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Encyclopedia > Cult film

A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. Often, cult movies have failed to achieve fame outside of the small fanbases, however, there have been exceptions that have managed to gain fame amongst mainstream audiences, including 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), A Clockwork Orange (1971), The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), Taxi Driver (1976), The Warriors (1979), Xanadu (1980), Blade Runner (1982), Blue Velvet (1986), and Pulp Fiction (1994).[1] Many cult movies have gone on to transcend their original cult status and have become recognized as classics; others are of the "so bad it's good" variety, and are destined to remain in obscurity. Cult films often become the source of a thriving, obsessive, and elaborate subculture of fandom, hence the analogy to cults. However, not every film with a rabid fanbase is necessarily a cult film. This article is about motion pictures. ... Fans of Janet Jackson, at Much Music in Toronto The word fan refers to someone who has an intense, occasionally overwhelming liking of a person, group of persons, work of art, idea, or trend. ... The year 1968 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the film. ... See also: 1970 in film 1971 1972 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 8 - Bob Dylans hour long documentary film, Eat the Document, premieres at New Yorks Academy of Music. ... The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a 1975 musical comedy film that parodies horror films. ... The year 1975 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the 1976 American film. ... // Events March 22 - Filming begins on George Lucas Star Wars science fiction film. ... The Warriors is a cult classic 1979 film directed by Walter Hill and based on the 1965 novel by Sol Yurick. ... // Events March 5 - Production begins on Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back. ... Xanadu is a 1980 musical/romance film directed by Robert Greenwald. ... The year 1980 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... // This is the year of film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, which will become the highest grossing movie for almost 15 years (until Titanic), earning double or triple against any major film of the 1980s. ... Blue Velvet is an influential 1986 neo-noir mystery and thriller film written and directed by David Lynch. ... // April 12 - Actor Morgan Mason marries The Go-Gos Belinda Carlisle Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger marries television journalist Maria Shriver. ... Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ... Fandom (from the noun fan and the affix -dom, as in kingdom, dukedom, etc. ... Cult typically refers to a cohesive social group devoted to beliefs or practices that the surrounding culture considers outside the mainstream, with a notably positive or negative popular perception. ...


The term cult film is used to describe a film that has had little to no success commercially and critically upon its initial release but has later spawned a small, but devoted and usually obsessive fanbase, however there are various exceptions. One exception is Napoleon Dynamite (2004), which was a success at the box office. This has led to a misconception in Cult classic films that the definition is a film that 'you either love or hate'. The term was first coined in the early 1980s in the book Cult Movies, by Danny Peary and is continued to be used to describe the films to this day. Usually, cult films have limited but very special, noted appeal. Cult films are often known to be eccentric, and do not follow traditional standards of mainstream cinema and usually explore topics not considered in any way mainstream—yet there are examples that are relatively normal. They are often considered controversial because they step outside standard narrative and technical conventions known.[2] This article is about the movie. ... Cult Movies is a 1981 book by Danny Peary, consisting of a series of essays regarding what Peary described as the 100 most representative examples of the cult film phenomenon. ... Danny Peary (born 1949) is an American film critic and sports writer. ... For other uses, see Mainstream. ...

Contents

General overview

A cult film is a movie that attracts a devoted group of followers or obsessive fans, despite having failed on their initial releases. The term also describes films that have remained popular over a long period of time amongst a small group of followers. In many cases, cult films may have failed to achieve mainstream success on original release although this is definitely not always the case. Whilst they may only have a short cinema release cult films often enjoy ongoing popularity due to a myriad of VHS, LaserDisc and DVD releases. In some cases, these films tend to enjoy long runs on video, thus being issued in video "runs" with more copies than other movies. The box office bomb Office Space (1999) managed to financially redeem itself when word-of-mouth made it a popular video rental. Harold and Maude (1971) was not successful financially at the time of its original release in 1971, but has since nevertheless earned a huge cult following and has become successful following its video and DVD releases. This has also happened with The Big Lebowski (1998), among others. Many cult films were independently made and were not expected by their creators to have much mainstream success. Night of the Living Dead (1968), Pink Flamingos (1972), Basket Case (1982), The Evil Dead (1981) and its sequels, and Eraserhead (1977) have all been commonly acknowledged as having become cult films. Sometimes the audience response to a cult film is somewhat different from what was intended by the film makers. Many films that become cult contain unusual elements. Cult films usually offer something different or innovative in comparison to more mainstream films but cult films can also be popular across a wide audience. Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... The home video business rents and sells videocassettes and DVDs to the public. ... Office Space is an American comedy film written and directed by Mike Judge. ... For other uses, see Word of mouth (disambiguation). ... Harold and Maude is a movie directed by Hal Ashby in 1971. ... The Big Lebowski, a 1998 comedy film written by Joel and Ethan Coen and directed by Joel Coen, chronicles a few days in the life of a burned-out, unemployed California slacker after he is mistaken for a millionaire with the same name. ... An independent film, or indie film, is usually a low-budget film that is produced by a small movie studio. ... This article is about the 1968 film directed by George A. Romero. ... Pink Flamingos is a 1972 film directed by John Waters. ... Basket Case is a 1982 horror comedy directed and written by Frank Henenlotter. ... For other uses, see The Evil Dead (disambiguation). ... Evil Dead II (also known as Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn or The Sequel to the Ultimate Experience in Grueling Terror) is an American horror film, released in 1987 . ... For the wrestling stable, see The Army of Darkness. ... Eraserhead (released in France as The Labyrinth Man) is a 1977 surrealist-horror film written and directed by David Lynch. ...


A film can be both a major studio release and a cult film, particularly if despite its affiliation with a major studio, it failed to achieve broad success on either the theatrical or home video markets but was championed by a small number of dedicated film fanatics who seek out lesser-known gems, which can also be said about Freddy Got Fingered. It is also true that the content of certain films (such as dark subjects, alienation, transgressive content, or other controversial subject matter) can also decide whether or not a film is a "cult film", regardless of the film's budget or studio affiliations. An example may be Paul Verhoeven's big budgeted, highly sexualized Showgirls (1995), initially intended to be a drama film about the rise of a Las Vegas stripper, that flopped both critically and commercially. Today, it is a favorite of homosexual audiences and audiences in general have considered it to be a comedy thanks to frequent midnight madness. According to activist writer Naomi Klein, ironic enjoyment of the film initially arose among those with the video before MGM, the films chief marketer, capitalized on the idea. MGM noticed the video was performing all right, since "trendy twenty-somethings were throwing Showgirls irony parties, laughing sardonically at the implausibly poor screenplay and shrieking with horror at the aerobic sexual encounters."[3] ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... The Cinema of Transgression is a term coined by Nick Zedd in 1985 to describe, a New York City based underground film movement, consisting of a loose-knit group of like-minded artists using shock value and humor in their work. ... A controversy is a contentious dispute, a disagreement over which parties are actively arguing. ... Paul Verhoeven (IPA: [pʌul vɛrhuvən]) (born July 18, 1938 in Amsterdam) is a Dutch film director, screenwriter, and film producer. ... This article is about the film Showgirls. For a dancer/performer, see Showgirl. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... See labrys, black triangle. ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... A classic midnight movie in every sense of the term, Tod Brownings Freaks (1932) is the sort of (then) obscure horror film shown on late-night TV beginning in the 1950s; in the 1970s and early 1980s it was a staple of midnight screenings at theaters around the U... Naomi Klein (b. ... Ironic redirects here. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ...


A cult film can often been widely regarded and had been successful upon its early release. An example is Stanley Kubrick's vision of a grim and disturbing, ultra-violent future in A Clockwork Orange (1971), which won several major film awards and was nominated for four Academy Awards including Best Picture. Another example maybe Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (1943), which was popular on home video while being widely regarded upon its initial release. Sometimes cult films can be revolutionary for their era, thus becoming far more successful later on, namely Walt Disney's Fantasia (1940).[4] Kubrick redirects here. ... Clockwork Orange redirects here. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... This article is about the film director. ... For other uses, see Its a Wonderful Life (disambiguation). ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture, produced by Walt Disney and first released on November 13, 1940 in the United States. ...


History

Early period: 1959-1970s

Dr. Frank-N-Furter (Tim Curry) self proclaimed "Sweet Transvestite from Transsexual, Transylvania" in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975).
Dr. Frank-N-Furter (Tim Curry) self proclaimed "Sweet Transvestite from Transsexual, Transylvania" in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975).

The term itself came into usage during the late 1970s and was popularized in a series of three books by Danny Peary, beginning in 1981 with Cult Movies.[citation needed] Plan 9 from Outer Space (1959) and other films by Edward D. Wood, Jr. were among the earliest to be considered cult classics, attracting devotees who reveled in his incompetence. Other low-budget science fiction and horror films of the 1950s (for example Robot Monster), along with exploitation films of the 1930s, which resurfaced in the home video market of the 1980s (including the infamous Reefer Madness), were accorded that status. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Timothy James Curry (born April 19, 1946) is an Emmy Award-winning English actor, singer, and composer, perhaps best known for his role as Dr. Frank-N-Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show and as Pennywise the Dancing Clown in Stephen Kings It. ... The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a 1975 musical comedy film that parodies horror films. ... Danny Peary (born 1949) is an American film critic and sports writer. ... Cult Movies is a 1981 book by Danny Peary, consisting of a series of essays regarding what Peary described as the 100 most representative examples of the cult film phenomenon. ... This article is about 1959 film. ... Edward Davis Wood, Jr. ... Robot Monster is a 1953 science fiction B-movie made in 3-D by Phil Tucker. ... Grindhouse redirects here. ... The home video business rents and sells videocassettes and DVDs to the public. ... Reefer Madness, originally titled Tell Your Children, is a 1936 drama film directed by Louis Gasnier, who had well learned the silent era craft of over-acting. ...


The low budget horror film Night of the Living Dead (1968) directed by George A. Romero earned moderate box office takings but was critically polarized at the time. However, the culture of Vietnam-era America had a tremendous impact on the film and the film was given a cult status after playing frequently at midnight movie circuits. It is so thoroughly laden with critiques of late-1960s American society that one historian described the film as "subversive on many levels."[5] While not the first zombie film made, Night of the Living Dead influenced countless films and is perhaps the defining influence on the modern pop-culture zombie archetype.[6] The film is the first of five Dead films (completed or pending) directed by Romero. Stanley Kubrick's war thriller Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) has been recognized outside of its cult fanbase, while still maintaining its status as a cult film. Around this time, the black comedy Harold and Maude (1971) became the first major Hollywood studio movie of the era to develop a substantial cult audience of repeat viewers; though apparently it was not picked up by much of the midnight movie circuit during the 1970s, it subsequently became a late show staple as the phenomenon turned more to camp revivals.[7] Mel Stuart's musical Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971) has widely been regarded as one of the most favored, well known children's films of all-time, with Gene Wilder as the eccentric head of the factory of sweet confections, yet has developed a cult fanbase among adults for its campy production design. Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange (1971), a film about violence in a Dystopian future world was a major commercial success, receiving an Academy Award for Best Picture nomination, yet the subject matter explored in the film is considered controversial and therefore had limited appeal to audiences thus giving it a cult classic status. John Waters notorious Pink Flamingos (1972), was wildly controversial (being an exercise in "poor taste") featuring incest and coprophagia, became the best known of a group of campy midnight films focusing on sexual perversions and fetishism.[8] Filmed on weekends in Waters's hometown of Baltimore, with a mile-long extension cord as a power conduit, it was also crucial in inspiring the growth of the independent film movement.[9] In 1973, the Elgin Theater started midnight screenings of both Pink Flamingos and a crime drama from Jamaica with a remarkable soundtrack. In its mainstream release, The Harder They Come (1972) had been a flop, panned by critics after its U.S. distributor, Roger Corman's New World Pictures, marketed it as a blaxploitation picture. Rereleased as a midnight film, it screened around the country for six years, helping spur the popularity of reggae in the United States. While the midnight-movie potential of certain films was recognized only some time after they opened, a number during this period were distributed to take advantage of the market from the beginning—in 1973, for instance, Broken Goddess, Dragula, The White Whore and the Bit Player, and Elevator Girls in Bondage (as well as Pink Flamingos) had their New York premieres at midnight screenings.[10] In 1974, midnight opener Flesh Gordon evidenced how the phenomenon lent itself to flirtations with pornography. This article is about the 1968 film directed by George A. Romero. ... George Andrew Romero (born February 4, 1940) is an American director, writer, editor and actor. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... A classic midnight movie in every sense of the term, Tod Brownings Freaks (1932) is the sort of (then) obscure horror film shown on late-night TV beginning in the 1950s; in the 1970s and early 1980s it was a staple of midnight screenings at theaters around the U... This article is about the computer software framework. ... The Zombie Survival Guide ... A group of actors portraying zombies in a film Zombies are regularly encountered in horror- and fantasy-themed fiction and entertainment. ... Living Dead is a blanket term for various films and series that all originated with the seminal 1968 zombie movie Night of the Living Dead created by George A. Romero and John A. Russo. ... For the hit 1987 single by Depeche Mode, see the album Music for the Masses Film poster for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 satirical film directed by Stanley Kubrick. ... Harold and Maude is a movie directed by Hal Ashby in 1971. ... Mel Stuart is an American film director born in 1928. ... Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory is a musical film adaptation of Roald Dahls classic book for children Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. ... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor who is best known for his role as Willy Wonka, his collaborations with Mel Brooks in Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his four movies with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Stir Crazy, See No Evil... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... Clockwork Orange redirects here. ... A dystopia (or alternatively cacotopia) is a fictional society, usually portrayed as existing in a future time, when the conditions of life are extremely bad due to deprivation, oppression, or terror. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... John Waters (born April 22, 1946) is an American filmmaker, writer, personality, visual artist and art collector, who rose to fame in the early 1970s for his transgressive cult films. ... Pink Flamingos is a 1972 film directed by John Waters. ... Incest is defined as sexual intercourse or any form of sexual activity between closely related persons, especially within the nuclear family. ... Coprophagia is the consumption of feces, from the Greek copros (feces) and phagein (eat). ... A fetish (from French fétiche; from Portuguese feitiço; from Latin facticius, artificial and facere, to make) is an object believed to have supernatural powers, or in particular a man-made object that has power over others. ... An independent film, or indie film, is usually a low-budget film that is produced by a small movie studio. ... The Harder They Come is a 1972 Jamaican crime film directed by Perry Henzell. ... Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appellation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies, many of which are some of the most influential movies made. ... // New World Communications Company Info •This company no longer exists. ... Shaft (1971) Blaxploitation is a film genre that emerged in the United States in the early 1970s when many exploitation films were made that targeted the urban black audience; the word itself is a portmanteau of the words “black” and “exploitation. ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Flesh Gordon was a 1974 science fiction and comedy adventure film. ... Porn redirects here. ...


The transgender spoof film The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) is possibly the best-known and longest-running cult film in the U.S.[citation needed] The movie satirizes conventions of science fiction and horror films of its time, and includes elements of transvestism, incest and homosexuality — all within the context of a musical film. The film received little critical attention or mainstream cinema exhibition when first released in 1975, but built up a base of fans who repeatedly showed up at midnight screenings at inexpensive neighborhood cinemas, dressed in costume and "participating" in the film by doing such things as throwing rice during its wedding scene.[11] In this case, the film intentionally ridiculed its own subject matter, thereby entering into the spirit of sarcastic fun often surrounding the attainment of cult status and gained a new life on VHS. The Rocky Horror Picture Show can be seen as a standard to help determine if a movie is indeed a cult film, as it is likely the most famous cult film. Much of the attention has steamed from the fanbase, rather than the film itself.[12] If a movie is more widely known than The Rocky Horror Picture Show, it is not likely to be considered a cult film. Network television, cable television and pay-per-view stations have also changed the nature of cult films. David Lynch's experimental Eraserhead (1977), an example of shoe-string surrealism was a flop both critically and commercially, yet was saved from obscurity thanks to home video in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a 1975 musical comedy film that parodies horror films. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... A male dressed as a female. ... Incest is defined as sexual intercourse or any form of sexual activity between closely related persons, especially within the nuclear family. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... Cable TV redirects here. ... Pay-per-view is the name given to a system by which television viewers can call and order events to be seen on TV and pay for the private telecast of that event to their homes later. ... Eraserhead (released in France as The Labyrinth Man) is a 1977 surrealist-horror film written and directed by David Lynch. ...


Other cult films from this period are those of director and actor Tom Laughlin, including the Billy Jack series. There are at least two well-known men named Tom Laughlin: Tom Laughlin - an actor best-known for playing the title role in Billy Jack Tom Laughlin - a professional wrestler better-known by his stage name of Tommy Dreamer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other... Billy Jack is the second, and highest grossing, in a series of motion pictures centering on a fictional character of the same name, played by Tom Laughlin. ...


Later period: 1980s to present

The commercial viability of the sort of big-city arthouses that launched outsider pictures for the midnight movie circuit began to decline in the late 1970s as broad social and economic shifts weakened their countercultural base. Leading midnight movie venues were beginning to fold as early as 1977 — that year, New York's Bijou switched back permanently to the live entertainment for which it had been built, and the Elgin, after a brief run with gay porn, shut down completely.[13] In succeeding years, the popularization of the VCR and the expansion of movie-viewing possibilities on cable television meant the death of many additional independent theaters, which as a result, developed a stream of newer cult films. The first, possibly, was the biographical Mommie Dearest (1981), which details the life of Joan Crawford and her alleged abusive relationship with her adopted daughter. The over-acting by Faye Dunaway as Crawford gave the film a campy tone, and critics were very negative of the film. While Dunaway garnered some critical acclaim for her astonishing physical metamorphosis and her portrayal of Crawford (finishing a narrow second in the voting for the New York Film Critics Circle Awards for Best Actress of the Year), she also received a Razzie Award for Worst Actress and caused considerable damage to her career. It did manage to develop a cult classic status, especially with gay audiences and became famous for Crawford's emphasis on the line "No wire hangers, ever!", when urging her daughter not to use them in her closet. The video cassette recorder (or VCR, less popularly video tape recorder) is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... Mommie Dearest is a 1981 Paramount biopic about Joan Crawford, starring Faye Dunaway. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... Faye Dunaway (born January 14, 1941, in Bascom, Florida) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Razzie Award The Raspberry Awards or Razzies, first awarded in 1981, were created by John Wilson in 1980, intended to counterpoint the Academy Awards by dishonoring the worst acting, screenwriting, songwriting, directing, and films that the film industry had to offer. ... The 2nd Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 29, 1982. ...


While Rocky Horror soldiered on, by then a phenomenon unto itself, and new films like The Warriors (1979), The Gods Must Be Crazy (1980), The Evil Dead (1981), Heavy metal (1981), and Pink Floyd The Wall (1982)—all from mainstream distributors—were picked up by the midnight movie circuit, the core of exhibitors that energized the movement was disappearing. By the time the fabled Orson Welles Cinema in Cambridge, Massachusetts, shut its doors after a fire in 1986, the days of the theatrical midnight movie as a significant countercultural phenomenon were already past. Ridley Scott's influential science fiction film Blade Runner (1982) film set in an overpopulated neon-lit Los Angeles, 2019, and centred around a police-cop or 'blade runner', played by Harrison Ford, seeking four genetically made human beings, one of whom he falls in love with which forces him to question his own place as a human. The film was largely unpopular with both audiences and critics 1982 but became popular with HBO and various VHS releases in the early 1990s and has since developed status as a cult classic. The Warriors is a cult classic 1979 film directed by Walter Hill and based on the 1965 novel by Sol Yurick. ... The Gods Must Be Crazy is a film released in 1980, written and directed by Jamie Uys. ... For other uses, see The Evil Dead (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1981 Canadian film. ... Pink Floyd The Wall is a 1982 film by British director Alan Parker based on the 1979 Pink Floyd album The Wall. ... Ad as it appeared in The Real Paper in June 1973 Orson Welles Cinema was a well-remembered movie theater which operated at 1001 Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge, Massachusetts from the late 1960s into the mid-1980s, often showcasing independent films, foreign films and revivals. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ...


In 1985, Terry Gilliam's Brazil (1985), an Orwellian inspired science fiction film about a man and his dreams of a better life and relationship with the woman of his dreams became a huge failure (largely because of the difficulties involved in marketing the film), yet was critically acclaimed and subsequently revitalized by video releases. A year later, David Lynch's landmark, highly influential neo-noir thriller Blue Velvet (1986) became a cult classic, having initially failed at the box office in 1986 (because of its limited release in theatres) but was revitalized with video releases in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The film became hugley controversial and well-known because of its bizarre, often graphic depiction of small town America and male-female relationships featuring a psychotic Dennis Hopper and his drug-fueled sexual relationship with Dorothy Vallens, played by Isabella Rossellini. Lynch continued his career with various other cult films: Wild at Heart (1990), Lost Highway (1997) and the critically acclaimed Mulholland Dr. (2001) as well as his short lived cult phenomenon television series Twin Peaks (90-91), and its subsequent movie adaptation: Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992). Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... The adjective Orwellian describes the situation, idea, or societal condition that George Orwell identified as being inimical to the welfare of a free-society. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Neo-noir (from the Greek neo, new; and the French noir, black) is a type of motion picture that prominently utilizes elements of film noir, but with updated themes, content, style or visual elements that were absent in films noir of the 1940s and 1950s. ... Blue Velvet is an influential 1986 neo-noir mystery and thriller film written and directed by David Lynch. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Isabella Fiorella Elettra Giovanna Rossellini (born June 18, 1952) is an Italian actress, filmmaker, author, philanthropist, and model. ... Wild at Heart is a 1990 American film written for the screen and directed by David Lynch, based on Barry Giffords novel Wild at Heart: The Story of Sailor and Lula about a young couple from South Carolina who, after Sailors return from prison, decide to go on... For the Bon Jovi album, see Lost Highway (album). ... For the hills in San Francisco, see Twin Peaks, San Francisco, California. ... Fire Walk With Me is a 1992 movie directed by David Lynch and starring Sheryl Lee, Ray Wise, Chris Isaak, Kiefer Sutherland, Mädchen Amick, Phoebe Augustine and Dana Ashbrook. ...


Alan Parker's mystery horror hybrid movie, Angel Heart (1987), starring Mickey Rourke and Robert De Niro, fared poorly at the box office, only just breaking even.[14] Despite this, the film became a hit once released on VHS, and has become something of a cult classic ever since, known for its spooky tone, excellent cinematography (by Michael Seresin), a sad and spooky score (by Trevor Jones), and an unusual but effective blend of genres, all encompassing a highly atmospheric movie. Also notable, some of the producers of the movie, Andrew G. Vajna and Mario Kassar were also the producers of the movie Jacob's Ladder which had a very similar narrative structure to it, as well as a twist ending. Alan Parker on the set of Pink Floyd The Wall Sir Alan Parker (born February 14, 1944) is a British film director, producer, writer, and actor. ... Look up mystery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... Angel Heart is a 1987 horror movie written and directed by Alan Parker, starring Mickey Rourke, Lisa Bonet and Robert De Niro. ... Mickey Rourke (born September 16, 1956) is an American actor who has primarily appeared in drama, action, and thriller films. ... Robert Mario De Niro, Jr. ... Trevor Jones (born 1949 Cape Town, South Africa) is an orchestral film score composer. ... Andrew George Vajna (born August 1, 1944) is a Hungarian film producer, originally from Budapest. ... Mario Kassar (born Beirut, Lebanon, 10 October 1951) is a movie-industry executive whose projects are frequently in association with Andrew Vajna. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The word Twist has the following meanings: The Twist, 1960s dance Wing twist, change of the cross-section shape of a wing along the span. ...


Michael Lehmann's satirical teenage comedy Heathers (1989), starring Winona Ryder and Christian Slater, was intended to take on the John Hughes teenage films (The Breakfast Club, Sixteen Candles) and give them a much darker, realistic and comedic approach. However, the film was a failure at the box office (mainly because of its limited release). Despite this, it was hugely popular on VHS in the early 1990s and launched cutting-edge dialogue spoken by its characters ('What's your damage?', 'I love my dead, gay son!') into mainstream popular culture. In 1993, the comedy horror Army of Darkness, a sequel to the Evil Dead series, was released. The movie had a considerably higher budget than the prior two Evil Dead films. The budget was estimated to be around $11 million; while Evil Dead II had a budget of $3.5 million and The Evil Dead a budget of $350,000. At the box office, Army of Darkness was not a big success as hoped, only grossing $11,501,093 domestically. After its video release, however, it has obtained an ever-growing cult following, along with the other two films in the trilogy. Michael Lehmann (Born March 30, 1957) is an American film and television director. ... This article is about the film Heathers. ... Winona Laura Horowitz[1] (born October 29, 1971), better known under her professional name Winona Ryder, is a two-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Christian Slater(born August 18, 1969) is an American actor. ... For other people with this name, see John Hughes. ... This article is about the 1985 film. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... For the wrestling stable, see The Army of Darkness. ... The Evil Dead series started as a series of films created by Sam Raimi. ... Evil Dead II (also known as Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn or The Sequel to the Ultimate Experience in Grueling Terror) is an American horror film, released in 1987 . ...

"[A] moody young dreamer trying to figure out the Vonnegutian complexities of the Tangent Universe and how to survive in the arid, psychically toxic suburbs": Donnie Darko played weekend midnights at New York's Two Boots Pioneer Theater for 28 straight months and developed cult classic status among its audiences.
"[A] moody young dreamer trying to figure out the Vonnegutian complexities of the Tangent Universe and how to survive in the arid, psychically toxic suburbs":[15] Donnie Darko played weekend midnights at New York's Two Boots Pioneer Theater for 28 straight months and developed cult classic status among its audiences.[16]

One of the most successful of the 1990s generation of cult films was the Australian drag queen road saga The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994). One of the theaters to show it regularly at midnight was New York's Waverly (also now closed), where Rocky Horror had played for a house record ninety-five weeks. A celebrated episode of television's The Drew Carey Show features a song-and-dance battle between Rocky Horror fans (led by Drew Carey) and Priscilla fans (led by Mimi Bobeck). Writer/director Todd Solondz, a favorite cult director, had his first major success with the black comedy Welcome to the Dollhouse (1995), a brutally-honest look at the persecution of a young junior high student by her classmates. His next film was the challenging, controversial dark comedy of sex and perversion in American suburbia—titled Happiness (1998). Paul Verhoven's big budget production of Showgirls (1995), given an NC-17 rating by the MPAA in the United States, was strongly criticised for its graphic sexuality. It managed to develop a cult status among audiences who embraced it as a comedic satire and became one of MGM's best-selling DVDs[citation needed]. Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction (1994), despite its huge commercial mainstream success, is often considered to be a cult title[citation needed]. The Big Lebowski (1998) was a flop on its initial release, yet became a cult classic and has been called "the first cult film of the Internet era."[17] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... For the fictional character, see Donald Darko. ... The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert is a 1994 Oscar-winning Australian film about two drag queens and a transsexual woman driving across the outback from Sydney to Alice Springs in a large bus they have named Priscilla. ... The Drew Carey Show was a long-running American sitcom (set in Cleveland, Ohio) that aired on ABC from 1995 to 2004 and was known for its everyman characters and themes. ... Drew Allison Carey (born May 23, 1958) is an American comedian, actor, and game show host. ... Kathy Kinney Kathy Kinney (b. ... Todd Solondz (born October 15, 1959) is an American writer/director known for his controversial films. ... Welcome to the Dollhouse is a 1995 comedy /drama independent film written and directed by Todd Solondz. ... Happiness is a 1998 black comedy motion picture, written and directed by Todd Solondz, that shows the lives of three sisters and their families. ... This article is about the Dutch director; for the German director, actor, and writer see Paul Verhoeven (Germany). ... This article is about the film Showgirls. For a dancer/performer, see Showgirl. ... The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) is a non-profit trade association formed to advance the interests of movie studios. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is a Palme dOr-winning American film director, actor, and an Oscar winning screenwriter. ... Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ... The Big Lebowski, a 1998 comedy film written by Joel and Ethan Coen and directed by Joel Coen, chronicles a few days in the life of a burned-out, unemployed California slacker after he is mistaken for a millionaire with the same name. ...


Canadian actor and comedian Tom Green's 2001 film Freddy Got Fingered, was lambasted by many critics, and flopped at the box office.[18] The film quickly gained a cult following amongst fans of the film's genre due to its gross-out humour, and many of Green's fans say it's a brilliant movie. DVD rentals and sales managed to help the film become financially successful[citation needed]. The 2001 comic book adaptation Ghost World became popular on home video and quickly affirmed a cult status with audiences. The same can be said for the 2007 psychological thriller The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, which did terribly at the box office and only obtained a limited release.[19] Even though reviews have been double-sided for the film, response continues to remain positive for the most part.[20] After it received mainstream attention by getting two Academy Award nominations, Casey Affleck's portrayal as Robert Ford has since been recognized as one of the most impressive performances of the 21st century.[21] The film's fanbase still remains relatively small but devoted, frequently praising the film for it's hypnotic original score and cinematography as some of the best of all time as many critics have pointed out. Main articles: History of Canada, Timeline of Canadian history Parts of Canada have been inhabited by aboriginal peoples (known as First Nations) for at least 40,000 years. ... For other persons named Tom Green, see Tom Green (disambiguation). ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... george loves celeste is a sub-genre of comedy movies in which the producers aim to gross out their audience with disgusting and disturbing material, such as sexual or toilet humor. ... Ghost World is a 2001 film by Terry Zwigoff, based on a graphic novel by Daniel Clowes, also titled Ghost World. ... Psychological thriller is a specific sub-genre of the wide-ranging thriller genre. ... The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford is a 2007 Western drama film adapted from Ron Hansens 1983 novel of the same name. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Casey Affleck (born August 12, 1975) is an American actor. ... Robert Ford in an undated photograph with the weapon he used to kill Jesse James. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ...


Since the turn of the millennium, the most notable success among newly minted cult and midnight movies has been Donnie Darko (2001). Older films are also popular on the circuit, appreciated largely in an imposed camp fashion—a midnight movie tradition that goes back to the 1972 revival of the hectoring anti-drug movie Reefer Madness (1938).[22] (Tod Browning's 1932 horror classic Freaks, the original midnight movie revival, is both too dark and too sociologically acute to readily consume as camp.) Where the irony with which Reefer Madness was adopted as a midnight favorite had its roots in a countercultural sensibility, in the latter's place there is now the paradoxical element of nostalgia: the leading revivals on the circuit currently include the crème de la crème of the John Hughes oeuvre—The Breakfast Club (1985), Pretty in Pink (1986), and Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986)—and the preteen adventure film The Goonies (1985).[23] For the fictional character, see Donald Darko. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... Reefer Madness is a 1936 drama film revolving around the tragic events that follow when high school students are lured by pushers to try marihuana: a hit and run accident, manslaughter, suicide, rape, and descent into madness all ensue. ... Charles Albert Browning, Jr. ... For other uses, see Freak (disambiguation). ... Look up nostalgia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other people with this name, see John Hughes. ... This article is about the 1985 film. ... Pretty in Pink is a popular 1986 film about teenage love and social cliques in 1980s American high schools. ... Ferris Bueller redirects here. ... The Goonies was a hit movie in 1985, directed by Richard Donner. ...


In the world of animation, the 2007 animated film Flatland has garnered modest cult status from critics and fans alike, being likened by film review magazines such as Film Threat to older animation cult films like Yellow Submarine and Fritz The Cat [24]. Film Threat is the name of a magazine and website devoted to coverage of independent film. ... Yellow Submarine can refer to: Yellow Submarine - original song by The Beatles, released in 1966. ... Robert Crumbs Fritz the Cat. ...


Cult films within a particular culture

Occasionally, a film can become the object of a cult following within a particular region or culture if it has some unusual significance to that region or culture. An example is the cult status of British comedic actor Norman Wisdom's films in Albania. Wisdom's films, in which he usually played a family man worker who outsmarts his boss, were some of the few Western films considered acceptable by the country's communist rulers, thus Albanians grew familiar and attached to Wisdom. Curiously, he and his films are now acquiring nostalgic cult status in Britain. Another example is the place of The Wizard of Oz (1939) in white American homosexual culture, although a widely viewed and historically important film in greater American culture. Male homosexuals sometimes refer to themselves as "friends of Dorothy". Singin' in the Rain is another film adopted by the American homosexual subculture which used to regularly be shown during the 1980s and early 1990s for extended runs. Slaves of New York, released in 1989, has also found a cult audience in the homosexual community. A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Sir Norman Wisdom, OBE (born 4 February 1915) is an English comedian, singer and actor. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... Christopher Street Parade Sexuality and gender identity-based cultures concern the culture, knowledge, and references shared by members of sexual minorities or transgendered people by virtue of their membership in those minorities or their state of being transgendered. ... The name of this cafe, Dorothys Sister, in Ponsonby, Aucklands former gay quarter, is a play on the slang term. ... For other uses, see Singin in the Rain. ... Slaves of New York is a 1989 comedy-drama starring Bernadette Peters, Adam Coleman Howard, Chris Sarandon, Mary Beth Hurt, Madeleine Potter, and Steve Buscemi. ...


The 1936 anti-marijuana propaganda film Reefer Madness has become a cult film within the stoner subculture due to its humorously sensationalized, outdated and inaccurate descriptions of the effects of marijuana. 20th Century Fox and Legend Films released a colorized version of the film on DVD on April 20, 2004, an obvious reference to its ironic appeal (see 420 (cannabis culture)). The World War II-era Department of Agriculture film Hemp for Victory, encouraging the growing of hemp for war uses, has achieved a similar cult status. Lower IT workers and white-collar American workers alike have given Mike Judge's 1999 comedy film Office Space a cult following because of its heroic portrayal of ordinary office employees who become fed up with their jobs, make a stand, and try to overthrow the very corporation they work for. Belgian cult movie Man Bites Dog with Benoit Poelvoorde and the surrealist movie Camping Cosmos starring cult figures like Lolo Ferrari, Noël Godin and Arno Hintjens, are an element of the Belgian visual landscape with reminiscences to Belgian Surrealism. British comedies have enjoyed a cult status in America. These films include the Monty Python series, most notably Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... 1967 Chinese propaganda poster from the Cultural Revolution. ... Reefer Madness is a 1936 drama film revolving around the tragic events that follow when high school students are lured by pushers to try marihuana: a hit and run accident, manslaughter, suicide, rape, and descent into madness all ensue. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Legend Films, a San Diego-based company, was founded in August 2001. ... Film colorization is the general term for a film alteration process that involves adding color to a black and white film. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Santa Cruz 4/20 celebration at Porter Meadow on UCSC campus in 2007 On April 20th 2007, at 4:20pm PST more than 700 people gathered at City Hall in Victoria, BC to celebrate Victorias 10th annual 4/20 celebration. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... USDA redirects here. ... Hemp for Victory is a black-and-white United States government film made during the Second World War, explaining the uses of hemp. ... U.S. Marihuana production permit. ... Michael Craig Judge (born 17 October 1962 in Guayaquil, Ecuador) is an American animator, actor, voice actor, writer, director, and producer, best-known as the creator and star of the hit animated television series Beavis and Butt-head and King of the Hill. ... National motto: Dutch: Eendracht maakt macht; French: Lunion fait la force; German: Einigkeit macht stark (English: Strength lies in unity) Official language Dutch, French, German Capital Brussels Largest City Brussels King Albert II Prime Minister Guy Verhofstadt Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 148th 30,528 km² 6. ... Cest arrivé près de chez vous (Man Bites Dog) is a satirical 1992 Belgian French language black comedy mockumentary starring Benoît Poelvoorde. ... Beno t Poelvoorde Beno t Poelvoorde is a Belgian actor, born in Namur (Belgium) on September 22, 1964. ... Surrealism is an artistic movement and an aesthetic philosophy that aims for the liberation of the mind by emphasizing the critical and imaginative powers of the subconscious. ... Camping Cosmos is the second comedy in the film trilogy The Sexual Life of the Belgians (of which La Vie sexuelle des Belges 1950-78 is the first part), starring Claude Semal, Lolo Ferrari, Noël Godin. ... Lolo Ferrari, born Eve Valois (March 4, 1962 - March 5, 2000) was a French dancer and actress billed as the woman with the largest breasts in the world, though their size was artificially achieved. ... // Noël Godin (born Liège, September 13, 1945) is a Belgian writer, critic, actor and notorious cream pie flinger or ‘entarteur’. Godin gained global attention in 1998 when his group ambushed Microsoft CEO Bill Gates in Brussels, pelting the software magnate with pies (an invention he made with his... Arno Hintjens (usually referred to as Arno) is a Belgian artist from Ostend. ... Max Ernst. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons,[2][3] is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a 1975 film written and performed by the comedy group Monty Python (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin), and directed by Gilliam and Jones. ...

Lolo Ferrari being read Tintin in the typical Belgian cult movie Camping Cosmos (1996).

Lolo Ferrari, born Eve Valois (March 4, 1962 - March 5, 2000) was a French dancer and actress billed as the woman with the largest breasts in the world, though their size was artificially achieved. ... Look up Tintin, tintin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Camping Cosmos is the second comedy in the film trilogy The Sexual Life of the Belgians (of which La Vie sexuelle des Belges 1950-78 is the first part), starring Claude Semal, Lolo Ferrari, Noël Godin. ...

International cult cinema

Asian cinema, particularly Hong Kong martial arts films, such as wuxia, and Japanese tokusatsu, primarily from the Daikaiju Eiga, and anime, also has a cult following in the Western hemisphere. The Kaiju genre of films, most famously the Godzilla films, while enjoying much mainstream popularity in Japan, has a large following in the U.S.. Battle Royale has gained cult status in Britain due to the resonance the film has with the disaffected youth of that country. In India, Bollywood productions like Company, Satya, Andaz Apna Apna, Moksha, Jaane Bhi Do Yaaron, Darna Mana Hai, Waisa Bhi Hota Hai Part II, Gunda and No Smoking...! achieved cult-status. The action film Red Heat (1988) has found a cult audience amongst fluent Russian speakers because of the movie's weak portrayal of the Russian language and stereotypes. The Belgian The Afterman (1985) has also become a cult movie. WÇ”xiá (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: , Mandarin IPA: , Cantonese Pinyin: mou5 hap6), literally meaning martial (arts) heroes, is a distinct quasi-fantasy sub-genre of the martial arts genre in literature, television and cinema. ... Icons of tokusatsu in the late 1970s: Spider-Man, Kamen Rider Stronger, Kamen Rider V3, Battle Fever J, Ultraman Jonias, as well as the manga and anime icon Doraemon Tokusatsu ) is a Japanese word that literally means special effects. ... Animé redirects here. ... KaijÅ« (怪獣) is a Japanese term that generically translates to monster. ... This article is about the character itself. ... For related entries, see Battle Royale (disambiguation). ... Bollywood (Hindi: , Urdu: ) is the informal term popularly used for Mumbai-based Hindi-language film industry in India. ... Look up company in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Satya is a 1998 Hindi movie, directed by Ram Gopal Varma. ... Andaz Apna Apna (English: Everyone has their own style) is a 1994 Bollywood movie directed by Rajkumar Santoshi, starring Salman Khan, Aamir Khan, Raveena Tandon and Karisma Kapoor. ... For other uses, see Moksha (disambiguation). ... Jaane Bhi Do Yaaron (Who Pays the Piper in English. ... Darna Mana Hai (Hindi: डरना मना है, Urdu: ڈرنا منع ہے) is a Bollywood production, released on July 25, 2003. ... ... A must see MOVIE : FOR full movie follow the link [1] Gunda is a 1998 movie directed by Kanti Shah, starring Mithun Chakraborty, Mukesh Rishi and Shakti Kapoor. ... No Smoking. ... Red Heat is a 1988 movie in which Arnold Schwarzenegger plays Russian policeman Ivan Danko. ...


Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) has become a popular cult film. Originally released by Disney in 1993, the film failed to generate much attention in theaters due to its dark nature not found in most Disney films. By the late 1990s, the film had gained a cult following particularly among youth. The film expanded into a more mainstream film in the 2000s, with merchandise sold at stores such at Hot Topic. Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... The Nightmare Before Christmas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... For the Le Tigre song, see Hot Topic (Song). ...


So-bad-they're-good cult films and camp classics

Many films enjoy cult status because they are seen as ridiculously awful, for example Plan 9 from Outer Space (1958). The critic Michael Medved characterized examples of the "so bad it's good" class of low-budget cult film through books such as The Golden Turkey Awards. These films include such financially fruitless and critically scorned films as The Lonely Lady, Mommie Dearest, Cool as Ice, Boxing Helena, Manos: The Hands of Fate, Fatal Deviation and Showgirls, which have become inadvertent comedies to film buffs. Movies have even achieved cult status by successfully imitating the awfulnesses of so-bad-it's-good movies (The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra and Amazon Women on the Moon being just two examples.) This article is about 1959 film. ... Michael Medved (born October 3, 1948) is a Jewish-American, neoconservative radio talk show host, film critic, and author. ... The Golden Turkey Awards is a 1980 book by film critic Michael Medved and his brother Harry Medved. ... The Lonely Lady is a 1983 film directed by Peter Sasdy based on the book written by Harold Robbins. ... Mommie Dearest is a 1981 Paramount biopic about Joan Crawford, starring Faye Dunaway. ... Cool as Ice is a 1991 film loosely based on Rebel Without a Cause, and often referred to as the Vanilla Ice Movie. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Manos The Hands of Fate is a film written, directed, and produced by American fertilizer salesman Hal Warren in 1966, as a result of a bet. ... This article is about the film Showgirls. For a dancer/performer, see Showgirl. ... The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra is an independent film spoofing 1950s era B-movies. ... Amazon Women on the Moon is a 1987 film written by comedy duo Michael Barrie and Jim Mulholland. ...


In other cases, little-known or forgotten films from the past are revived as cult films, largely because they are considered goofy and senseless by modern standards, with laughable special effects and corny plotlines. These include Breakin', The Beastmaster, Santa Claus Conquers the Martians, The Creeping Terror, Robot Monster, The Incredibly Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and Became Mixed-Up Zombies, Attack of the 50 Foot Woman and the works of Edward D. Wood, Jr. See also: Mystery Science Theater 3000. The Beastmaster is an example of the strange vectors which can lead to cult filmdom, as its reputation stems as much from ubiquitous cable-TV overplay as anything in the film itself. Clifford, a 1994 film starring Martin Short (during his thirties) as a ten year old boy has recently become extremely popular among high school age teens and is a source of laughter because of how badly crafted and irritating it is. This article is about the 1984 movie; for other breakin or breaking references see breaking. ... The Beastmaster is a 1982 fantasy film directed by Don Coscarelli that starred Marc Singer, Tanya Roberts, John Amos and Rip Torn. ... Santa Claus Conquers the Martians (also titled Santa Claus Defeats the Aliens) is a 1964 science fiction film that regularly appears on lists of the worst films ever made. ... The Creeping Terror is a 1964 horror/sci-fi film, which appeared in the 2004 documentary, The 50 Worst Movies Ever Made, and was lampooned in a September 1994 episode of movie-mocking television series Mystery Science Theater 3000. ... Robot Monster is a 1953 science fiction B-movie made in 3-D by Phil Tucker. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Attack of the 50 Foot Woman is a 1958 science fiction film produced by Bernard Woolner for Allied Artists Pictures. ... Edward Davis Wood, Jr. ... Mystery Science Theater 3000 (often abbreviated MST3K, sometimes MST 3000 or MST 3K or just MST) is an American cult television comedy series created by Joel Hodgson and produced by Best Brains, Inc. ... Clifford is a 1994 comedy film starring Martin Short, Charles Grodin, and Mary Steenburgen. ...


These films should not be confused with comedic cult movies like The Toxic Avenger, Bad Taste, Army of Darkness, and the films of John Waters, which purposely utilize elements from films "so bad they're good" for comedic effect. This can be seen as related to the artistic style known as "camp". The most recent film to gain widespread acclaim under this jurisdiction is Samuel L. Jackson's Snakes on a Plane (2006), because this movie has been cited as trying for "so-bad-it's-good" status. The Toxic Avenger, first released in late 1985, is the most famous movie made by Troma Entertainment, known for producing low budget B-movies with campy concepts. ... Bad Taste is a low-budget 1987 cult film, one of the first directed by Peter Jackson, in which aliens invade the fictional New Zealand village of Kaihoro (population 78) in order to harvest human beings for their intergalactic fast food franchise but are repelled by a four-man paramilitary... For the wrestling stable, see The Army of Darkness. ... John Waters (born April 22, 1946) is an American filmmaker, writer, personality, visual artist and art collector, who rose to fame in the early 1970s for his transgressive cult films. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... Samuel Jackson redirects here. ... Snakes on a Plane is a cult high concept,[1] horror-thriller feature film[2] starring Samuel L. Jackson. ...


See also

The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ... This article does not discuss cultist groups, personality cults, or cult in its original sense of religious practice. See cult (disambiguation) for more meanings of the term cult. A cult following is a group of fans devoted to a specific area of pop culture. ... Cult television, like cult figures, cult film and cult radio, attracts a band of aficionados or appreciators, known as a cult following, devoted to a specific television series or fictional universe. ... A cult figure or cult icon is a person who attracts the attention of a small band of aficionados. ... Midnight movies are a once popular phenomenon that started in the early 1970s and largely faded with advent of the VCR in the 1980s. ... The first use of the term underground film occurs in a 1957 essay by American film critic Manny Farber, Underground Films. ... Grindhouse redirects here. ...

External links

  • Cult Caretakers An organization that lists, reviews and promotes cult films.
  • The Worldwide Celluloid Massacre
  • Razor Reel A Belgian cult film website.
  • Cinema Suicide - A blog dedicated to cult and b-movies
  • The Cult Film Archive
  • Nanarland.com a French site about "So-bad-they're-good cult films"
  • The Spinning Image a UK site featuring the internet's Cult Movie Database

References

  1. ^ Cult Films at Film Site; accessed 5 October 2007
  2. ^ Cult films at Film site; accessed October 5, 2007
  3. ^ Naomi Klein, No Logo, Vintage Canada Edition, 2000, p. 79.
  4. ^ Cult films at [1]; accessed October 5, 2007.
  5. ^ Adam Rockoff, Going to Pieces: The Rise and Fall of the Slasher Film, 1978–1986 (Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 2002), p. 35, ISBN 0-7864-1227-5.
  6. ^ "Zombie Movies" in The Encyclopedia of Fantasy, ed. John Clute and John Grant (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999), p. 1048, ISBN 0-312-19869-8
  7. ^ See Hoberman and Rosenbaum (1983), p. 298.
  8. ^ Waters (2006).
  9. ^ Pink Flamingos Production Notes. Retrieved 11/15/06.
  10. ^ Hoberman and Rosenbaum (1983), p. 13.
  11. ^ See History of the Rocky Horror Picture Show and Rocky Horror Timeline. Retrieved 11/14/06.
  12. ^ Henkin, Bill (1979). The Rocky Horror Picture Show Book. Dutton Adult, 36. ISBN 978-0801564369. 
  13. ^ Bijou Theatre; Elgin Theatre. Retrieved 11/15/06.
  14. ^ Angel Heart (1987) - Box office / business
  15. ^ Bryant (2005), p. lxxvii.
  16. ^ Burnett (2004).
  17. ^ Russell, Will. "Hey Dude: The Lebowski Festival", The Independent, August 15, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-17. 
  18. ^ Freddy Got Fingered at Rotten Tomatoes; accessed October 5, 2007.
  19. ^ Casey Affleck gives us the willies. Accessed on 03/29/08.
  20. ^ The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford at [http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/10005911-assassination_of_jesse_james_by_the_coward_robert_ford/ Rotten Tomatoes; accessed 03/29/08.
  21. ^ One stand-up coward. Retrieved on 02/06/08.
  22. ^ See Hoberman and Rosenbaum (1983), pp. 261–262. For their consideration of Freaks as part of the early midnight movie phenomenon, see pp. 3, 95, 99, 295–297.
  23. ^ Beale (2005).
  24. ^ Hall, Phill. "Flatland", Film Threat, March 16, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-17. (English) 
For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Naomi Klein (b. ... No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies is a book by Canadian journalist Naomi Klein. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Film Threat is the name of a magazine and website devoted to coverage of independent film. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cult (religion) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (475 words)
In traditional usage, the cult of a religion, quite apart from its sacred writings ("scriptures"), its theology or myths, or the personal faith of its believers, is the totality of external religious practice and observance, the neglect of which is the definition of impiety.
Cult and cultist have recently accrued negative connotations that are separately dealt with at the entry cult.
Among the observances in the cult of a deity are rituals and ceremonies, which may involve spoken or sung prayers or hymns, and often sacrifice, or substitutes for sacrifice.
Cult film - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1146 words)
Although films of all types of genres and plot conventions become cult films, the horror and science fiction genres produce a large number of cult films, perhaps due to the devoted nature of these genres' fan bases.
Many significant cult films are independently made and were not expected by their creators to have much mainstream success.
Wisdom’s films, in which he usually played a family man worker who outsmarts his boss, were some of the few Western films considered acceptable by the country’s communist rulers, thus Albanians grew familiar and attached to Wisdom.
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