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Encyclopedia > Crystal meth

Methamphetamine is a synthetic stimulant drug which induces a strong feeling of euphoria and is highly psychologically addictive. Pure methamphetamine is a colorless crystalline solid, sold on the streets as glass, ice, or crystal. It is also sold as less pure crystalline powder called crank or speed, or in rock formation termed tweak, dope, or raw. Methamphetamine was first synthesized in 1919 in Japan by chemist A. Ogata. A stimulant is a drug which increases the activity of the sympathetic nervous system and produces a sense of euphoria or awakeness. ... Many drugs are provided in tablet form. ... Euphoria may refer to: A psychological state of intense good feeling Euphoria (band), a psychedelic music group. ... Psychological addiction, as opposed to physiological addiction, is a persons need to use a drug out of desire for the effects it produces, rather than to relieve withdrawal symptoms. ... Crystal (disambiguation) Insulin crystals A crystal is a solid in which the constituent atoms, molecules, or ions are packed in a regularly ordered, repeating pattern extending in all three spatial dimensions. ... Inventor of Methamphetamine. ...


Methamphetamine image. ...

(S)-N-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-amine

CAS number
537-46-2 CAS registry numbers are unique numerical identifiers for chemical compounds, polymers, biological sequences and alloys. ...

ATC code
The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System is used for the classification of drugs. ...

Chemical formula C10H15N
Molecular weight 149.24
Bioavailability ?
Metabolism hepatic
Elimination half life 4-5 hours (normal renal function)
Excretion renal
Pregnancy category C (USA)
Legal status

Schedule II (USA)
Class B (oral) (UK)
Class A (injectable) (UK) A chemical formula (also called molecular formula) is a concise way of expressing information about the atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound. ... General Name, Symbol, Number Carbon, C, 6 Chemical series Nonmetals Group, Period, Block 14 (IVA), 2, p Density, Hardness 2267 kg/m3 0. ... General Name, Symbol, Number Hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1 (IA), 1, s Density, Hardness 0. ... General Name, Symbol, Number Nitrogen, N, 7 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 15 (VA), 2, p Density 1. ... The molecular mass of a substance (less accurately called molecular weight and abbreviated as MW) is the mass of one molecule of that substance, relative to the unified atomic mass unit u (equal to 1/12 the mass of one atom of carbon-12). ... In pharmacology, bioavailability is a term used to describe a pharmacokinetic property of drugs, namely, the fraction of a dose which reaches the systemic circulation. ... The liver is an organ in vertebrates including humans. ... Half-Life is a science fiction first-person shooter computer game developed by Valve Software and published by Sierra On-Line in 1998, based on a heavily-modified Quake game engine. ... --212. ... Kidneys viewed from behind with spine removed The kidneys are bean-shaped excretory organs in vertebrates. ... The pregnancy category of a pharmaceutical agent is an assessment of the risk of fetal injury due to the pharmaceutical, if it is used as directed by the mother. ... The Controlled Substances Act (CSA), Title II of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, is the legal foundation of the United States governments fight against the abuse of drugs and other substances. ...

Delivery 5mg tablets
Indicated for:

Recreational uses:
DISCLAIMER Please remember that Wikipedia is offered for informational use only. ... Narcolepsy is a neurological condition characterized by severe fatigue, irresistible episodes of sleep and general sleep disorder. ... Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational rather than medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ...

Other uses:
Euphoria may refer to: A psychological state of intense good feeling Euphoria (band), a psychedelic music group. ... A stimulant is a drug which increases the activity of the sympathetic nervous system and produces a sense of euphoria or awakeness. ...

Contraindications:
Side effects:

Severe: (with chronic use) Anorectics, anorexigenics or appetite suppressants, are substances which reduce the desire to eat (anorectic, from the Greek an- = not and oreg- = extend, reach). Used on a short term basis clinically to treat obesity, some appetite suppressants are also available over the counter. ... In medicine, a contraindication is a condition or factor that increases the risk involved in using a particular drug, carrying out a medical procedure or engaging in a particular activity. ... Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are a class of antidepressant drugs prescribed for the treatment of depression. ... In medicine, hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure. ... A side-effect is any effect other than an intended primary effect. ... Medicine In medicine, a persistent and lasting condition is said to be chronic (from Greek chronos). ...

Cardiovascular: Amphetamine psychosis is a form of psychosis which can result from amphetamine or methamphetamine use. ... -1... Kidneys viewed from behind with spine removed The kidneys are bean-shaped excretory organs in vertebrates. ... The liver is an organ in vertebrates including humans. ... The circulatory system or cardiovascular system is the organ system which circulates blood around the body of most animals. ...

Endocrinal: In medicine, hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure. ... The endocrine system is a control system of ductless endocrine glands that secrete chemical messengers called hormones that circulate within the body via the bloodstream to affect distant organs. ...

Eye: Thermoregulation is the ability of an organism to keep its body temperature within certain boundaries, even when temperature surrounding is very different. ... An eye is an organ that detects light. ...

Gastrointestinal: The human eye The pupil is the central transparent area (showing as black). ... For the Physics term GUT, please refer to Grand unification theory The gastrointestinal or digestive tract, also referred to as the GI tract or the alimentary canal or the gut, is the system of organs within multicellular animals which takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and...

Neurological: Diarrhea in American English, (spelled diarrhoea in other anglophone countries) is a condition in which the sufferer has frequent and watery or loose bowel movements (from the ancient Greek word διαρροή = leakage; lit. ... Nausea (Greek Ναυτεία) is the sensation of unease and discomfort in the stomach with an urge to vomit. ... Vomiting (or emesis) is the forceful expulsion of the contents of ones stomach through the mouth. ... Neurology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the central and peripheral nervous systems. ...

  • altered brain chemistry

Psychological: Psychology (ancient Greek: psyche = soul and logos = word) is the study of mind, thought, and behaviour. ...

Skin: Euphoria may refer to: A psychological state of intense good feeling Euphoria (band), a psychedelic music group. ... Model of the layers of human skin In zootomy and dermatology, skin is an organ of the integumentary system; which is composed of a layer of tissues that protect underlying muscles and organs. ...

Miscellaneous: For the manga by Tsukasa Hôjô, see Rash. ...

In some instances, these substances when found on the street are diluted or cut with inert substances like mannitol. In most instances, the methamphetamine is usually of a pure nature, but diluted mainly with the chemicals that were used to synthesize it. In medicine, anorexia is the symptom of diminished appetite or appetite loss. ... Insomnia is a sleep disorder characterised by an inability to sleep and/or to remain asleep for a reasonable period during the night. ... In the context of physical health, weight loss is the process of losing body weight, usually by losing fat. ... Mannitol or 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexanehexol (C6H8(OH)6) is a vasodilator which is used mainly to reduce pressure in the cranium, and to treat patients with oliguric renal failure. ...

Contents

Production

Methamphetamine is structurally similar to methcathinone, amphetamine, and other stimulants, and it may be produced from ephedrine or pseudoephedrine by chemical reduction. Most of the necessary chemicals are readily available in household products or over-the-counter medicines. This makes methamphetamine appear unusually easy to make, unlike cannabis and cocaine, which are both harvested directly from plants. Methcathinone is an addictive recreational drug that is cheap and simple to synthesize. ... Amphetamine, also known as speed, is a synthetic drug originally studied (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ... A stimulant is a drug which increases the activity of the sympathetic nervous system and produces a sense of euphoria or awakeness. ... Ephedrine (EPH) is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a decongestant. ... Pseudoephedrine is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a decongestant. ... Cannabis is a plant genus which includes the species Cannabis sativa and is also known as hemp, marijuana, marihuana, dope, pot, weed, grass or Mary Jane. ... Cocaine is a crystalline alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ...


Pseudoephedrine hydrochloride and ephedrine hydrochloride are commonly available decongestant drugs without strong euphoric effects. There are many different syntheses for conversion which can be found on the internet, although these sources are sometimes not trustworthy, and most experienced 'cooks' learned from either chemistry classes or other 'cooks' in person. The synthesis involves moderately dangerous chemicals and processes that could be considered extremely dangerous. A decongestant is a broad class of drugs designed to symptomatically treat ailments affecting the respiratory system. ... Chemistry (in Greek: χημεία) is the science of matter and its interactions with energy and itself (see physics, biology). ...


These chemicals are commonly used by people without laboratory training in and around the household for a variety of household uses; however, the production of methamphetamine is not to be confused with these much safer household uses. In fact, when law enforcement finds a methamphetamine lab they must have professionals trained and certified in dealing with meth labs and wearing full hazardous materials protection suits dismantle and dispose of the operation because of the safety and environmental hazards. It is estimated for every 1 pound of methamphetamine produced, 5 pounds of hazardous waste are also produced. A hazardous material is any solid, liquid, or gas that can cause harm to humans and other living organisms due to being flammable or explosive, irritating or damaging the skin or lungs, interfering with oxygen intake and apsorption (asphyxiants), or causing allergic reactions (allergens). ...


This can result in highly dangerous situations which can be environmental hazards, as the by-products of production are highly toxic in most syntheses, and are sometimes dumped in unsafe places. An example is Phosphine gas, which can be produced when the reaction is allowed to overheat, and which has killed operators of illegal "clan" (clandestine chemistry) or "meth" labs. An environmental hazard is a generic term for any situation or state of events which poses a threat to the surrounding environment. ... A by-product is a secondary or incidental product deriving from a manufacturing process or chemical reaction, and is not the primary product or service being produced. ... For a list of biologically injurious substances, including toxins and other materials, as well as their effects, see poison. ... Phosphine is the common name for phosphorus hydride (PH3), also known by the IUPAC name phosphane. ... Clandestine chemistry generally refers to chemistry carried out in illegal drug laboratories, but can include any kind of laboratory operation carried on in secret because of the illegality of its activities. ...


Methamphetamine can also be made from phenylacetone and methylamine, which are currently DEA List I chemicals. Aka phenyl-2-propanone, or P2P. ... Methylamine is a simple primary amine with a formula of CH3NH2. ... Since 1973, the DEA has enforced the drug laws in the United States. ...


Until the early 1990's, methamphetamine was made mostly in clandestine labs run by drug traffickers in Mexico and California, who still produce the largest amount of meth in the US. Since then, however, authorities have discovered increasing numbers of small-scale methamphetamine labs all over the United States, commonly located in rural, suburban, or low-income areas spread throughout the United States.


Very recently mobile methamphetamine and hotel based labs have caught the attention of both the news media and law enforcement. These have been seen as a public safety issue because of the increased exposure of the general public to hazardous chemicals and explosions and fires, since many of the chemicals used to produce meth are toxic and flammable. In addition to these serious issues there is also the likelihood of a 'cook' being well armed, in many cases more so than the police. The police have responded two ways, first by the creation of a number of specialized task forces and secondly by the education of those individuals likely to come in contact with persons involved in the production of methamphetamine with regards to clues and signs a store clerk or a hotel manager would use to identify someone as a potential suspect in the production of methamphetamine. The Indiana State police, for example, found just 6 labs in 1995 compared to 1,260 in 2003.


On April 6, 2004, Oklahoma issued a state law prohibiting the non-prescription sale of certain over-the-counter medications known to contain ingredients used in meth production. In Iowa a law has recently gone into effect concerning the sale of precusors such as pseudoephedrine. This law requires that non-prescription drugs with pseudoephedrine be placed behind the pharmicist's counter. A person can only buy 330mg of pseudoephedrine per day. They must also show ID when purchasing the drug, and sign a logbook when purchasing pseudoephedrine. The state of Oregon has also followed suit, passing a similar law which requires ID to be shown when purchasing products which contain psuedoephedrine, those products to be located behind a pharmacist's counter, and names of the purchasers to be placed on a list for up to two years. State nickname: The Hawkeye State Other U.S. States Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Governor Thomas Vilsack Official languages English Area 145,743 km² (26th)  - Land 144,701 km²  - Water 1,042 km² (0. ... State nickname: Beaver State Other U.S. States Capital Salem Largest city Portland Governor Ted Kulongoski Official languages None Area 255,026 km² (9th)  - Land 248,849 km²  - Water 6,177 km² (2. ...


History

Methamphetamine was first synthesized in 1919 by the Japanese chemist A. Ogata. The method of synthesis was reduction of ephedrine using red phosphorus and iodine. Methamphetamine is closely related to Amphetamine which was first synthesized the year 1887 by L. Edeleano, a german chemist. Over time the chemical's use, distribution and place in society changed from insignificant, to controversially beneficial, to terrible infamy. 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Inventor of Methamphetamine. ... Amphetamine, also known as speed, is a synthetic drug originally studied (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ...


Later use included its distribution by the Allies and the Axis to troops during World War II under the name Pervitin. The Nazis, in particular, distributed methamphetamine widely to its soldiers, particularly to SS personnel and Wehrmacht forces in the Eastern Front. After World War II a massive supply of methamphetamine, formerly stocked by the Japanese military, became available in Japan; skyrocketing addiction and hardship followed. When spelt with a capital A, Allies usually denotes the countries that fought together against the Central Powers in World War I and against the Axis Powers in World War II. Other uses In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to... The Axis Powers is a term for those participants in World War II opposed to the Allies. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


The 1950s saw a high rise in the legal prescription of methamphetamine to the American public. Prescribed for everything from obesity, loss of spunk to depression, methamphetamine, and amphetamines in general, were a very large part of the everyday American life ("Pop a pep pill"). Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Amphetamine is a synthetic drug originally developed (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ...

Meth lab.

The 1960s saw the start of the significant use of clandestine manufacture to supply methamphetamine. The five years from 1978 to 1983 are seen as the "golden years" of illicit methamphetamine manufacture. Until then drug laws were far behind the methods of production with the precursors, equipment and supply of such being almost freely available and in almost all cases legal to possess. Meth lab from http://home1. ... Meth lab from http://home1. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Starting in the 1980s and on into the start of the twenty-first century, the rural areas of the United States—especially the Midwest—have experienced a large rise, penetration and, in some parts, saturation and decline of methamphetamine use. Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


The saturation and decline has been seen as more of a natural trend than a result of law enforcement. The damage done by the chemical became so great that parts of society chose to not use the drug as a result of direct observation of the drug's effects.


The future of the drug is likely to follow the same path as the past, with its ups, downs, controversy, praise and defamation of the drug.


Effects

Methamphetamine is a potent central nervous system stimulant that affects the brain by acting on the mechanisms responsible for regulating a class of neurotransmitters known as the biogenic amines or monoamine neurotransmitters. This broad class of neurotransmitters is generally responsible for regulating heart rate, body temperature, blood pressure, appetite, attention and responses associated with alertness or alarm conditions. Although the exact mechanism of action is unknown, it is generally believed that methamphetamine blocks or impedes the re-uptake of one or more of these neurotransmitters, causing them to remain within the synaptic cleft longer than otherwise. As in most neurotransmitter chemistry, its effects are adapted by the affected neurons by a decrease in the production of the neurotransmitters being blocked from re-uptake, leading to the tolerance and withdrawal effects. In medicine it is used as an appetite suppressant in treating obesity, treating anesthetic overdose and narcolepsy. The vertebrate central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord. ... In biochemistry, monoamines are a group of organic compounds containing only one amino group. ... Neurotransmitters are chemicals that are used to relay, amplify and modulate electrical signals between a presynaptic and a postsynaptic neuron. ...


The acute effects of the drug closely resemble the physiological and psychological effects of the fight-or-flight response including increased heart rate and blood pressure, vasoconstriction, pupil dilation, bronchial dilation and increased blood sugar. The person who ingests meth will experience an increased focus and mental alertness and the elimination of the subjective effects of fatigue as well as a decrease in appetite. Many of these effects are broadly interpreted as euphoria or a sense of wellbeing, intelligence and power. Not surprisingly, it is often noted that meth users often become heavily immersed in what they are doing, which could be anything- it is not uncommon for an entire house to have all of its electronic equipment (TVs, radios, computers, etc) torn to pieces; it is also not uncommon for a meth user to be the exact opposite, one who chooses to construct things from junkyard material. Interestingly enough, some meth addicts become meth chemists ("Cooks"), and will ingest the methamphetamine just to stay awake for the long chemical reaction process. The flight or fight response, also called the acute stress response, was first described by Walter Cannon in the 1920s as a theory that animals react to threats with a general discharge of the sympathetic nervous system. ... An American family watching television in the 1950s. ... The tower of a personal computer (specifically a Power Mac G5). ...


The 17th edition of The Merck Manual (1999) describes the effects of heavy use of methamphetamines in these terms: "Continued high doses of methamphetamine produce anxiety reactions during which the person is fearful, tremulous, and concerned about his physical well-being; an amphetamine psychosis in which the person misinterprets others' actions, hallucinates, and becomes unrealistically suspicious; an exhaustion syndrome, involving intense fatigue and need for sleep, after the stimulation phase; and a prolonged depression, during which suicide is possible" (p. 1593). Depending on delivery method and dosage, a dose of methamphetamine will potentially keep the user awake with a feeling of euphoria for periods lasting from 2 to 24 hours. The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy (often referred to simply as The Merck Manual) is one of the worlds most widely used medical textbooks. ... Anxiety is a complex combination of the feeling of fear, apprehension and worry often accompanied by physical sensations such as palpitations, chest pain and/or shortness of breath. ... Psychosis is a psychiatric classification for a mental state in which the perception of reality is distorted. ... A hallucination is a false sensory perception in the absence of an external stimulus, as distinct from an illusion, which is a misperception of an external stimulus. ... In Wikipedia, fatigue can mean: Fatigue (physical) - tiredness in humans Fatigue (material) - failure by repeated stress in materials Fatigues (uniform) - military uniform Battle fatigue - also known as Post-traumatic stress disorder Readers fatigue Voter fatigue This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... A girl quietly at sleep Sleep is the fundamental anabolic process common to all life forms, plant and animal. ... The word depression can mean: A decrease of functional activity in behavior patterns. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of intentionally ending ones own life; it is sometimes a noun for one who has committed, or attempted the act. ...


The acute effects of meth wear off as the brain chemistry starts to adapt to the chemical conditions and as the body metabolizes the chemical, leading to a rapid loss of the initial effect and significant rebound effect as the previously saturated synaptic cleft becomes depleted of the same neurotransmitters that had previously been elevated. Many users then compensate by administering more of the drug to maintain their current state of euphoria and alertness. This process can be repeated many times, often leading to the user staying awake for days at a time, after which secondary sleep deprivation effects manifest in the user. Classic sleep deprivation effects include irritability, blurred vision, memory lapses, confusion, paranoia, hallucinations, nausea, and in extreme cases death. After prolonged use the meth user will begin to become irritable, most likely due to the lack of sleep. Sleep deprivation is an overall lack of the necessary amount of sleep. ...


Methamphetamine is reported to attack the immune system, so meth users are often prone to infections of all different kinds, one being an MRSA infection. This, too, may simply be a result of long term sleep deprivation and/or chronic malnutrition. MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is a bacterium that has developed antibiotic resistance, first to penicillin in 1947, and later to methicillin. ...


It is a common belief that methamphetamine gives people "super-human strength." This belief originates from the 'biker-drug' that was popular even before methamphetamine; PCP. Neither methamphetamine nor PCP actually increase muscular strength, (in fact, PCP, like Ketamine, is an anesthetic and reduces muscular capability). It does, however, cause much more motivation in the user; it is a stimulant and very similar to the amphetamines often used to treat conditions such as Attention Deficit Disorder. Phencyclidine (also called PCP or Angel dust) is a dissociative/anaesthetic drug that was commercially developed in the 1950s by the Parke-Davis pharmaceutical company. ... Ketamine is a general dissociative anesthetic for human and veterinary use. ... DISCLAIMER Please remember that Wikipedia is offered for informational use only. ...


Other side effects include twitching, "jitteriness", repetitive behavior (known as "tweaking"), and jaw clenching or teeth grinding. It has been noted anecdotally that methamphetamine addicts lose their teeth abnormally fast; this may be due to the jaw clenching, although heavy meth users also tend to neglect personal hygeine, such as brushing teeth. It is often claimed that smoking methamphetamine speeds this process by leaving a crystalline residue on the teeth, and while this is apparently confirmed by dentists, no clinical studies have been done to investigate.


Some users exhibit sexually compulsive behavior, and may engage in extended sexual encounters with one or more individuals, often strangers. As it is symptomatic of the user to continue taking the drug to combat fatigue, an encounter or series of encounters can last for several days. This compulsive behavior has created link between meth use, and STD transmission, especially HIV and Syphilis. See Crystal and sex. Sexual Compulsion (also sex/sexual addiction) is an overwhelming need for sex or preoccupation with sex or the procurement of sex. ... Sexually-transmitted infections (STIs), also known as sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs), are diseases that are commonly transmitted between partners through some form of sexual activity, most commonly vaginal intercourse, oral sex, or anal sex. ... HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a retrovirus that infects cells of the human immune system. ... Depression-era U.S. poster advocating early syphilis treatment Syphilis (historically called lues) is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that is caused by a spirochaete bacterium, Treponema pallidum. ... Crystal d-methamphetamine hydrochloride (commonly known as Crystal meth, Crystal, or meth) is a powerfully addictive stimulant drug often used recreationally as a party drug. ...


Addiction

Methamphetamine is an addictive drug. While withdrawal symptoms are less pronounced than alcohol or opiates such as heroin, they are no less physiological in nature, and include seizures, narcolepsy, and stroke. Furthermore, the mental and social consequences of quitting can be severe and extremely difficult for the addict to experience. As with all addictions relapse is a common occurrence. Addiction is an uncontrollable compulsion to repeat a behavior regardless of its consequences. ... When an addictive behavior is stopped or an addictive substance is withdrawn from use, withdrawal symptoms almost always follow. ... In general usage, alcohol (from Arabic al-khwl الكحول, or al-ghawl الغول) refers almost always to ethanol, also known as grain alcohol, and often to any beverage that contains ethanol (see alcoholic beverage). ... An opioid is any agent that binds to opioid receptors found principally in the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. ... Asian heroin Black tar heroin Bayer Heroin (TM) Primary worldwide producers of heroin. ... Physiology (in Greek physis = nature and logos = word) is the study of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of living organisms. ... This article is about the medical condition. ... Narcolepsy is a neurological condition characterized by severe fatigue, irresistible episodes of sleep and general sleep disorder. ... A stroke or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is suddenly interrupted by occlusion (an ischemic stroke- approximately 90%of strokes) or by hemorrhage (a hemorrhagic stroke - approximately 10% of strokes). ... A relapse occurs when a person is affected again by a condition that affected them in the past. ...


In an article about his son's addiction to methamphetamine, a California writer who has also experimented with the drug put it this way: "[T]his drug has a unique, horrific quality. In an interview, Stephan Jenkins, the singer in the band Third Eye Blind, said that methamphetamine makes you feel 'bright and shiny.' It also makes you paranoid, incoherent and both destructive and pathetically and relentlessly self-destructive. Then you will do unconscionable things in order to feel bright and shiny again" (David Sheff, "My Addicted Son," New York Times Magazine, February 6, 2005, p. 44). Stephan Jenkins was born September 27, 1964 and is best known as the lead singer for Third Eye Blind. ... Third Eye Blind is an alternative rock band which formed in the early 1990s. ...


Former users have noted that they feel stupid or dull when they quit using methamphetamine. This is because the brain is adapting a need for methamphetamine to think faster, or at what seems to be a higher level. Individuals with ADHD are often at especially higher risk for addiction to methamphetamine, because the drug often increases the user's ability to focus and reduces impulsivity, creating a mechanism in which one is better able to cope. However, as self-medication is never done under the supervision of a licensed psychiatrist, and the individual with ADHD seldom experiences any less of the adverse effects (see below), prescription stimulants such as methylphenidate (Ritalin®), dextroamphetamine (Dexadrine®) and amphetamine salt (Adderall®)are overwhelmingly indicated. A biological adaptation is an anatomical structure, physiological process or behavioral trait of an organism that has evolved over a period of time by the process of natural selection such that it increases the expected long-term reproductive success of the organism. ... DISCLAIMER Please remember that Wikipedia is offered for informational use only. ... Psychiatry is a branch of medicine that studies and treats mental and emotional disorders (see mental illness). ... Methamphetamine is a synthetic stimulant drug which induces a strong feeling of euphoria and is highly psychologically addictive. ... Methylphenidate or MPH, is an amphetamine-like prescription stimulant commonly used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children and adults. ... Dextroamphetamine (also known as dextroamphetamine sulfate, dexamphetamine, dexedrine, Dexampex, Ferndex, Oxydess II, Robese, Spancap #1, and, informally, Dex), a stereoisomer of amphetamine, is an indirect-acting stimulant that releases norepinephrine from nerve terminals, thus promoting nerve impulse transmission. ... Amphetamine, also known as speed, is a synthetic drug originally studied (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ...


With long-term use, enough dopamine will have flooded the brain to cause chemical cell damage. This often leads to slow thinking (which in turn requires that the addict use meth to 'fix' it), and depression. This is known colloquially as "The Vampire Life". THIS IS STUPID Dopamine is a chemical naturally produced in the body. ... The word depression can mean: A decrease of functional activity in behavior patterns. ...


Beneficial versus adverse effects

Beneficial effects of methamphetamine use are generally experienced immediately. Adverse effects occur with chronic use (more than six to twelve months).


Beneficial effects

  • Increased awareness and alertness
  • Greater motivation
  • Increased thinking and brain activity (short-term)
  • Weight loss (may also be a negative depending upon circumstances)

Adverse effects

Psychological addiction, as opposed to physiological addiction, is a persons need to use a drug out of desire for the effects it produces, rather than to relieve withdrawal symptoms. ... The word depression can mean: A decrease of functional activity in behavior patterns. ... Erectile dysfunction, also known as impotence, is the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis for satisfactory sexual intercourse regardless of the capability of ejaculation. ... Crystal d-methamphetamine hydrochloride (commonly known as Crystal meth, Crystal, or meth) is the crystalline form of methamphetamine, a powerfully addictive stimulant drug often used recreationally as a party drug. ... The term neurotoxic is used to describe a substance, condition or state that damages the nervous system and / or brain, usually by killing neurons. ... Tooth decay, or dental caries, is a disease of the teeth resulting in damage to tooth structure. ... Meth mouth is an informal name to the tooth decay induced by methamphetamine abuse. ... The immune system is the organ system that protects an organism from outside biological influences. ... In psychology, anhedonia is a patients inability to experience pleasure from normally pleasurable life events such as eating, exercise, and social/sexual interactions. ...

Methods of use

Methamphetamine can be swallowed, snorted, smoked, or injected. As with heroin, nicotine, or cocaine, the potential for addiction is greater when it is delivered by methods that cause the concentration in the blood to rise quickly, principally because the effects desired by the user are felt quicker and with a higher intensity than a moderated delivery mechanism.


Methamphetamine is a powerful nasal decongestant, so methamphetamine users who snort it often have very clear nasal cavities; however, there have been rare cases of people snorting so much meth that their nose cartilage deteriorates. Snorting methamphetamine also causes tooth decay, since the nasal passages are directly connected to the mouth region, and the crystalline particles still attach to the teeth. A nasal decongestant helps to remove nasal congestion (congestion in the nasal passage). ... The mouth, also known as the buccal cavity or the oral cavity, is the opening through which an animal or human takes in food. ...


Methamphetamine is commonly smoked in glass pipes, or in tin foil without direct flame. Methamphetamine must be heated to put off the desired smoke; not burned. Smoking methamphetamine is probably the most impure form of ingestion; in addition to the possible effects on teeth, it is very damaging to the lungs. Methamphetamine users who smoke it sometimes experience mild asthma, which can be countered by inhaling salbutamol aerosol spray, or epinephrine aerosol. Salbutamol (INN) or albuterol (USAN) is a short-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonist used for the relief of bronchospasm in conditions such as asthma and COPD. It is marketed by the Allen & Hanburys respiratory division of GlaxoSmithKline under the trade name Ventolin. ... http://visibleearth. ... Epinephrine (INN) or adrenaline (BAN) is a hormone and a neurotransmitter. ...


Many users believe that the least harmful method of ingestion is by injection. Methamphetamine is soluble in water; injection users usually dose 0.2 grams in 3ml of water through a small needle. One may take note in methamphetamine research that injection users often do not experience severe tooth decay, presumably because there is no residue left as with smoking it. However, injection users experience the jaw-clenching greater than users who snort or smoke it, since injecting methamphetamine has a much more powerful effect. This does cause loose teeth, so injection users still do lose their teeth. This method of ingestion brings the risk of infection; injection users often experience skin rashes and all kinds of infections due to the methamphetamine damage to the skin. It is also not uncommon for meth users not to shower; bad hygiene does play a very large role in needle related infections.


Legality

Methamphetamine is classified as a Schedule II substance by the DEA in the United States. While there is technically no difference between the laws regarding methamphetamine and other controlled stimulants, most medical professionals are averse to prescribing it due to its status in society. Further, there is some anecdotal evidence that the DEA audits such prescriptions on a far more regular basis than similar drugs. Internationally, methamphetamine is a Schedule II drug under the Convention on Psychotropic Substances[1] (http://www.incb.org/pdf/e/list/green.pdf). The Controlled Substances Act (CSA), Title II of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, is the legal foundation of the United States governments fight against the abuse of drugs and other substances. ... Since 1973, the DEA has enforced the drug laws in the United States. ... Convention on Psychotropic Substances Opened for signature February 21, 1971 at Vienna Entered into force August 16, 1976 Conditions for entry into force 40 ratifications Parties 175 The Convention on Psychotropic Substances is an international agreement adopted in 1971 under the auspices of the United Nations. ...


Methamphetamine is legally marketed in the United States under the trade name Desoxyn, manufactured by Ovation Pharma. A generic formulation is also produced by Abbott Laboratories. Bulk pharmaceutical bottle of Desoxyn Desoxyn® CII is a pharmaceutical form of methamphetamine hydrochloride (also known as desoxyephedrine, hence the name Desoxyn), indicated for treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD), narcolepsy, and exogenous obesity. ... A generic drug is a drug which is bioequivalent to a brand name drug with respect to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, but is normally sold for a lower price. ... Abbott Laboratories (NYSE: ABT) is a pharmaceuticals and health care company. ...


Methamphetamine has become a major focus of the 'war on drugs' in the U.S. in recent years. In some localities (e.g. Pierce County in Washington State, in 2000) special task forces were formed by police to attack the problem of rampant methamphetamine production. The prohibition of drugs through legislation or religious law is a common means of controlling the perceived negative consequences of recreational drug use at a society- or world-wide level. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Pierce County is the second most populous county in the state of Washington. ... State nickname: The Evergreen State Other U.S. States Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Governor Christine Gregoire Official languages None Area 184,824 km² (18th)  - Land 172,587 km²  - Water 12,237 km² (6. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In some areas of the United States, manufacturing methamphetamine is punishable by a mandatory ten-year prison sentence. In some cases, however, judges have ruled for life in prison without the possibility of parole, especially in cases where victims were killed by overdoses or impure substance.


In the UK, methamphetamine is classified as a Class B drug (under the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act). The maximum penalty for possession is five years imprisonment, and the maximum penalty for supplying is 14 years. If methamphetamine is prepared for injection, it is re-classified as a Class A drug. The maximum penalty for possession is then seven years imprisonment, and the maximum penalty for supplying is life. Class B can mean either: Class B amplifier, a category of electronic amplifier Class B network, a type of Internet Protocol address This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Misuse of Drugs Act is the name of several similar national drug control laws passed by countries in the Commonwealth of Nations. ... Class A can mean either: Class A amplifier, a category of electronic amplifier Class A network, a type of Internet Protocol address In English law Class A drugs are those which have the highest criminal penalties under the various Misuse of Drugs Acts. ...


Street names

A handful of methamphetamine pills

Methamphetamine has many street names; it was known as rain in the 1960s, and terms in popular use today include glass, ice, crystal, or tina for purer forms, or as less pure crystalline powder termed crank or speed, and in rock form as tweak, dope, or raw (in Hawaii the slang term batu is often used). In New Zealand the term "P" is used. "Crystal meth" is the crystalline form of methamphetamine. In its purest form, it is commonly referred to as "glass" or "ice". This is because it appears to be broken shards of glass, or crushed ice. The term ice has also been used for a less common illicit stimulant, 4-methylaminorex, which often causes confusion. Methamphetamine pills in a hand Source: USDOJ File links The following pages link to this file: Methamphetamine Wikipedia:WikiProject Drugs/Photographs/M User:Chris 73/PublicDomain Gallery 005 Categories: United States government images ... Methamphetamine pills in a hand Source: USDOJ File links The following pages link to this file: Methamphetamine Wikipedia:WikiProject Drugs/Photographs/M User:Chris 73/PublicDomain Gallery 005 Categories: United States government images ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... State nickname: The Aloha State Other U.S. States Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Governor Linda Lingle Official languages Hawaiian and English Area 28,337 km² (43rd)  - Land 16,649 km²  - Water 11,672 km² (41. ... P is the 16th letter of the Latin alphabet. ...


As Methamphetamine was quite popular in Japan after World War II, the nickname Shabu has seemed to stick with this drug for quite a while. While some street folk may now call it just "Shabs" the origins of this nickname come from the Japanese word for "swish". Either the Japanese commonly smoked it, or the name swish came from the behaviour of the people under the influence. St Vitus Dance is quite commonly seen as the symptoms of prolonged use, and in Japan also now seems to be quite taboo (people say that the person who shakes their leg makes the other people around them 'lose their fortune' and sometimes elder Japanese folk will hold your leg completely still until you have stopped shaking). A rather large percentage of Japanese had became dependant on the drug for either profit, motivation or entertainment soon after the second world war. The Japanese banned the drug soon after the second world war adding to growing yakuza businesses. Large Yakuza leaders began to control supplies which had once been produced for military purposes. In Japan today there is still a rather large "underworld" associated with the drug, with some people being associated to a completely separate society to most of the law abiding citizens of Japan based purely on this chemical. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Chorea is the occurrence of continuous rapid, jerky, involuntary movements that may involve the face and limb and result in an inability to maintain a posture. ... Yakuza (from Japanese やくざ or ヤクザ), also known as gokudō, are members of traditional organized crime groups in Japan. ... Yakuza (from Japanese やくざ or ヤクザ), also known as gokudō, are members of traditional organized crime groups in Japan. ...


Nazi Dope generally refers to methamphetamine made with anhydrous ammonia, since it is rumored that this was the way the Nazis synthesized it in World War II. This same method is sometimes called annie's dope or just annie. Ammonia is a chemical compound with the formula NH3. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


Yaba are methamphetamine tablets, often colored and candy flavored. Yaba means "crazy drug" in the Thai language and is popular in East Asia and Southeast Asia, where the drug is produced. Methamphetamine is a synthetic stimulant drug which induces a strong feeling of euphoria and is highly addictive. ... The Thai language is the official language of Thailand. ... East Asia can be defined in either cultural or geographic terms. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational rather than medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ...


Books

  • Secrets of Methamphetamine Manufacture, by Uncle Fester
  • Yaa Baa. Production, Traffic, and Consumption of Methamphetamine in Mainland Southeast Asia, by Pierre-Arnaud Chouvy (Online (http://www.geopium.org/yaabaa-english.htm)) & Joël Meissonnier, Singapore, Singapore University Press, 2004.
  • Phenethylamines I Have Known And Loved: A Chemical Love Story, Alexander Shulgin and Ann Shulgin, (ISBN 0963009605). aka PiHKAL. synthesis. online (http://www.erowid.org/library/books_online/pihkal/pihkal.shtml)

Uncle Fester is the author of such controversial books as Secrets of Methamphetamine Manufacture, and Silent Death. ... Alexander Sasha Shulgin (born June 17, 1925) is a pharmacologist, chemist and drug developer. ... PiHKAL is a 1991 book written by Dr. Alexander Shulgin and Ann Shulgin about phenethylamines. ...

See also

Amphetamine, also known as speed, is a synthetic drug originally studied (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ... Clandestine chemistry generally refers to chemistry carried out in illegal drug laboratories, but can include any kind of laboratory operation carried on in secret because of the illegality of its activities. ... Crystal d-methamphetamine hydrochloride (commonly known as Crystal meth, Crystal, or meth) is a powerfully addictive stimulant drug often used recreationally as a party drug. ... Bulk pharmaceutical bottle of Desoxyn Desoxyn® CII is a pharmaceutical form of methamphetamine hydrochloride (also known as desoxyephedrine, hence the name Desoxyn), indicated for treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD), narcolepsy, and exogenous obesity. ... Dextroamphetamine (also known as dextroamphetamine sulfate, dexamphetamine, dexedrine, Dexampex, Ferndex, Oxydess II, Robese, Spancap #1, and, informally, Dex), a stereoisomer of amphetamine, is an indirect-acting stimulant that releases norepinephrine from nerve terminals, thus promoting nerve impulse transmission. ... Ephedrine (EPH) is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a decongestant. ... Methcathinone is an addictive recreational drug that is cheap and simple to synthesize. ... Phenethylamine is an alkaloid and monoamine. ... Pseudoephedrine is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a decongestant. ... Since 1973, the DEA has enforced the drug laws in the United States. ...

External links

  • Erowid Methamphetamine Vault (http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/meth/meth.shtml)
  • Geopium: Geopolitics of Illicit Drugs in Asia (http://www.geopium.org)
  • Rhodium's Archive (http://www.erowid.org/archives/rhodium/chemistry/)
  • Special Report on Meth in California's Central Valley (http://www.valleymeth.com/)
  • "New Yorker" story on the impact of widespread methamphetamine abuse (http://www.newyorker.com/printables/fact/050523fa_fact)
  • BBC story on high levels of use of methamphetamine amongst the male gay community (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4604047.stm)
  • Drug Enforcement Administration (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/):
    • Brief on amphetamines (http://www.dea.gov/concern/meth_factsheet.html)
    • The forms of amphetamines (http://www.dea.gov/pubs/intel/02016/index.html)


Stimulants edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:Stimulants&action=edit)

Caffeine Nicotine Modafinil Synephrine A stimulant is a drug which increases the activity of the sympathetic nervous system and produces a sense of euphoria or awakeness. ... Caffeine molecular structure Caffeine, also known as trimethylxanthine, coffeine, theine, mateine, guaranine, and methyltheobromine, is an alkaloid found naturally in such foods as coffee beans, tea, kola nuts, Yerba maté, guarana, and (in small amounts) cacao beans. ... Nicotine is an organic compound, an alkaloid found naturally throughout the tobacco plant, with a high concentration in the leaves. ... Modafinil (Provigil®; Vigicer®; Alertec®) is a eugeroic stimulant drug produced by the pharmaceutical company Cephalon. ... Synephrine is a dietary supplement aimed at encouraging fat loss. ...

Sympathomimetic amines edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:Sympathomimetic_amines&action=edit)

Benzylpiperazine Cathinone Chlorphentermine Cocaine Diethylpropion Ephedrine Fenfluramine Fen-phen Mazindol Methcathinone Methylphenidate Pemoline Phendimetrazine Phenmetrazine Phentermine Pseudoephedrine Sympathomimetic drugs are substances that mimic the effects of the hormone adrenaline. ... Benzylpiperazine (BZP) is a recreational drug with euphoric, stimulant effects. ... General Information Cathinone (β-ketoamphetamine) is a monoamine alkaloid found in the shrub Catha edulis (Khat). ... Cocaine is a crystalline alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ... Ephedrine (EPH) is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a decongestant. ... Fenfluramine is a drug that was part of the Fen-Phen anti-obesity (the other drug being phentermine). ... Fen-phen was an anti-obesity medication (an anorectic) which consisted of two drugs: fenfluramine and phentermine. ... Methcathinone is an addictive recreational drug that is cheap and simple to synthesize. ... Methylphenidate or MPH, is an amphetamine-like prescription stimulant commonly used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children and adults. ... Pemoline is a medication for ADHD. It is marketed under the brand name Cylert. ... <A HREF=http://www. ... Phentermine is a drug that was part of the Fen-phen anti-obesity drug, the other drug being fenfluramine. ... Pseudoephedrine is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a decongestant. ...

Amphetamines edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:Amphetamines&action=edit)

Amphetamine Benzphetamine Dexamphetamine MDMA Methamphetamine Paramethoxyamphetamine Amphetamine is a synthetic drug originally developed (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ... Amphetamine, also known as speed, is a synthetic drug originally studied (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ... USA by Pharmacia. ... Dextroamphetamine (also known as dextroamphetamine sulfate, dexamphetamine, dexedrine, Dexampex, Ferndex, Oxydess II, Robese, Spancap #1, and, informally, Dex), a stereoisomer of amphetamine, is an indirect-acting stimulant that releases norepinephrine from nerve terminals, thus promoting nerve impulse transmission. ... ecstasy and religious ecstasy MDMA, most commonly known today by the street name ecstasy, is a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family whose primary effect is to stimulate the brain to rapidly secrete large amounts of serotonin, causing a general sense of openness, empathy, energy, euphoria, and well-being. ... PMA (p-methoxyamphetamine) is a dangerous synthetic drug, psycho stimulant and hallucinogen. ...


Phenethylamines edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:Phenethylamines&action=edit)

{2C-B} {2C-C} {2C-D} {2C-E} {2C-I} {2C-N} {2C-T-2} {2C-T-21} {2C-T-4} {2C-T-7} {2C-T-8} {3C-E} {Amphetamine} {Bupropion} {Cathine} {Cathinone} {Dimethylcathinone} {DOB} {DOI} {DOM} {Dopamine} {Br-DFLY} {Ephedrine} {Epinephrine} {Escaline} {Fenfluramine} {MDBD} {MDA} {MDMA} {MDEA} {Mescaline} {Methamphetamine} {Methcathinone} {Methylphenidate} {Norepinephrine} {Phentermine} {Salbutamol} {Tyramine} Hydrocodone (http://cheap-hydrocodone.drags.net/) Phenethylamine is an alkaloid and monoamine. ... 2C-B is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin in 1974, sometimes used as an entheogen. ... 2C-C is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin, sometimes used as an entheogen. ... 2C-D is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin, sometimes used as an entheogen. ... 2C-E (2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenethylamine) is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug phenethylamine first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin, sometimes used as an entheogen. ... 2C-I is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug and entheogenic phenethylamine that was developed and popularized by Alexander Shulgin. ... 2C-N is a psychedelic entheogen first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. ... 2C-T-2, also known as Rosy, is a psychedelic entheogen presumably first synthesized in 1981 by Alexander Shulgin, and has structural and pharmacodynamic properties similar to the drugs Mescaline, MDMA, and 2C-B. In Shulgins book PIHKAL (Phenethylamines I Have Known and Loved), the dosage range is listed... 2C-T-21 is a psychedelic entheogen first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. ... 2C-T-4 or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-(i)-propylthiophenethylamine is a psychedelic entheogen presumably first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin that has some structural and pharmacodynamic properties similar to the drug MDMA, and even more similarities with the drugs mescaline, 2C-B, and 2C-T-7. ... 2C-T-7 (Sulfurous Samadhi) is a psychedelic phenethylamine presumably first synthesized in 1986 by Alexander Shulgin, sometimes used as an entheogen; it has structural and pharmacodynamic properties similar to the drugs Mescaline, MDMA, and 2C-B. In Shulgins book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines I Have Known and Loved), the dosage... 2C-T-8 is a psychedelic entheogen first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. ... 3C-E is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug and entheogen of the phenethylamine class of compounds. ... Amphetamine, also known as speed, is a synthetic drug originally studied (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ... Bupropion (amfebutamone) is an antidepressant of the aminoketone class, chemically unrelated to tricyclics or SSRIs. ... Cathine (β-hydroxyamphetamine) is a monoamine alkaloid found in the shrub Catha edulis (khat). ... General Information Cathinone (β-ketoamphetamine) is a monoamine alkaloid found in the shrub Catha edulis (Khat). ... Dimethylcathinone is a phenethylamine that is synthesized from dichloromethane, bromopropiophenone, and dimethylamine. ... DOB (or Bromo-DMA) is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug of the phenethylamine class of compounds, sometimes used as an entheogen. ... DOI or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug of the phenethylamine family. ... DOM (STP) is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug of the phenethylamine class of compounds, sometimes used as an entheogen . ... THIS IS STUPID Dopamine is a chemical naturally produced in the body. ... Bromo-DragonFLY is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug of the phenethylamine family. ... Ephedrine (EPH) is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a decongestant. ... Epinephrine (INN) or adrenaline (BAN) is a hormone and a neurotransmitter. ... Escaline is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug and entheogen of the phenethylamine class of compounds. ... Fenfluramine is a drug that was part of the Fen-Phen anti-obesity (the other drug being phentermine). ... An uncommon hallucinogenic phenethylamine, closely related to MDMA. It was first synthesized by David Nichols. ... 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, or MDA, is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug and entactogen of the phenethylamine family. ... ecstasy and religious ecstasy MDMA, most commonly known today by the street name ecstasy, is a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family whose primary effect is to stimulate the brain to rapidly secrete large amounts of serotonin, causing a general sense of openness, empathy, energy, euphoria, and well-being. ... MDEA stands for 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine. ... Mescaline or 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug and entheogen of the phenethylamine family. ... Methcathinone is an addictive recreational drug that is cheap and simple to synthesize. ... Methylphenidate or MPH, is an amphetamine-like prescription stimulant commonly used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children and adults. ... Norepinephrine, known as noradrenaline outside the USA, is a catecholamine and a phenethylamine with chemical formula C8H11NO3. ... Phentermine is a drug that was part of the Fen-phen anti-obesity drug, the other drug being fenfluramine. ... Salbutamol (INN) or albuterol (USAN) is a short-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonist used for the relief of bronchospasm in conditions such as asthma and COPD. It is marketed by the Allen & Hanburys respiratory division of GlaxoSmithKline under the trade name Ventolin. ... Categories: Chemistry stubs ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
CBC News Indepth: Drugs (0 words)
Crystal meth is one street form of the drug, methamphetamine hydrochloride, which comes in clear, chunky crystals, which are then inhaled or smoked.
Crystal meth can be easy to produce in small, clandestine labs, sometimes in a kitchen or bathroom, by mixing a cocktail of about 15 substances, mostly pseudoephedrine (a cold remedy), red phosphorous and iodine, but also including ammonia, paint thinner, ether, Drano and the lithium from batteries.
Crystal meth has become the most widespread and popular form of the drug, largely because it is so easy to make that anyone can set up a lab (instructions are widespread on the World Wide Web), but also because motorcycle gangs, which are becoming dominant in organized drug trafficking, usually sell the drug.
Methamphetamine crystal meth treatment detox withdrawal (1714 words)
Crystal meth usually refers to the form of meth that is smoked and is one of the most common terms used to refer to methamphetamine.
Meth abusers in this stage are only one step from binge use – if they should smoke or inject crystal meth, they will be drawn in by the euphoric rush that they have not experienced in their low-intensity use pattern.
A crystal meth abuser who is tweaking can pose a serious danger to those around him or her, especially to police officers, who are perceived as a threat by the tweaker.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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