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Cult Awareness Network - Wikipedia

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Cult Awareness Network

From Wikipedia

The Cult Awareness Network (or CAN) is a cult-related organization now owned by associates of the Church of Scientology. It previously provided information on cults and referrals to deprogrammers. In religion and sociology, a cult is a group of people (often a new religious movement) devoted to beliefs and goals which may be contradictory to those held by the majority of society. ... Official Scientology Cross Symbol The Cult of Scientology was founded by author L. Ron Hubbard as an organization dedicated to the practice of Scientology, an applied religious philosophy formulated by Hubbard. ... In religion and sociology, a cult is a group of people (often a new religious movement) devoted to beliefs and goals which may be contradictory to those held by the majority of society. ... Deprogramming is the highly controversial practice in which a persons relatives and/or others use coercive means to get him or her to leave a religious or similar group which they regard as spurious (i. ...


It evolved out of the Citizens' Freedom Foundation which Ted Patrick helped create, and referred hundreds of cases to Rick Ross before being driven out of business in June 1996 by a crippling lawsuit [1]. Ted Patrick was considered the father of deprogramming. Patrick helped found the Citizens Freedom Foundation, which evolved into the Cult Awareness Network. ... Rick Ross (born November 1952) is a cult expert in the United States and a former deprogrammer. ...


After a jury awarded $1,000,000 to a young man who was kidnapped after CAN referred his parents to a deprogrammer, the old CAN declared bankruptcy. Its assets, including its name and phone number were sold at auction for $20,000 to a Scientologist. Deprogramming is the highly controversial practice in which a persons relatives and/or others use coercive means to get him or her to leave a religious or similar group which they regard as spurious (i. ... A Scientologist is a believer in Scientology. ...


Supporters and detractors alike use the terms old CAN and new CAN to refer to the two periods of the organization's existence.


Controversy

So, opponents of the old CAN charge that it deliberately provided a distorted picture of the groups it tracked. They claimed it was "a Chicago-based national anticult organization claiming to be purely a tax-exempt informational clearinghouse on new religions". [2]


Opponents of the new CAN say it has become effectively a subsidiary organization of, and a front group for, Scientology, as it exclusively promotes Scientology's point of view regarding cults and deprogrammers. A front organization, also known as a front group (if it is structured to look like a voluntary association) or a front company or simply a front (if it is structured to look like a company), is any entity set up by and controlled by another organization. ... A Scientology Center in Los Angeles, California. ... Deprogramming is a form of coercive persuasion in which a persons parents hire professional faith breakers to get their child to leave a religious group which they regard as spurious (i. ...


CAN was founded in the wake of the Jonestown mass suicide, and it collected information on many controversial organizations and religious movements. It also, however, became the subject of considerable controversy regarding the tactics employed by CAN operatives such as Galen Kelly and Donald Moore, both of whom were convicted of kidnapping in the course of carrying out "deprogramming." [3] Houses in Jonestown Alternate uses: See Jonestown (disambiguation) Jonestown was a town in Guyana established by Peoples Temple cult leader Jim Jones. ... Galen Kelly has conducted cult deprogrammings. ... Deprogramming is a form of coercive persuasion in which a persons parents hire professional faith breakers to get their child to leave a religious group which they regard as spurious (i. ...


In 1991, Time magazine reported: 8:17 am, August 6, 1945, Japanese time. ...

According to the Cult Awareness Network, whose 23 chapters monitor more than 200 "mind control" cults, no group prompts more telephone pleas for help than does Scientology. Says Cynthia Kisser, the network's Chicago-based executive director: "Scientology is quite likely the most ruthless, the most classically terroristic, the most litigious and the most lucrative cult the country has ever seen. No cult extracts more money from its members.'" (Time, May 6, 1991, "Scientology: The Thriving Cult of Greed and Power.")

Around this time, the Church of Scientology struck back. In The American Lawyer, an article recounts: May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Official Scientology Cross Symbol The Cult of Scientology was founded by author L. Ron Hubbard as an organization dedicated to the practice of Scientology, an applied religious philosophy formulated by Hubbard. ...

Starting in 1991, CAN was forced to fend off some 50 civil suits filed by Scientologists around the country, many of them asserting carbon copy claims and many pressed by the same law firm, Los Angeles's Bowles & Moxon. Scientologists also filed dozens of discrimination complaints against CAN with state human rights commissions nationwide, requiring the services of still more lawyers. The avalanche of litigation staggered the network. By 1994 CAN, which ran on a budget of about $300,000 a year, had been dumped by its insurers and owed tens of thousands of dollars to attorneys. [4]

After driving the Cult Awareness Network to bankruptcy, a Scientologist attorney appeared in bankruptcy court and managed to win the bidding for what remained of the organization. The 'Cult Awareness Network' is now one of the hundreds of front companies run by the Church of Scientology.[5]


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Watchman Expositor: Cult Awareness Network Loses Lawsuit (619 words)
Cult Awareness Network (CAN), a Chicago-based, secular cult awareness organization, received a devastating blow last year when they lost a $1.1 million civil suit and were forced into chapter 11 bankruptcy.
Cynthia Kisser, CAN executive director, believes that the case was in reality, an attack from the Church of Scientology which she said had already backed over 50 lawsuits against them.
CAN was, however, found guilty of conspiracy and charged with over a million dollars of the total damages awarded.
Cult Awareness Network - Scientology organization defends religious cults (2680 words)
Cult experts like Steve Hassan and Margaret Singer are subjected to ad-hominem attacks, as is the publisher of Apologetics Index.
Citing the old CAN's "reign of terror," she scarcely conceals her glee at the prospect that some of the formerly targeted groups may want to use the newly obtained materials to pursue lawsuits or even criminal prosecutions.
CAN R.I.P. Mirror of the old, real CAN (Cult Awareness Network) site shortly before CAN was taken over by the Scientology Church.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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