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Encyclopedia > Cult Information Centre
Cult Information Centre
Founder Ian Haworth
Type Charitable organization
Founded 1987
Headquarters London,  United Kingdom
Key people Ian Haworth, General Secretary
Area served  United Kingdom
Focus Cult education
Method Education, Research, Counseling support, Outreach resource
Website Main Web site

The Cult Information Centre (CIC) is a Britain-based organization that provides information and advice to members of what the organization terms as cults, as well as affected family members[1], members of the press and scholarly researchers. The organization also serves as a resource for information on controversial religious groups[2][3], therapy cults[4][2][5], and political cults[6]. The Cult Information Centre gives educational talks about cults in schools around the United Kingdom, to students about to start college education[7][8]. For the computer game previously called Entrepreneur, see The Corporate Machine. ... A charitable organization (also known as a charity) is a trust, company or unincorporated association established for charitable purposes only. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Political cult is a term used to describe some groups on what is generally considered to be the political fringe. ...

Contents

History

The Cult Information Centre was initially founded in 1987[9] and gained charitable status in the United Kingdom, in 1992[10]. Ian Haworth is founder[11] and current General Secretary of the organization, and he had previously been involved with the Council on Mind Abuse[12]. According to Arweck's Researching New Religious Movements, Ian Haworth and an associate had previously lost a court case in Canada that was brought by Werner Erhard against the Council on Mind Abuse organization[10]. Arweck writes that Haworth went bankrupt after losing the case to Erhard, and left Canada for Britain[10][12]. Later in an article in the Sunday Mercury, Ian Howarth was quoted as stating that the Cult Information Centre received complaints in Britain about the actions of Landmark Education[13], which the article described as being linked to Werner Erhard's est movement[13]. Similar statements from the Cult Information Centre were reported in an article on The Forum[14]. Allegorical personification of Charity as a mother with three infants by Anthony van Dyck Charity, meaning selfless giving, is one conventional English translation of the Greek term agapē. // Etymology In the 1400, charity meant the state of love or simple affection which one was in or out of regarding one... The Council on Mind Abuse (COMA) was a Canadian non-profit organization promoting education about cults from 1979 to 1992. ... Werner Hans Erhard (born John “Jack” Paul Rosenberg on September 5, 1935 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), [11] became arguably best known to the general public for the programs he set up: the “est Training” (1971 – 1981) and the “Forum” (1981 – 1991). ... Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... Landmark Education LLC (LE) offers training and development programs in over 20 countries. ... Erhard Seminars Training, or est (always in lower-case), was a controversial New Age large group awareness training (LGAT) seminar program, widespread during the 1970s. ... Werner Erhard and Associates or WEA was (from February 1981 until 1991) a successor organization to est and precessor organization to Landmark Education (http://www. ...


Methodology

The Cult Information Centre believes that the most striking features of post-war religious cults includes the usage of mind control techniques, and strict adherence to a leader or tight-knit leadership structure[11]. This high level of adherence helps to reinforce authority, as well as belief in the leader's doctrine, which may involve his own personal delusions[11]. According to the Cult Information Centre, these individuals are prone to suffering from forms of mental illness[11]. The organization cites twenty-six key forms of mind control, which includes hypnosis, peer pressure and groupthink, love bombing, the rejection of old values, confusing doctrine, use of subliminal messages, time-sense inhibition, dress codes, disinhibition, diet, confession, fear, and chanting and singing[11]. Mind control (or thought control) has the premise that an outside source can control an individuals thinking, behavior or consciousness (either directly or more subtly). ... hi A mental illness or mental disorder refers to one of many mental health conditions characterized by distress, impaired cognitive functioning, atypical behavior, Emotional dysregulation, and/or maladaptive behavior. ... Professor Charcot was well-known for showing, during his lessons at the Salpêtrière hospital, hysterical woman patients – here, his favorite patient, Blanche (Marie) Wittman, supported by Joseph Babiński. ... Peer pressure comprises a set of group dynamics whereby a group in which one feels comfortable may override personal habits, individual moral inhibitions or idiosyncratic desires to impose a group norm of attitudes and/or behaviors. ... Groupthink is a type of thought exhibited by group members who try to minimize conflict and reach consensus without critically testing, analyzing, and evaluating ideas. ... Love bombing is the deliberate show of affection or friendship by an individual or a group of people toward another individual. ... Doctrine, from Latin doctrina, (compare doctor), means a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the body of teachings in a branch of knowledge or belief system. ... A subliminal message is a signal or message designed to pass below (sub) the normal limits of perception. ... Clothing has various sociological functions, including: conspicuous consumption stating or claiming identity establishing, maintaining and defying sociological group norms Thus wearing specific types of clothing or the manner of wearing clothing can convey messages about class, income, belief and attitude. ... 1. ... Diet may mean: In nutrition: Diet (nutrition), the sum of the food consumed by an organism or group. ... Modern confessional in the Church of the Holy Name, Dunedin, New Zealand. ... Fear is a powerful, unpleasant feeling of risk or danger, either real or imagined. ...


The organization has attempted to define the term cult by analyzing dictionary definitions, and psychological, religious, and secular definitions, however it has found that they are all deficient in some manner[15]. Its current definition of the term cult includes three main points: the group's identity was derived from a major religion, but its practices and belief system are dramatically different; its followers are not bound by a codified belief struture; and the group was founded by an individual who utilized fraudulent means to gain respect and acceptance[15]. Psychology (ancient Greek: psyche = soul and logos = word) is the study of mind, thought, and behaviour. ... Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... In the broadest sense a fraud is any crime (or civil wrong) for gain that utilises some deception practiced on the victim as its principal method. ...


The Cult Information Centre has estimated that there are approximately 2,500 cults operating within the United States, as of 2007[16]. Intelligent students that are intellectually and/or spiritually curious were described as prime recruitment targets for cults, according to the Cult Information Centre[17][18]. The organization has stated that these religious sects are limited by very strict rules in Britain as to how they can fundraise and advertise in recruitment of new members[19]. The organization believes that the number of cults actively recruiting from college campuses has increased[20]. Though the organization has stated that college-age students and teenagers are susceptible[21], it also believes that well-off professionals within the middle class are targeted by cults[22]. The organization states that it is a common misperception that only loners and misfits are drawn to controversial groups and movements[23]. Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ...


Analyzed in secondary sources

Along with the Family Action Information and Rescue organization, the Cult Informatin Centre was cited by Wilson and Cresswell's New Religious Movements as one of the best known secular groups that monitor new religious movements[24]. Arweck also compared the Cult Information Centre to the Family Action Information and Rescue Organization, as well as to other groups such as Reachout Trust[10]. A new religious movement or NRM is a religious, ethical, or spiritual grouping of fairly recent origin which is not part of an established religion and has not yet become recognised as a standard denomination, church, or religious body. ... Reachout Trust is an evangelical Christian organisation. ...


Gurr's The New Face of Terrorism[11], Shaw's Spying in Guruland[25] and Mikul's Bizarrism[26] cite the Cult Information Centre's twenty-six techniques of mind control. William Shaw had consulted with the Cult Information Centre in his 1993 investigation of cults, and his opinion was that individuals had joined them out of "their own hunger to believe."[27] These twenty-six techniques have also been cited by the press as well[28]. BBC News has cited the Cult Information Centre's five key factors that distinguish a cult, in an article on Scientology[29]. In a separate article Howarth of the Cult Information Centre was quoted as stating he was deeply concerned about Scientology's activities and use of celebrities in a global marketing campaign[30]. The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Scientology is a system of beliefs and practices created by American pulp fiction[1][2] and science fiction [3] author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as a self-help philosophy. ... Recruitment and endorsements by Scientologist celebrities have always been very important to the Church of Scientology. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up marketing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In his work Undestanding New Religious Movements, Saliba notes that though the organization's definition of the term cult stems from a theological background, it incorporates sociological and psychological features as well[15]. The research is of the Cult Information Centre's Web site is cited as a resource by Penn's False Dawn[31]. The Cult Information Centre was also cited as a resource in British parliamentary proceedings investigating the Home Secretary's actions regarding the Unification Church and Sun Myung Moon[32]. Theology is literally rational discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, rational discourse). By extension, it also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies. ... The Unification Church is a new religious movement started by Sun Myung Moon in Korea in the 1940s. ... Sun Myung Moon in 2005. ...


References

  1. ^ Lane, Megan. "Cults: Playing for keeps", BBC News, BBC, 26 July, 2000. 
  2. ^ a b Shipman, Martin. "Tourist board defends pounds 11,000 cash grant to 'cult' group", Western Mail, 2004 MGN Ltd., April 13, 2004. 
  3. ^ Shipton, Martin. "Storm over pounds 180,000 grant to Welsh 'cult'.", Western Mail, 2004 MGN Ltd., April 2, 2004. 
  4. ^ Staff. "`Self help' cults target professionals.", The Independent, Independent Newspapers (UK) Ltd., July 22, 2001. 
  5. ^ Hampshire, Mary. "I was raped.. then lured into misery by church fanatics.", The Mirror, 2000 MGN LTD, November 28, 2000. 
  6. ^ Kirby, Terry. "Grieving parents warn of dangers of `political cults'.", The Independent, Independent Newspapers (UK) Ltd., March 27, 2004. 
  7. ^ Bacon, Hanna. "Sixth formers on cult alert", BBC News, BBC, July 16, 1999. 
  8. ^ Staff. "Children wooed by forces of Satanism on Internet", Irish Independent, Unison.ie, August 28, 2001. 
  9. ^ Kon, Andrea. "In the Hot Seat: Just the Job", The Evening Standard, Solo Syndication Limited, July 25, 2005. 
  10. ^ a b c d Arweck, Elizabeth (2006). Researching New Religious Movements. Routledge, 69, 132, 194, 442, 443. ISBN 041527754X. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f Gurr, Nadine; Benjamin Cole (2002). The New Face of Terrorism: Threats from Weapons of Mass Destruction. I.B.Tauris, 134, 158, 182, 193, 308. ISBN 1860648258. 
  12. ^ a b Williams, Raymond Brady; Harold G. Coward, John Russell Hinnells (2000). The South Asian Religious Diaspora in Britain, Canada, and the United States. SUNY Press, 64. ISBN 0791445097. 
  13. ^ a b Bourke, Fionnuala. "Fears as 'life-change' firm recruits in Brum", Sunday Mercury, April 18, 2004. 
  14. ^ Braid, Mary. "Turn up, tune in, transform? - The Landmark Forum claims to change utterly the lives of its devotees - and it is spreading fast by their word of mouth. But are its 'breakthrough' sessions a good or bad thing? Some see it as education, and others as brainwashing.", The Independent, Independent News and Media Limited, December 5, 2003. 
  15. ^ a b c Saliba, John; J. Gordon Melton (2003). Understanding New Religious Movements. Rowman Altamira, 4, 283. ISBN 0759103569. 
  16. ^ Dry, Gena. "Have You Heard that Therapists and Self Development Workshops Can Cause Harm Instead of Help?", The Five Questions You Must Ask Your Therapist.com (Press Release), www.TheFiveQuestionsYouMustAskYourTherapist.com, May 2, 2007. 
  17. ^ Wallace, Wendy. "Cult following: Evangelical groups are recruiting hard on Britain's campuses", The Guardian, Guardian News and Media Limited, June 20, 2000. 
  18. ^ Coxon, Kate. "Cult following: Students may find themselves the target of religious sects seeking new members, warns Kate Coxon", The Guardian, Guardian News and Media Limited, November 6, 2001. 
  19. ^ Vasagar, Jeevan, Alex Bellos. "Brazilian sect buys London radio station", The Guardian, Guardian News and Media Limited, August 3, 2000. 
  20. ^ Wallis, Lynne. "Let us prey: Many new students starting university are curious and idealistic. Which makes them vulnerable to the increasing number of cults targeting campuses, reports Lynne Wallis", The Guardian, Guardian News and Media Limited, October 1, 2003. 
  21. ^ Staff. "As the number of potentially-lethal sects in the UK tops 500, the groups are targeting Birmingham in the run up to the millennium", Sunday Mercury, Birmingham Post & Mail Ltd, November 8, 1998. 
  22. ^ Staff. "Wanted: middle-class professionals", BBC News, BBC, January 5, 1999. 
  23. ^ Staff. "Fact or Cult Fiction - You Decide", Aberdeen Press and Journal, July 7, 2006, pp. 18. 
  24. ^ Wilson, Bryan R.; Jamie Cresswell (1999). New Religious Movements. Routledge, xvii, 259, 272, 276. ISBN 0415200490. 
  25. ^ Shaw, William (1994). Spying in Guruland: Inside Britain's Cults. Fourth Estate. ISBN 1857021525 , ISBN 978-1857021523. 
  26. ^ Mikul, Chris (1999). Bizarrism. Critical Vision, 142, 152. ISBN 1900486067. 
  27. ^ Medway, Gareth J. (2001). Lure of the Sinister: the unnatural history of Satanism. NYU Press, 277. ISBN 081475645X. 
  28. ^ Staff. "Fear, coercion and control - tactics used to recruit members.", Sunday Mercury, Birmingham Post & Mail Ltd, November 8, 1998. 
  29. ^ Staff. "Cult or religion: What's the difference?", BBC News, BBC, July 13, 1999. 
  30. ^ Qualtrough, Stuart. "Stars Back Cult Crusade to Take Over the World", The People, 1996 MGN LTD, October 13, 1996. 
  31. ^ Penn, Lee (2004). False Dawn. Sophia Perennis, 470. ISBN 159731000X.  Cult Information Centre home page.
  32. ^ The Stationery Office (2004). Immigration Appeals 2004 - 4th Quarter (Imm AR 535 - 734), 650. ISBN 0117830534. 

The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. John Gordon Melton is the founding director of the Institute for the Study of American Religion and is a research specialist with the Department of Religious Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... The Stationery Office is a private publishing company that was created in 1995 when the publishing arm of Her Majestys Stationery Office was privatised. ...

External links

Official

See also

theory of conversion exit tactics
brainwashing
coercive persuasion
love bombing
mind control
personality alteration
religious conversion
snapping
deprogramming
exit counseling
intervention (counseling)
post-cult trauma
psychotherapy

 
 

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