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Encyclopedia > Croydon
Croydon
Population 330,000
OS grid reference TQ335655
London borough Croydon
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region London
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town CROYDON
Postcode district CR0
Dialling code 020
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
UK Parliament Croydon Central
Croydon North
Croydon South
London Assembly Croydon and Sutton
European Parliament London
List of places: UKEnglandLondon

Coordinates: 51°22′22″N 0°06′36″W / 51.3727, -0.1099 Croydon may be: The London Borough of Croydon Croydon - a village in Cambridgeshire Croydon, New Hampshire, USA Croydon, Pennsylvania, USA One of two places in Sydney in the State of New South Wales, Australia: Croydon Croydon Park Croydon is also a town in the north of Queensland. ... Image File history File links Greater_london_outline_map_bw. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... For other places called Croydon see Croydon (disambiguation) For details of the town of Croydon on which this borough is centred see Croydon The London Borough of Croydon is a London borough in South London, England and part of Outer London. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The CR postcode area is a group of nine postal districts in southern Greater London, which are subdivisions of eight post towns. ... +44 redirects here. ... 020 is the dial code for Greater London in the United Kingdom. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The London Fire Brigade (LFB) is the statutory fire and rescue service for London, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is the largest ambulance service in the world that does not directly charge its patients for its services. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Croydon Central is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Croydon North is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Croydon South is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Greater London is divided into a number of constituencies for London Assembly elections. ... Croydon and Sutton is a constituency represented in the London Assembly. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... London is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a partial list of places in London, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Croydon is a large town and major commercial centre in south London, and the principal settlement of the London Borough of Croydon. It is 9.5 miles (15.3 km) south of Charing Cross, and is one of ten major metropolitan centres identified in the London Plan. The town is also expected to have its urban planning changed dramatically as part of Croydon Vision 2020. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other places called Croydon see Croydon (disambiguation) For details of the town of Croydon on which this borough is centred see Croydon The London Borough of Croydon is a London borough in South London, England and part of Outer London. ... The Victorian Eleanor Cross at Charing Cross The name Charing Cross, now given to a district of central London in the City of Westminster, comes from the original hamlet of Charing, where King Edward I placed a memorial to his wife, Eleanor of Castile. ... Ken Livingstone, the current Mayor of London The Mayor of London is an elected politician in London, United Kingdom. ... Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ... Croydon Vision 2020 is a vigorous regeneration programme aimed at the centre of Croydon in South London. ...

Contents

Etymology

One theory is that the name Croydon derives originally from the Anglo-Saxon croh, meaning "crocus" and denu 'valley', indicating that, like Saffron Walden in Essex, it was a centre for the collection of saffron.[1] Old English redirects here. ... Species See text. ... Fljótsdalur in East Iceland, a rather flat valley In geology, a valley (also called a vale or dale) is a depression with predominant extent in one direction. ... Saffron Walden is a small market town in the Uttlesford district of Essex, England. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ...


Another opinion[2] holds that the name derives from the Old French croie dune, meaning chalk hill. This was because Croydon stands at the northern edge of the chalk hills called the North Downs. Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... The Needles, situated on the Isle Of Wight, are part of the extensive Southern England Chalk Formation. ... Geology of the South East, Chalk is light green (6) A cross-section , showing the Wealden Dome, and relating it to the towns of Kent The North Downs are a ridge of chalk hills located in south east England that stretch for 120 miles (190 km) from Hampshire through Surrey...


According to John Corbett Anderson, (Anderson J C, "A Short Chronicle Concerning the Parish of Croydon", Reeves and Turner, London, 1882, pp19-20; republished in 1970 by SR Publishers, East Ardsley, Wakefield) "The earliest mention of Croydon is in the joint will of Beorhtric and Aelfswth, dated about the year 962. In this Anglo-Saxon document the name is spelt (here he uses original script) Crogdaene. Crog was, and still is, the Norse or Danish word for crooked, which is expressed in Anglo-Saxon by crumb, and totally different word. From the Danish came our crook and crooked. This term accurately describes the locality; it is a crooked or winding valley; in reference to the valley which runs in an oblique and serpentine course from Godstone to Croydon." Anderson rejected the claim, originally cited by Ducarel given above meaning chalk hill, for the reasons that the name was in use at least a century before the French language would have been commonly used following the Norman Invasion, and the fact that the dune part of the etymology is actually Saxon in origin and not French at all, makes the second option above, an unlikely partnership.


Status

The area lay within the Anglo-Saxon administrative division of Wallington hundred.[1] For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Wallington was an ancient hundred in the north east of the county of Surrey, England. ... A hundred is an administrative division, frequently used in Europe and New England, which historically was used to divide a larger region into smaller geographical units. ...


Croydon was created a municipal borough in Surrey in 1883. In 1889, through its growing economic importance, it was made a county borough exempt from county administration. In 1965 the County Borough of Croydon was abolished and its former area was transferred to Greater London and combined with that of the Coulsdon and Purley Urban District to form the present-day London Borough of Croydon. A borough is a political division originally used in England. ... This article is about the English county. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... Croydon was a local government district in north east Surrey from 1849 to 1965. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... Coulsdon and Purley Urban District was a local government district of Surrey from 1915 to 1965. ...


History

Croydon's Victorian Town Hall and Clocktower
Croydon's Victorian Town Hall and Clocktower

There is a plate recording a Bronze Age settlement on Croham Hurst. In addition there is evidence of a Roman settlement in the area and a 5th to 6th century pagan Saxon cemetery. Croydon Town Hall taken 5 Feb 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: London Borough of Croydon Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London Croydon Council Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London/Croydon Categories: GFDL images ... Croydon Town Hall taken 5 Feb 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: London Borough of Croydon Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London Croydon Council Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London/Croydon Categories: GFDL images ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Archbishops of Canterbury as lords of the manor

In the late Saxon period, it was the centre of a large estate belonging to the Archbishops of Canterbury. The church and the archbishops' manor house occupied the area still known as the Old Town. The archbishops used the manor house as an occasional place of residence and would continue to have important links as Lords of the manor, a title originally bestowed on Archbishop Lanfranc by William the Conqueror,[1] and then as local patrons right up to the present day. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... Ightham Mote For the London district, see Manor House, London. ... In England, Lord of the Manor is a minor, feudal title. ... Lanfranc (d. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ...


Croydon appears in Domesday Book as Croindene. It was held by Archbishop Lanfranc of Canterbury. Its domesday assets were: 16 hides and 1 virgate; 1 church, 1 mill worth 5s, 38 ploughs, 8 acres of meadow, woodland worth 200 hogs. It rendered £37 10s 0d.[3] A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... The hide was a variable unit of land area used in medieval England, defined according to its arable yield and taxable potential rather than its exact dimensions. ... The virgate was a unit of land area measure in Medieval England. ... An ancient Chinese tomb model of a foot-powered mill, Eastern Han Dynasty (25 - 220 AD), Freer Gallery of Art. ... The traditional way: a German farmer works the land with a horse and plough. ... A meadow is a habitat of rolling or flat terrain where grasses predominate. ... Limber Pine woodland, Toiyabe Range, central Nevada Biologically, a woodland is a treed area differentiated from a forest. ... Hog is a domestic or feral adult swine. ...


In 1276, the archbishop acquired a charter for a weekly market, and this probably marks the foundation of Croydon as an urban centre. Croydon developed into one of the main market towns of northeast Surrey. The market place was laid out on the higher ground to the east of the manor house in the triangle now bounded by High Street, Surrey Street and Crown Hill. It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Look up Market in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ... A marketplace is the space, actual or metaphorical, in which a market operates. ...


By the 16th century the manor house had become a substantial palace used as the main summer home of the archbishops, visited by monarchs and other dignitaries. The original palace was sold in 1781, by then dilapidated and surrounded by slums and stagnant ponds, and a new residence, nearby at Addington, purchased in its place. Many of the buildings of the original Croydon Palace survive, and are in use today as Old Palace School. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Slums in Delhi, India. ... Addington Palace is a largely 18th-century Palace in Addington near Croydon, south London. ... , St Marys Church, Addington, with the cross commemorating five archbishops in the foreground Addington is a village in the London Borough of Croydon in south London. ... Croydon Palace was the summer residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury for over 500 years. ... The Old Palace School is an independent girls school in Croydon, England, founded in 1889. ...


Croydon Parish Church, St John the Baptist

The earliest record of Christian leaders in Croydon is in an Anglo-Saxon will made in about 960, witnessed by Elfsies, priest of Croydon. The Domesday Book has the earliest written record of Croydon Church. The earliest recording of the name of the church is 6 December 1347, when it was recorded in the will of John de Croydon, fishmonger, containing a bequest to "the church of S John de Croydon". The church still bears the arms of Archbishop Courtenay and Archbishop Chicheley, presumed to be its benefactors. St. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Events Edgar the Peaceable crowned King of England. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411). ... William Courtenay (c. ... Henry Chicheley (also Checheley or Chichele) (c. ...


The Perpendicular-style church was remodelled in 1849 but was destroyed in a great fire in 1867, following which only the tower, south porch and outer walls remained. A new church was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott, one of the greatest architects of the Victorian age, and opened in 1870. His design loosely followed the previous layout, with knapped flint facing and many of the original features, including several important tombs. Croydon Parish Church is the burial place of six Archbishops of Canterbury: John Whitgift, Edmund Grindal, Gilbert Sheldon, William Wake, John Potter and Thomas Herring. The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her ascension to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... This article is about the sedimentary rock. ... John Whitgift (c. ... Edmund Grindal (c. ... Gilbert Sheldon (1598-1677), Archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Stanton in the parish of Ellastone, Staffordshire, and educated at Oxford. ... William Wake (1657-1737), English archbishop, was born in Blandford Forum, Dorset, on January 26 1657, and educated at Christ Church, Oxford. ... For other persons named John Potter, see John Potter (disambiguation). ... Thomas Herring (1693-23 March 1757) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1747 to 1757. ...


Previously part of the Diocese of Canterbury, Croydon is now in the Diocese of Southwark. The Vicar of Croydon is an important post, in addition to the suffragan Bishop of Croydon. Arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior bishop of the state Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion, outranking the other English archbishop, the Archbishop of York. ... The Diocese of Southwark forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... The Bishop of Croydon is a suffragan Bishop in the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. ...


Addington Palace

Addington Palace
Addington Palace

Addington Palace is a Palladian-style mansion between Addington Village and Shirley, surrounded by park landscapes and golf courses, within the boundaries of Croydon. After an Act of Parliament enabled the mansion to be purchased for the Archbishops of Canterbury in 1807, it became the official residence of six Archbishops until it was sold in 1898. Image File history File linksMetadata Addington_Palace. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Addington_Palace. ... Addington Palace is a largely 18th-century Palace in Addington near Croydon, south London. ... Palladian architecture is a European style of architecture derived from the designs of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580). ... , St Marys Church, Addington, with the cross commemorating five archbishops in the foreground Addington is a village in the London Borough of Croydon in south London. ... Shirley is a place in the London Borough of Croydon, England. ... An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1953, it was leased to the Royal School of Church Music until 1996, when it was leased to a private company who have developed it as a conference and banqueting venue with plans for a health farm and country club. January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... The largest church music organisation in Britain, the Royal School of Church Music was founded in 1927 by Sir Sydney Nicholson and has 11,000 members worldwide; it was originally named the School of English Church Music. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


The grounds were landscaped by Capability Brown and are mainly a golf course and public park. A famous very large cedar tree stands next to the Palace. Capability Brown, by Nathaniel Dance, ca. ... For other uses, see Cedar (disambiguation). ...


Whitgift Almshouses

The Elizabethan Whitgift Almshouses, named the "Hospital of the Holy Trinity", have stood in the centre of Croydon (at the corner of North End and George Street) since they were erected by Archbishop John Whitgift. He had petitioned for and had received permission from Queen Elizabeth I to establish a hospital and school in Croydon for the "poor, needy and impotent people" from the parishes of Croydon and Lambeth. The foundation stone was laid in 1596 and the building was completed in 1599. The Almshouse at Sherborne, Dorset The Almshouse at Woburn, Bedfordshire West Hackney Almshouses in Stoke Newington, London. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... Lambeth is a place in the London Borough of Lambeth. ... Year 1599 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...

The Elizabethan Whitgift Almshouses in the centre of Croydon
The Elizabethan Whitgift Almshouses in the centre of Croydon

The premises included the actual Hospital or Almshouses, providing accommodation for between 28 and 40 people, and a nearby schoolhouse and schoolmaster's house. There was a Warden in charge for the well-being of the almoners. The building is constructed with the chambers of the almoners and various offices surrounding an inner courtyard. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 743 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Croydon Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London/Croydon Metadata This... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 743 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Croydon Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London/Croydon Metadata This...


Threatened by various reconstruction plans and road-widening schemes, the Almshouses were saved in 1923 by intervention of the House of Lords. On 21 June 1983, Queen Elizabeth II visited the almshouses and unveiled a plaque celebrating the recently-completed reconstruction of the building. On 22 March each year the laying of the foundation stone is commemorated as Founder's Day. This article is about the British House of Lords. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Industrial era

The development of Brighton as a fashionable resort in the 1780s increased Croydon's role as a significant halt for stage coaches on the road south of London. At the beginning of the 19th century, Croydon became the terminus of two pioneering commercial transport links with London. The first, opened in 1803, was the horse-drawn Surrey Iron Railway from Wandsworth, which in 1805 was extended to Merstham, as the Croydon, Merstham and Godstone Railway. The second, opened in 1809, was the Croydon Canal, which came from the Grand Surrey Canal at Deptford. The London and Croydon Railway (an atmospheric and steam-powered railway), opened between London Bridge and West Croydon in 1839, using much of the route of the canal, which had closed in 1836, and other connections to London and the south followed. For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... Nothing much really happened in the 1780s only that Mary-Anne Tobin was hung in public for wearing a flase beard and voting. ... A stagecoach is a type of four-wheeled enclosed passenger and/or mail coach, strongly sprung and drawn by four horses, widely used before the introduction of railway transport. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Surrey Iron Railway (SIR) linked Wandsworth in south London and Croydon in Surrey via Mitcham. ... Wandsworth is a town on the south bank of the River Thames in south-west London. ... Merstham is a village in the Reigate and Banstead borough of Surrey, England and is part of the London commuter belt. ... The Croydon Canal ran 9. ... The Grand Surrey Canal was a canal constructed in south London during the early 19th century. ... This article is about the district in London. ... The London & Croydon Railway (L&C) was incorporated in 1835, and the line to West Croydon was opened on 5 June 1839. ... For other uses, see London Bridge (disambiguation). ... West Croydon is a locality to the north west of central Croydon in South London. ...


The arrival of the railways and other communications advances in the 19th century led to a 23-fold increase in Croydon's population between 1801 and 1901.[1] This rapid expansion of the town led to considerable health problems, especially in the damp and overcrowded working class district of the Old Town. In response to this, in 1849 Croydon became one of the first towns in the country to acquire a Local Board of Health. The Board constructed public health infrastructure including a reservoir, and water supply network, and sewers, a pumping station, and sewage disposal works. The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... Local Boards or Local Boards of Health were local authorities in urban areas of England and Wales from 1848 to 1894. ... Public health is concerned with threats to the overall health of a community based on population health analysis. ... For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ... A water supply network is a system of engineered hydrologic and hydraulic components, including: the watershed or geographic area that collects the water, see water purification - sources of drinking water; a raw (untreated) water reservoir (above or below ground) where the water gathers, such as a lake, a river, or... A sewer is an artificial conduit or system of conduits used to remove sewage (human liquid waste) and to provide drainage. ... Urban areas require some methods for collection and disposal of sewage. ...


A growing town

An artists impression of the proposed Croydon Tower skyscraper next to East Croydon station
An artists impression of the proposed Croydon Tower skyscraper next to East Croydon station

As the town continued to grow, it became especially popular as a pleasant leafy residential suburb for members of the Victorian middle classes, who could commute to the City of London by fast train in 15 minutes. In 1883, Croydon was incorporated as a borough. In 1889, it became a county borough, with a still greater degree of autonomy. The new county borough council implemented the Croydon Improvement scheme in the early 1890s, which resulted in the widening of the High Street and the clearance of much of the 'Middle Row' slum area. The remaining slums were cleared shortly after World War II, with much of the population relocated to the isolated new community at New Addington. New stores opened and expanded in central Croydon, including Allders, Kennards and Grants, and the first Sainsbury's self-service shop in the country.[1] There was also a bustling market on Surrey Street.[4] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... An artists impression of the Croydon Tower skyscraper in both schemes for the Croydon Gateway Croydon Gateway is the name given to a project to redevelop a block of land between East Croydon railway station and the existing town centre of Croydon in South London. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ... Commuters on the New York City Subway during rush hour Rush hour at Shinjuku Station, Yamanote Line Traffic jam Commuting is the process of travelling between a place of residence and a place of work. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... In San Francisco, during the mid-1960s, the bohemian center of the city shifted from the old Beat enclave of North Beach to Haight-Ashbury (pictured) as a response to gentrification. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... , New Addington is a place in the London Borough of Croydon. ... Allders in Croydon, the fourth largest department store in Britain Allders is a full service department store in Central Croydon. ... This article is about the supermarket business. ... A shop on Surrey Street Surrey Street Market is a market on pedestrianized Surrey Street that sells mainly meat & vegetables as well as a range of other items through the week in Croydon, south London. ...


By the 1950s, with its continuing growth, the town was becoming congested, and the Council decided to introduce another major redevelopment scheme. The Croydon Corporation Act was passed in 1956. This, coupled with government incentives for office relocation out of London, led to the building of new offices and accompanying road schemes through the late 1950s and 1960s, and the town boomed as an important business centre in the 1960s, with the building of a large number of multi-storey office blocks, an underpass, a flyover and multi-storey car parks. the first thing that was invented was the automatic DILDO. Education grew explosively because of a very strong demand for high school and college education. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... An underground pedestrian tunnel between buildings at MIT. Note the utility pipes running along the ceiling. ... Overpass in East Potomac Park, Washington, D.C. Flyover in Miami Beach, Florida An overpass (In UK, India, Hong Kong flyover) is a bridge, road or similar structure that crosses over another road. ...


Modern Croydon

Croydon's main shopping area, North End. Part of the front of the Whitgift Almshouses on the right-hand side
Croydon's main shopping area, North End. Part of the front of the Whitgift Almshouses on the right-hand side

In more modern times Croydon has developed an important centre for shopping, with the construction of the Whitgift Centre, which opened in 1969. The Fairfield Halls arts centre and event venue opened in 1962. The Warehouse Theatre opened in 1977. The 1990s saw further changes intended to give the town a more attractive image. These include the closure of North End to vehicles in 1989 and the opening of the Croydon Clocktower arts centre in 1994. Tramlink began operation in May 2000. A new equally large shopping centre, Centrale, opened in 2004 opposite the Whitgift Centre, straddling the site of the smaller Drummond Centre and what was once a large branch of C&A. There are plans for a large new shopping centre, Park Place, which will replace most of the eastern edge of the shopping district including St George's Walk; the redevelopment of the Croydon Gateway site; and extensions of Tramlink to Purley, Streatham, Lewisham and Crystal Palace. Croydon has become the second-largest place to shop in the south east, after central London, offering a range of shops and department stores. It is also home to many high density buildings, being London's third main CBD, after the Square Mile and the Docklands and South London's main business centre. Croydons main shopping street, North End, taken 5 Feb 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: London Borough of Croydon Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London/Croydon Allders Categories: GFDL images ... Croydons main shopping street, North End, taken 5 Feb 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: London Borough of Croydon Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London/Croydon Allders Categories: GFDL images ... The Whitgift Centre is a large shopping centre in Croydon, London, which officially opened in 1970. ... Fairfield Halls, ready to receive Tony Hadley and Cindarella on Ice Fairfield Halls is an arts centre in Croydon, London and opened in 1962. ... The Warehouse Theatre is a studio theatre with up to hundred seats in Croydon, South London, based in a Victorian warehouse. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... The eastern side of North End, showing on the right Allders and to the back left the Drummond Centre building of Centrale North End is a pedestrianized road in Central Croydon which is the main equivalent to a high street in Croydon. ... Croydon Clocktower is an arts centre in Croydon, London. ... Tramlink (initially known as Croydon Tramlink) is a public transport tramway in south London, operated by FirstGroup on behalf of Transport for London. ... Centrale is a shopping centre in Croydon, South London. ... The Drummond Centre was a shopping centre located on North End in Croydon, London. ... C&A Logo C & A is an international chain of clothing stores, with its head office in Brussels and Dusseldorf. ... Park Place is a proposed shopping centre in Croydon, England. ... St Georges Walk is a shopping parade in Croydon, London that houses many independent stores. ... An artists impression of the Croydon Tower skyscraper in both schemes for the Croydon Gateway Croydon Gateway is the name given to a project to redevelop a block of land between East Croydon railway station and the existing town centre of Croydon in South London. ... , Purley is a place in the London Borough of Croydon. ... Streatham is a place in the London Borough of Lambeth in the United Kingdom . ... Lewisham is a district in south-east London, England and the principal settlement of the London Borough of Lewisham. ... For other uses, see Crystal Palace. ... Central London is a much-used but unofficial and vaguely defined term for the most inner part of London, the capital of England. ... CBD may stand for: Central business district Convention on Biological Diversity Cannabidiol, a cannabinoid from Cannabis sativa (hemp). ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... The Millennium Dome and Canary Wharf from the Royal Victoria Dock. ... South London area South London (known colloquially as South of the River) is the area of London south of the River Thames. ...


The Arts

There are several high-quality arts venues. Foremost amongst these is the Fairfield Halls, opened in 1962, which consists of a large concert hall frequently used for BBC recordings, the Ashcroft Theatre and the Arnhem Gallery. The Halls are the home of the London Mozart Players, whose Principal Guest Conductor is flautist Sir James Galway. Many famous faces have appeared at the Fairfield Halls, from the Beatles through Bucks Fizz, omid Djalili,Robert Cray, Chuck Berry, Status Quo, Level 42, Joe Satriani, John Mayall, Jools Holland, Kenny Rogers, James Last to Coolio. The main concert hall was used for the conference scene in the Tom Hanks film The Da Vinci Code. Founded by Harry Blech in 1949 as the UK’s first chamber orchestra, the London Mozart Players (LMP) is an ensemble of musicians from the UK and abroad. ... James Galway and his golden flute Sir James Galway (born December 8, 1939) is a Northern Ireland-born virtuoso flutist from Belfast, often called The Man With the Golden Flute. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Bucks Fizz is an English pop group, formed in 1981 to compete in the Eurovision Song Contest that year. ... Omid Djalili (pronounced Omeed Jaleelee, Persian: ‎ ​, born September 30, 1965 in Chelsea, London) is a British born Iranian stand-up comedian, born to Iranian Baháí parents. ... Robert Cray (foreground) Robert Cray (born 1 August 1953, in Columbus, Georgia) is a blues musician, guitarist and singer. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... This article is about the English rock band. ... Level 42 is a popular British pop and funk band. ... Joseph Satch Satriani (born on July 15, 1956, in Westbury, New York, U.S.) is an American guitarist and former guitar instructor. ... For the photographer, see John Jabez Edwin Mayall. ... Julian Miles Holland, OBE, DL (born 24 January 1958 in Blackheath, South East London) is an English virtuoso pianist, bandleader, television presenter, architectural eccentric and pop music enthusiast. ... Kenneth Donald Kenny Rogers (born August 21, 1938, in Houston, Texas) is a prolific American country music singer, photographer, producer, songwriter, actor and businessman. ... James Last in 2006 James Last together with fan Guenter Krueger from Berlin James Last (born Hans Last on April 17, 1929 in Bremen) is a German composer and big band leader. ... This article is about the hip hop artist. ... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist, writer, and movie producer. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ...


The Warehouse Theatre is a studio theatre known for promoting new writing, as well as comedy and youth theatre. Croydon Clocktower, built by the London Borough of Croydon in the mid-1990s, houses a state-of-the-art library, the David Lean cinema, a performance venue in the old reference library and the town museum. The Warehouse Theatre is a studio theatre with up to hundred seats in Croydon, South London, based in a Victorian warehouse. ... Croydon Clocktower is an arts centre in Croydon, London. ... Sir David Lean, KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago . ...

The Fairfield Halls, Croydon's entertainment complex
The Fairfield Halls, Croydon's entertainment complex

There are several local and small venues for live music, comedy and community events dotted around Croydon and its neighbourhoods. There is a thriving rock scene producing some local talent such as; Czagio, The Tunics, Kitty Hudson, Von Kleet, Rose West, Black Krash, 5th Man Down, Godsized, Ten Foot Nun and Noisettes. Local bands can be found playing at the Black Sheep Bar, Walkabout, The Green Dragon or The George, or recording at Scream Studios. The Cartoon in West Croydon was a very popular live music venue for many years, but closed down in November 2006. Croydon Youth Theatre Organisation celebrated its 40th birthday in 2005. There are several community arts groups, particularly in the large Asian community. There are controversial plans to develop an arena for entertainment and sporting events at the Croydon Gateway site. Croydon Fairfield Halls taken 5 Feb 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: London Borough of Croydon Fairfield Halls Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London/Croydon Categories: GFDL images ... Croydon Fairfield Halls taken 5 Feb 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: London Borough of Croydon Fairfield Halls Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London/Croydon Categories: GFDL images ... Noisettes (occasionally written as NOISEttes) are an indie rock band from London comprising singer and bassist Shingai Shoniwa, guitarist Dan Smith, and drummer Jamie Morrison. ... West Croydon is a locality to the north west of central Croydon in South London. ... Croydon Youth Theatre Organisation, often referred to simply as CYTO, is a professionally-led youth theatre group based at the Shoestring Theatre in South Norwood, Croydon in south London. ... The term British Asian is used to denote a person of Southern Asian ancestry or origin, or sometimes Western Asian origin, who was born in or was an immigrant to the United Kingdom. ...


Croydon has been at the centre of the development of the dubstep genre, a relatively recent musical development that traces its roots from dub, garage and drum and bass. Artists such as Benga and Skream, who honed their production and DJing skills whilst working at the now defunct Big Apple Records on Surrey Street, along with Norwood's Digital Mystikz and Thornton Heath's Plastician, form the core roster of dubstep DJs and producers. Dubstep is a genre of electronic music which has its roots in Londons early 2000s UK garage scene. ... For other uses, see Dub. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... Drum and bass (commonly abbreviated to d&b, DnB, dnb, dnb, drum n bass and drum & bass) is a type of electronic dance music also known as jungle. ... There is also Benga in the province of Nyanga, see Benga, Gabon Benga is a musical genre of Kenyan popular music. ... This article is about the dubstep producer. ... Digital Mystikz consists of dubstep producers Mala and Coki. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


The black composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875-1912) lived at 30 Dagnall Park, Selhurst, until his death. He grew up in Croydon and sang in the church choir at St George's and taught at the Crystal Palace and many other schools of music. He died from pneumonia after collapsing at West Croydon station. There is an impressive grave with a touching poem at Bandon Hill Cemetery, as well as exhibits about him in the Clock Tower Museum, Katharine Street. A 1912 obituary in the African Methodist Episcopal Church Review Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (August 15, 1875–September 1, 1912) was a black, English composer who achieved such success he was called The Black Mahler. ... For other uses, see Crystal Palace. ... West Croydon station is a key transport interchange for National Rail, Tramlink and London Buses services in south London. ...


The town centre is home to Europe's largest second-hand record store, Beanos, offering rare vinyl, CDs and books. It is off Church Street near the Grants cinema complex. Croydon is home to the BRIT School for performing arts and technology, based in Selhurst, which has produced stars such as Katie Melua, Amy Winehouse, Imogen Heap, Dane Bowers and members of The Feeling & The Kooks. The world famous stage school, The BRIT School, located in The Crescent, Selhurst, London Borough of Croydon, is Britains only free* performing arts and technology school. ... “Melua” redirects here. ... Amy Jade Winehouse (born 14 September 1983) is an English soul and jazz singer songwriter. ... Imogen Heap (IPA: )[1] (born December 9, 1977) is a Grammy-nominated English singer-songwriter from Romford, London, most famous for her work as part of Frou Frou and for her 2005 solo record Speak for Yourself. ... Born in 29 November 1979, Croydon, Surrey, England. ... The Feeling are a five-piece BRIT award-nominated English band from Sussex and London. ... Kooks, see Donna Kossy. ...


A calendar entitled Rare Roundabouts of Croydon, with a picture of a different Croydon roundabout each month, has enjoyed some success.[5]


Croydon also plays host to the filming of the popular Channel 4 show, Peep Show. Croydon is also home to several video game developers, including Crawfish. This article is about the British television station. ... A peep show or peepshow is an exhibition of pictures or objects viewed through a small hole or magnifying glass. ...


Transport

Croydon is near one of the sources of the River Wandle. Just to the south is a significant gap in the North Downs, which acts as a route focus for transport from London to the south coast. Categories: UK geography stubs | London Rivers | Rivers in Surrey | Croydon ...


The old London to Brighton road, the A23, passed through the town, as does the main railway line from London to Brighton. Today the A23 follows Purley Way, to the west of the town. Croydon is the main hub of the South London Tramlink, initially known as Croydon Tramlink until further expansion. The A23 road, in its original form, was a major road running between London to Brighton, England. ... Purley Way is a section of the A23 trunk road in the London Borough of Croydon, in the areas of Purley, Waddon and West Croydon, and has given its name to the out-of-town shopping area alongside it with a catchment area covering most of South London. ... South London area South London (known colloquially as South of the River) is the area of London south of the River Thames. ... Tramlink (initially known as Croydon Tramlink) is a public transport tramway in south London, operated by FirstGroup on behalf of Transport for London. ... a Tramlink Tram Tramlink (until recently known as Croydon Tramlink) is a public transport system in south London, operated by FirstGroup on behalf of Transport for London. ...


Croydon's early transport links

The horse-drawn Surrey Iron Railway was the world's first public railway. It was opened in 1803, had double track, was some 8½ miles long and ran from Wandsworth to Croydon, terminating at what is now Reeves Corner. The railway boom of the 1840s brought superior and faster steam lines and it closed in 1846. The route is followed in part by Tramlink. The last remaining sections of rail can be seen behind railings in a corner of Rotary Field in Purley. // First use of general anesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long The first electrical telegraph sent by Samuel Morse on May 24, 1844 from Baltimore to Washington, D.C.. First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi, Northland New Zealand. ... Tramlink (initially known as Croydon Tramlink) is a public transport tramway in south London, operated by FirstGroup on behalf of Transport for London. ...


The Croydon Canal ran for 9½ miles from what is now West Croydon railway station north largely along the course of the present railway line to New Cross Gate, where it joined the Grand Surrey Canal and went on into the Thames. It opened in 1809 and had 28 locks. It had a strong competitor in the Surrey Iron Railway and was never a financial success. It sold out to the London & Croydon Railway in 1836. The lake at South Norwood is the former reservoir for the canal. West Croydon station is a key transport interchange for rail, Tramlink and bus services in West Croydon in the London Borough of Croydon. ... New Cross Gate is an area within Lewisham mainly bounded by the SE14 postcode area. ... Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames... Canal locks in England. ... South Norwood is a place in the London Borough of Croydon. ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ...


Croydon Airport

Main article: Croydon Airport

Croydon Airport on Purley Way was the main international airport for London until it was superseded by London Heathrow Airport and London Gatwick Airport. Starting out during World War I as an airfield for protection against Zeppelins, and developing into one of the great airports of the world during the 1920s and 1930s, it welcomed the world's pioneer aviators in its heyday. As aviation technology progressed, however, and aircraft became larger and more numerous, it was recognized in 1952 that the airport would be too small to cope with the ever-increasing volume of air traffic. The last scheduled flight departed on 30 September 1959. The control tower of Croydon Airport in 1939, with the BOAC de Havilland DH 91 Albatross Fortuna alongside Croydon Airport was an airport in South London which straddled the boundary of what are now the London Borough of Croydon and the London Borough of Sutton. ... Heathrow redirects here. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second largest airport and the second busiest airport in the United Kingdom after Heathrow. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Zeppelins are a type of rigid airship pioneered by German Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin in the early 20th century, based in part on an earlier design by aviation pioneer David Schwarz. ... The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... Flying machine redirects here. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The air terminal, now known as Airport House, has been restored and has a museum open one day a month.


Railways and trams

Croydon is the hub of Tramlink and from East Croydon station.has main-line rail services to Central London, Gatwick Airport and the South Coast. Services are provided by Southern, Southeastern, First Capital Connect and Virgin Trains. There is a large bus station at West Croydon. There are plans to extend the East London Line to West Croydon. Tramlink stop at East Croydon railway station - London, England (27 April 2004) File links The following pages link to this file: Tramlink London Borough of Croydon East Croydon station Flexity Swift Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London/Croydon ... Tramlink stop at East Croydon railway station - London, England (27 April 2004) File links The following pages link to this file: Tramlink London Borough of Croydon East Croydon station Flexity Swift Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/London/Croydon ... East Croydon station is a railway station and tram stop in Croydon, 9. ... Tramlink (initially known as Croydon Tramlink) is a public transport tramway in south London, operated by FirstGroup on behalf of Transport for London. ... Tramlink (initially known as Croydon Tramlink) is a public transport tramway in south London, operated by FirstGroup on behalf of Transport for London. ... East Croydon station is a railway station and tram stop in Croydon, 9. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA Airport Code: LGW, ICAO Airport Code: EGKK) is Londons second airport and the second largest airport in the UK after Heathrow. ... Southern is the latest name of the train operating company that took over from Connex South Central on the routes to South London, Surrey, and Sussex from Victoria and London Bridge. ... This article is about the company that began operations in April 2006. ... First Capital Connect is a train operating company in England that began its passenger operations on the National Rail network at 02:00 BST 1 April 2006. ... Virgin Trains is a train operating company in the United Kingdom, which currently provides services from London Euston to the West Midlands, the North West and Scotland, on the West Coast Main Line. ... West Croydon station is a key transport interchange for National Rail, Tramlink and London Buses services in south London. ... London Transport Portal The East London Line is a line of the London Underground, coloured orange on the Tube map. ...


Railway stations

Stations in central Croydon:

Croydon Central station was a railway station in Croydon, Surrey, now in south London, England. ... East Croydon station is a railway station and tram stop in Croydon, 9. ... South Croydon railway station is in the London Borough of Croydon in south London. ... West Croydon station is a key transport interchange for rail, Tramlink and bus services in West Croydon in the London Borough of Croydon. ...

Tramlink stops

Tramlink stops near the centre of Croydon: Tramlink (initially known as Croydon Tramlink) is a public transport tramway in south London, operated by FirstGroup on behalf of Transport for London. ...

East Croydon station is a railway station and tram stop in Croydon, 9. ... West Croydon station is a key transport interchange for National Rail, Tramlink and London Buses services in south London. ... Wellesley Road tram stop is a halt on the Tramlink service in the London Borough of Croydon. ... Reeves Corner tram stop is a halt on the Tramlink service in central Croydon. ... Church Street is a halt in central Croydon. ... Reeves Corner tram stop is a halt on the Tramlink service in central Croydon. ... Lebanon Road tram stop, is a halt on the Tramlink service in Croydon, east of the towns centre by Addiscombe. ... Centrale is a shopping centre in Croydon, South London. ...

Notable people associated with the town of Croydon

See also the list of notable people from connected with the wider Borough of Croydon here. This is a list about individuals associated with the London Borough of Croydon in England. ...

BRIT School Alumni Duke McKenzie (born 4 May 1963) has commentated on ITVs boxing coverage in the UK since boxing returned to the network in September 2005. ... Tasha Danvers-Smith (born September 19, 1977, London) is a British hurdler. ... Charles Burgess Fry (born 25 April 1872 in Croydon, died 7 September 1956 in Hampstead) was an English sportsman. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Martyn Rooney (born April 3, 1987) is an English sprinter. ... Donna Fraser (born November 7, 1972) is an English athlete who mainly competes in the 400 metres. ... See: Sir William Stanley (?-1485) -Brother of Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby); fought at the Battle of Bosworth Field Sir Willam Stanley bt. ... Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ... D. H. Lawrence David Herbert Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was one of the most important, certainly one of the most controversial, English writers of the 20th century, who wrote novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, and letters. ... A publicity shot for the film The Ghost of St. ... Arthur Conan Doyle Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (May 22, 1859 - July 7, 1930) is the British author most famously known for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction. ... Desmond Dekker (July 16, 1941 – May 25, 2006) was a Jamaican ska and reggae singer and songwriter. ... Neil Fraser was a former Canadian civil servant who came to prominence for his crusade against the Metric system of weights and measures in the early 1980s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Chris Reed is an American-Japanese ice dancer who currently represents Japan. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Jeannie Baker is the author of the book Where the Forest meets the Sea. ... William Miles Malleson (May 25, 1888 – March 15, 1969) was a British actor and dramatist, particularly known for his appearances in British comedy films of the 1930s to 1950s. ... Simon Prebble (born February 13, 1942) is an English actor and narrator. ... Bernard Spear (b. ... James Booth (19 December 1927- 11 August 2005) was the stage name of David Geeves. ... mile Zola (April 2, 1840 - September 29, 1902) was an influential French novelist, the most important example of the literary school of naturalism, and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. ... Deryck Guyler (April 29, 1914 - October 7, 1999) was a versatile British actor, equally at home with comedy and classical/character roles, but best known for his portrayal of officious short-tempered middle-aged men in sitcoms such as Please, Sir and Sykes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tracey Emin RA (born 3 July 1963) is an English artist of Turkish Cypriot origin, one of the group known as Britartists or YBAs (Young British Artists). ... Joseph Charles Holbrooke (b. ... Graham Moodie (born on January 15, 1981 in Croydon) is a Scottish field hockey player, who was a member of the Great Britain and Northern Ireland squad that finished ninth at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens. ... Matthew Fisher in Cannes in 2000. ... Janet and Allan Ahlberg are the creators of many popular childrens books, which regularly appear at the top of the most popular lists for public libraries. ... For the Cornish painter, see Alfred Wallis. ... Dame Peggy Ashcroft DBE (22 December 1907 – 14 June 1991) was an acclaimed Academy Award-winning English actress. ... Cicely Mary Barker (June 28, 1895 - February 16, 1973) was the illustrator who created the famous Flower Fairies. As a child she was greatly influenced by the works of the illustrator Kate Greenaway, whom she assiduously copied in her formative years. ... Geoffrey Arnold (Jeff) Beck (born June 24, 1944 to Arnold and Ethel Beck in Wallington, Greater London) is an English rock guitarist. ... Keith Berry fishing for sounds. ... Born in 29 November 1979, Croydon, Surrey, England. ... Derren Victor Brown (born 27 February 1971) is an English psychological illusionist, mentalist, and skeptic of paranormal phenomena. ... Mark Alan Butcher (born Croydon, Surrey, 23 August 1972) is an English cricketer. ... Dr. Martin Clunes (born 28 November 1961 in Wimbledon, South London) is an English actor. ... A 1912 obituary in the African Methodist Episcopal Church Review Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (August 15, 1875–September 1, 1912) was a black, English composer who achieved such success he was called The Black Mahler. ... Ronnie Corbett in Extras Ronald Balfour Corbett, OBE (born 4 December 1930 in Edinburgh, commonly credited as Ronnie Corbett) is a British comedian and actor, best known as one of The Two Ronnies. ... Luol Deng (born April 16, 1985 in Wau, Sudan) is a British professional basketball player for the National Basketball Associations Chicago Bulls, where he plays small forward. ... Lewis Grabban (born January 12, 1988 in Croydon, Greater London, England) is a footballer who plays for Crystal Palace of The Championship. ... Roy Hudd, OBE (b. ... Stephen Dennis Steve Kember (born September 8, 1948 in Croydon, south London) was a footballer who played in the centre of midfield during his career, before going into management. ... Sir David Lean, KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago . ... Kirsty Anna MacColl (10 October 1959 – 18 December 2000) was an English singer-songwriter. ... Captain Sensible, performing live with The Damned in 2006. ... Not to be confused with Kate Mosse. ... Thomas Malcolm Muggeridge (March 24, 1903–November 14, 1990) was a British journalist, author, satirist, media personality, soldier-spy and Christian scholar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kellie Shirley appearing as a Celebrity Soccerette on Soccer AM, alongside Tim Lovejoy. ... EastEnders is a popular BBC television soap opera, first broadcast in the United Kingdom on BBC1 on 19 February 1985[4] and continuing to date. ... Peter Sarstedt (aka Peter Eardley Sarstedt[1] born 12 December 1942, in Delhi, Northern India[2][3]) is a singer-songwriter. ... Edward Albert Arthur Woodward (born June 1, 1930 Croydon, Surrey) is an English stage, film and television actor and singer. ... Henry Havelock Ellis (February 2, 1859 - July 8, 1939), known as Havelock Ellis, was a British doctor, sexual psychologist and social reformer. ... The world famous stage school, The BRIT School, located in The Crescent, Selhurst, London Borough of Croydon, is Britains only free* performing arts and technology school. ...


Fictional “Melua” redirects here. ... Amy Jade Winehouse (born 14 September 1983) is an English soul and jazz singer songwriter. ... In Between Jobs (2005), album cover Lynden David Hall (May 7, 1974 – February 14, 2006) was a singer, songwriter, arranger, and producer. ... Kate Nash (born 6 July 1987) is an English [1] singer songwriter from Harrow, London. ... Imogen Heap (IPA: )[1] (born December 9, 1977) is a Grammy-nominated English singer-songwriter from Romford, London, most famous for her work as part of Frou Frou and for her 2005 solo record Speak for Yourself. ... Luke Pritchard (born March 2, 1985) is an English musician. ... Dan Gillespie Sells (born 1979[1] in London, England) is guitarist and lead vocalist with UK band The Feeling. // Sells attended the BRIT School in Croydon. ... See: richard jones, cricketer, wales F. Richard Jones (1893-1930), U.S. filmmaker Richard Jones (British diplomat), a British diplomat and current Ambassador to Albania Richard Jones (cricketer) is a New Zealand cricketer English first-class cricketers by the same name are: Richard Stoakes Jones (1857-1935) Kent and Cambridge... Marsha Ambrosius or Marsha is a member of the English band Floetry. ... Born in 29 November 1979, Croydon, Surrey, England. ... Wayne Bertram Williams (born May 27, 1958) was identified as the key suspect in the Atlanta Child Murders that occurred between 1979 and 1981. ... Leona Louise Lewis (born 3 April 1985) is an English singer-songwriter who was the winner of the third series of the popular television talent show The X Factor. ...

Sarah Jane Smith is a fictional character played by Elisabeth Sladen in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who and its related spin-offs. ... This article is about the television series. ... June Whitfield and Terry Scott on Terry and June Terry and June was a popular British sitcom, broadcast on the BBC from 1979 to 1987. ...

See also

For other uses, see Park Hill (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Dutch city and municipality. ... For other uses, see South Croydon (disambiguation). ... West Croydon is a locality to the north west of central Croydon in South London. ...

External links

The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclop dia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... A blue plaque showing information about The Spanish Barn at Torre Abbey in Torquay. ...

References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  1. ^ a b c d Brewer's Britain and Ireland, compiled by John Ayto and Ian Crofton, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2005, ISBN 0-304-35385-X
  2. ^ 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica at Love to Know
  3. ^ Surrey Domesday Book
  4. ^ http://www.surreystreetmarket.com/
  5. ^ BBC News - Roundabout calendar is gift hit

  Results from FactBites:
 
Croydon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2189 words)
Croydon is a major suburban town and commercial centre situated 9.5 miles (15.3 km) south of Charing Cross and the principal town in the London Borough of Croydon.
In 1965 the County Borough of Croydon was abolished and its former area was transferred to Greater London and combined with that of the Coulsdon and Purley Urban District to form the present-day London Borough of Croydon.
Croydon Clocktower, built by the London Borough of Croydon in the mid-1990s, houses a state-of-the-art library, the David Lean cinema, a performance venue in the old reference library and the town museum.
London Borough of Croydon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1434 words)
The London Borough of Croydon was fomed in 1965 from Coulsdon and Purley Urban District and the County Borough of Croydon.
The London Borough of Croydon is twinned with Arnhem in the Netherlands.
The Mayor of Croydon for 2005-2006 is Councillor Maggie Mansell.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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