Ross, Boy George, and Madonna in gay culture or John Lennon, Phish, and Bob Marley in hippie and neo-hippie culture. This article is about the musician. ... Richey James Edwards (born Richard James Edwards, 22 December 1967) was the co-lyricist and guitarist of the Welsh rock band Manic Street Preachers. ... This article is about the avant-garde metal composer and musician. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Roger Keith Syd Barrett (6 January 1946 – 7 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. ... Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortensen;[1] June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe award winning[2] American actress, singer, model, Hollywood icon,[3] Cultural icon, beauty ideal,[4] fashion icon,[5] pop icon and sex symbol. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... This article is about the entertainer. ... For the author-illustrator, see Diana Ross (author). ... George Alan ODowd, better known as Boy George (born June 14, 1961 in Eltham, London) is a rock singer-songwriter and club DJ. He grew up in a large, working-class Irish family in Thurles, County Tipperary, Ireland. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... See labrys, black triangle. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about the reggae musician. ... For the British TV show, see Hippies (TV series). ...


In some cases, a cult following is so large or so infamous that the figure becomes a household name. Examples include Jimmy Buffett, Bruce Lee, and Elvira. Still these people are usually considered cult figures because a relatively small group of fans are responsible for their fame. Jimmy Buffett tours Pearl Harbor with United States Navy Admiral Jonathan Greenert, June 12, 2003 James William Jimmy Buffett (born December 25, 1946) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ... Bruce Lee (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: Lǐ Xiǎolóng; Cantonese Yale: Léih Síulùhng; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Chinese-American martial artist, philosopher, instructor, and martial arts actor widely regarded as the most influential martial artist of the 20th century and a... Cassandra Peterson (born September 17, 1951) is better known for her on-screen persona Elvira, Mistress of the Dark. She gained fame on Los Angeles television station KHJ wearing a black, gothic, cleavage-enhancing gown as host of Movie Macabre, a weekly horror movie presentation. ...


Cult film

Main article: Cult film

Cult film is a colloquial term for a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans (Such as Donnie Darko, and Pipedream). Often, cult movies have failed to achieve fame outside of this small group (however, there are a few exceptions.) Some cult movies have gone on to transcend their original cult status and have become recognized as classics, others are of the "so bad it's good" variety, and are destined to remain in obscurity. Some examples are horror films such as Little Shop of Horrors, The Rocky Horror Picture Show and Evil Dead which has spawned video games. Other cult film examples include A Clockwork Orange, Pulp Fiction, Blade Runner, Donnie Darko, Boondock Saints, and Blue Velvet. A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... For the fictional character, see Donald Darko. ... Pipedream is the first solo album from Lindisfarne front man Alan Hull. ... DVD cover showing horror characters as depicted by Universal Studios. ... Little Shop of Horrors is a title that can mean: The Little Shop of Horrors, the 1960 Roger Corman cult classic. ... The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a 1975 musical comedy film that parodies horror films. ... -1... Clockwork Orange redirects here. ... Pulp Fiction is an Academy Award-winning 1994 film directed by Quentin Tarantino, who co-wrote the screenplay with Roger Avary. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... For the fictional character, see Donald Darko. ... The Boondock Saints (1999) is a cult film about two Irish brothers in Boston who, in response to rampant organized crime, turn to vigilantism and are named Saints by the Boston press. ... Blue Velvet is an influential 1986 neo-noir mystery and thriller film written and directed by David Lynch. ...


Cult television

Cult television, like cult figures, cult film and cult radio, attracts a band of aficionados or appreciators, known as a cult following, devoted to a specific television series or fictional universe. A cult figure or cult icon is a person who attracts the attention of a small band of aficionados. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... Cult radio, like cult figure and its audio-visual equivalents cult television and cult film attracts a band of aficionados devoted to a particular program. ...


Although some cult TV series are science fiction shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Star Trek, Invader Zim, Doctor Who, seaQuest DSV, The X-Files, Supernatural, The Outer Limits and The Twilight Zone, many pilots or short-lived shows such as My So-Called Life, Fawlty Towers, Firefly, Lookwell, Twin Peaks, TV Funhouse and Invasion have also developed strong followings. A "cult" show can also be from the genres of drama, action adventure, animation, comedy, and children's series. Some unknown TV shows, such as Megas XLR, also have cult followings. For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Invader Zim, trademarked as Invader ZIM, is an award-winning[1] American animated television series that aired on and was produced by Nickelodeon. ... This article is about the television series. ... This section has been identified as trivia. ... The X-Files is an American Peabody, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning science fiction television series created by Chris Carter, which first aired on 10 September 1993, and ended on 19 May 2002. ... This article is about the US TV series. ... The Outer Limits is an American television series. ... The Twilight Zone is a television series created by Rod Serling. ... For other uses, see My So-Called Life (disambiguation). ... Fawlty Towers is a British sitcom made by the BBC and first broadcast on BBC2 in 1975. ... Firefly is an American science fiction television series created by writer/director Joss Whedon, creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel, under his Mutant Enemy Productions. ... Lookwell Pilot episode. ... For the hills in San Francisco, see Twin Peaks, San Francisco, California. ... TV Funhouse is the title of a recurring skit on NBCs Saturday Night Live featuring cartoons created by longtime SNL writer Robert Smigel, as well as a short-lived spinoff series that ran on Comedy Central. ... Invasion is an American science fiction television series that aired on ABC for only one season beginning in September 2005 before it was cancelled. ... Megas XLR (XLR = eXtra Large Robot) is an American Anime-influenced animated television series that aired on the Toonami block on Cartoon Network and is produced by Cartoon Network Studios. ...


Some cult shows are considered "underground" such as the hard to find show The Sleep of Reason [1] which has only a web presence as a guide. Look up Underground in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


What exactly makes something a "cult" is widely debated. Some popular and strongly interconnected definitions are:

  1. A genre, covering all series that play with widely held beliefs and perceptions. This covers most shows in genres like science fiction, fantasy fiction, horror fiction and some forms of sitcom (especially most forms of British comedy). Most adult animation series (like much anime) are included.
  2. Any series that has a strong loyal audience that thinks a lot about the show, especially the world in which it is set. Such shows generally have a much higher than average level of intensity. Most such programmes are of the "cult" genre. This interest and support by fans is seen by some as being similar to religions and cults, hence the term. An example of this is Monty Python's Flying Circus. This may also include quoting the show in question as an inside joke amongst its followers.
  3. Any fictional series made for television that encourages its viewers to do more than just sit and watch it. This can be in the form of interacting, debating and partying with other fans, either via conventions or online communities, or through activities such as writing series-related fiction, costume creation, replica prop and model building, or creating their own audio or video productions based around the formats and characters. This is the definition of choice of Cult TV[2], a group of appreciators who are also the owners of the Registered Trademark "Cult TV" in the UK.
  4. Any series that has achieved a moderate level of popularity, but not a large one. This is what is usually meant when a series is said to have "achieved cult status". Even if a group of people agree on this definition of "cult status", arguments on a show's status within this type are common as the "moderate" band has two highly subjective borders. Arrested Development is an example of this.
  5. Any unpopular or obscure series. This definition encompasses the fourth one, but also includes shows with only a small level of popularity, but are usually critically acclaimed and have devoted following. This definition is also used by those conferring "cult status". It is easier to reach consensus on this definition than the other because only one subjective boundary is involved. Examples include Firefly and The Prisoner, though Firefly's development of a substantial fanbase subsequent to its cancellation (and the feature film release that followed) suggests it is no longer unpopular or obscure.

Many series that some people found strongly compelling were not hits in their original runs, and quite a few well-loved shows had only a season (or less) worth of material. For the gay mens lifestyle magazine, see Genre (magazine). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other definitions of fantasy see fantasy (psychology). ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... British Comedy, in film, radio and television, is known for its consistently quirky characters, plots and settings, and has produced some of the most famous and memorable comic actors and characters in the last fifty years. ... Adult animation is animation that is targeted at adults. ... Animé redirects here. ... This article is about the television series. ... Generally, convention means coming together. ... A virtual community is a group whose members are connected by means of information technologies, typically the Internet. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Firefly is an American science fiction television series created by writer/director Joss Whedon, creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel, under his Mutant Enemy Productions. ...


Cult computers

Many people become attached to a specific computer and platform despite their marketplace failures (marketplace success suggests mere fandom). Computers known to have large cult followings include the Texas Instruments TI-99/4A, Commodore Amiga, DEC PDP-11, and SGI Indy. The Sega Dreamcast, which is relatively easy to modify, gained a cult following as enthusiasts modified them for their own amusement. The Texas Instruments TI-99/4A was an early home computer, released in June 1981, originally at a price of $525. ... Amiga is the name of a range of home/personal computers using the Motorola 68000 processor family, whose development started in 1982. ... The PDP-11 was a 16-bit minicomputer sold by Digital Equipment Corp. ... An SGI Indy running Linux The Indy was the fruit of SGIs effort to muscle into the market for desktop publishing, low-end CAD, and multimedia. ... The Dreamcast , code-named Dural, Dricas and Katana during development) is Segas fifth and final video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ...


Recent developments

Since the late 1990s, cult shows have increasingly been available on DVD (Such as Invader ZIM), leading to many formerly niche series (such as Futurama, Family Guy and Freaks and Geeks) becoming popular as new people discover them. Cartoon Network's adult oriented "Adult Swim" programming block in the USA shows cult television quite often. Before the DVD and internet file sharing, cult shows were often much harder to obtain and spread. Success in syndication and DVD sales even influenced Fox to bring back Family Guy, and then later Futurama, a rare phenomenon in television. The DVD success of the short-lived series Firefly led to the show being followed-up with the feature film Serenity. Other creators refuse to release DVDs into the mainstream as it may be a threat to the cult status of a show (such as The Bronx Bunny Show). DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Invader Zim, trademarked as Invader ZIM, is an award-winning[1] American animated television series that aired on and was produced by Nickelodeon. ... This article is about the television series. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Freaks and Geeks is an American television series, created by Paul Feig and produced by Judd Apatow, that aired on NBC during the 1999–2000 TV season. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... Adult Swim is the name for an adult-oriented television programming network. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... FOX redirects here. ... Firefly is an American science fiction television series created by writer/director Joss Whedon, creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel, under his Mutant Enemy Productions. ... Serenity is a 2005 science fiction space western/epic film written and directed by Joss Whedon. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... The Bronx Bunny Show was a ten part (10 x 22 mins) series originally broadcast in 2003 on E4 in the UK. An adult puppet interview show which followed the premise of a semi educational show for the good people of the Bronx, Brooklyn and Manhattan. ...


The internet has also been instrumental in growing TV series cults through inter-fan communication. Previously, a cult required enough people to support local clubs, conventions and book publishing to raise fan communications beyond the monthly newsletter level. Now many fans communicate daily with others about the series they are fans of. They can access vast stores of information on websites, even if there are only a few dozen people worldwide interested in a show.


The internet is also increasingly a platform for publishing cult shows. Programs like Happy Tree Friends and Queer Duck both went from online hobbies to broadcast cult TV. Others like Homestar Runner are immensely popular without any traditional TV presence. Happy Tree Friends is a Flash cartoon series by Mondo Mini Shows, created by Kenn Navarro, Aubrey Ankrum, Rhode Montijo and Warren Graff. ... Queer Duck is an animated series that originally appeared on Icebox. ... Homestar Runner is a Flash animated Internet cartoon. ...


As it has become easier to make, distribute and promote TV shows, there has been a correlated increase in material of very modest support. This correlation is partially explained by the Long Tail theory. According to the theory, if these shows become yet easier to create and access, we will see yet more niche programming produced, and mainstream material will eventually make up a substantially lower proportion of all viewership. The phrase The Long Tail (as a proper noun with capitalized letters) was first coined by Chris Anderson in an October 2004 Wired magazine article[1] to describe certain business and economic models such as Amazon. ...


See also

Otaku ) is a derisive Japanese term used to refer to people with obsessive interests in manga, anime or hentai. ... A sleeper hit (often simply called a sleeper) refers to a film, book, album, TV show, or video game that gains unexpected success or recognition. ... Underground music is music which has developed a cult following, independent of commercial success. ... A Whovian is a fan of the British science-fiction television programme Doctor Who. ...

References

  1. ^ http://radioanyway.org/pastshows/show46.html Internet Radio program on Allain dated 11-19-05, entitled Cults
  2. ^ www.Cult.TV - The Official Cult TV Magazine

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cult - SCIFIPEDIA (159 words)
A cult in the traditional sense is an assemblage of adherents of any exclusive system of religious beliefs and/or spiritual practice.
Cult following - used to refer to any work or creative artist who has not gained mainstream (mundane) fame, but has attracted a smaller, but loyal fan base.
Cult (status) - which is achieved by a work or creative artist with a cult following.
Cult film - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1305 words)
Cult film is a colloquial term for a film that has accrued a small but devoted group of fans, having failed to achieve fame outside that group.
Although films of all genres and plot conventions may become cult films, the horror and science fiction and experimental film genres have become the focus of those wanting to identify a film as a cult film, perhaps due to the relatively young and cynical nature of these genres' fan bases.
The identification of a film as having cult status is particularly dependent upon generation x, whose members are most interested in the concept and its films.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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